International Studies Program

George and Martha Kellner Chair in South Asian History and Professor of International Studies Prashad, Director; Professor Baker, Paul E. Raether Distinguished Professor of Global Urban Studies and Sociology Chen, Professors Desmangles and Euraque, Scott M. Johnson ’97 Distinguished Professor of Religion Findly, Paul E. Raether Distinguished Professor of Urban International Studies Myers, Professors Wade∙∙ and Wen; Associate Professors Antrim and Bauer; Assistant Professors Markle and Shen; Principal Lecturer Wagoner

The International Studies Program examines the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and their institutions. Since 1969, the program has trained students to analyze the variety of human experience and to consider the challenges posed to our planet by our current circumstances and history. Because of the breadth of its purview, the program asks students to choose from one of two pathways through the major: either the study of one of five world regions (Africa; Asia; Caribbean and Latin America; Middle East; or Russia and Eurasia) or the study of global interrelations with a disciplinary or thematic focus (global studies).

All majors, whether following the area studies or the global studies pathway, must take at least one course from the program’s “global core” (global studies majors take three); complete a minimum of four semesters of study in a single language other than English; complete at least one semester (or summer) of college-level study abroad; and cap their major with the INTS 401. Senior Seminar in International Studies. Area studies majors must also take at least five courses relevant to their world region from across the Trinity curriculum, and global studies majors must choose between a disciplinary or thematic focus cluster and a comparative regions option.

Language—International studies majors are required to engage in sustained college-level language study by completing a minimum of four semesters of credit-bearing work in a single language other than English after matriculating at Trinity. One semester (or one summer) of intensive language acquisition on a study-away program counts toward this requirement as a single semester, regardless of the number of credits earned. Language courses beyond the four semester requirement may count toward the major as electives or, in some cases, as area courses. Students following the area studies pathway should select a language from the region under study in consultation with their international studies advisers.

Study away—International studies majors are required to complete at least one semester (or summer) of college-level study outside of the United States, typically by completion of an accredited study-away program selected with the aid of international studies faculty and the Office of Study Away staff. In certain cases, students may, in consultation with their international studies advisers, fulfill this requirement by completing a course with a community learning component or a globally inflected internship in the United States.

Credits and grades—Students must earn 10 credits to complete the major (students pursuing honors earn 11). Language courses applied toward the four-semester minimum are not counted in the total credits required for the major. No course taken toward the 10- or 11-credit major may be taken pass/fail or completed with a grade of less than C-. No more than three transfer credits may be applied toward the credit count for the major, and all required courses at the 300 level or above must be taken at Trinity.

Honors—To earn honors, international studies majors must complete a one-credit honors thesis with a grade of A or A- and must attain an A- average overall in their 11-credit major. Students pursuing honors will ordinarily take INTS 401. Senior Seminar in International Studies in the fall of their senior year and the one-credit honors thesis in the spring. Applications for the honors thesis are made available each year on the Web site and in Jennifer Fichera’s office in McCook 202, and are typically due to the International Studies Program director in early November.

Curricular requirements

All international studies majors must fulfill the following core requirements:

Fall Term

[101. Understanding the History, Culture and Politics of Latin America & the Caribbean]— This interdisciplinary course explores major historical themes and contemporary cultural and political topics related to Latin American and Caribbean societies and cultures. The goal is for the students to acquire a panoramic view of the Latin America and the Caribbean worlds while acquiring a deeper understanding of various issues that are explored more deeply in other upper-division courses at Trinity. We will engage issues of demography, geography, basis historical periods processes, particular anthropological and cultural debates, fundamental political and gender, sociological approaches to daily life, aesthetic and literary movements, and the regions’ positions within the historic and contemporary world economy. Open to all students, this course is required of INTS majors with a Caribbean and Latin American Studies focus. (GLB2) (Enrollment limited)

[121. Modern South Asia]— A close examination of the contemporary history of South Asia will allow us to study the dynamic and complex worlds of the South Asian subcontinent. Booming economies combined with violent political events, vast malls next to vast slums — the contradictions are apparent and cliched. In this course we will go beneath the stereotypes and study the social processes at work in modern South Asia through a reading of historical and journalistic texts, government reports and novels. (GLB5) (Enrollment limited)

[131. Modern Iran]— This course provides an introduction to 20th-century Iranian society, culture, and politics, examining secular and religious debates over gender roles, modernity, Islamism, democracy, and the West. (GLB) (Enrollment limited)

202. Pacific Asia’s Fall and Resurgence: An Economic Response to Western Challenge— Although the prospect for many developing economics has been very dim, economics in East Asia have thrived since 1945. The next century is likely to be the Pacific century. The most recent evidence of this possibility comes from China, the awakening giant with enormous potential. In an era of accelerating integration and globalization, it is important to understand how and why the Pacific Asian economies have been able to respond to the modernization challenges from the West. Topics to be discussed include: East Asia’s geographical characteristics, the early experience of interaction between this region and the West, the various modernization efforts in the region from an historical perspective, the similarities and differences in the responses of the main economies in the region to Western challenges, the competition and integration among these economies, especially between China, the emerging economic power, and its neighbors including Japan, and their interaction with the rest of the world, particularly with the U.S. today. This course is designed for non-economics majors and has no economics. (GLB5) (Enrollment limited) –Wen

