Public Policy and Law

Associate Professor Fulco, director; participating faculty: Ahmed∙∙ (Economics), Bangser (Public Policy and Law), Brown (Philosophy), J. Chambers (Public Policy and Law), Keysar (Public Policy and Law), Kosmin (Public Policy and Law), Moskowitz (Public Policy and Law), Power (Theater and Dance), Schaller (Public Policy and Law), Silk (Religion), G. Smith (Political Science), Stater (Economics), B. Stevens (Public Policy and Law), T. Stevens (Public Policy and Law), Wade∙∙ (Philosophy, International Studies, and Public Policy and Law), and Williamson (Political Science and Public Policy and Law)

The public policy and law major—The public policy and law major is an interdisciplinary program in which students learn and practice methods and modes of thinking required to understand and become actively engaged in the analysis of legal and public policy issues. Grounded in the liberal arts, the program provides students with the tools of analysis in social science, law, and the humanities needed to understand the substance of public policy concerns. Trinity College is a particularly appropriate place to study public policy and law because students have ready access to state, regional, and local governments, as well as to lobbyists and numerous nonprofit and advocacy organizations involved in the making of law and policy.

For more details on the program’s faculty, requirements, and sources, visit its Web site at http://www.trincoll.edu/Academics/MajorsAndMinors/Policy/.

Requirements for the public policy and law major:

The public policy and law major requires 14 courses consisting of:

Students considering the public policy major are strongly urged to take ECON 101. Introduction to Economics, PBPL 123 Fundamentals of American Law, and POLS 102. American National Government prior to declaring the major. These two courses are important for understanding the basic elements of public policy debate and are a prerequisite for certain upper-level courses students may wish to elect later in the program. Only courses passed with a grade of C- or better will count toward the major.

Foundation courses (three courses)—All students must take the following courses. They are not sequential, but it is recommended that students take PBPL 201 first.

Core courses (four courses)—All students must take a course in each of four core areas.

Concentrations (three courses and a one-credit academic internship )—All students must select one of the concentrations specified below and take three courses from an approved list that are chosen in consultation with their adviser. Students must also complete an integrated internship in their area of concentration. One senior thesis credit may count as a concentration course.

Alternatively, students may, with the approval of their adviser and the director of the program, pursue a self-designed concentration.

The Writing Intensive Part II requirement is fulfilled by one of the following courses: PBPL 201, PBPL 202, PBPL 355, PBPL 401, PBPL 498, or PBPL 499.

Electives (two courses)—One quantitative elective and one cross-cultural elective must be selected from a list of courses made available to students each term.

Senior seminar—All students will take the 400-level current issues senior seminar, which serves as the senior exercise. The specific topics for the seminar will vary from year to year.

Thesis option: Students may elect to write a one-semester, one-course-credit senior thesis in their area of concentration. Only students who write a thesis will be considered for honors in the major.

Honors—An average of at least A- in courses counted toward the major, and a grade of A- or higher on a senior thesis. Students who fall just below the A- average may petition the program director on the basis of exceptional circumstances.

Study away—While there are many general programs of foreign study available to Trinity students, public policy majors interested in foreign study should be aware of The Swedish Program at Stockholm University, which was specially created “to develop an understanding of how organizations and public policy in Sweden address economic, political, and social issues relevant to all Western industrial societies.” The Center for European Studies at Maastricht, the Danish Institute for Study Abroad, and Washington Semester at American University also offer programs that are particularly well suited to Public Policy and Law majors. For additional information students should refer to the updated study aborad listings available at the Office of Study Away.

Fall Term

[113. Introduction to Law]— This course traces the development of law as a stabilizing force and instrument of peaceful change from the state of nature through the present day. Among the topics covered are the differences between civil law and common law systems, law and equity, substantive and procedural law, civil and criminal processes, and adversarial and inquisitorial systems. Federal trial and appellate courts, the role of counsel and the judge, and the function of the grand and petit juries are also studied. The doctrine of substantive due process is explored from its beginning through modern times, as are the antecedents and progeny of Griswold v. Connecticut. The Warren Court and its decisions in Miranda, Escobedo, Massiah, Mapp, Gideon, Gault, Baker, and Brown, as surveyed. Though not a course in constitutional law, the role of the U.S. Constitution as the blueprint of a democratic, federated republic, and as the supreme law of the land, is examined. There is some emphasis on the fourth, fifth, sixth, eighth, and 14th amendments. Students are exposed to conflicting views on controversial issues such as capital punishment, gay rights, abortion, and rights of the criminally accused. (Enrollment limited)

