Course Descriptions

Trinity College Rome Campus courses are taught by a mixture of Trinity College Rome Campus faculty. 

 
All students must receive approval for major, minor, and general requirements credit. All students should receive approval from their major department for courses to count towards their major and work with their minor coordinator on their minor. Visiting students should receive approval for all courses through the appropriate process at their home institution.

Visiting students, it is important to note that 1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours. You need to check with your study abroad office and registrar’s office to see how many courses you will need to take in Rome to fulfill the minimum amount of credits you need per semester at your home institution. 

 
Please note that all course information is subject to change at any time.
To request syllabi, please contact the Trinity Rome Campus Coordinator.

Special Course Offerings for Spring 2019!

The Trinity College Rome Campus is excited to be offering two additional Economics courses taught by  Trinity College Economics Professor Adam Grossberg for the spring 2019 term.

Market Power in the US and the European Union (ROME TBD) - 
New Course Offering!
Term Offered:  Spring 2019 ONLY
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101

Economists’ claims about the efficiency and social desirability of markets rest largely on assumptions about the competitiveness of those markets: More competitive markets result in less market power for buyers and sellers, and more efficient and socially desirable outcomes. But how competitive are real world markets? And does the answer differ depending on whether we are examining markets in the US versus those in the EU? This course will examine market power and its consequences, paying particular attention to the differences in the legal frameworks and cultural attitudes regarding market power in the US and the EU, and how they have evolved in recent decades. This is a 200 level course. (Trinity College Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101)

 
Labor Economics (ROME TBD) -  New Course Offering!
Term Offered:  Spring 2019 ONLY
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 301

An examination of a number of important issues in modern labor economics, with applications to Italy, the US, and the EU. Topics include (but are not limited to): the determinants of labor supply, with special emphasis on the growth of women's labor supply during the last century; the demand for labor and the determination of wages; discrimination in labor markets. This is a 300 level course. (Trinity College Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 301)


 
Regular Rome Campus Courses 

 

 
Drawing from Masterpieces (ROME 120)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None
Additional fee required for supplies: $150
 
An introduction to drawing from masterpieces of sculpture, painting, and architecture, with emphases on observation, technique, interpretation, and aesthetic emotions. Rome's museums and cityscape of ruins and monuments will be our studio. We shall focus on the human figure, monumental forms, vantage points, choices of significant details, methods of composition, and techniques of linear and tonal drawing.​

 
Introduction to the Art of Rome (ROME 181)
Term Offered: Fall ONLY
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None
 
A survey of Roman art from the Ancient Republic through the seventeenth century. Topics include: religious art; the basilica; monumental architecture designed to express imperial and papal power; visual narrative in sculpture and painting; the rise of perspective and illusion in pictorial space; and the classical tradition. Reserved for students new to art history.

 
Women in Art (ROME TBD) -  New Course Offering!
Term Offered:  Spring ONLY
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None

 
The course covers major artistic periods—antiquity, Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Baroque—from the point of view of women’s presence as artists, patrons, and subjects of the art of Rome. It takes advantage of the richness of monuments and works of art in the Eternal City for direct analysis and discussions in the light of women’s studies.

 
Economics of Art (ROME 208)
Term Offered: Fall ONLY
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: Introductory Economics​
 
Is art just another commodity? Or is art beyond the normal laws of economics? This course will examine markets and policy in the arts to determine how and why the arts are special. Topics include the value of priceless art, the starving artist, subsidies for the arts, and the role of non-profits, patronage, and investing in art. There will be guest speakers from the Roman art world. (Trinity College Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101).​

 
Contemporary Italy through Cinema (ROME 217)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None

 
This course uses film as a lens to explore important topics in Contemporary Italy, such as immigration, the political climate, the mafia, unemployment, youth culture, the contemporary Italian family, and gender politics.  Through the works of important film directors like Fellini, Salvatores, Giordana, Sorrentino and other important directors, students will gain a deep understanding of the multifaceted and complex aspects of contemporary Italy and learn to critically analyze changes in society and culture through film.

