Theater and Dance

Associate Professor Karger, Chair; Associate Professors Farlow, Polin, Power, and Preston; Visiting Assistant Professors Bernsen, Davis, and Hendrick; Visiting Lecturers Agrawal, Creary, and Matias; Director of Trinity/La MaMa Performing Arts Semester in New York City Burke

The Theater and Dance Department is committed to the integration of the two disciplines of theater and dance. The departments curriculum supports both the specific areas of training required in each discipline as well as the ways in which each informs the other, in both theory and in practice, over time and across cultures.

To this end, the Theater and Dance Department offers students the choice of six suggested concentrations, as well as the opportunity to design their own concentration in the major.

The 100-, 200-, and some 300-level courses in the department are designed for students with a general interest as well as for those students intending to become majors.

The theater and dance major—Students are required to complete 12 course credits for the major. Students who choose the two-credit thesis option will complete 13 course credits for the major.

Required courses:

The Writing Intensive Part II requirement is fulfilled either by the one-credit THDN 496-497. Senior Thesis, or by the two-credit THDN 498-499. Senior Thesis.

In addition to completing the required core courses, all theater and dance department majors must complete a concentration. Students choose one of six suggested concentrations listed below or design their own concentration in the major subject to departmental approval:

Acting

Dance and Choreography

Media and Performance

History and Dramaturgy

Performing Arts in the Community

Writing, directing

Theater and dance majors are required to participate in at least three departmental productions, one of which must be a THDN 309. Stage Production. In addition, all majors are required to complete 90 hours of design/production work in the Department of Theater and Dance. Upon declaring the major, the student will develop a plan with the performing arts technical director. It is recommended that students complete their production hours in 30-hour segments over the course of three semesters.

A grade of C- or higher must be obtained in all courses for the major. The last term of the senior year must be in residence. No more than three full credits in techniques and applications of theater and dance courses (THDN 109, THDN 209, and THDN 309) may be counted toward fulfillment of the general credit requirement for the bachelors degree.

Honors—Typically, departmental honors are awarded to students who have at least an A- average in courses required for the major and earn at least an A- in a two-credit thesis. Students who complete an exceptional one-credit thesis and have an A- average in courses required for the major may also be considered for honors.

Trinity/La MaMa Performing Arts Program in New York City—Sponsored by the Department of Theater and Dance, this semester program utilizes the landscape and history of New York City as a catalyst for an intensive study in theater, dance, and performance. Based at the historic and critically acclaimed La MaMa Experimental Theater Club (E.T.C.), the program offers students an immersion experience in the unique and vibrant New York arts scene. Occurring in the fall semester, the program is designed for both major and non-major arts students. The program includes a comprehensive academic seminar, an internship at a nonprofit arts organization, performance practice classes, attendance at multiple performances each week, and multi-arts exploration of NYC as a field- study site. The program culminates with a performance presented both at Trinity and at La MaMa E.T.C. In order to foster dynamic academic and artistic growth, the interdisciplinary learning approach includes group and individualized study and research. In addition to students with a focus in theater, dance, and performance, the semester can accommodate those interested in other genres. Further information is available from Professor Michael Burke, program director, by telephone at (212) 598-3058 or by e-mail: Michael.Burke@trincoll.edu; or from Associate Professor Barbara Karger of the Department of Theater and Dance, at Barbara.Karger@trincoll.edu. Students earn five course credits for the program, not more than two of which may be counted toward the major in the Department of Theater and Dance. See course descriptions for TLMM 401. Performance Workshop, TLMM 405. The Nonprofit Arts Organization, and TLMM 411. Performance Analysis.

