2021–2022 ACADEMIC YEAR FALL TERM SPRING TERM TOTAL
Tuition $29,305 $29,305 $58,610
General Fee $1,165 $1,165 $2,330
Student Activity Fee $215 $215 $430
Room $5,175 $5,175 $10,350
Meal Plan* $2,775 $2,775 $5,550
Total Due $38,635 $38,635 $77,270

* Based on the required first-year meal plan

**There is an additional charge of $1475 to live in a Crescent Townhouse

Fall Spring
IDP Tuition (Per Credit) $3,900 $3,900
IDP General Fee $580 $580
IDP Student Activity Fee $60 $60

The full tuition amount of $29,305 per semester will be charged for full-time study, 3.00 to 5.75 course credits per term. Students exceeding 5.75 credits will be charged an additional $6,264 for exceeding the credit limit (6.00 = $6,264; 6.25 credits = $7,830; 6.50 credits = $9,396; 6.75 credits = $10,962; 7.0 to 7.75 credits = $12,528-$ 17,226). Trinity College students enrolled in study at a Trinity College Global Learning Site will be charged fees according to the following rates for 2020- 2021:

Barcelona TBD
Cape Town $36,345
LaMaMa*NYC $37,105
Rome $39,345
Shanghai $36,570
Trinidad TBD
Vienna $36,570
Study Away Fee (Non-Trinity) $3,500/semester
(non-Trinity program) $4,000 full year

Part-Time Study: Students who receive Academic Affairs approval for part-time status and take 2.75 or fewer course credits will be billed ($19,536) per semester, which represents 2/3 of full tuition. Written approval for part-time status by the Registrar’s Office or the Office of Student and Community Life must be submitted to the Student Accounts Office for an adjustment to the tuition billing.

Repeat Courses: A fee of XXXX per credit will be charged for each repeated course if that course brings the student’s course credit hours over the 5.75 limit.

The General Fee: This recurring fee helps finance the operations of the student center and covers student lab fees, vocational testing, and admission to all Trinity athletic events.

The Student Activity Fee: Enacted by the Student Budget Committee to finance student organizations and publications, the radio station, and admission to Austin Arts Center events.

Study-Away Fees: Students participating in a study-away program on the College’s approved study-away list will be charged $3,500 for one semester and $4,000 for the full year.

 

 

Payment of College Bills, Office of Student Accounts

Trinity College maintains a single account for each student to which all charges for tuition, fees, room, meal plans, and miscellaneous charges (fines, etc.) will be applied. Financial aid and payments received will be reflected on the student’s account as those transactions occur. Students can view their current account activity and access prior billing statements on the Nelnet Campus Commerce system at all times. A Statement of Account is issued electronically on the Nelnet Campus Commerce system in July for the fall term and November for spring term.
Students can authorize a parent or third party to access the Nelnet Campus Commerce system to view and make payments on their student account. Students and authorized payers are notified by e-mail when bills are ready for viewing. Students are responsible for monitoring their account activity and making payment by the published due dates. Monthly statements will be issued as new charges occur or an unpaid balance remains. Payment is due by the due date on the electronic bill.

The Financial Aid Office will review aid applications and verify the accuracy of information, after which financial aid will credit the student account for grants, loans, and scholarships. Outside scholarships will be posted when funds are received.

Any student who fails to pay the balance on the Statement of Account by the specified due dates will not be allowed to attend class, register, utilize campus facilities, receive academic transcripts or grade reports, or graduate.

A late payment fee of $100 may be assessed each month if billed charges remain beyond the billing due date, up to a maximum of $500 each term. Families must allow sufficient time for mailing payments if Nelnet Campus Commerce is not used for electronic payment delivery. The student account will be assessed any collection costs incurred by the College.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy, Office of Financial Aid

Satisfactory Academic Progress standards for financial aid eligibility effective July 1, 2021 for all full-time and part-time undergraduate degree candidates.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy, Office of Financial Aid

For purposes of determining student eligibility for financial assistance under Title IV, HEA programs, the College establishes, publishes, and applies Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) standards that meet all federal requirements. To be eligible to receive federal financial aid, a student is required to maintain satisfactory academic progress in their course of study according to the College’s published standards. SAP standards are based on cumulative measures of a student’s progress toward degree completion. The Financial Aid Office is responsible for ensuring that all students who receive financial aid meet these standards.