 
Art Conservation (ROME 224)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None
 
An introduction to the history, theory, techniques, institutions and policies of art conservation. Students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of art by viewing masterpieces as complex, vulnerable materials that require our involvement in conservation if we are to grasp and preserve the artists’ message. We will examine firsthand outstanding examples of art conservation in several media and from different periods in history. Works may include ancient Etruscan tombs in Tarquinia, Egyptian paintings of the 3rd century, the huge Montelparo polyptych of the 15th century, Michelangelo’s frescoes in the Sistine Chapel, the Casina Pio IV (a beautiful 16th-century structure in the Vatican Gardens that has been comprehensively restored) and its stucco decorations, and gypsum casts of sculptures by Canova. We will discuss criteria and policies for selecting particular works of art for conservation (and necessarily neglecting others) when resources are scarce. We will also discuss preventive conservation, particularly the importance of environment and the ideal parameters for temperature humidity, air quality, and lighting. Slide lectures in the classroom alternate with on-site instruction at museums, monuments, and conservation workshops. 

 
Mussolini’s Rome (ROME 228)
Term Offered:  Fall ONLY
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None

 
Few cities have been so transformed by ideology as Rome; its current state is a direct reflection of Fascist policy and propaganda during the period between the two World Wars. Although the emerging Fascist party initially embraced the bold, modernist forms of Futurism for its visual propaganda, Mussolini and his supporters preferred the stripped, monumental classicism known as Rationalism for their massive architectural and urban projects. This sensibility was ideally suited to Mussolini’s global ambitions, and talented architects flocked to the Fascist party as Rome was reshaped to reflect its status as resurgent Imperial power. This course will trace the rise and fall of Fascism, its influence upon the art and architecture of the Italian state, and its role in the physical transformation of Rome during the Fascist era.​

 
Ancient Art of Rome (ROME 230)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Seminar
 1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None
 
Art and architecture in RoSme, from the Etruscan age to the late Empire. Topics include: historical context; style; iconography; building typology and techniques; sculpture; painting; the development of artistic taste; and the use of art as propaganda. Fieldwork includes a trip to the Naples Archeological Museum, Pompeii, and Villa Jovis (Capri). 

 
Power and Devotion in the Art of Early Christian and Medieval Rome (ROME 238)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Seminar
 1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None

 
This course will investigate the birth and evolution of Christian Art in Rome. As the Center of Western Christianity, embodied in the figure Pope (the “vicar of Christ”), Rome came to be the artistic reference point for all of Europe. Emphasizing the Glory of the “true God” and the Triumph of the Church, the Early Christian Art and Architecture of Rome remained intrinsically linked to the city’s pagan past, which it both repurposed and built upon. This multilayered genesis was further enriched by the encounter with the artistic experiences of Constantinople, the new capital of the Roman Empire (later labelled as “Byzantine”). Not only Rome, but also other important cities in Italy, and in particular Ravenna (which we will visit during a weekend course trip) are a testimony to this dialogue between past and present. In our examination of the development of intellectual, spiritual and political meaning in the art work of the period, as the course progresses, we will see how the papacy increasingly expressed and consolidated its spiritual and political authority through artistic images between the 11th and 13th centuries. The proclamation of the “Holy year” in 1300 with its unprecedented output of masterpieces by some of the greatest artists of the time (Arnolfo, Giotto and Cavallini) marks the apex of this project.

The City of Rome (ROME 250)
Term Offered: Fall ONLY
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None
 
We will trace the profile and examine the fabric of the Eternal City from ancient to contemporary times, from insula to borgata. We will explore the city not as a showplace of famous monuments but as a complex pattern of historical, political, and social elements that have shaped its distinctive character. Classroom lectures alternate with site visits in Rome. Assignments include readings from a variety of disciplines and field research.

 
Continuity and Transformation of the Ancient Mediterranean: Rome, Constantinople and Damascus.
(ROME TBD) -
New Course Offering!
Term Offered: Spring ONLY
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None

 
 This course intends to study the historical events that dramatically transformed the Mediterranean world from the “Fall of Rome” to rise of Islamic rule in the Eastern Mediterranean (3rd-8th cent. AD). It will be mainly based upon archaeological and literary sources and give the students an insight in the complex geo-political developments that redefined the political, religious, economic and cultural relations in the region, with particular regard for the events in Italy, Constantinople, Western Europe, Northern Africa and the Near East. The course will include a three day academic excursion to Milan, Brescia and Ravenna.