123. Fundamentals of American Law— This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the United States legal system. Core topics covered include: sources of law; the role of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in the creation, implementation, and interpretation of laws ; state and federal judicial systems; civil and criminal cases; trial and appellate process; criminal law and procedure; elements of due process; safeguarding the rights of the accused; current issues confronting the criminal justice system; and an overview of torts, contracts and alternate dispute resolution. The course will also focus on legal ethics and emerging trends in the legal profession. Students will learn to read and analyze case law and statutes and acquire substantive techniques for legal writing and oral presentations. (Enrollment limited) –Chambers, Fulco, Stevens

201. Introduction to American Public Policy— This course introduces students to the formal and informal processes through which American public policy is made. They will study the constitutional institutions of government and the distinct role each branch of the national government plays in the policy-making process, and also examine the ways in which informal institutions-political parties, the media, and political lobbyists-contribute to and shape the policy process. This course is only open to sophomores and juniors. (SOC) (Enrollment limited) –Fulco

220. Research and Evaluation— Which policy interventions actually work and which fail to meet their goals? Answering this question is essential to improving public and non-profit services and securing further funding for worthwhile projects. This course aims to give students the ability to comprehend policy research and evaluation, as well as the tools to design and conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them to design evaluations or analyze data to assess the effectiveness of policies. Topics will include data analysis using statistical software, but no previous programming experience is necessary. Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, and permission of instructor. (NUM) (Enrollment limited) –Moskowitz

245. Title IX: Changing Campus Culture— This course will explore the legal and policy implications of the new Title IX federal guidelines as they apply to sexual misconduct on college campuses. Students will attend four seminar sessions that consider how best to devise and implement effective policies aimed at: reducing incidents of sexual misconduct on college campuses; protecting the legal rights of both the accuser and the accused; and ensuring that institutions of higher education are in full compliance with new federal and state mandates. Students have the option either to undertake an independent research project in the form of a policy memo or to enroll in the CT State certification program for sexual assault counseling and advocacy held weekly throughout the Fall term on the Trinity campus. (0.5 course credit) (Enrollment limited) –Fulco, Power

[263. Art and the Public Good]— Is art a public good? Is government good for art? Students will explore these questions by examining what happens when U.S. taxpayer dollars are used to fund the arts. Course topics will include: the depression era federal arts projects and the dream of a “cultural democracy” that inspired them; the State Department’s export of art across the globe during the Cold War era; the legal and congressional battles over offensive art that threatened to shut down the National Endowment for the Arts during the 1990s; and former Mayor Giuliani’s attempt to withdraw funding from the Brooklyn Museum of Art following public outcry over a provocative depiction of the Virgin Mary. (ART) (Enrollment limited)

264. Urban Policy and Politics in America— This course focuses on the development of urban policies and politics and their impact on urban America. Adopting both a historical and contemporary perspective on these issues will help us understand how the historical development of cities and specific policy choices shaped the urban problems and conflicts we see today. We will also study how the distribution of urban power affects urban policy outcomes. In addition, we will explore many contemporary urban policy issues, including public education, criminal justice, public housing, neighborhood decline, preservation, and gentrification, as well as downtown economic redevelopment. Central to these urban challenges are issues of race, ethnicity, equality, and fairness. We will consider how current policies may generate both potential solutions and new unintended problems for urban America. Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, or permission of instructor (SOC) (Enrollment limited) –Moskowitz

323. The Legal History of Race Relations— This course will examine the interaction between the American social and legal systems in the treatment of race relations. The seminar will analyze major Supreme Court cases on equal rights and race relations with an emphasis on the historical and social contexts in which the decisions were rendered. The Socratic method will be used for many of the classes, placing importance on classroom discussion among the students and the lecturer. The goals of the course are to expose the students to the basis of the legal system and the development of civil rights legislations sharpen legal and critical analysis, improve oral expression, and develop a concise and persuasive writing style. Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 113, 123, or 201 or permission of instructor. (SOC) (Enrollment limited) –Fulco, Stevens

328. Constitutional Foundation of Public Policy— This course will examine the history, methods, and types of successful, formal, written argumentation in policy advocacy. Among the arenas explored will be courts of law, legislative bodies, and the broader field of public opinion. Most course material will be drawn from case studies. Prerequisite: Political Science 102, Public Policy and Law 201, or Public Policy and Law 202. (SOC) (Enrollment limited) –Fulco, Horowitz

