Course Descriptions

FREN 101:Intensive Elementary French I

Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak French. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will be the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take both 101 and 102 in sequence. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. Other than beginning students must have the explicit permission of the instructor.
1.50 units, Lecture
 

FREN 102: Intensive Elementary French II

Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour.
1.50 units, Lecture
 

FREN 201: Intermediate French I

Review of basic grammatical concepts and development of fundamental language skills, with increasing emphasis on written expression and spoken accuracy. Use is made of video-based presentations. Since significant linguistic progress cannot be achieved in 201 alone, students wishing to acquire proficiency should plan to take both 201 and 202 in sequence.
1.00 units, Lecture
 

FREN 202: Intermediate French II

Further reinforcement of written and spoken skills, with continuing practice in the use of complex grammatical structures and greater emphasis on the mastery of contemporary usage through extensive class discussion, reading, and writing.
1.00 units, Lecture
 

FREN 235: Islam & the French Colonial Encounter

This course focuses on French colonization in Muslim-majority the North and West African regions. Situating the French example within a broader narrative about the economic and political strategies inherent in the colonial project, we will pay particular attention to the issue of religion in the relationship between colonizer and colonized. This course will examine the nature of the French "civilizing mission" in Africa, and the Muslim-African response to the French presence, as Islam and its "symbols" played a major role in anti-colonial movements throughout the two regions. Among others, we will read works by authors Assia Djebar, Camara Laye, Gustave Flaubert and Fatima Mernissi. The course is taught in English, but students who have taken FREN 241 or a higher-level course can complete assignments in French.
1.00 units, Seminar

FREN 241: Advanced Composition & Style

Development of a high level of proficiency through the reading and analysis of texts and films in contemporary idiomatic French, with considerable emphasis on attainment of grammatical accuracy.
1.00 units, Lecture

FREN 247: Introduction to Francophone Studies

This course provides an introduction to the history, literature and culture of the Francophone world. Through a range of texts and films hailing from French-speaking countries in Africa, the Caribbean, and the Americas, we explore the legacy of colonialism and post-colonialism, and pay particular attention to issues of race, identity, language, and nationhood. Conducted in French. 
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
 

FREN 251: French Literature I: From the Middle Ages to Romanticism

This course is designed to introduce the student to the major authors of French literature from the Middle Ages to the 19th century. Representative works will be read in chronological order to foster a sense of literary history. Special emphasis will be placed on techniques of literary appreciation. Class conducted entirely in French.
1.00 units, Lecture
 

FREN 252: French Literature II: Modern French Literature

This course will be a survey of the major texts of 19th- and 20th-century France. Principles of literary history and literary appreciation will be emphasized.
1.00 units, Lecture
 

FREN 281: Conversational French

This course is designed for students who want to be informed about and keep abreast of current events in France, and who want to develop a high level of oral proficiency in French. We will examine current political, social, historical and educational issues as they appear in French journals, periodicals, reviews and magazines such as "L’Express," "Le Monde," "Le Nouvel Observateur," and others. Students will lead and participate in class discussion through presentations of oral reports on the issues under study. All work will be done orally.
1.00 units, Lecture
 

FREN 320: French Cinema

This course is designed to familiarize students with the development and art of the French cinema as seen through its important phases and movements, and in its relationship to modern France. Relevant literary and critical texts will accompany each film. Lectures and coursework will be in English. (Listed both as LACS 320 and French 320.)
1.00 units, Lecture

FREN 355:  Reading the Streets of Paris

This course focuses on representations of Paris through the eyes of a variety of 19th and 20th-century authors. This course integrates the experience of study abroad and with the analysis of texts that evoke different aspects of urban life. We will begin with a brief history of the city of Paris and specific features of its transformation under Haussmann. Urban icons such as Baudelaire's flâneur, working girls, (grisettes) and ragpickers (chiffonniers) hold an important place in visual and textual representations by the following authors: Charles Baudelaire, Honoré Balzac, Delphine Girardin, George Sand, Jules Verne, Walter Benjamin, André Breton and Colette.We begin with texts by Baudelaire to understand the concept of the flâneur. This becomes an important and uniquely urban phenomenon in 19th-century French culture. The flâneur implies either bohemian or bourgeois social status; however we also analyze texts about women navigating the city, and ragpickers (chiffonniers) who are immortalized in the poetry of Baudelaire and photographs of Atget. Authors include: Charles Baudelaire, Honoré Balzac, Céleste Mogador, George Sand, Jules Verne, Walter Benjamin, Louis Aragon, and Colette.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 251 or 252, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 