 
Love and Eros in Ancient Rome (ROME TBD) - New Course Offering!
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None

This course focuses on the role of love and sexuality in the everyday life in Ancient Rome. Exploration of selected readings (Ovid, Horace, Petronius, Catullus, Juvenal and other authors) concentrates on the representation of women, family, children and slaves during the last decades of Republican Rome and the imperial times. The questions of gender identity and views on homosexuality, prostitution, female and male seduction are considered. Finally, the course brings together instructions for finding love and love-making found in the text and the existing ancient roman topography.


 
Urban and Global Rome (ROME 270)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None
 
This is an interdisciplinary course that draws on perspectives from anthropology, sociology, political science, geography, economy and other relevant disciplines. It offers the students local perspectives on globalization as it allows global perspectives on the city of Rome. The intertwined processes of globalization and localization ("globalization") will be addressed via an in-depth study of the city and the social, cultural, political, demographic and economic transformations Rome is currently going through. On-site visits will enable students to experience alternative settings of the "Eternal City" and give them direct contact with local inhabitants and representatives of religious/ethnic minority groups.

 
Sports & Society in Modern Italy (ROME 285)
Term Offered: Spring ONLY 
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None

 
This course will examine the role of sport (with an emphasis on soccer and cycling) in Italian society from historical and contemporary perspectives. The course will consider the relationship between sports and issues such as gender, race, class, ethnicity, sexuality, nationalism, nation-building, the Italian economy, and the role of the media in order to determine how developments in sports have influenced,  and been influenced by Italian politics and society.
 
Economics of Corruption (ROME TBD) - New Course Offering!
Term Offered: Spring ONLY
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

 
This course will address the problem of incentives and constraints faced by politicians when choosing public policies and will illustrate the pathologies which may affect the correct functioning of institutions such as rent-seeking and corruption. The course analyzes corruption within the principal-agent framework and addresses the following issues: the existence of a plurality of measures which describe the phenomenon at both national and regional level and in different sectors; the multiplicity of causes of corruption. The direct and indirect effects of corruption on economic growth; the anti-corruption policies. This course can be taken at the 200 or 300 level.

International and European Public Choice (ROME TBD) - New Course Offering!
Term Offered: Spring ONLY
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: Introductory Economics
 
This course will expose students to the more recent European and international applications of public choice theories. To this end, the course will be divided in two parts. The first will teach students the fundamental analytical tools to understand political phenomena and institutions; the second part will apply these tools European and international topics, with emphasis placed on a comparative institutional analysis. This course can be taken at the 200 or 300 level.

Public Finance (ROME 306/ECON 306)
Term Offered: Fall ONLY
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: Intermediate Microeconomics
 
 A course in the economics of taxation, government spending, governmental finance and related policy issues in comparative institutional perspective. Part I is a brief overview of the role of government from positive and normative perspectives. Part II develops the economics of public choice and public finance in a range of institutional settings: majority vs. unanimity voting, presidential vs. parliamentary democracy, federal vs. centralized states, dictatorships, and supranational institutions. Part III applies the tools developed in parts I and II to special topics, which may include health-care and pension systems, taxation, appropriations, expenditures, bureaucracy, the size of government, and corruption. Empirical examples are drawn from Italy and the EU, the U.S., and developing countries. (Trinity College Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301).​​
 
Power and Devotion in the Art of Early Christian and Medieval Rome (ROME 238)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Seminar
 1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None

 
This course will investigate the birth and evolution of Christian Art in Rome. As the Center of Western Christianity, embodied in the figure Pope (the “vicar of Christ”), Rome came to be the artistic reference point for all of Europe. Emphasizing the Glory of the “true God” and the Triumph of the Church, the Early Christian Art and Architecture of Rome remained intrinsically linked to the city’s pagan past, which it both repurposed and built upon. This multilayered genesis was further enriched by the encounter with the artistic experiences of Constantinople, the new capital of the Roman Empire (later labelled as “Byzantine”). Not only Rome, but also other important cities in Italy, and in particular Ravenna (which we will visit during a weekend course trip) are a testimony to this dialogue between past and present. In our examination of the development of intellectual, spiritual and political meaning in the art work of the period, as the course progresses, we will see how the papacy increasingly expressed and consolidated its spiritual and political authority through artistic images between the 11th and 13th centuries. The proclamation of the “Holy year” in 1300 with its unprecedented output of masterpieces by some of the greatest artists of the time (Arnolfo, Giotto and Cavallini) marks the apex of this project.