[331. Becoming American: Immigration and Integration Policy]— Critics of immigration argue that a growing foreign-born population endangers economic health, threatens democratic traditions, and undermines cultural unity. Proponents respond that immigration is central to America’s national identity and crucial for prosperity. This course examines popular and scholarly debates over immigration and immigrant adaptation and analyzes the efficacy of U.S. policies aimed at managing this process. Topics include U.S. border security, the increased state and local regulation of immigration, and the DREAM Act, a proposal that would offer certain undocumented youth a path toward legal status. Course assignments will emphasize persuasive writing and communication for a policymaking audience, including memos and briefings. This course has a community learning component. Prerequisite: C- or better in either Political Science 102 or Public Policy and Law 201, or permission of instructor. (SOC) (Enrollment limited)

343. Topics in Bioethics— The aim of this seminar is to reflect critically on the ethical dimensions of rapid and profound developments in medicine and biotechnology and on the public policies that are evolving to deal with them. Topics will be chosen from among the following: the doctor-patient relationship, genetic research, therapy and enhancement, reproductive rights and technology, the ownership of human biological materials, medical decisions at the beginning and end of life, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, or permission of instructor (SOC) (Enrollment limited) –Brown, Fulco

[350. Inside the Nonprofit Sector]— This course will provide students with a firm grounding in the role of the nonprofit sector (also called the independent, third, or voluntary sector) in American public policy and community life. Topics to be studied include: the nature and role of the nonprofit sector; what makes the nonprofit sector distinctive; current challenges facing the nonprofit sector; the role of foundations and other sources of philanthropic giving; and assessment of the effectiveness of nonprofit organizations. Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, and permission of instructor. (WEB) (Enrollment limited)

352. Art and the Public Good— Is art a public good? Is government good for art? Students will explore these questions by examining what happens when U.S. taxpayer dollars are used to fund the arts. Course topics will include: the depression era federal arts projects and the dream of a “cultural democracy” that inspired them; the State Department’s export of art across the globe during the Cold War era; the legal and congressional battles over offensive art that threatened to shut down the National Endowment for the Arts during the 1990s; and former Mayor Giuliani’s attempt to withdraw funding from the Brooklyn Museum of Art following public outcry over a provocative depiction of the Virgin Mary. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Power

398. Public Policy and Law Internship and Seminar— The required internship is designed to: (1) To provide students with the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to the work of an organization concerned with the making of public policy; (2) To engage students in academic projects directly linked to the internship experience and their areas of concentration in the major. To enroll in the internship students need the permission of a faculty member, who will supervise the academic work. (Enrollment limited) –Bangser

399. Independent Study— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment. (1 - 2 course credits) –Staff

466. Teaching Assistantship— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment. (0.5 - 1 course credit) –Staff

490. Research Assistantship— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment. –Staff

497. Senior Thesis— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.) (WEB) –Staff

498. Public Policy and Law Thesis and Colloquium— This course is designed to teach senior Public Policy and Law majors how to write a year long honors thesis. The course is designed to provide support and structure to the process of writing a thesis. Students will formulate a research question, undertake a review of the literature, develop strategies to organize their work, and familiarize themselves with the appropriate Library and Internet sources. Students will also make oral presentations of their work. This course is required of all senior Public Policy and Law majors who are writing an honors thesis. (2 course credits) (WEB) (Enrollment limited) –Fulco

Students must consult with their adviser to discuss the appropriateness of particular graduate courses.

Graduate Courses

800. Introduction to PUblic Policy— This is the introductory course in public policy. It builds on the notion than an interesting reason to study public policy is that public policy making is about problem solving. It introduces and examines issues such as how we think society is better in one state than another; what means should we use to solve problems; what is government’s appropriate role in society; how should the public be engaged in solving common problems. The course will be taught from the perspective of what researchers tell us about the theory and process of making public policy, and how practitioners go about solving problems. The interesting question is whether theory informs practice, or the contrary. Or are the theory and practice of public policy making truly different? The course will explain the roles of certain government institutions and “actors” such as elected officials, appointed public managers, interest group leaders, citizens, and the media in the public policy process. An integral part of the course involves learning how to write in a concise, well-reasoned, professional manner by producing policy memos pertaining to public sector case studies as discussed in class. –Feldman