[205. War on Terror]— 9/11 inaugurated a new epoch not only for the United States, but decidedly for the world. Tentacular wars of and on terror stretched from Afghanistan into Yemen, from Madrid into Bali. This course will offer a social history of the war on terror. We will explore the roots of the war on terror in the histories of Afghanistan and Yemen, and plot the switch from the prehistory of the War on Terror (1993-2001) to the War on Terror Part 1 (2001-2007) to the War on Terror Part 2 (2007 to the present). (GLB) (Enrollment limited)

[208. Geography of Mexico]— This course is a comprehensive introduction to the geography of Mexico, a country marked by great extremes: metropolitan areas and thick rainforests; stunning resorts and steaming sweatshops; a handful of billionaires and millions in extreme poverty. We will examine these contrasts by focusing on topics such as uneven development, migration, climate change, violence and security, biodiversity protection, and indigenous movements. We will pay particular attention to why geography matters in the study of political, social, and environmental change in Mexico. (GLB2) (Enrollment limited)

212. Global Politics— This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East. (GLB5) (Enrollment limited) –Baker

213. Worldly Islam, The Sacred and the Secular— This course explores the diverse domestic, regional, and international politics of the Islamic world. A rich historical perspective illuminates contemporary political struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human rights and needs. (Also offered under Political Science and Middle Eastern Studies.) (GLB) (Enrollment limited) –Baker

[215. Central Asia in Transition]— This course investigates contemporary Central Asia as a specific context of postsocialist and postcolonial transition to independent statehood in the aftermath of global Cold War politics. Until 1990, Central Asia was considered a remote part of the Soviet Union and was little known to the outside world. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan emerged as modern, independent nation-states and were promptly integrated into global processes through Western initiatives for democratization and market reforms, oil and gas exploitation, and the American-led war on terrorism. Our major goal is to understand Central Asian societies and postsocialist changes from the perspective of communities themselves and see how these refract through the lenses of age, gender, ethnicity, and religion. (GLB2) (Enrollment limited)

[218. Women, Gender, and Family in the Middle East]— As an introduction to the lives of women in the men’s world’ of the Middle East, this course examines the impact of global sociopolitical and economic transformations on gender relations, sexuality, adolescence, family structure, local culture, and feminist movements across the Middle East and North Africa. Case studies survey male and female perspectives in a variety of ethnic/religious communities (Muslim, Jewish, Christian) and types of societies (Bedouin, agricultural, urban). (GLB5) (Enrollment limited)

[234. Gender and Education]— What is gender equity in schooling and what impact does this have on gender equity more broadly? Different disciplinary perspectives on the impact of gender in learning, school experience, performance and achievement will be explored in elementary, secondary, post-secondary, and informal educational settings. The legal and public policy implications of these findings (such as gender-segregated schooling, men’s and women’s studies programs, curriculum reform, Title IX, affirmative action and other proposed remedies) will be explored. Findings on socialization and schooling in the U.S. will be contrasted with those from other cultures. (GLB) (Enrollment limited)

237. 20th-Century Chinese Literature— A survey of modern Chinese literature, 1918-2000. We will study three major periods of the 20th century: 1918-1949, 1949-1976, and 1976 to the present. The course will concentrate on the work of writers such as Lu Xun, Yu Dafu, Eileen Chang (Zhang Ailing), Xu Zhimo, Mao Dun, Shen Congwen, Bei Dao, Yu Hua, Su Tong, and Wang Anyi. Students will be introduced to the basic developmental trajectory of 20th-century Chinese literature, and will explore interactions between social-historical conditions and the production of modern Chinese literary works. Readings and discussion in English. (GLB) (Enrollment limited) –Shen

238. Contemporary Africa: Resource Wars and Human Rights— Human civilizations and communities have been shaped by the ability and desire to gain access to critical resources for survival. Economic globalization has created competition for resources—ranging from oil to diamonds to water—that has influenced social and political structures in the contemporary world. This course looks at the impact of modern globalization on the continent of Africa. Situating Africa historically in its relationship to “the West” through the Atlantic slave trade and European colonialism, we will explore the consequences of Africa’s unequal role in this system. We will be investigating the links between civil conflict, resource control, social justice, poverty, and international movements that attempt to address these issues. Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one college-level course that addresses the history of Africa before or during the colonial era, including History 252, 253, or 331. (GLB) (Enrollment limited) –Markle

[249. Immigrants and Refugees: Strangers in Strange Lands]— The post-cold war world is one of changing national boundaries and governments, environmental devastation and internal conflicts, resulting in an apparently unprecedented flow of people from their native homelands. At a time when multiculturalism is not a popular model for national integration, immigrants, refugees, and other sojourners find themselves in new places creating new lives for themselves. The processes by which this occurs illustrate some of the basic social, cultural, and political dilemmas of contemporary societies. Using historical and contemporary case studies from Europe and the Americas, this course looks at issues of flight, resettlement, integration, cultural adaptation, and public policy involved in creating culturally diverse nations. Questions to be raised include what are the conditions under which people leave, who can become a (authentic) member of society, what rights do non-citizens versus citizens have, are borders sacrosanct, are ethnic and racial diversity achievable or desirable, is multiculturalism an appropriate model, do people want to assimilate, what are the cultural consequences of movement, and how can individuals reconstruct their identities and feel they belong? This course includes a community learning component. (Also offered under American Studies, Public Policy & Law, and Women, Gender, & Sexuality.) This course has a community learning component. (GLB5) (Enrollment limited)

[250L. Hartford Global Migration Lab]— Optional Community Learning Component integrated with INTS249: Immigrants and Refugees and INTS250: Global Migration to provide field-based, participatory research experience with community partners on the consequences of global migration in the greater Hartford area. This course has a community learning component. Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in International Studies 249 or 250. (0.5 course credit) (Enrollment limited)