FREN 355:  18th-Century Enlightenment

The Enlightenment can be defined as a movement of political, social, and philosophical contestation advocating the reign of reason and progress. This course will examine the manifestations of this questioning through the study of the dominant genres of the periods: plays, philosophical tales, dialogues, novels. We will also study a selection of films whose subject is the history and cultural life of 18th-century France and examine the relevance of 18th-century issues to the contemporary world. Sample reading list, L'île des esclaves, Marivaux, Le Neveu de Rameau, Diderot Candide, Voltaire, Le Mariage de Figaro, Beaumarchais, Les Infortunes de la vertu, Sade. Films: Que la fête commence, Bertrand Tavernier, Ridicule, Patrice Leconte, L'Anglaise et le duc, Éric Roemer. (GLB2)
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 251 or 252, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar

FREN 355:  The World of Marcel Proust

Marcel Proust is arguably the most iconic and influential French author of the twentieth century. The proustian gaze reaches into every aspect of social, intellectual and artistic life of the period from 1870 to 1920. In this course, a close reading of Du côté de chez Swann, provides an intiation to the world of Proust and A la recherche du temps perdu. Substantial extracts from other parts of the epic seven volume novel will allow a more in-depth understanding of the author’s ideas and of the narrative arch of his work. We will also study a number of adaptations of Proust’s novel in film and other media. 
1.00 units, Seminar

FREN 355:  French Radicals

Radical, irreverent, and trailblazing: such terms typify an uncanny number of French writers and intellectuals of the 20th century, who inspired political and literary movements across the globe. From the Dreyfus Affair to Charlie Hebdo, and by way of feminism, existentialism, postcolonialism, French theory, and current debates on the burqa and secularism, we will study critical moments when French and Francophone thinkers changed the history of modern thought. We will examine a range of materials (novels, radio broadcasts, films, political treatises, comics, graffiti and street art). At every turn, we will consider both how literature is political, and how politics becomes the stuff of literature. Readings by Barthes, Beauvoir, Camus, Fanon, Houellebecq, Sansal, Sartre, Wittig, and Zola.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 251 or 252, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar

FREN 355:  Crime Stories: A Study of Francophone Detective Novels and their Cinematographic Adaptations.

Students will explore the evolution of the francophone detective novel through the works of major authors such as Gaston Leroux, Georges Simenon, Didier Daeninckx, Jean-Patrick Manchette and Achille F. Ngoye. Emphasis will be placed upon narratological, social and political analysis. The study of film adaptations will complement the readings. The class will be conducted in French.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent, or permission of instructor 1.00 units, Seminar

FREN 355:  Marvels, Moors, and Myths: Threshold Places and Spaces in 19th and 20th cent. French Lit.

This course investigates the representation of threshold places and spaces in several French texts. Historically liminal areas are the settings for medieval lore, stories of magic and monsters, tales of the supernatural, and narratives of spiritual or otherworldy encounters. We will explore these representations, the characters who inhabit or occupy them, and their role(s) in the French collective imagination. The Normandy coast, the craggy shores of Brittany, subterranean places, secret passages, depots, trains, carriages, windows, and stairwells are some of the venues that lend themselves to myth-making, storytelling, and creative innovation. Primary texts include but are not limited to L'Ensorcelée by Barbey d'Aurevilly, excerpts from La mer and La sorcière by Michelet, Récits de la Luçotte by Mme Emile Lévy, Giraudoux's La Folle de Chaillot, and Emily L. by Duras.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 251 or 252, or permission of instructor. 1.00 units, Seminar

FREN 355:  Skin Deep: writing the face of francophone literature

The human face is considered not just the representation but the very incarnation of individual identity, and yet we know that "appearances should not be trusted," or that "beauty is only skin deep. In this course, we will read literary texts, films and theoretical works that ponder (among other things), the meaning of the face, its truth and its disguises. Topics include narcissism, the portrait and self-portrait, physiognomy, beauty, aging, makeup, and mirror-scenes. Emphasis will be placed on questions of gender identity/performance, as well as race and stereotyping. Works by Colette, Franju, Duras, Carrère, Assia Djebar and others. Readings, discussions and assignments in French. C- or better in French 241, or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent, or permission of instructor 1.00 units, Seminar

FREN 399: Independent Study

Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units min / 2.00 units max, Independent Study
 

FREN 401: Senior Seminar: Special Topics

This seminar is required of all seniors majoring or minoring in French: Plan A, Plan B (French as primary language), and French Studies minor. Over the term, students will work collaboratively on the various papers they are writing by way of integrating exercises in their major or minor, and the whole class will undertake a number of readings in common in order to provide informed criticism of one another’s papers. Depending on enrollment, the class may also spend part of the semester considering a special topic, author or genre in French Studies.
1.00 units, Seminar
 

FREN 460: Tutorial

Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units, Independent Study
 

FREN 466: Teaching Assistantship

Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study