808. Constitutional Foundations of Public Policy— This course will examine the history, methods, and types of successful, formal, written argumentation in policy advocacy. Among the arenas explored will be courts of law, legislative bodies, and the broader field of public opinion. Most course material will be drawn from case studies. –Fulco, Horowitz

[810. Public Finance]— Prerequisite: B- or better in Public Policy 801

827. Education Law— This course is designed for those interested in an introduction to and overview of education law. It will provide a survey of statute and case law related to the structure and organization of schools and districts, constitutional law in schools, teacher and student rights, special education, and school finance. Our discussions will focus not only on the legal foundations but the social implications of education law. Of particular note will be the ways in which law can both help and inhibit efforts to build greater equity in education. –Ellis

[828. Theory of Democratic Institutions]— The course applies social choice theory to the study of four components of democratic policy making; voting, political strategy, theories of governance, and bureaucracy. The course emphasizes weekly readings and in-class discussion of central themes in the literature. Examination of the formal properties of voting rules leads to a deeper understanding of representation and political outcomes. The analysis of institutions offers lessons on the problems of delegation, policy design, implementation, and democratic administration.

[832. Contemporary Issues in Education Policy]— Education policy is constantly shifting and is influenced by myriad social and political factors. This course examines the role of public education in American society and employs a sociological lens to the various factors influencing public education. It will follow contemporary trends in education policy at the national, state, and local level. Frequent guest speakers will provide context and perspectives on how contemporary issues are affecting various stakeholders in the area of public education.

836. Moral Theory and Public Policy— The purpose of this course is to assist students in acquiring the skill in ethical reasoning and analysis needed for mature participation in society’s continuing debates over moral issues of public concern. The course will begin by examining some types of ethical theories and will proceed to consider a number of controversial social issues. Abortion, euthanasia, racial and sexual discrimination, world hunger, treatment of animals, and capital punishment are among the topics to be considered. (HUM) –Wade

840. Budget Management and Public Policy— This course will focus on the practical aspects of pubic budgeting, finance, and financial management in the policy making process. It will begin with the “how to’s” of budget development, from estimating and projecting revenues to deconstructing expenditures in order to develop the best estimates. Where appropriate, elements of public finance theory will be introduced and discussed as it relates to practical budget and financial management Both the bonding process and the complications related to third party service provision will be addressed. We will utilize practical tools for budget and financial management, such as results-based accountability, performance contracting, and reviewing budget to actual data together with projected to actual service data on a regular basis. –Schack

846. Policy Analysis— In policy analysis, we focus on the problems of empirical policy analysis: defining the problem, framing the questions to be answered, picking the location and scope of the study, selecting the metrics of analysis, aligning metrics with public values, collecting evidence, and transforming the evidence into data. The readings and weekly discussions are avenues for students to query themselves on the problems they must solve to advance their own research agendas. Students will complete a major project in empirical policy analysis. Enrollment limited. –Fotos III

[858. Alt Paradigms for Health Care]— In light of widespread recognition that providing high quality, affordable healthcare to everyone is not possible within the current, fragmented system, this course will focus on national, state, and local policy implications of alternative paradigms for addressing this dysfunctional situation. After studying the nature, causes, and implications of the current health and healthcare debacle in the U.S., students will develop their own paradigms for creating more sustainable, equitable, efficient, and effective approaches for addressing current problems, and then develop policy approaches and prescriptions for fostering the paradigm that they wish to propose.

[872. The Least Dangerous Branch Revisited: 2014-2015 Term]— Over the past 40 years, the Supreme Court has been called upon to resolve many important and often controversial public policy questions. The 2014-2015 is no exception, and the Court will issue opinions that determine the fate of the Affordable Care Act, the status of same-sex marriage, and the constitutionality of lethal injections as a means of carrying out the death penalty. The purpose of this course is three-fold: (1) to familiarize students with the role of the Supreme Court as a policy making institution; and (2) to use decisions in the current term, several of which will be handed down during the time our course will meet in June and July, as a means of assessing the scope of the Court’s power to shape public policy in areas where there is little political consensus. Readings will include texts and articles on the role of the Supreme Court and several of the cases decided this term.

This course can substitute for PBPL 808, Constitutional Foundations of Public Policy.