260. The City in African Studies: Past, Present, and Potential— Africa is a rapidly urbanizing region of the world; the most rapidly urbanizing by World Bank standards. Contemporary urbanization in Africa has stimulated new scholarship on the history of African cities, African urban economies, urban politics and urban identities, among other topics. African urban studies has produced some of the most thoughtful and engaged work on Africa to date. In this course we will be exploring major themes in the field of African urban studies to gain deeper appreciation of the history of African cities, their contemporary iterations, and their future possibilities. (GLB) (Enrollment limited) –Myers

[262. Peoples and Culture of the Caribbean]— A review of the attempt to develop generalizations about the structure of Caribbean society. Theoretical materials will focus on the historical role of slavery, the nature of plural societies, race, class, ethnicity, and specific institutions such as the family, the schools, the church, and the political structure. (GLB5) (Enrollment limited)

[302. Global Cities]— This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of ’developed’ and ’developing’ worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization. (GLB) (Enrollment limited)

[312. Global Political Ecology]— The broad field of political ecology makes connections between local ecologies and larger political and economic structures. This course will explore the global things’ of political ecological research, such as: trees, trash, sugar, seeds, bugs, rivers, and sea turtles. Using examples of things’ from diverse world regions, the course invites students to explore the messy multi-level connections between people, ecologies, knowledge and power dynamics in a globalized world. (GLB2) (Enrollment limited)

314. Black Internationalism— This course introduces students to the history of people of African descent and their struggles for universal emancipation during the 20th century. We will begin by drawing on theoretical readings about race/blackness and the African Diaspora. The second part of the class will probe the relationship between nationalism and pan-Africanism through comparative assessments of Marcus Garvey and his UNIA organization; Rastafarianism and music; and the U.S. Black Power Movement. Over the entire course, we will also seek to locate and critically evaluate Africa’s importance to these political and cultural projects. The ultimate purpose of this course is to impress upon students how struggles for self-determination were simultaneously local, national and global. Prerequisite: C- or better in International Studies 101, International Studies112, History 238, or History 253. (GLB2) (Enrollment limited) –Markle

317. Planetary History— How have humans understood their relationship with each other and nature, over time and space? This course will investigate the various theories of planetary history, and will develop an understanding of the interdependency of our social ecology. In the main, we shall concentrate on the world after 1300, and trace the principle social processes of our time (such as capitalism, democracy, science, and religion). This course is open only to International Studies majors or by instructor consent. (GLB) (Enrollment limited) –Prashad

[320. Postsocialist City]— At the beginning of the twentieth century, the Soviet Union was a key site of experimentation where avant-garde architects and planners could realize their visions for democratic and egalitarian cities. This course explores how these ideals were implemented, compromised or modified from the perspectives of administrators and residents. We will also learn how the socialist legacy of built urban environments has shaped and conditioned the ways in which postsocialist societies are remade under the terms of a market economy. The course will be of particular interest to students interested in design, architecture, city planning, and public policy. (GLB2) (Enrollment limited)

[335. Capitalism and Authoritarianism]— This course interrogates the common identification of capitalism with liberal democracy. Although the emergence of capitalism overlapped with the process of formation of the public sphere and participatory democracy, post-WWII economic developments have troubled this coupling. We will explore the emergence of authoritarian capitalisms in Asia by attending to the phenomenon of “Asian Tigers” and delineating their conditions of possibility. We will also investigate the scholarship on the rise of neoliberalism in Western countries that identified this particular incarnation of capitalism as authoritarian control of the most private realms of human existence. Together, we will ponder on the consequences of this disassociation of political and economic liberalism. (GLB2) (Enrollment limited)

336. Women, War, and Violence— This course examines the intersections of imperialist wars, global capitalism, militarism, and patriarchal violence. Using a feminist anti-racist, anti-imperialist lens, it explores the rise of public sexual violence in the Middle East. Examining US imperialism, Israeli colonialism, and neoliberal capitalism as male and white projects, the course looks at how these systems re-entrench local patriarchal forces and exacerbate the conditions that promote sexual violence against women. Examining cases ranging from the US occupation of Iraq, to Egypt, Palestine and elsewhere in the region, the course considers the implications of the US neoconservative project of a “New Middle East,” the rise of imperial feminism, NGO’s, and ISIS for Arab women’s movements and the politics of women’s everyday lives. (GLB5) (Enrollment limited) –Tabar

350. Contemporary Muslim Artists: The Body in Crisis— How have war, violence, and crisis marked much of the current Islamic world and how are performance artists reflecting this world? This course is intended to stimulate and complicate the dialogue on Islam and contemporary “Islamic” art. We will consider the role of performance among artists who, whether Muslim by faith or not, are classified under the Islamic umbrella as a result of their political, social, or aesthetic choices. We will study the ways in which these “Muslim” artists have applied multiple lenses to their performance practices and how they invoke crisis in their works. Some artists featured in this course include Wafaa Bilal, Arahmaiani, Lida Abdul, Mos Def, Lalla Essaydi and more. (Enrollment limited) –Ali

351. Politics of Memory: Memory, History, Decolonization— This course introduces students to the theories, methods, and pedagogies of memories and life writings. Using feminist epistemologies, it explores women, people of color and indigenous peoples’ memories as an alternative body of knowledge. The course examines the politics, aesthetics, and ethics of remembering and narrating histories of oppression, violence, and resistance. (GLB5) (Enrollment limited) –Tabar

