Recent Selected Anthropology Faculty Publications

Shafqat Hussain

(faculty profile)
Remoteness and Modernity: Transformation and Continuity in Northern Pakistan. 2015. Yale University Press. [Book]

Hunting and the Shikari in Precolonial and Colonial India. Paper presented at the American Society for Environmental History, Annual Meeting 2016. April 1, 2016. Seattle.

Timothy Landry

(faculty profile)
2015. Vodún, Globalization, and the Creative Layering of Belief in Southern Bénin. Journal of Religion in Africa 45(2): 170-199.

Jane Nadel-Klein

(faculty profile)
Op-Ed: Bloomfield Water Bottling Plant Potential Drain On Community.  Hartford Courant, March 20, 2016.

Beth Notar

(faculty profile)
Beth E. Notar, Kyaw San Min, and Raju Gautam. 2018. “Echoes of Colonial Logic in Re-Ordering ‘Public’ Streets: From Colonial Rangoon to Postcolonial Yangon.” Transfers Vol.8, no. 3: 55-73. https://doi.org/10.3167/TRANS.2018.080305

Beth E. Notar. 2017. “‘My Dad is Li Gang’ or Seeing the State: Transgressive Mobility, Collective Visibility and Playful Corruption in Contemporary Urban China.” Asian Anthropology 16 (1): 35-53. [online 28 Nov 2016): 1-19].
*Co-winner of the best paper prize in Asian Anthropology

Beth E. Notar primarily conducts research in Yunnan, China and Yangon, Myanmar on issues of mobility. Her first book, Displacing Desire: Travel and Popular Culture in China, was designated by the American Library Association as one of the “most significant publications for undergraduates.” As part of the Luce Faculty Initiative on Asia and the Environment, she loves to take students on summer study abroad programs to China and Southeast Asia. Given her research interests in the rise of global automobility, and a Mellon foundation pedagogy grant, she has developed a new course: “Mobility & Sustainability.”

James Trostle

(faculty profile)

ST Cherng/I Cangemi, JA Trostle, JV Remais, JNS Eisenberg. Social cohesion and passive adaptation in relation to climate change and disease. Global Environmental Change. 2019. 58 doi: 10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2019.101960.

PA Collender, C Morris, R Glenn-Finer, A Acevedo, HH Chang, JA Trostle, JNS Eisenberg, JV Remais. “Mass gatherings and diarrheal disease transmission among rural communities in coastal Ecuador.” Am J Epidemiol. 2019. doi: 10.1093/aje/k wz102.

E. August, KJ Burke, C Fleischer, J Trostle. Writing assignments in epidemiology courses: how many and how good? Public Health Reports. 2019. Jul/Aug;134(4):441-446. doi: 10.1177/0033354919849942.

Hubbard A, Trostle J, Cangemi I, Eisenberg J.  Countering the curse of dimensionality: Exploring data-generating mechanisms through participant observation and mechanistic modeling. Epidemiology 2019. 30(4):609-14. Doi: 10.1097/EDE.0000000000001025

August E & Trostle JA. “Using Writing Assignments to Promote Critical Thinking, Learning and Professional Identity: The Epidemiology Workplace Writing Repository.” Journal of Public Health 2018. (January 30). doi: 10.1093/pubmed/fdy011.

Lopez VK, Dombecki C, Trostle J, Mogrovejo P, Castro Morillo N, Cevallos W, Goldstick J, Jones AD, Eisenberg JNS. “Trends of Child Undernutrition in Rural Ecuadorian Communities with Differential access to Roads, 2004-2013.” Maternal & Child Nutrition 2018.  (February 7). doi: 10.1111/mcn.12588.

Kraay ANM, Trostle J, Brouwer AF, Cevallos W, Eisenberg JNS. Determinants of Short-term Movement in a Developing Region and Implications for Disease Transmission. Epidemiology. 2018 Jan;29(1):117-125. doi:10.1097/EDE.0000000000000751.

Tsai AC, Mendenhall E, Trostle JA, Kawachi I. Co-occurring epidemics, syndemics, and population health. The Lancet. 2017. Mar 4;389(10072):978-982. doi:10.1016/S0140