 
Michelangelo and His World (ROME 340)
Term Offered: Fall ONLY
Seminar
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: One course in Art History
 
The life and works of Michelangelo painter, sculptor, and architect in historical context. Works include Bacchus, David, the early and late Pietà, the Sistine Chapel frescoes, the Medici Chapel, St. Peter’s dome, Moses, and the unfinished Slaves. Topics include Florence and Rome, genius and patronage, classicism and mannerism, and technique and neo-platonism. The academic excursion to Florence is an integral part of the course. The focus on Michelangelo is supplemented by contextual survey elements. The seminar component consists of reports and presentations on topics chosen in consultation with the instructor.
 
Bernini and His World (ROME 342)
Term Offered: Spring ONLY
Seminar
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: One course in Art History

 
The course will focus on the art of Gianlorenzo Bernini's oeuvre in the context of late-sixteenth and seventeenth-century Italian art and society. Students will investigate the artistic evolution of the sculptor/architect, the influence he exerted on his contemporaries, the legacy he left to posterity, as well as the literary and biographical texts that shaped the image of the artist as we have come to know him. The weekly lectures will be complemented by weekly on-site visits to museums (such as the Borghese Gallery and the Palazzo Barberini), churches (such as Sant' Andrea al Quirinale and St. Peter's Basilica) and sites usually inaccessible to general visitor (such as the Oratorio del Gonfalone, the Casino Rospigliosi and the archives of the Accademia di San Luca)/ The seminar component of the course consists of reports and on-site presentations by the students. 

In addition to the regular classes,  students visit the marble quarries in Carrera (from where Michelangelo and Bernini got their marble) and the Nicoli sculpture studio. While at the former site the class will be to see how marble is quarried and transported, at the latter venue students will learn about various types of marble used by artists to this day, sculpting tools and techniques, and sculpture reproduction on various scales from original plaster models.  On the way back to Rome, students will spend one night in the town of Orvieto where they will see Francesco Mochi’s famous sculpture ensemble The Archangel Gabriel and Virgin Mary as well as the impressive Baroque sculpture collection in the Church of Sant’Agostino, formerly located in the Orvieto cathedral.

 
 
ITALIAN LANGUAGE
 ***All students are required to take an Italian language course in Rome***


 
​Intensive Introductory Italian (ROME 101)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1.5 Trinity course credits = 5.25 semester hours
Prerequisite: None

 
A course designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Italian.
 
Advanced Introductory Italian (ROME 102)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1.5 Trinity course credits = 5.25 semester hours
Prerequisite: Italian 101 or equivalent

 
Continuation of 101, emphasizing conversation, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension.
 
Intermediate Italian I: Conversation and Composition (ROME 201)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: Italian 102 or equivalent
 
A course to develop conversational and writing skills. A brief review of grammar and syntax will be followed by readings from a variety of texts to foster a solid command of the written and spoken language.
 
Intermediate Italian II: Composition and Introduction to Literary Readings (ROME 202)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: Italian 102 or equivalent
 
Practice in oral and written expression on topics in Italian culture, incorporating an introduction to literary genres (theater, poetry, and prose).
 
Italian Culture (ROME 299)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: Intermediate Italian or its equivalent
 
Analysis and interpretation of elements of Italian culture. Topics may be drawn from literature, film, performing arts, fine arts, minor arts, anthropology, or contemporary media. Coursework is in Italian.

 
Intermediate Latin Tutorial (ROME 410)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None

 
The program can provide instruction in Latin at various levels for students whose majors require continued study in Rome. Students will be grouped according to broad ability levels in small group settings.

 
Advanced Latin Tutorial  (ROME 460)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity course credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None

 
The program can provide instruction in Latin at various levels for students whose majors require continued study in Rome. Students will be grouped according to broad ability levels in small group settings.
 
Greek Tutorial (Available at various levels)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
Prof. TBA
Prerequisite: None
 
The program can provide instruction in Greek at various levels for students whose majors require continued study in Rome. Students will be grouped according to broad ability levels in small group settings.
 
 

 
 

 

 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

 
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