Fall Term

103. Basic Acting— An introduction to the basic elements of acting. Students will work on releasing tension, developing their powers of concentration, promoting spontaneity through improvisation, and exploring a systematic approach to preparing a role for performance. This course is a prerequisite for all upper-level acting courses. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Hendrick, Karger

[107. Introduction to Performance]— Utilizing improvisational structures, students will explore the performing body through movement, voice, character, and physical space as the basic elements of performance. Looking at some of the earliest performance traditions throughout the world, the course will examine the notion of performance as transformative experience and the dancer/actor as the unified source of performance. Specific contexts for performance will be studied, referencing Australian aboriginal, Asian, and Native American traditions, and how these influence and redefine the performer’s intention will be explored. Finally, students will establish a working vocabulary for the performer that evolves out of their active experience and analysis. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

109. Performance— Major performance participation in a faculty-directed dance showcase concert or a non-faculty-directed Theater and Dance Department production. Students participating in the production should see the show’s director to arrange for .25 credit. Do not register for this course during regular Trinity College registration. (0.25 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Staff

109. Production— Major technical role in a faculty-directed dance showcase concert or a non-faculty-directed Theater and Dance Department production. Students participating in the production should see the show’s technical director to arrange for .25 credit. Do not register for this course during regular Trinity College registration. (0.25 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Staff

121. Introduction to Media Studies— This course is designed to examine the language and iconography of mediated forms of communication through an interdisciplinary historical and theoretical framework. To this end we will define “media” broadly as including practices ranging from print and theatrical, to cinematic and digital forms and practices. Through the readings, lectures, and discussions, as well as their own writing, students will have the opportunity to analyze various media texts and critically explore the role of media in their own lives. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Polin

[123. Introduction to Ballet]— Designed for the beginning-level dancer. This course combines an introduction to the fundamentals of ballet dance technique with an integrating seminar on the history and aesthetics of classical and contemporary ballet. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

[130. Jazz Dance Technique I]— For the beginning dancer; a study of the fundamentals of technique and alignment as the basis for an introduction to jazz dance movement vocabulary. (0.5 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited)

209. African Dance— Energetic and vibrant, African dance embodies joyful expression of the spirit through the physical body. This class provides an introduction to West African dance and culture. Students will learn steps from traditional dances from Guinea, West Africa; the role dance plays in Guinean culture; and develop an understanding of the communication between the drum and the dancer. The class includes a performance requirement, but no previous dance experience is necessary. Also listed under international studies/African studies. (0.5 course credit) (GLB1) (Enrollment limited) –Creary

209. Indian Dance: Kathak Tradition— Expressive, sharp, alluring, and precise, Kathak lives today as an important school of classical dance that originated over 2,000 years ago. Evolving from a blend of Middle Eastern styles and Indian temple dance, Kathak combines dance, drama, and music to tell a story. Modern Kathak emphasizes geometrical patterns and design with special emphasis on footwork and intricate rhythmic patterns. The course covers specific techniques as well as the cultural context from which they evolved. Also listed under international studies/Asian studies. (0.5 course credit) (GLB1) (Enrollment limited) –Agrawal

209. Movements Fundamentals: Ballet— An introduction to ballet movement vocabulary with emphasis on alignment, balance, extension, and physical presence. (0.5 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Power

215. Making Dances— An introduction to the principles of choreography using a variety of improvisational and compositional structures. In addition to making their own dances, students will study the working methods and dances of several major contemporary choreographers. Concurrent enrollment in a technique class, either for credit or as an auditor, is recommended. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Farlow

[218. Principles of Movement]— An introduction to body alignment, flexibility, and the basic principles of movement. The course will include an examination of the musculoskeletal structure, basic kinesiology, stretch, placement, yoga, floor barre, and breath work. For dancers, actors, athletes, and those interested in understanding and experiencing the moving body. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

[226. Intermediate Acting: Shakespeare Performance]— This course explores the unique demands of playing Shakespeare on the stage. Through work on monologues and scenes, students will learn how to bring Shakespeare’s language to life through research, analysis, and a dynamic use of the voice and body. Prerequisite: C- or better in Theater and Dance 103 or permission of instructor. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

229. Jazz Dance Technique II— Designed for intermediate level dancers with previous training in modern, jazz, lyrical, or ballet. This course deepens the dancer’s understanding of the principles of jazz dance, with an emphasis on rhythmic complexity and performative style. (0.5 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Matias