To be eligible to receive institutional funds, a student is also required to maintain satisfactory academic progress toward degree completion. For additional information regarding institutional funds eligibility, a student should contact the Financial Aid Office.

It is important to note that SAP standards are separate from, and in addition to, the Academic Standing policy established by the faculty of the College. The Academic Affairs
Committee (AAC) and IDP Council (IDPC) are responsible for ensuring that all traditional and IDP degree candidates, respectively, meet the College’s academic standing
requirements. For additional information regarding academic standing requirements, students should refer to the Academic Discipline section of the Bulletin or the Student
Handbook.

Sections included in this policy are:
• Overview
• SAP Standards
• Relevant SAP Definitions
• Appeals
• Regaining Eligibility

A printed copy of this SAP policy will be provided upon request.

Federal regulations require that the College’s SAP policy contain reasonable standards for measuring whether an otherwise eligible financial aid student is maintaining satisfactory progress in their educational program. An institution’s standards are considered to be reasonable if the standards:

  1. Are the same as or stricter than the institution’s standards for a student enrolled in the educational program who is not receiving assistance under a Title IV, HEA program; and Trinity’s SAP standards must, therefore, be the same as or stricter than the College’s good academic standing requirements listed in the Student Handbook. A calculation confirming that Trinity’s SAP standards are the same as or stricter than the College’s good academic standing requirements is on file with the Financial Aid Office.
  2. Include the following elements:
    1. Qualitative Standard: the College measures a student’s progression toward degree completion using a fixed grade point standard on a 4.0 grade point average scale.
      1. For an admitted student who began enrollment prior to July 1, 2013: To be eligible to receive federal, state, and institutional financial assistance, a student is required to maintain a cumulative 1.667 GPA at the end of each semester of enrollment. Minimum Cumulative GPA = 1.667 at the end of each and every term of enrollment. Federal regulations further specify that “a student is making SAP if, at the end of the second year, the student has a grade point average of at least a “C” or its equivalent, or has academic standing consistent with the institution’s requirements for graduation.” Since the College’s requirement for graduation is attainment of a “C-” or a 1.667 for a student who began enrollment prior to July 1, 2013, the College’s qualitative standard satisfies federal requirements.
      2. For an admitted student who began enrollment after July 1, 2013: To be eligible to receive federal, state, and institutional financial assistance, a student is required to maintain a cumulative GPA at the end of each semester of enrollment as follows: Minimum Cumulative GPA = 1.667 at the end of the first term of
        enrollment; Minimum Cumulative GPA = 2.000 at the end of the second and every subsequent term of enrollment. Federal regulations further specify that “a student is making SAP if, at the end of the second year, the student has a grade point average of at least a “C” or its equivalent, or has academic standing consistent with the institution’s requirements for graduation.” Since the College’s requirement for graduation is attainment of a “C” or a 2.000 for a student who began/begins enrollment after July 1, 2013, the College’s qualitative standard satisfies federal requirements.
    2. Quantitative Standard: the College also measures a student’s progression toward degree completion based on a quantitative scale that consists of a maximum timeframe in which a student must complete their degree. The quantitative standard includes:
      1. Maximum Timeframe: the College defines maximum timeframe as 150% of the published length of the education program in attempted credits. Maximum Timeframe = 54 Attempted Credits (150% X 36 Credits) To be eligible to receive federal, state, and institutional financial assistance, a student is required to complete their degree requirements within the maximum timeframe of 54 attempted credits. This maximum timeframe of 54 attempted credits is a standard applicable to federal aid eligibility and not to Trinity grant funds. College policy limits the maximum number of terms for which a student may receive institutional grant assistance based on their enrollment status and the number of transfer credits accepted by the College. For additional information regarding institutional funds eligibility, a student should contact the Financial Aid Office.
      2. Increments: College policy divides the maximum timeframe into equal periods of enrollment known as semesters or terms.
      3. Pace: The College has established a schedule designating the minimum percentage of work, known as Pace, that a student must successfully complete at the end of each semester to complete their degree within the maximum timeframe. Pace is calculated by dividing the cumulative number of credits that the student has successfully completed by the cumulative number of credits that the student has attempted. Pace = Cumulative Number of Credits Successfully Completed/Cumulative Number of Credits Attempted. To be eligible to receive federal, state, and institutional financial assistance, a student is required to successfully complete a minimum of 80% of all attempted credits. Minimum Pace = 80%

Pace
A student’s Pace is calculated by dividing the cumulative number of credits successfully completed by the cumulative number of credits attempted. College policy defines the following terms for the calculation of Pace and review of credits counted toward the maximum timeframe of 54 attempted credits:

Credits Successfully Completed
Credits successfully completed include all courses for which a student receives a passing grade of “D-” or better, pass, or low pass. In addition, all transfer credits are counted as credits successfully completed.