375. Global Agitation: Art and Activism— This course investigates the role of the artist in agitating cultural norms and participating in global social movements. We will study art as a site of contested representations, embedded in power formations whereby the artists play a critical role in challenging societies. We will look at artists and collectives from all over the world, such as Tania Bruguera, Ai Wei Wei, Shirin Neshat, Pussy Riot, Raqs Media Collective, and The Propeller Group. We will study art removed from private studio spaces, “unexhibited” on gallery walls, and displaced from temperature controlled museum halls. To that end, we will also consider art that spills into the streets, onto social media, and occupies the public sphere. (Enrollment limited) –Ali

399. Independent Study— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment. (1 - 2 course credits) –Staff

401. Senior Seminar in International Studies— This writing intensive course functions as the capstone experience for all INTS majors. The instructor will guide INTS seniors through the process of completing a substantial research paper that engages critically with dominant disciplinary approaches to and public discourses about the “global” or “international” sphere. The instruction of this course will rotate among INTS faculty, each of whom will organize the course around a particular theme. This course is open only to seniors majoring in International Studies; other students may enroll only with permission of instructor. (WEB) (Enrollment limited) –Prashad

466. Teaching Assistantship— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment. (0.5 - 1 course credit) –Staff

497. Senior Thesis— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single semester thesis. –Staff

Courses Originating in Other Departments

American Studies 336. Globalization(s): “America” in the Modern World— View course description in department listing on p. 251. –Heatherton

American Studies 409. Senior Seminar: American Empire— View course description in department listing on p. 252. –Baldwin

Anthropology 101. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology— View course description in department listing on p. 276. –Landry, Nadel-Klein, Notar

Anthropology 228. Anthropology from the Margins of South Asia— View course description in department listing on p. 277. –Hussain

Anthropology 241. Women in the Caribbean— View course description in department listing on p. 277. –DiVietro

Anthropology 245. Anthropology and Global Health— View course description in department listing on p. 277. –Trostle

[Anthropology 253. Urban Anthropology]— View course description in department listing on p. 278.

Anthropology 310. Anthropology of Development— View course description in department listing on p. 278. –Hussain

Economics 101. Basic Economic Principles— View course description in department listing on p. 371. –Butos, Clark, Hoag, Skouloudis, Szembrot

Educational Studies 305. Immigrants and Education— View course description in department listing on p. 394. Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200, or majoring in International Studies, or permission of instructor –Dyrness

Educational Studies 316. Education and Social Change Across the Globe— View course description in department listing on p. 394. Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Educational Studies or International Studies Course. –Dyrness

[English 288. World Cinema]— View course description in department listing on p. 424.

English 310. Postcolonial Literature and Theory— View course description in department listing on p. 424. –Bergren

Art History 207. The Arts of China— View course description in department listing on p. 476. –Hyland

History 223. Japan into the Modern World, 1840-1945— View course description in department listing on p. 527. –Bayliss

[History 228. Islamic Civilization to 1517]— View course description in department listing on p. 527.

History 241. History of China, Shang to Ming— View course description in department listing on p. 528. –Lestz

Jewish Studies 219. Israeli Film and Visual Media— View course description in department listing on p. 608. –Ayalon

Russian 101. Elementary Russian I— View course description in department listing on p. 660. –Lahti

Hispanic Studies 222. Portuguese for Spanish Speakers— View course description in department listing on p. 645. Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 202 or equivalent. –Hubert

Hispanic Studies 337. 21st Century Latin American Film— View course description in department listing on p. 646. Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 or permission of instructor. –Lambright

Chinese 413. Advanced Chinese III— View course description in department listing on p. 625. Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 302 or equivalent. –Wang

[Chinese 430. Chinese Speaking and Writing I]— View course description in department listing on p. 625. Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 202 or equivalent.

Political Science 103. Introduction to Comparative Politics— View course description in department listing on p. 752. This course is not open to seniors. –Messina

Political Science 104. Introduction to International Relations— View course description in department listing on p. 753. This course is not open to seniors. –Lefebvre

Political Science 312. Politics in the Middle East and North Africa— View course description in department listing on p. 754. –Flibbert

Political Science 322. International Political Economy— View course description in department listing on p. 754. Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 104. –Kamola

Spring Term

205. War on Terror— 9/11 inaugurated a new epoch not only for the United States, but decidedly for the world. Tentacular wars of and on terror stretched from Afghanistan into Yemen, from Madrid into Bali. This course will offer a social history of the war on terror. We will explore the roots of the war on terror in the histories of Afghanistan and Yemen, and plot the switch from the prehistory of the War on Terror (1993-2001) to the War on Terror Part 1 (2001-2007) to the War on Terror Part 2 (2007 to the present). (GLB) (Enrollment limited) –Prashad

[207. Global South]— In 1985, the South Commission reported that two-thirds of the world’s people lived in distress. To rectify this, the Commission proposed a laundry list of reforms. At the same time, political and social movements in what had been the Third World grew apace. These movements and this report inaugurate the creation of the “Global South”, which is both a place and a project. This course will investigate the contours of the Global South, the conferences held to alleviate its many problems (Beijing/Women, Johannesburg/Environment, Durban/Race), and the people who live in the “South”. (GLB) (Enrollment limited)

[209. Gender and Natural Resources]— This course will introduce students to the factors that shape women and men’s experience of sustainable development in international contexts. The objective is to better understand how natural resources influence gender roles, opportunities, and expectations both positively and negatively in a variety of case studies from around the world. Primary topics will include: water resource issues; gender and land rights; participation in biodiversity protection; forestry and fishing; food security in urban and agricultural contexts; and health issues related to waste pickers and sanitation. (GLB2) (Enrollment limited)