232. Intermediate/Advanced Modern Dance Technique— Designed for intermediate and advanced-level dancers with previous training in modern, jazz, lyrical, or ballet. This course deepens the dancer’s understanding of the principles of modern dance, with an emphasis on alignment, breath, and dynamic range. (0.5 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Bernsen

236. Contemporary Dance History: Global Perspectives— A study of the origins and development of dance in various world cultures. Students will explore how the Western modern dance aesthetic has evolved concurrently with the development of non-Western dance forms and will address questions of crossover of form and content, the transmission of cultural values, and the implications for contemporary choreography. Also listed under international studies-global studies. (GLB1) (Enrollment limited) –Farlow

[270. Arts in Action: Moving into the Community]— In this course we will examine the way the arts in general and movement in particular both engage a community and are engaged in the community. Using Hartford and the region as a field for our inquiry, we will look at the role the arts play in contributing to the overall health of a community with a particular focus on schools for at-risk youth, correctional institutions, homes for the elderly, specialized magnet schools, after-school programming and performance that utilizes the community as a generative resource. In addition to readings, films, guest speakers and discussions, there will be applied observation and study in the city of Hartford and beyond. This course has a community learning component. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

[302. Horror and the Culture of Excess]— Zombies, vampires, and werewolves appear across the landscape of contemporary film, television, and theater. Monsters reveal the limits of the imagination and have traditionally symbolized the domains beyond rationality and the terrors of the unconscious. This course will examine the horror genre, paying particular attention to such topics as: psychopathology and private worlds; fear of imperfection and impurity; and the performance of excess. Students in the course will examine films (including The Ring and Videodrome); television shows (including Walking Dead, True Blood, and Twin Peaks); and performance events such as haunted houses, ghost tours, sťances, and other phantasmagoria. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

309. Stage Production— Major performance or design participation in a faculty-directed Theater and Dance Department production. Cast members will enroll at the first rehearsal. Design students will enroll with the technical director. All students participating in the production will receive .5 credit and will be graded. Do not register for this course during regular Trinity College registration. (0.5 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Preston, Staff

[348. The Arts and Special Populations]— In this seminar, we will investigate the application of the arts to special populations with a focus on, but not limited to, urban youth at risk; the incarcerated and families affected by incarceration; and victims of crime. We will look at the role the arts play in a healing and rehabilitative process with these populations, analyzing the mission, goals, action steps, and results through research and hands-on experience. Students will do a significant fieldwork project in the city of Hartford in connection and collaboration with a nonprofit organization that will include research, observation, and analysis. This course has a community learning component. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

393. Playwrights Workshop— An introduction to different styles and techniques of playwrighting through the study of selected plays from various world theater traditions. Assignments and exercises will lead to the development of short plays scripted by students. Prerequisite: At least one theater and dance course or permission of instructor. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Karger, Preston

399. Independent Study— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment. (0.5 - 1 course credit) –Staff

401. Performance Workshops/Trinity/La MaMa/New York City Performing Arts Program— A participatory workshop in which students interested in performance can work on expanding their expressive vocabulary and develop physical, vocal, psycho-physical skills. Classes include sessions in movement, improvisation, acting, image work, text, scene and ensemble work and field study in the city of New York. This course culminates in a presentation of final performance projects at Trinity and La MaMa ETC. Only students accepted in the Trinity/La MaMa Performing Arts Semester can enroll in this course. (2 course credits) (Enrollment limited) –Burke Jr.

405. The Nonprofit Arts Organization/Trinity/La MaMa/New York City Performing Arts Program— Students will work at field study placements selected by the students and the director for a minimum of 20 hours each week. In addition, they will have weekly discussions with the director of the program about their on-site work, as well as hear lectures, do readings, and discuss how non-profit arts organizations are structured and function. Only students accepted in the Trinity/La MaMa Performing Arts Semester can enroll in this course. –Staff

411. Performance Analysis/Trinity/La MaMa/New York City Performing Arts Program— In this course, students will investigate ways to evaluate and discuss performance. Each week, they will attend three performances and a two-hour seminar. The seminar will focus on exploring ways to articulate and write about the performances they see. In addition, students will do readings, view videotapes, read reviews, and discuss together with guest artists the historical and cultural context of the performance works they attend. Only students accepted in the Trinity/La MaMa New York City Performing Arts Program can enroll in this course. (2 course credits) (Enrollment limited) –Burke Jr.