Credits Attempted
Credits attempted include all courses for which a student receives a passing grade of D- or better, pass, low pass, incomplete, “W”, “F”, or “NGR.” In addition, all transfer credits are counted as credits attempted. All credits attempted must be counted toward the maximum timeframe.

Incompletes
All courses for which a student receives a provisional designation of “incomplete” must be counted toward the maximum timeframe and included in the calculation of a student’s Pace.

Withdrawals
All courses for which a student receives a “W” on the permanent record must be counted toward the maximum timeframe and included in the calculation of a student’s Pace.

Remedial Courses (noncredit)
Remedial courses are not offered nor accepted at the College. Therefore, remedial courses are not counted toward the maximum timeframe and are not included in the calculation of a student’s Pace.

Repeated Courses
All repeated courses must be counted toward the maximum timeframe and included in the calculation of a students Pace. Repeated courses for which a student receives
additional credit (e.g., topics, independent studies, music lessons, etc.) are counted both in the cumulative number of successfully completed and attempted credits.
Repeated courses for which a student does not receive additional credit are not counted in the cumulative number of successfully completed but are counted in the
cumulative number of attempted credits.

English as a Second Language (ESL)
ESL courses are not offered nor accepted at the College. Therefore, ESL courses are not counted toward the maximum timeframe and are not included in the calculation of a student’s Pace.

Test-based Credits (e.g., CLEP)
Test-based credits are not offered nor accepted at the College. Therefore, test-based credits are not counted toward the maximum timeframe and are not included in the calculation of a student’s Pace.

Transfer Credits
All pre–matriculation (including AP credits) and post–matriculation transfer credits must be counted toward the maximum timeframe and included in the calculation of a student’s Pace. Transfer credits are counted in both the cumulative number of successfully completed and attempted credits. Transfer credits are not counted in the calculation of a student’s GPA.

Second Majors
A student who elects to declare a second major must complete all degree requirements within the maximum timeframe. Credits applicable to second majors are included in the calculation of a student’s Pace.

Additional Degrees
A student pursuing a second undergraduate degree at the College is only eligible to receive federal Stafford loans. All credits applicable to the second degree are counted toward the maximum timeframe and included in the calculation of a student’s Pace.

SAP Reviews
At the end of each semester (fall, spring and summer), normally within two to four weeks of grade posting, the record of each financial aid applicant enrolled in that semester is reviewed to determine if the applicant is making satisfactory academic progress toward degree completion. The review includes a determination as to whether the student has met the cumulative qualitative and quantitative standards set forth in the Colleges SAP policy. Specifically included in the review is a measurement of the students Pace to ensure that the student will complete the program within the maximum timeframe of 54 attempted credits. Students will be notified in writing of the results of an evaluation that impacts the student’s eligibility for federal, state, and institutional financial assistance. SAP reviews will result in a student being placed on one of the following statuses:

Good Financial Aid Standing
A student who has met the SAP qualitative and quantitative standards listed above is making satisfactory academic progress toward degree completion. This student
is in good financial aid standing with the College and is eligible to receive assistance under federal Title IV, state, and institutional financial aid programs during the next semester of enrollment, providing the student remains in good academic standing with the College and meets all other program requirements.

Financial Aid Warning
The first time a student has not met all SAP qualitative and quantitative standards listed above, the student will be placed on financial aid warning. This student is not making satisfactory academic progress toward degree completion and must repair the deficiencies during the next term of enrollment. A student on financial aid warning may continue to receive assistance under federal Title IV, state, and institutional financial aid programs during the next semester, providing the student remains in good academic standing with the College and meets all other program requirements. The financial aid warning status will be assigned automatically without an appeal or other action required by the student. A student cannot be placed on two consecutive terms of financial aid warning; a student must return to good financial aid standing by the end of the financial aid
warning period to remain eligible to receive financial aid. A student who has returned to good financial aid standing but at a later date does not meet SAP standards can be placed on a second term of financial aid warning.