891. Health Policy— This course addresses current major U.S. health policy issues and the critical processes and forces that shape them. Major health policy issues addressed include: Medicare, Medicaid, the uninsured, public health, the impact of welfare policy on health care, managed care development and regulation, state and federal health care reform and others. The course discusses the politics of health policy in terms of legislative and executive processes at the state and federal level; key forces involved including economic, social, ethical and political factors; and central players of importance, including special interest groups, lobbyists, the press, elected officials, legislative staff and public agencies. –Hughes

940. Independent Study— Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. (1 - 2 course credits) –Staff

953. Research Project— A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. –Staff

954. Thesis Part I— Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, “final” first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes. –Staff

955. Thesis Part II— –Staff

956. Thesis— (2 course credits) –Staff

Courses Originating in Other Departments

Economics 217. Economics of Health and Health Care— View course description in department listing on p. 372. Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101. –Helming

Economics 334. Law and Economics— View course description in department listing on p. 376. Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301. –Helming

[International Studies 249. Immigrants and Refugees: Strangers in Strange Lands]— View course description in department listing on p. 577.

[International Studies 250L. Hartford Global Migration Lab]— View course description in department listing on p. 578. Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in International Studies 249 or 250.

Philosophy 246. Human Rights: Philosophical Foundations, Issues, and Debates— View course description in department listing on p. 717. –Marcano

Political Science 301. American Political Parties— View course description in department listing on p. 754. Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102. –Evans

[Political Science 316. Constitutional Law II: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties]— View course description in department listing on p. 754. Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, and permission of instructor.

[Political Science 412. The Politics of Judicial Policy Making]— View course description in department listing on p. 757.

Religion 267. Religion and the Media— View course description in department listing on p. 811. –Silk

Spring Term

[113. Introduction to Law]— This course traces the development of law as a stabilizing force and instrument of peaceful change from the state of nature through the present day. Among the topics covered are the differences between civil law and common law systems, law and equity, substantive and procedural law, civil and criminal processes, and adversarial and inquisitorial systems. Federal trial and appellate courts, the role of counsel and the judge, and the function of the grand and petit juries are also studied. The doctrine of substantive due process is explored from its beginning through modern times, as are the antecedents and progeny of Griswold v. Connecticut. The Warren Court and its decisions in Miranda, Escobedo, Massiah, Mapp, Gideon, Gault, Baker, and Brown, as surveyed. Though not a course in constitutional law, the role of the U.S. Constitution as the blueprint of a democratic, federated republic, and as the supreme law of the land, is examined. There is some emphasis on the fourth, fifth, sixth, eighth, and 14th amendments. Students are exposed to conflicting views on controversial issues such as capital punishment, gay rights, abortion, and rights of the criminally accused. (Enrollment limited)

123. Fundamentals of American Law— This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the United States legal system. Core topics covered include: sources of law; the role of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in the creation, implementation, and interpretation of laws ; state and federal judicial systems; civil and criminal cases; trial and appellate process; criminal law and procedure; elements of due process; safeguarding the rights of the accused; current issues confronting the criminal justice system; and an overview of torts, contracts and alternate dispute resolution. The course will also focus on legal ethics and emerging trends in the legal profession. Students will learn to read and analyze case law and statutes and acquire substantive techniques for legal writing and oral presentations. (Enrollment limited) –Chambers, Stevens

201. Introduction to American Public Policy— This course introduces students to the formal and informal processes through which American public policy is made. They will study the constitutional institutions of government and the distinct role each branch of the national government plays in the policy-making process, and also examine the ways in which informal institutions-political parties, the media, and political lobbyists-contribute to and shape the policy process. This course is only open to sophomores and juniors. (SOC) (Enrollment limited) –Moskowitz

202. Law, Argument, and Public Policy— In this course, students will study legal reasoning and the myriad ways in which legal arguments influence the making of American public policy. They will learn how to structure a legal argument and identify key facts and issues, analyze the formal process through which legal cases unfold (including jurisdiction, standing, and the rules of evidence), and examine how rules of law, which define policy choices and outcomes, develop out of a series of cases. Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or Economics 247,or Public Policy and Law majors, or permission of instructor. (SOC) (Enrollment limited) –Cabot

220. Research and Evaluation— Which policy interventions actually work and which fail to meet their goals? Answering this question is essential to improving public and non-profit services and securing further funding for worthwhile projects. This course aims to give students the ability to comprehend policy research and evaluation, as well as the tools to design and conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them to design evaluations or analyze data to assess the effectiveness of policies. Topics will include data analysis using statistical software, but no previous programming experience is necessary. Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, and permission of instructor. (NUM) (Enrollment limited) –Moskowitz

[251. The Judicial Process: Courts and Public Policy]— This course examines the evolution of the judicial process in America and the role of the courts as policy makers. We will study civil and criminal courts at both the state and federal level as well as the functions of judges, lawyers, litigants, and other actors. We will also consider how the courts make policy in areas such as the war on terrorism, the right to privacy, gay and lesbian rights, and the rights of the accused. Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science102 and Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor. (SOC) (Enrollment limited)

[302. Law and Environmental Policy]— The course emphasizes how and why American environmental law has developed over the preceding three decades as a primary tool to achieve environmental goals. Topics include the analysis of policy options, “command-and-control” regulation, modification of liability rules, pollution prevention through non-regulatory means, and the environmental aspects of U.S. energy policies in relation to petroleum, electricity, and transportation. The course concludes by addressing transnational environmental issues such as atmospheric change, burgeoning population growth, depletion of forests and species, sustainable development, and the role of international legal institutions in relation to these pressing problems. Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor. (SOC) (Enrollment limited)

303. The Real World of Policy Implementation— Implementation, sometimes called the hidden chapter in public policy, will be explored primarily using case studies describing the practical realities of what happens after a statute is passed, a regulation is issued, a court decision is handed down, or a public or nonprofit agency decides on a course of action. The cases will be drawn primarily from areas such as education, health care, children’s issues, housing and economic development, and civil rights. They will include examples from the Hartford area and around the country in which the professor and/or guest speakers have participated. Class discussions and related exercises will emphasize students’ ability to frame the salient policy and implementation challenges, identify the strengths and weaknesses of potential solutions, and present and defend their recommendations to decision makers (e.g., legislators, agency officials, and judges). Permission of the instructor is required for enrollment. Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor. (Enrollment limited) –Bangser

[335. Pandemics, Emerging Diseases, and the Public’s Health]— This course examines critical issues in public health - arising from both national and global events (such as the recent outbreak of Ebola) - from the viewpoints of public health law, ethics, and public policy. The course will explore policy implications of epidemics and chronic diseases that beset the world’s most vulnerable populations. The course will also consider the public health problems that many people in our own country face on a day-to-day basis. Questions include: What issues should be considered public health problems? What is our responsibility to people outside as well as inside the U.S.? The objective of the course is to provide a sound basis for applying ethical principles, along with law and public policy, to public health problems. (SOC) (Enrollment limited)

[348. Constitutional Law and Advocacy]— In this course teams of students will brief and argue landmark cased in constitutional law that were decided by a Supreme Court dominated by justices appointed by President Richard M. Nixon, who was elected in 1968 and impeached in 1974. A strong case can be made that he had a greater influence on the development of constitutional law than any president or justice of the 20th century. The tests for the course will be the cased themselves: the full opinions, the actual briefs submitted by opposing counsel and transcripts or recordings of the actual oral argument before the Supreme Court. Teams of students will do in-depth research on major cases to explore the social background against which they were decided and the immediate and long-term consequences of the decisions themselves. (Enrollment limited)

[351. Managing Diversity in the City]— Drawing on literature related to federalism, urban politics, and state and local policy, this course will examine how cities have responded to diverse newcomers, from the early twentieth century’s machine politics, through the Great Migration of African-Americans to northern cities, to the dispersion of new immigrant populations since the late 1980s. Using this historical perspective, we will consider how local policies shape processes of social and political incorporation, as well as how the presence of newcomers shapes the on-going development of local policies. The course will incorporate case studies of policy decision-making, devoting particular attention to the city of Hartford. This course has a community learning component. Prerequisite: C+ or better in Political Science 102 or Public Policy and Law 201, or consent of instructor. (SOC) (Enrollment limited)

377. Law, Gender, and the Supreme Court— This course introduces students to contemporary gender issues as they have been treated both in the law and in the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. We will explore some of the historical antecedents to contemporary legal gender questions and then examine in detail the following areas of controversy: sex discrimination, marriage equality, reproductive rights, and Title IX. Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, or permission of instructor (Enrollment limited) –Fulco

[398. Public Policy and Law Internship and Seminar]— The required internship is designed to: (1) To provide students with the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to the work of an organization concerned with the making of public policy; (2) To engage students in academic projects directly linked to the internship experience and their areas of concentration in the major. To enroll in the internship students need the permission of a faculty member, who will supervise the academic work.

399. Independent Study— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment. (1 - 2 course credits) –Staff

401. Current Issues: The Supreme Court and Public Policy— This seminar will focus on the Supreme Court in transition. We will explore competing theories of constitutional interpretation that have characterized the Rehnquist court and examine specific cases that are representative of the court’s work. We will study contending theories of the Supreme Court’s role in our constitutional framework, and we will consider how new appointees to the court may shift the balance in important areas of jurisprudence that have become increasingly contentious, especially with respect to issues of personal autonomy, affirmative action, and national security. This course is only open to senior Public Policy and Law majors. (Enrollment limited) –Fulco

407. Power, Values, and Making American Public Policy and Law— Politicians often speak in sweeping and contradictory generalities, but once elected or appointed to public office, they must govern. Using case studies developed at the Kennedy School of Government, this course will explore how officials make tough choices in specific cases. Students will refine their own views of complex ethical/public policy issues and learn how advocates achieve results through the American political process. Controversial issues will include: what obligations government owes to the least among us,’ the line between a candidate’s personal privacy and the duty of full disclosure, and the use of lies and distortions in campaigns, the media and in the confirmation of a justice of the Supreme Court. Special attention will be devoted to the question of how public opinion is formed and the role of mass media in that process. This course is open only to Public Policy and Law majors. (WEB) (Enrollment limited) –Cabot

[411. Journalism and the Public Good in America]— Alexis de Tocqueville considered newspapers essential to democracy in America, but from the days of Cotton Mather and John Peter Zenger to those of Fox News and WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange, the news media have been a source of controversy and contention. This seminar will explore the place of journalism in American civic life by examining both the history of the law governing journalistic enterprise and the evolution of the news media as social and political actors. Topics to be discussed will include the nature of news, libel law, national security as a basis for censorship, public reason, the economics of journalism, and the new media environment. Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor. (Enrollment limited)

466. Teaching Assistantship— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment. (0.5 - 1 course credit) –Staff

490. Research Assistantship— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment. –Staff

497. Senior Thesis— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.) (WEB) –Staff

[499. Senior Thesis Part 2]— (2 course credits) (WEB)

Graduate Courses

806. Methods of Research— This course is intended to empower students to evaluate common forms of research critically, and to give them some experience in conducting research. Through a series of weekly assignments and class projects, students will be introduced to the shaping of research questions; hypothesis testing, writing a research paper, conducting interviews and surveys, giving a professional presentation, and presenting simple tabular data to prove a point. The course does not require an extensive mathematics background. Regular attendance and access to a computer, e-mail, and the Internet are expected. –Schack

808. Constitutional Foundations of Public Policy— This course will examine the history, methods, and types of successful, formal, written argumentation in policy advocacy. Among the arenas explored will be courts of law, legislative bodies, and the broader field of public opinion. Most course material will be drawn from case studies. –Horowitz

[822. American Economic History and Public Policy]— This course attempts to provide the student with a basic yet thorough understanding of the growth and development of the American economy. At the outset of the course, we will discuss the role and importance of economic history and the methodology of economic historians. We will then study the colonial economy, the early national and antebellum years, the reunification era, the emergence of a modern U.S. economy, and the development of the post-WWII economy up to the present. The analysis will focus on key economic sectors - agriculture, commerce, money and banking, labor, government - and their growth and development.

825. Policy Implementation— Implementation is the action step in the public policy process that arguably is the most challenging and complex to do. It is the key to making something happen and is often the gauge the public uses to determine the overall effectiveness of government, in its broadest terms. This course is devoted exclusively to the study of policy implementation from the relevant literature, theoretical constructs, and the practical issues of attempting to implement public policy that often has vague and conflicting policy goals and inadequate resources. Students will examine a current public policy that was adopted by a town/city government in the Greater Hartford area, will ascertain whether the policy was implemented, analyze the challenges involved in the implementation, and meet and question government leaders involved in the policy implementation effort. The class will be conducted as a seminar, with fieldwork as necessary. A major research paper that reviews and analyzes the success of the town/city government in implementing the adopted policy studied during the semester comprises an important end product of the course. –Feldman

828. Theory of Democratic Institutions— The course applies social choice theory to the study of four components of democratic policy making; voting, political strategy, theories of governance, and bureaucracy. The course emphasizes weekly readings and in-class discussion of central themes in the literature. Examination of the formal properties of voting rules leads to a deeper understanding of representation and political outcomes. The analysis of institutions offers lessons on the problems of delegation, policy design, implementation, and democratic administration. –Fotos III