466. Teaching Assistantship— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment. (0.5 - 1 course credit) –Staff

496. Senior Thesis Part 1— The first semester of a capstone exercise for all theater and dance majors who do not elect the two-credit thesis option. Students will be required to present an original theatrical piece and to submit an accompanying paper as the culmination of their work in the Theater and Dance Department. (WEB) –Staff

[497. Senior Thesis Part 2]— The second semester of a capstone exercise for all theater and dance majors who do not elect the two-credit thesis option. Students will be required to present an original theatrical piece and to submit an accompanying paper as the culmination of their work in the Theater and Dance Department. (WEB)

498. Senior Thesis Part 1— Year-long independent study. An option available only to students with strong academic records in the major and proven ability to work independently. Individual topics to be selected by the student and approved by departmental faculty. It is expected that the thesis will consist of a substantial written component with a performance or public presentation which relates in some fundamental way to the written part of the thesis. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (two course credits are considered pending in the first semester; two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.) (2 course credits) (WEB) –Staff

Courses Originating in Other Departments

English 441. Writing for Film— View course description in department listing on p. 422. –Brink

Spring Term

103. Basic Acting— An introduction to the basic elements of acting. Students will work on releasing tension, developing their powers of concentration, promoting spontaneity through improvisation, and exploring a systematic approach to preparing a role for performance. This course is a prerequisite for all upper-level acting courses. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Hendrick, Preston

109. Performance— Major performance participation in a faculty-directed dance showcase concert or a non-faculty-directed Theater and Dance Department production. Students participating in the production should see the show’s director to arrange for .25 credit. Do not register for this course during regular Trinity College registration. (0.25 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Staff

109. Production— Major technical role in a faculty-directed dance showcase concert or a non-faculty-directed Theater and Dance Department production. Students participating in the production should see the show’s technical director to arrange for .25 credit. Do not register for this course during regular Trinity College registration. (0.25 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Staff

[121. Introduction to Media Studies]— This course is designed to examine the language and iconography of mediated forms of communication through an interdisciplinary historical and theoretical framework. To this end we will define “media” broadly as including practices ranging from print and theatrical, to cinematic and digital forms and practices. Through the readings, lectures, and discussions, as well as their own writing, students will have the opportunity to analyze various media texts and critically explore the role of media in their own lives. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

[132. Introduction to Modern Dance]— Designed for the beginning-level dancer. This course combines an introduction to the fundamentals of modern dance technique with an integrating seminar on the history and aesthetics of contemporary dance and choreography. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

205. Intermediate Acting— Students will continue to refine their ability to portray character through movement and gesture, incorporating both classical and contemporary methods of performance training. Prerequisite: C- or better in Theater and Dance 103 or permission of instructor. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Staff

209. Indian Dance: Kathak Tradition— Expressive, sharp, alluring, and precise, Kathak lives today as an important school of classical dance that originated over 2,000 years ago. Evolving from a blend of Middle Eastern styles and Indian temple dance, Kathak combines dance, drama, and music to tell a story. Modern Kathak emphasizes geometrical patterns and design with special emphasis on footwork and intricate rhythmic patterns. The course covers specific techniques as well as the cultural context from which they evolved. Also listed under international studies/Asian studies. (0.5 course credit) (GLB1) (Enrollment limited) –Agrawal

[209. Hip Hop]— A course in hip hop dance technique open to students of all level of experience. The course will also include discussion of the influence of Africanist traditions on contemporary Black dance and popular culture. (0.5 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited)