212. Global Politics— This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East. (GLB5) (Enrollment limited) –Baker

[213. Worldly Islam, The Sacred and the Secular]— This course explores the diverse domestic, regional, and international politics of the Islamic world. A rich historical perspective illuminates contemporary political struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human rights and needs. (Also offered under Political Science and Middle Eastern Studies.) (GLB) (Enrollment limited)

216. Understanding the History, Culture and Politics of Latin America & the Caribbean— This interdisciplinary course explores major historical themes and contemporary cultural and political topics related to Latin American and Caribbean societies and cultures. The goal is for the students to acquire a panoramic view of the Latin America and the Caribbean worlds while acquiring a deeper understanding of various issues that are explored more deeply in other upper-division courses at Trinity. We will engage issues of demography, geography, basis historical periods processes, particular anthropological and cultural debates, fundamental political and gender, sociological approaches to daily life, aesthetic and literary movements, and the regions’ positions within the historic and contemporary world economy. Open to all students, this course is required of INTS majors with a Caribbean and Latin American Studies focus. (GLB2) (Enrollment limited) –Euraque

[217. Global Postsocialisms]— This course explores the subject of postsocialism as a global phenomenon. Although the term has been traditionally associated with Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, our inquiry will include a much broader range of countries from the regions of Latin America (Cuba, Venezuela), the Middle East, and East and Southeast Asia (China, Vietnam, Laos, Mongolia). In light of the socialist project overlapping with the postcolonial movements around the world, it is expedient to understand postsocialism as a series of interconnections and solidarities. This course will be of particular interest to students interested in globalization, transnationalism, international relations, and postsocialism. (GLB2) (Enrollment limited)

225. Hip Hop and Urban Arts in Southeast Asia— From Myanmar to Malaysia, this course takes a regional look at the emerging visual, counter-, and youth cultures within Southeast Asia. Countries like Cambodia, Vietnam, and Indonesia have experienced an unprecedented rate of urbanization and globalization that affects the growing youth population. How are communities in these countries localizing their urban arts scene and preserving a legacy of resistance emblematic of Hip Hop? How are musical and pop culture trends from nearby Korea, Japan, and China influencing Southeast Asian Hip Hop artists to remix sound and identities? (Enrollment limited) –Ali

[235. Youth Culture in the Muslim World]— Increasingly much of the Muslim world is young and with the expansion of media and cyberspace technologies, the circulation of globalized youth culture increasingly challenges taken-for-granted notions in local societies. This course examines the impact of youth and youth culture on personal, social, and political expression in a variety of Muslim communities around the world. We will examine intergenerational struggles over marriage, gender, and sexuality, the renegotiation of religion and morality, and the often ’revolutionary’ disputes over conventional politics as conveyed through music, texts, fashion, personal memoirs, and cyberspace blogging. (GLB) (Enrollment limited)

236. Japanese Crime Literature and Film— This course examines major works of Japanese crime literature and film from the works of Edogawa Rampo, known as the father of crime fiction in Japan, to those of contemporary writers to explore social and moral issues reflected in them. While Japanese writers and filmmakers of this genre readily acknowledge Western influences, the literary and cinematic explorations of crime in Japan have also developed ona trajectory of their own, producing works that are easily distinguishable from those of other cultures. The course will also consider the mixing of the crime genre with others, such as ghost and science fiction genres. Works studied in this course include those of Edogawa Rampo, Akira Kurosawa, Miyuki Miyabe, Seicho Matsumoto, and Kobo Abe, as well as yakuza movies. Readings and discussion in English. (GLB) (Enrollment limited) –Shen

[240. Theories of Race and Modernity in Latin America]— Taking as a point of departure Enrique Dusell’s assertion that European modernity depended (and depends) on the invention of an American otherness, this course will look at the intersection of race and discourses on/projects of modernity in the Americas and Europe. Specifically, we will examine how 20th - and 21st- century Latin American intellectuals have theorized race and its relationship to nation-building and modernizing efforts from 19th century to the present. Rather than tracing the historical development of the concept of race, we will read deeply major texts that theorize the relationship between race and modernity. The course, thus, will look to understand not only the theories, but how these Latin American intellectuals think through problems, develop arguments, converse with peers, and articulate ideas. (GLB2) (Enrollment limited)

[245. Latin American Film and Human Rights]— This course has the dual purpose of examining important human rights issues in Latin America and questioning the role of film in making visible, critiquing, or even sustaining the structures that lead to human rights violations. We will study specific human rights issues tackled by filmmakers in Latin America, such as cultural rights, gender and sexuality rights, economic rights, environmental issues, and war and state terror. Furthermore, we will discuss specific film schools and movements that developed to address human rights issues in diverse Latin American contexts. Finally, we will look at how Latin American films work the international human rights film festival circuit, and the ethical and practical implications of filming local human rights issues for international audiences. (GLB2) (Enrollment limited)

[250. Global Migration]— This course explores population mobility as an outcome of global processes and investigates its role in reconfiguring personal, cultural, social, political, and economic life. Specifically considers the impact of migration on gender relations and identities, cultural and educational practices, integration policies, individual and group rights and questions of citizenship and governance. (GLB5) (Enrollment limited)

[250L. Hartford Global Migration Lab]— Optional Community Learning Component integrated with INTS249: Immigrants and Refugees and INTS250: Global Migration to provide field-based, participatory research experience with community partners on the consequences of global migration in the greater Hartford area. This course has a community learning component. Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in International Studies 249 or 250. (0.5 course credit) (Enrollment limited)