Financial Aid Probation
A student on financial aid warning who has not met all SAP qualitative and quantitative standards by the end of the next semester of enrollment is no longer eligible to receive assistance under federal Title IV, state, and institutional financial aid programs unless the student has an approved SAP appeal on file with the Financial Aid Office. All SAP appeals must be submitted to the Financial Aid Office according to the process outlined in the Appeals section of this policy. If an appeal is approved, the student will be placed on financial aid probation. A student on financial aid probation is eligible to receive assistance under federal Title IV, state, and institutional financial aid programs during the next semester of enrollment, providing the student remains in good academic standing with the College and meets all other program requirements.

Financial Aid Suspension
A student on financial aid warning who has not met all SAP qualitative and quantitative standards by the end of the next semester of enrollment and who does not have an approved appeal on file with the Financial Aid Office is no longer eligible to receive assistance under federal Title IV, state, and institutional financial aid programs. This student will be placed on financial aid suspension and will be required to make up all SAP deficiencies to regain eligibility for federal, state, and institutional financial aid. A student’s Pace is calculated by dividing the cumulative number of credits successfully completed by the cumulative number of credits attempted. College policy defines the following terms for the calculation of Pace and review of credits counted toward the maximum timeframe of 54 attempted credits: Credits Successfully Completed Credits successfully completed include all courses for which a student receives a passing grade of “D-” or better, pass, or low pass. In addition, all transfer credits are counted as credits successfully completed.

As stated above, a student on financial aid warning who has not met the SAP standards by the end of the next semester of enrollment is no longer eligible to receive financial aid and will be placed on financial aid suspension. If mitigating circumstances prevented the student from meeting the requirements, a student may appeal to have their eligibility reinstated for one term of financial aid probation. Such circumstances would include:

  1. the death of a relative;
  2. an injury of the student;
  3. an illness of the student; or
  4. other special circumstances.

A student who wishes to appeal their financial aid suspension must adhere to the following procedures:

  1. complete and sign a SAP appeal form;
  2. attach supporting documentation to the SAP appeal form; and
  3. submit the SAP appeal form with documentation to the Financial Aid Office, according to the deadline schedule listed on the form.

Submitting a SAP appeal does not guarantee approval or reinstatement of financial aid eligibility.

Decisions are made after a careful evaluation of the student’s unique circumstances, federal Title IV requirements, and College policy. In some cases, it may be necessary for the Director of Financial Aid to consult with the AAC or IDPC before appeal decisions can be made. Notification will be sent in writing to the student as to the outcome of the appeal review. SAP appeal reviews will result in one of the following outcomes:

Not Approved

A student whose SAP appeal is not approved will remain on financial aid suspension and will not be eligible to receive financial aid until all SAP deficiencies have been repaired (See Regaining Eligibility).

Approved with Probation

A student whose SAP appeal is approved with probation will be placed on financial aid probation and is eligible to receive financial aid during the next semester of enrollment, provided the student remains in good academic standing with the College and meets all other program requirements.

A student on financial aid probation may be required to fulfill specific terms and conditions, such as taking a reduced course load or enrolling in specific courses. A student on financial aid probation must repair all SAP deficiencies during the next term of enrollment in order to remain eligible for financial aid.

Approved with an Academic Plan

In some cases, it may be mathematically impossible for a student to repair his or her SAP deficiencies with one term of enrollment. In such cases, a student’s SAP appeal may be approved with an academic plan to restore SAP deficiencies over more than one term. The student should work with AAC and the IDPC to develop an academic plan with the student that, if followed, will ensure that the student is able to meet the College’s SAP standards by a specific point in time. The academic plan may require the student to fulfill specific terms and conditions, such as taking a reduced course load or enrolling in specific courses. This plan must be submitted in writing to the Financial Aid Office.

A student on an approved academic plan is eligible to receive financial aid during the next semester of enrollment and each subsequent term of enrollment, provided the student meets the SAP standards outlined in the student’s specific academic plan. The student must remain in good academic standing with the College and meet all other program requirements.