209. Principles of Movement— An introduction to body alignment, flexibility, and the basic principles of movement. The course will include stretch, placement, yoga, floor barre, and breath work. For dancers, actors, athletes, and those interested in experiencing the moving body. (0.5 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Farlow

209. Movement Fundamentals: Modern Dance— A basic movement course with emphasis on alignment, breath, gesture, and physical presence. (0.5 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Farlow

[210. Contemporary Theater History]— This course will provide a detailed study of the plays, performances, and techniques of major figures in world theater from the early 20th century to the present day. Artists examined include: Arthur Miller, Andre Breton, Anton Chekhov, Samuel Beckett, and Tatsumi Hijikata among other giants of contemporary theater. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

211. Introduction to T’ai Chi— T’ai chi is a Chinese movement practice that emphasizes a fluid flow of energy based on the dynamic interplay of yin(yielding)-yang(asserting) forces. This studio-based course will introduce students to the basic movement vocabulary of T’ai chi as well as to techniques designed to enhance balance, gestural articulation, postural alignment, centeredness and presence. (0.5 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Power

213. Theatrical Lighting: Design and Production— This course will, through careful examination and experimentation with the controllable properties of light, expose the students to the theories, processes, and technologies of designing and working with light. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –

[218. Principles of Movement]— An introduction to body alignment, flexibility, and the basic principles of movement. The course will include an examination of the musculoskeletal structure, basic kinesiology, stretch, placement, yoga, floor barre, and breath work. For dancers, actors, athletes, and those interested in understanding and experiencing the moving body. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

[223. Intermediate/Advanced Ballet Technique]— Designed for intermediate and advanced-level dancers with previous training in ballet. This course enhances the dancer’s classical vocabulary, musical sensibility, and performance skill (0.5 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited)

225. Introduction to Interactive Media— Cyberspace is merging with physical space as new technologies and applications make their way into almost every phase of artistic practice and root themselves in our day-to-day lives. This course is designed to provide students with an overview of new media history as well as hands-on experience using various interactive technologies towards application in live art and performance practice. Areas to be covered include: remix practice, online communities, sound/video art, and interactive audio and video programming. The forms and uses of the new technologies are explored in a studio context of experimentation and discussion. Assignments will take the form of experimental paper writing, assemblages, installations, sound mash-ups, and interactive’ art projects. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Polin

229. Jazz Dance Technique II— Designed for intermediate level dancers with previous training in modern, jazz, lyrical, or ballet. This course deepens the dancer’s understanding of the principles of jazz dance, with an emphasis on rhythmic complexity and performative style. (0.5 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Matias

232. Intermediate/Advanced Modern Dance Technique— Designed for intermediate and advanced-level dancers with previous training in modern, jazz, lyrical, or ballet. This course deepens the dancer’s understanding of the principles of modern dance, with an emphasis on alignment, breath, and dynamic range. (0.5 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Bernsen

233. Critical Views/Critical Values— Why are we profoundly moved by a particular performance we see? Why are we perplexed? Or disturbed? What is going on in a performance that we should understand in order to come to terms with our own values about art and life? And how have others come to such terms? These are the questions that students will consider as they examine a broad array of critical perspectives on performances both present and past as a means to developing their own criteria for critical elevation. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Power

235. Voice— This course examines vocal production for performance and public speaking. Students explore the connection between body, breath, voice, imagination, language, and presence. The class is based in Fitzmaurice Voicework, an approach which encourages vibrant voices that communicate intention and feeling without excess effort. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Davis

247. Post War American Theater— This course offers a survey of prominent plays and choreographies authored by American theater artists during the post-war period (1945-1965). Playwrights such as Arthur Miller, Lorraine Hansberry, and Tennessee Williams, along with selected choreographers, including Martha Graham and Alvin Ailey will be discussed with reference to the House Committee on Unamerican Activities; the popularity of Freudian and Jungian psychoanalysis; the emergence of a civil rights movement; and the social and political forces of “containment” that defined the early years of the Cold War era. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Power