262. Peoples and Culture of the Caribbean— A review of the attempt to develop generalizations about the structure of Caribbean society. Theoretical materials will focus on the historical role of slavery, the nature of plural societies, race, class, ethnicity, and specific institutions such as the family, the schools, the church, and the political structure. (GLB5) (Enrollment limited) –Desmangles

[301. Arab Politics]— This seminar examines the outstanding features of the full range of politics in the Arab world, from regimes and resistances to the new forms of politics in civil society and private spheres. (Also offered under Political Science and Middle Eastern studies.) (GLB5) (Enrollment limited)

302. Global Cities— This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of ’developed’ and ’developing’ worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization. (GLB) (Enrollment limited) –Myers

[307. Women’s Rights as Human Rights]— This course is a cross-cultural investigation of the gendered nature of human rights and of the changes in different societies that have resulted from struggles for human rights for women. Topics covered will include rights to protection against sexual abuse and gender violence (such as female genital mutilation), subsistence rights, reproductive rights, human rights and sexual orientation, and the rights of female immigrants and refugees. The course will make use of formal legal documents as well as cultural materials such as novels, films, personal testimonies, religious rituals, and folk traditions in music. (Enrollment limited)

[309. Development in Africa: From Civilizing Mission to World Bank]— This course examines the history of development ideas and practices in Africa. Beginning with the early colonial era, when Europeans spoke of their “civilizing mission,” and ending with present-day critiques of World Bank policies, it traces continuity and change in state and grassroots efforts to bring about development in Africa. It explores the theories behind development policies. including the ways in which experts have conceptualized African farming systems and Africa’s place in the world economy, and it asks to what extent these theories match reality. It also examines how development policies have been put into practice, how African communities have responded to and reshaped development, whether communities have a “right to development” and who should define what that development should be. Finally, it considers why so many development efforts have failed and whether past failures have led to improved practice. (Also offered under History.) (GLB) (Enrollment limited)

[311. Global Feminism]— This course examines how the struggles of diverse gender based movements (religious and secular, urban and rural, black and white), from the Americas to the Middle East and Asia, shed light on vexing social problems like the lack of sexual and reproductive rights, political and social representation, and equal opportunities. Using historical and contemporary examples of women’s organizing and theorizing, course materials interrogate the meaning of feminism’, the relationship between the gendered self and society, the impact of race, class, and cultural differences on women’s solidarity, the challenge of women’s (and gender based) activism to state and social order, the impact of women’s networking, and the possibilities for achieving a transnational, cross-cultural or global feminism.’ (GLB) (Enrollment limited)

[315. Global Ideologies]— From the 1920s to the 1980s, the countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America forged a “Third World project.” This project came undone in the 1980s, as debt, war and corruption overwhelmed the three continents. Along came neo-liberalism and globalization, which emerged as the dominant ideologies of the time. With the rise of Bolivarianism in Latin America, and with the financial crisis, neo-liberalism has lost its shine. This course will trace the “Third World project,” neo-liberalism, and the emergent ideology of the Global South. (GLB5) (Enrollment limited)

344. Global Hip Hop Cultures— Hip-Hop is both music and culture with a global imprint that dates back to the 1980s. This course is a reading and writing intensive course that critically examines hip-hop cultural and political formations in Africa and the African Diaspora. We begin with canonical texts that contributed to the growth of an emergent interdisciplinary field called, ’Hip-Hop Studies’ in order to familiarize ourselves with a set of core concepts, discourses and frameworks that will help us assess hip-hop’s global emergence. What does the globalization of African-American music and culture tell us about the power and impact of neoliberalism on post-colonial identities, culture and nation-states in the non-Western world? It is a question that will shape our discussions on race, youth, masculinity, and nationalism in contemporary urban societies. (GLB2) (Enrollment limited) –Markle

[345. Worldly Sex]— This course will examine sexual practices and their cultural and social meaning across different cultures and at different periods in the sweep of human history. We will read social history, biographies, memories, and study representations of sexual practices and behaviors in the daily life of different societies, from the ancient Aztecs, and the Egyptians to the “sexual revolution” in the 1960’s in the U.S. and beyond. (GLB) (Enrollment limited)

[350. Traffic in Art: 20th Century Global Economy of Cultural Production]— This course complements twentieth century art history by focusing on the traffic in art objects and aesthetic ideologies, initially, between the West and the colonized non-West, and more recently between “global” cities hosting international biennials of art. We will first trace the ways in which these circulations constituted the colonial powers and produced the colonized people. Subsequently, we will investigate the recent prominence of non-Western artists in key sites of the global art world. (GLB2) (Enrollment limited)

399. Independent Study— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment. (1 - 2 course credits) –Staff

401. Senior Seminar in International Studies— This writing intensive course functions as the capstone experience for all INTS majors. The instructor will guide INTS seniors through the process of completing a substantial research paper that engages critically with dominant disciplinary approaches to and public discourses about the “global” or “international” sphere. The instruction of this course will rotate among INTS faculty, each of whom will organize the course around a particular theme. This course is open only to seniors majoring in International Studies; other students may enroll only with permission of instructor. (WEB) (Enrollment limited) –Prashad

[405. Reading Capital]— How do we understand the world that we live in today? How do we make sense of the vast economic divides and the great unemployment crisis — both of which seem to be intractable? In this advanced seminar, we will investigate the Marxist theory of capitalism and of crisis. (GLB) (Enrollment limited)

466. Teaching Assistantship— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment. (0.5 - 1 course credit) –Staff

[490. Research Assistantship]—

497. Senior Thesis— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single semester thesis. –Staff

Courses Originating in Other Departments

Anthropology 101. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology— View course description in department listing on p. 280. –DiVietro, Hussain, Trostle

[Anthropology 310. Anthropology of Development]— View course description in department listing on p. 282.

