Human Rights

Associate Professor Marcano (Philosophy), Director; Professor of Political Science and Dean of Academic Affairs Cardenas (Political Science), Professor Euraque (History and International Studies), Paul E. Raether Distinguished Professor of History Greenberg (History), Professors Raskin (Psychology and Neuroscience), and Wade∙∙ (Philosophy, International Studies, and Public Policy and Law); Professor Emerita Dworin; Associate Professor Bauer (International Studies); Assistant Professor Markle (History and International Studies); Visiting Assistant Professor Anthony; Visiting Lecturer Lea

The study of human rights draws on multiple disciplines and perspectives to address fundamental questions relating to the humane treatment of people—theoretically, historically, and globally. Students explore the complexities underlying civil, political, economic, social, and cultural rights. For example, what are internationally recognized human rights norms, and what are their origins and controversies? Why do human rights conditions vary so widely? How and why do human rights practices change, and how can more effective human rights policies be devised? How are human rights abuses and aspirations expressed through literature and the arts? And how might we approach the study of human rights critically, questioning its assumptions and applicability across diverse contexts? Students who wish to pursue an in-depth examination of human rights issues may undertake an individually tailored, interdisciplinary major in human rights studies. Student learning in the major is supplemented by co-curricular opportunities, including lectures, films, performances, exhibits, and internships.

The individually tailored, interdisciplinary major in human rights studies—An individually tailored major in human rights studies consists of three core courses, two specialized electives, five general electives, and a senior thesis or project. No more than two courses may be double-counted toward another major or minor. Students must earn a minimum of C- in any given course to receive credit for the major. Declaration forms and instructions are available from the Human Rights Program director.

Requirements for the major

Fall Term

125. Introduction to Human Rights— This course introduces students to the key concepts and debates in the study of Human Rights. For example, what are human rights standards and how have they evolved historically? Why do human rights violations occur and why is change sometimes possible? Is a human rights framework always desirable? In tackling such questions, the course surveys competing theories, including critical perspectives, applying these to a broad range of issues and concrete cases from around the world. CD:Not open to Seniros (Enrollment limited) –Carbonetti

332. Understanding Civil Conflict and Its Causes and Consequences— This course surveys the many causes and consequences of civil conflict and civil war. Major themes of the course include ethnic fractionalization, natural resources, climate change, colonial legacies, institutional design, globalization, intervention, international efforts in state building, gendered violence, and human rights. The course also examines the different theoretical and methodological approaches to studying civil conflict. All seats are reserved for juniors and sophomores. (Enrollment limited) –Carbonetti

348. The Arts and Special Populations— In this seminar, we will investigate the application of the arts to special populations with a focus on, but not limited to, urban youth at risk; the incarcerated and families affected by incarceration; and victims of crime. We will look at the role the arts play in a healing and rehabilitative process with these populations, analyzing the mission, goals, action steps, and results through research and hands-on experience. Students will do a significant fieldwork project in the city of Hartford in connection and collaboration with a nonprofit organization that will include research, observation, and analysis. This course has a community learning component. Prerequisite: C- or better in Theater and Dance 332 or Human Rights 373, or permission of instructor. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Anthony, Dworin

399. Human Rights Studies— –Staff

466. Human Rights Teaching Assistant— –Staff

497. Senior Project— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single term project. (WEB) –Staff

498. Senior Thesis Part 1— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester). (2 course credits) (WEB) –Staff

Courses Originating in Other Departments

[History 256. Human Rights in Latin America and the Caribbean: A History]— View course description in department listing on p. 529.

International Studies 238. Contemporary Africa: Resource Wars and Human Rights— View course description in department listing on p. 577. Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one college-level course that addresses the history of Africa before or during the colonial era, including History 252, 253, or 331. –Markle

[International Studies 250L. Hartford Global Migration Lab]— View course description in department listing on p. 578. Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in International Studies 249 or 250.

Philosophy 246. Human Rights: Philosophical Foundations, Issues, and Debates— View course description in department listing on p. 717. –Marcano

[Philosophy 304. 20th-Century African-American Philosophical Thought]— View course description in department listing on p. 718.

Political Science 369. International Human Rights Law— View course description in department listing on p. 756. –Carbonetti

Spring Term

[125. Introduction to Human Rights]— This course introduces students to the key concepts and debates in the study of Human Rights. For example, what are human rights standards and how have they evolved historically? Why do human rights violations occur and why is change sometimes possible? Is a human rights framework always desirable? In tackling such questions, the course surveys competing theories, including critical perspectives, applying these to a broad range of issues and concrete cases from around the world. CD:Not open to Seniros (Enrollment limited)

[251. Marginalization and Migrations]— In recent years, we have witnessed a renewed awareness of social inequality in the United States as well as globally. While some have suggested that these realities are “natural” elements of the human condition, others insist that such gaps in power between individuals and governments are the result of consciously devised public policies and institutions. In this class, we will look at some of the political, economic, and artistic manifestations of social marginalization and the closely linked phenomenon of migration. We will analyze how such realities might be generated or constructed by the society’s more privileged social actors. This course has a community learning component. (HUM) (Enrollment limited)

[252. Issues in Gender, Power, and Expression]— In The Second Sex, Simone de Beauvoir famously wrote, “One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman.” If gender is a construction, we arguably have varying degrees of power and autonomy, always in negotiation with the culture around us, in the formation and expression of our gendered identity. In this multidisciplinary course, we will discuss the ways in which women, but also men, confirm, engage, and sometimes subvert the gendered expectations of their cultures. By studying a variety of art forms and writings from across a span of historical periods and global societies, we will examine the kinds of power and expression that can become embedded in gendered identity. This course has a community learning component. (HUM) (Enrollment limited)

373. Human Rights Through Performance: The Incarcerated— In this course we will examine selected human rights issues through a multi-disciplinary approach that includes readings, discussion, journal writing, site visits and art-making. This semester’s study will look at life behind the razor wire—what are the human rights issues that emerge in the world of the incarcerated? Included in our investigation will be the question of the death penalty, the notion of rehabilitation vs. punishment, gender-specific issues and the impact of the arts on prisoners and the institution of prison. Also listed under human rights studies. (ART) (Enrollment limited) –Lea

399. Human Rights Studies— –Staff

497. Senior Project— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single term project. (WEB) –Staff

499. Senior Thesis Part 2— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (Two course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.) (2 course credits) (WEB) –Staff

Courses Originating in Other Departments

[American Studies 263. The American Civil Rights Movement]— View course description in department listing on p. 261.

[Hispanic Studies 245. Latin American Film and Human Rights]— View course description in department listing on p. 649.

History 256. Human Rights in Latin America and the Caribbean: A History— View course description in department listing on p. 538. –Euraque

[History 260. The American Civil Rights Movement]— View course description in department listing on p. 539.

[International Studies 245. Latin American Film and Human Rights]— View course description in department listing on p. 584.

[International Studies 250. Global Migration]— View course description in department listing on p. 585.

[International Studies 250L. Hartford Global Migration Lab]— View course description in department listing on p. 585. Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in International Studies 249 or 250.

[International Studies 307. Women’s Rights as Human Rights]— View course description in department listing on p. 585.

[Language & Cultural Studies 245. Latin American Film and Human Rights]— View course description in department listing on p. 618.

Philosophy 246. Human Rights: Philosophical Foundations, Issues, and Debates— View course description in department listing on p. 723. –Marcano

Political Science 369. International Human Rights Law— View course description in department listing on p. 763. –Carbonetti

Religion 338. Christian Social Ethics— View course description in department listing on p. 816. –Kirkpatrick