270. Arts in Action: Moving into the Community— In this course we will examine the way the arts in general and movement in particular both engage a community and are engaged in the community. Using Hartford and the region as a field for our inquiry, we will look at the role the arts play in contributing to the overall health of a community with a particular focus on schools for at-risk youth, correctional institutions, homes for the elderly, specialized magnet schools, after-school programming and performance that utilizes the community as a generative resource. In addition to readings, films, guest speakers and discussions, there will be applied observation and study in the city of Hartford and beyond. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Staff

[303. Acting: Physical Theater]— The use of masks goes back to the origins of theater and has been a vital element of advanced actor training. Through practical exercises that are designed to open up the expressiveness of the actor’s body we will explore the world of masks and contemporary physical theatre. Readings will focus on the historical aspects of masks and their importance as a means of expression. Prerequisite: C- or better in Theater and Dance 103 or 207. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

304. Directing— This course explores the fundamentals of stage directing. Students will read texts by and about major 20th-century directors. In addition, students will direct a scene for each class, focusing on and combining different directing skills, including the understanding of stage space, movement, and text. The class will culminate in a presentation of one-act plays directed by the students. Prerequisite: C- or better in THDN 103 or 107, or Permission of the Instructor (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Karger, Polin

309. Stage Production— Major performance or design participation in a faculty-directed Theater and Dance Department production. Cast members will enroll at the first rehearsal. Design students will enroll with the technical director. All students participating in the production will receive .5 credit and will be graded. Do not register for this course during regular Trinity College registration. (0.5 course credit) (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Bernsen, Farlow, Staff

[315. Making Dances]— An introduction to the principles of choreography using a variety of improvisational and compositional structures. In addition to making their own dances, students will study the working methods and dances of several major contemporary choreographers. Concurrent enrollment in a technique class, either for credit or as an auditor, is recommended. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

[332. Education Through Movement]— In this course, students will examine the philosophical and theoretical foundations of arts education in general and movement education in particular. Students will participate in a semester-long movement/arts residency program in a Hartford elementary school with professional artists from the community. This project, which culminates in a large-scale performance piece with the children, gives students an on-site experience of how movement is integrated into an existing public school curriculum. Also listed under educational studies. This course has a community learning component. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

[364. Acting for Stage and Screen]— This intermediate-level acting class explores the parallels and differences between acting in the theater and on film. Through scene work we will examine which particular skills are necessary for either one and the techniques that an actor can apply to create engaging performances. Prerequisite: C- or better in Theater and Dance 103 or permission of instructor. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

[373. Human Rights Through Performance: The Incarcerated]— In this course we will examine selected human rights issues through a multi-disciplinary approach that includes readings, discussion, journal writing, site visits and art-making. This semester’s study will look at life behind the razor wire—what are the human rights issues that emerge in the world of the incarcerated? Included in our investigation will be the question of the death penalty, the notion of rehabilitation vs. punishment, gender-specific issues and the impact of the arts on prisoners and the institution of prison. Also listed under human rights studies. This course has a community learning component. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

399. Independent Study— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment. (0.5 - 1 course credit) –Staff

466. Teaching Assistantship— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment. (0.5 - 1 course credit) –Staff

497. Senior Thesis Part 2— The second semester of a capstone exercise for all theater and dance majors who do not elect the two-credit thesis option. Students will be required to present an original theatrical piece and to submit an accompanying paper as the culmination of their work in the Theater and Dance Department. (WEB) –Staff

499. Senior Thesis Part 2— An option available only to student with strong academic records in the major and proven ability to work independently. Individual topics to be selected by the student and approved by departmental faculty. It is expected that the thesis will consist of a substantial written component with a performance or public presentation which relates in some fundamental way to the written part of the thesis. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending for Part 1 in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion of Part 2 in the second semester.) (2 course credits) (WEB) –Staff

Courses Originating in Other Departments

Hispanic Studies 342. Latin American Theater— View course description in department listing on p. 650. Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 and one of the following: Hispanic Studies 261, 262, 263, or 264, or permission of instructor. –Melendez