Economics 101. Basic Economic Principles— View course description in department listing on p. 378. –Clark, Schneider, Skouloudis

[Educational Studies 320. Anthropology and Education]— View course description in department listing on p. 398. Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or Anthropology 101 (formerly 201), or permission of instructor.

English 288. World Cinema— View course description in department listing on p. 438. –Younger

[English 440. Localism Unrooted]— View course description in department listing on p. 444.

Art History 294. The Arts of Africa— View course description in department listing on p. 481. –Gilbert

History 215. Latin American Cities— View course description in department listing on p. 536. –Figueroa

History 224. Gender in Brazilian History, from Colonialism to the 20th Century— View course description in department listing on p. 537. –Staff

[History 229. Middle East Since 1517]— View course description in department listing on p. 537.

History 231. Abraham’s Children: Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the Middle Ages— View course description in department listing on p. 537. –Elukin

History 242. History of China, Qing to Present— View course description in department listing on p. 538. –Lestz

[History 283. African Diaspora in Latin America and the Caribbean]— View course description in department listing on p. 539.

Jewish Studies 220. Modern Israeli Literature and Jewish Heritage— View course description in department listing on p. 610. –Ayalon

Russian 102. Elementary Russian II— View course description in department listing on p. 662. Prerequisite: C- or better in Russian 101 or equivalent. –Lahti

[Hispanic Studies 222. Portuguese for Spanish Speakers]— View course description in department listing on p. 648. Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 202 or equivalent.

Hispanic Studies 223. Portuguese for Spanish Speakers II— View course description in department listing on p. 648. Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 222 or permission of instructor –Hubert

Chinese 415. Advanced Chinese IV— View course description in department listing on p. 627. Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 413 or equivalent. –Wang

[Chinese 440. Chinese Speaking and Writing II]— View course description in department listing on p. 627. Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 202 or equivalent.

[Philosophy 223. African Philosophy]— View course description in department listing on p. 722.

Political Science 103. Introduction to Comparative Politics— View course description in department listing on p. 759. This course is not open to seniors. –Molles

Political Science 104. Introduction to International Relations— View course description in department listing on p. 759. This course is not open to seniors. –Flibbert

[Political Science 322. International Political Economy]— View course description in department listing on p. 760. Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 104.

[Political Science 331. Comparative Politics of East Asia]— View course description in department listing on p. 761.

Political Science 344. Politics of Africa— View course description in department listing on p. 762. Prerequisite: C- or better Political Science 103 or permission of instructor. –Kamola

Political Science 380. War and Peace in the Middle East— View course description in department listing on p. 763. –Flibbert

Religion 282. Modern Islamic Movements Religion, Ideology, and the Rise of Fundamentalism— View course description in department listing on p. 815. –Koertner

Religion 285. Religions of Africa— View course description in department listing on p. 815. –Landry

Religion 286. Islam in America— View course description in department listing on p. 815. –Koertner

Urban Studies 210. Sustainable Urban Development— View course description in department listing on p. 855. –Staff

African Studies

Coordinator: Assistant Professor Seth Markle (History and International Studies); Affiliated Faculty: Leslie Desmangles (Religion and International Studies), Eric Galm (Music), Michelle Gilbert (Fine Arts), Shafqat Hussain (Anthropology), Isaac Kamola (Political Science), Timothy Landry (Anthropology and Religion), Garth Myers (Urban Studies and International Studies), Maurice Wade (Philosophy and International Studies), Johnny Williams (Sociology), James Prakash Younger (English)

The African studies major introduces students to the second-largest continent on the planet, which comprises over 50 independent nations and houses just short of a billion people. Culturally and ethnically diverse, Africa nonetheless is united by several social processes, including colonialism, transnationalism, and globalization. We tend to these formative social processes through an array of courses across disciplines (from history to literature, from art to politics).

Curricular requirements

In addition to the language and study-away requirements for all majors (see above under the introduction to international studies), the African studies major consists of 10 credits, distributed as follows:

Asian Studies

Coordinator: Associate Professor Jeffrey Bayliss (History); Affiliated Faculty: Janet Bauer (International Studies), Xiangming Chen (Sociology, Urban Studies, and International Studies), Ellison Findly (Religion and International Studies), Shafqat Hussain (Anthropology), Alice Hyland (Fine Arts), Michael Lestz (History), Reo Matsuzaki (Political Science), Beth Notar (Anthropology), Vijay Prashad (International Studies), Yipeng Shen (Language and Culture Studies and International Studies), Rieko Wagoner (Language and Culture Studies and International Studies), James Wen (Economics and International Studies), James Prakash Younger (English)

The Asian studies major offers an interdisciplinary framework for the examination of the societies and cultures of Asia. Students must choose to focus on China, Japan, or South Asia. The goal of the major is a comprehensive understanding of the region of choice from historical, social, and cultural perspectives, but a thorough grasp of the interrelations among regions is also crucial.