A student who has been placed on financial aid suspension may reestablish their eligibility to receive federal, state, and institutional financial assistance by one of three paths described below:

  1. The student successfully appeals the suspension and is approved for a term of financial aid probation or approved with an academic plan.
  2. The student meets the minimum SAP quantitative and qualitative standards by completing a course(s) at the College without receiving financial assistance. To enroll in a course(s) at the College, all traditional and IDP students must meet the academic standing requirements of the College as overseen by the AAC and IDPC, respectively.
  3. The student meets the minimum SAP quantitative and qualitative standards by completing a course(s) at another institution without receiving financial assistance. A student who wishes to take a course(s) at another institution must receive prior approval according to College policy. The following explains the impact of transfer credits on SAP standards:
    1. Impact of transfer credits on SAP quantitative standards: All transfer credits must be counted toward the maximum timeframe and included in the calculation of a student’s Pace. Transfer credits are counted in both the cumulative number of successfully completed and attempted credits.
    2. Impact of transfer credits on SAP qualitative standard (GPA): According to College policy, post-matriculation transfer grades will be indicated on the transcript, but will not be included in calculations of grade point average, rank-in-class, or other academic standings. Therefore, a student will not be able to repair the SAP qualitative standard by completing a course(s) at another institution. A student who needs to restore their GPA to the minimum SAP standard will need to enroll in a course(s) at Trinity without receiving financial assistance or successfully appeal their financial aid suspension. However, transfer grades may be considered when reviewing and approving SAP appeals.

Trinity College Refund Policy

Refund requests will be processed upon written request by the student to the Student Accounts Office. Students who officially withdraw after tuition and fees are billed, but before classes begin, will be given a full refund of all charges, less a $400 administrative charge. The date of withdrawal is the date the registrar receives written notification from the student. First-year and transfer students withdrawing prior to the start of classes should submit notice to the director of admissions. If the official withdrawal occurs after classes begin, refunds may be affected by financial aid award adjustments and any federal regulations. Tuition and fees are charged as follows and refunds processed accordingly. There are no refunds for housing or meal plan charges once term begins.

First day through second week 80% refund
Third week 60% refund
Fourth week 40% refund
Fifth week 20% refund
After fifth week no refund

This refund policy also applies to charges for extra course credits

Students may add or drop course credit hours during the add/drop period. Following the conclusion of the add/drop period, a student may still withdraw from a class up to the Friday of the sixth full week of classes; however, the student is financially responsible for the cost of this class.

Students must notify The Bantam Network Residential Learning Community as soon as the decision is made to withdraw from a housing contract. Students who participate in the housing lottery and then withdraw from housing will be subject to a monetary penalty. Please consult with The Bantam Network Residential Learning Community for additional information.

Room charges are based upon the date of receipt of written notification of withdrawal from a residential contract. No room charge adjustment is made for withdrawal from housing during or after the fifth week of a contracted term. If a resident fails to occupy a residence by the first day of undergraduate classes in the contracted term, it may be assumed that the resident has withdrawn and that a legitimate vacancy exists. Rental charges will be computed as if the resident submitted written notification of withdrawal on the first day of class and a cancellation fee will apply.

Returning students will automatically be registered and billed for the Mather Unlimited meal plan or the last meal plan on file from a prior term. All first-year and transfer students will be billed for the Mather Traditional. Except for members of Trinity authorized eating clubs (St. Anthony’s Hall, Alpha Delta Phi and PSI Upsilon) participation in a meal plan is mandatory for all students in college housing for the 2021-2022 academic year. The Crescent Street Townhouses are not considered off campus housing; students living in the Crescent Street Townhouses will be required to participate in a mandatory meal plan.

All meal plan changes must be made during the first seven days of the semester. You may change your meal plan only once per semester. Meal-plan changes must be made with Trinity College Dining Services by visiting its office located on the second floor of Mather Hall or by sending an e-mail to meal.plans@trincoll.edu. Changes will not be accepted over the phone or by notes handwritten on your bill. Refunds for meal-plan adjustments will be processed, beginning one week after the last day of the add/drop period, and are subject to verification of available funds from the student’s account.

Meal Plan Dollars (part of your meal plan) do not roll over from semester to semester and any unused Meal Plan Dollars are nonrefundable. Dining Dollars (funds added to your account) do carry over from the fall semester to the spring semester; however, at the end of the spring semester any unused Dining Dollars are nonrefundable.

There are a few times each semester that a meal is taken for all students with meal plans for campus wide student events when a meal can’t be swiped. Examples are the Welcome Back BBQ, Carnival Night, and the Spring Weekend BBQ (but are not limited to these events.) Meal balances are adjusted for shortened weeks (i.e. Thanksgiving Break, Spring Break) when dining halls are closed.

Refunds will be made on a timely basis following receipt of a written request and will be prorated among sources of outside payment. Refunds will not be issued until at least one week after the last day of the add/drop period.