[833. Introduction to Urban Planning]— This course provides an overview of urban planning. Students will be introduced to key theories and concepts as well as methods and empirical case studies in this multidimensional field. Lectures and seminar discussions concentrate on applications of urban planning theories and concepts as practiced by urban planners. Topics discussed in the course may include regional, environmental, metropolitan, transportation, spatial, and land-use planning issues. Empirical emphasis is expected to be on Hartford and other Connecticut cities, but the course may discuss other American or international urban areas. The course is an elective geared toward public policy graduate students with an interest in urban policy, regardless of their track. This course may be of interest to American studies graduate students as well (permission of adviser required).

[835. Pandemics, Emerging Diseases, and the Public’s Health]— This course examines critical issues in public health - arising from both national and global events (such as the recent outbreak of Ebola) - from the viewpoints of public health law, ethics, and public policy. The course will explore policy implications of epidemics and chronic diseases that beset the world’s most vulnerable populations. The course will also consider the public health problems that many people in our own country face on a day-to-day basis. Questions include: What issues should be considered public health problems? What is our responsibility to people outside as well as inside the U.S.? The objective of the course is to provide a sound basis for applying ethical principles, along with law and public policy, to public health problems. (SOC)

[846. Policy Analysis]— In policy analysis, we focus on the problems of empirical policy analysis: defining the problem, framing the questions to be answered, picking the location and scope of the study, selecting the metrics of analysis, aligning metrics with public values, collecting evidence, and transforming the evidence into data. The readings and weekly discussions are avenues for students to query themselves on the problems they must solve to advance their own research agendas. Students will complete a major project in empirical policy analysis. Enrollment limited.

[854. Leading Issues in Bioethics, Public Policy, and Law]— This course examines leading issues in bioethics, public policy, and law in relation to recent developments in medicine, public health, and the life sciences. After tracing the historical background of bioethical issues and law and deciding on methods of legal and ethical analysis, we will consider how issues in contemporary medicine, public health, and science challenge traditional ethical principles as well as existing law and public policy. Among other topics, we will explore the tension between traditional biomedical ethics, centering on individual autonomy, and the public health model, focusing on the common good. Recent and ongoing legal cases and controversies will be closely followed along with other current developments in bioethics.

[866. State and Local Policy and Politics]— State and local governments play a vital role in governing, policy innovation, and the delivery of services in the United States. Their importance has arguably increased in recent decades with the trend toward devolution of government to the state and local levels, the use of referenda, and the central role of states in battles over social issues. In this course we will review available social science research to consider the central issues and challenges of governance at the state and local levels. We will examine differences between states’ political cultures and their implications for public policy, compare federal versus state and local provision of social services, and consider the significance of the use of redistricting, recalls, referenda and initiatives in political struggles across the country.

940. Independent Study— Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. (1 - 2 course credits) –Staff

953. Research Project— A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. –Staff

954. Thesis Part I— Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, “final” first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes. –Staff

955. Thesis Part II— –Staff

956. Thesis— (2 course credits) –Staff

Courses Originating in Other Departments

[Classical Civilization 242. Kings, Tyrants, Emperors: Autocracy in the Greek and Roman World]— View course description in department listing on p. 334.

[Economics 217. Economics of Health and Health Care]— View course description in department listing on p. 379. Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.

[Economics 247. Introduction to Policy Analysis]— View course description in department listing on p. 380. Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.

[Educational Studies 309. Race, Class, and Educational Policy]— View course description in department listing on p. 397. Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or permission of instructor.

History 270. Parliamentary Debate in History and Practice— View course description in department listing on p. 539. –Regan-Lefebvre

[International Studies 250. Global Migration]— View course description in department listing on p. 585.

[International Studies 250L. Hartford Global Migration Lab]— View course description in department listing on p. 585. Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in International Studies 249 or 250.

[Philosophy 215. Medical Ethics]— View course description in department listing on p. 722.

Philosophy 246. Human Rights: Philosophical Foundations, Issues, and Debates— View course description in department listing on p. 723. –Marcano

Political Science 344. Politics of Africa— View course description in department listing on p. 762. Prerequisite: C- or better Political Science 103 or permission of instructor. –Kamola

[Women, Gender, and Sexuality 301. Western Feminist Thought]— View course description in department listing on p. 864. Prerequisite: C- or better in one other course in Women Gender and Sexuality.