Curricular requirements

In addition to the language and study-away requirements for all majors (see above under the introduction to international studies), the Asian studies major consists of 10 credits, distributed as follows:

Caribbean and Latin American Studies

Coordinator: Assistant Professor Rosario Hubert (Language and Culture Studies); Affiliated Faculty: Sonia Cardenas (Political Science), Pablo Delano (Fine Arts), Leslie Desmangles (Religion and International Studies), Andrea Dyrness (Educational Studies), Darío Euraque (History and International Studies), Luis Figueroa (History), Eric Galm (Music), Francisco Goldman (English), Hebe Guardiola-Diaz (Biology and Neuroscience), Thomas Harrington (Language and Culture Studies), Anne Lambright (Language and Culture Studies), Seth Markle (History and International Studies), Priscilla Meléndez (Language and Culture Studies), Miguel Ramírez (Economics), Milla Riggio (English), Dan Román (Music), Kristin Triff (Fine Arts), Christopher van Ginhoven Rey (Language and Culture Studies)

The Latin American and Caribbean region is home to close to 600 million people, a diverse population that comprises indigenous peoples and groups that trace their origin to Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. It includes six of the 30 largest metropolitan regions in the world (Mexico City, Sao Paulo, Buenos Aires, Rio de Janeiro, Lima, and Bogotá).

The Caribbean and Latin American studies major allows students to explore this vast region from a variety of perspectives, including history, literature, music, religion, economics, and educational studies. Faculty expertise ranges across South America, Central America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. In addition, Hartford itself represents an excellent window into the Latin American and Caribbean world, thanks to its immigrant communities from the cultures of Puerto Rico, the West Indies (including Trinidad and Jamaica), Brazil, and Peru, among others.

Caribbean and Latin American Studies majors engage deeply in the region by spending a semester or year in two of Trinity’s study-abroad programs: 1) Trinity-in-Buenos Aires, Argentina. This program provides students with both intermediate and advanced Spanish language abilities an opportunity to study and live in this vibrant Latin American city. Whether you have just begun Spanish, need to fulfill your language requirement, or are a more advanced speaker, this program has a great deal to offer; 2) the Trinity-in-Trinidad option in the English-speaking Caribbean is a great comparative contrast. This program includes an 8-10 day study-travel experience in Caribbean Costa Rica. In this option students explore Caribbean civilization via unparalleled immersion experiences in and out of the classroom in two of the Caribbean region’s most dynamic, unique, and diverse societies. Students are strongly encouraged to plan a one-year sequence of study in Argentina, Trinidad, and Caribbean Costa Rica. A non-Trinity program in another Latin American or Caribbean country may be approved only if strong curricular reasons are presented.

Curricular requirements

In addition to the language and study-away requirements for all majors (see above under the introduction to international studies), the Caribbean and Latin American studies major consists of 10 credits, distributed as follows:

Global Studies

Coordinator: George and Martha Kellner Chair in South Asian History and Professor of International Studies Vijay Prashad (International Studies); Affiliated Faculty: Raymond Baker (International Studies), Janet Bauer (International Studies), Sonia Cardenas (Political Science), Xiangming Chen (Sociology, Urban Studies, and International Studies), Leslie Desmangles (Religion and International Studies), Andrea Dyrness (Educational Studies), Lesley Farlow (Theater and Dance), Andrew Flibbert (Political Science), Shafqat Hussain (Anthropology), Isaac Kamola (Political Science), Sara Kippur (Language and Culture Studies), Donna Marcano (Philosophy), Seth Markle (History and International Studies), Anthony Messina (Political Science), Garth Myers (Urban Studies and International Studies), Beth Notar (Anthropology), James Trostle (Anthropology), James Wen (Economics and International Studies), James Prakash Younger (English)

The global studies major encourages students to grapple with the fundamental dynamics of our time through an interdisciplinary framework. We are interested in the social processes that cut across regions, the global flows that have local impacts, and the local initiatives that have global resonances.

Curricular requirements

In addition to the language and study-away requirements for all majors (see above under the introduction to international studies), the global studies major consists of 10 credits, distributed as follows:

Middle East Studies

Coordinator: Professor Raymond Baker (International Studies); Affiliated Faculty: Zayde Antrim (History and International Studies), Michal Ayalon (Language and Culture Studies), Janet Bauer (International Studies), Andrew Flibbert (Political Science), Kifah Hanna (Language and Culture Studies), Shafqat Hussain (Anthropology), Ronald Kiener (Religion and Jewish Studies), Gary Reger (History), Seth Sanders (Religion)

The Middle East studies major engages the region extending from Morocco to Kazakhstan. Through an interdisciplinary approach, we acquaint students with the complex hopes and struggles that animate the diverse peoples and cultures of this vast territory.

Curricular requirements

In addition to the language and study-away requirements for all majors (see above under the introduction to international studies), the Middle East studies major consists of 10 credits, distributed as follows:

Russian and Eurasian Studies

Coordinator: Associate Professor Katherine Lahti (Language and Culture Studies); Affiliated Faculty: Carol Any (Language and Culture Studies), Carol Clark (Economics), Samuel Kassow (History), Reo Matsuzaki (Political Science), Mitchell Polin (Theater and Dance), Arthur Schneider (Economics)

From the borders of Germany to the eastern coastline of Russia, from the North Pole to the border of Afghanistan, the vast area and diverse peoples of Russia and Eastern Europe are central to an understanding of the 21st century. Energy and geopolitics clash in this crucible of modern literature and theater. The Russian and Eurasian studies major engages this enormous area culturally, socially, economically, and politically.

Curricular requirements

In addition to the language and study-away requirements for all majors (see above under the introduction to international studies), the Russian and Eurasian studies major consists of 10 credits, distributed as follows: