Educational Studies Program

Associate Professor Dyrness, Director; Associate Professor Dougherty; Lecturer and Director, Urban Educational Initiatives Cotto; Visiting Assistant Professors Mackey and Wilson

The interdisciplinary major enables students to integrate knowledge and research methods from several academic disciplines into a focused examination of the field of education. It provides opportunities for students to analyze the learning process, the organization of schooling, its links to broader contexts, and the potential for change. The interdisciplinary major is not a teacher certification program. Rather, it is designed for students who seek a richer understanding of education grounded in the liberal arts, whether they aspire to become educators, researchers, or policymakers, or simply in their role as informed citizens.

In addition to core courses taught by educational studies faculty, the major draws upon selected offerings by participating departments and programs, such as psychology, sociology, anthropology, philosophy, political science, and theater and dance. Students also learn through field experiences offered in cooperation with Hartford-area schools, educational centers, and campus-community initiatives such as the Learning Corridor.

Participating faculty include:

The educational studies major—Students must earn five credits in the core, four credits in a thematic concentration, and three other electives for a total of 12 credits counted toward the major.

Core sequence:

Concentration—A student-designed thematic concentration of four courses, at least three of which must be at the 300 level or above. Previous students have designed concentrations in numerous areas (such as learning, cognition, and development; urban education; gender and schooling; sociology of education; international education). A written proposal, which delineates the links between courses in the concentration and the student’s evolving interests, must be planned in consultation with the director and submitted upon declaration of the major.

Eligible courses for the concentration include:

Other electives—Three other electives, either in educational studies or approved cross-referenced courses, but not necessarily linked to the student’s concentration.At least three departments or programs (i.e., educational studies and two others) must be represented in the total number of credits. No more than six courses may be drawn from any one department or program outside of educational studies. Only courses in which the student earns a grade of at least C- may be counted toward the major.

Double major—Students considering a double major (such as psychology and educational studies, or sociology and educational studies) are encouraged to plan their schedules early in consultation with their advisers. Selected courses for an educational studies major may also be applied toward fulfillment of the student’s other major, if listed or approved by both departments or programs.

Honors—Students must complete a senior research project with a grade A- or better, and earn a GPA of at least 3.50 in core courses in the major.

Teacher preparation—Students who desire to teach should consult with educational studies faculty about the various routes available to them, including the consortial teacher preparation program at University of Saint Joseph in West Hartford, as well as alternate route certification programs, graduate school programs, and independent school teaching opportunities. For more information, see the “Pathways to Teaching” section of the educational studies Web site.

Fall Term

200. Analyzing Schools— This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments. This course has a community learning component. (1.25 course credits) (SOC) (Enrollment limited) –Cotto, Dougherty, Wilson

305. Immigrants and Education— This course examines the experience of immigrants in education in comparative perspective, focusing on questions of citizenship and belonging. How do schools respond to the challenges and opportunities of large-scale migration, cultural diversity, and inequality and attempt to produce national and/or global citizens? How do immigrants in schools negotiate and respond to global and national forces as they craft their own identities and forms of belonging? We will examine the experience of immigrant groups in the United States and in several countries in Europe, including France, Spain, the U.K., and Denmark. The course will include a community learning component in which students will conduct interviews with immigrants who have been involved in U.S. education institutions. This course has a community learning component. Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200, or majoring in International Studies, or permission of instructor (Enrollment limited) –Dyrness

[308. Cities, Suburbs, and Schools]— How did city dwellers’ dreams of better schooling, along with public policy decisions in housing and transportation, contribute to the rise of suburbia in the 20th century? How do city-suburban disparities affect teaching and learning in classrooms today? What promise do Sheff v O’Neill remedies for racial isolation, such as magnet schools at the Learning Corridor, hold for the future? Students will investigate these questions while developing their skills in oral history, ethnographic fieldwork, and geographical information system (GIS) software. Community learning experiences will be integrated with seminar readings and research projects. This course has a community learning component. Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or participation in The Cities Program or permission of instructor. (SOC) (Enrollment limited)

[315. Higher Education in America]— America has developed one of the largest and most diverse systems of higher education in the world, with curricula that range from the study of Greek, Latin, and antiquity to the decorating of cakes. Despite this diffuseness, American higher education enjoys an enviable global reputation and each year the number of students from around the world applying to colleges and universities in the United States far surpasses the number of American students seeking to matriculate abroad. This course will examine the forces that shaped the development of American higher education from its origins to the present, and then focus on several salient issues (such as diversity, student misbehavior, academic freedom, and athletics) that vex and enrich modern institutions. Students will be required to conduct a field research project that analyzes a current issue and compares how two or more institutions have reacted. This course has a community learning component. Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or permission of instructor. (Enrollment limited)

316. Education and Social Change Across the Globe— Through a comparative framework, this course examines the relationship between education and social change in various regions of the world. How do governments use schooling to produce certain kinds of citizens, and how do grassroots movements use education to resist these agendas? What role does education play in promoting democracy versus social and economic inequality? Students will conduct independent research on education in a country of their choice to contribute to the comparative framework. Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Educational Studies or International Studies Course. (GLB5) (Enrollment limited) –Dyrness

399. Independent Study— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment. (1 - 2 course credits) –Staff

400. Senior Research Seminar— To fulfill the senior exercise requirement, students carry out an independent research project that builds upon acquired skills and evolving interests. The weekly seminar provides a thematic focus as well as a continuous forum for both support and critical feedback from peers, in preparation for a public presentation of the student’s work at the end of the semester. Each year, the seminar will be organized around a broad theme in educational studies. This seminar is open to senior Educational Studies majors only. (WEB) (Enrollment limited) –Dougherty

466. Teaching Assistantship— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment. (0.5 - 1 course credit) –Staff

Courses Originating in Other Departments

American Studies 357. Race and Urban Space— View course description in department listing on p. 251. –Baldwin

Anthropology 301. Ethnographic Methods and Writing— View course description in department listing on p. 278. Prerequisite: Anthropology major or permission of instructor. –Notar

[Economics 318. Basic Econometrics]— View course description in department listing on p. 374. Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 and a C- or better in Economics 218 (formerly 109) or Mathematics 207 or Mathematics 306.

History 299. What is History?— View course description in department listing on p. 529. Prerequisite: This course is open only to History majors and minors. –Regan-Lefebvre

[International Studies 218. Women, Gender, and Family in the Middle East]— View course description in department listing on p. 577.

[International Studies 234. Gender and Education]— View course description in department listing on p. 577.

[International Studies 250L. Hartford Global Migration Lab]— View course description in department listing on p. 578. Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in International Studies 249 or 250.

Public Policy & Law 323. The Legal History of Race Relations— View course description in department listing on p. 793. Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 113, 123, or 201 or permission of instructor. –Fulco, Stevens

Political Science 241. Empirical Political Methods and Data Analysis— View course description in department listing on p. 753. –Laws

Psychology 221. Research Design and Analysis— View course description in department listing on p. 774. Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101. –Chapman, Reuman

Psychology 295. Child Development— View course description in department listing on p. 776. Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101. –Anselmi

Psychology 295L. Child Development Laboratory— View course description in department listing on p. 776. Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 295, or concurrent enrollment. –Anselmi

Psychology 384. Cultural Psychology— View course description in department listing on p. 777. Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 226. –Outten

[Psychology 426. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology: Cultural Psychology]— View course description in department listing on p. 779. Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 226.

[Sociology 214. Racism]— View course description in department listing on p. 829.

[Sociology 246. Sociology of Gender]— View course description in department listing on p. 830.

[Sociology 312. Social Class and Mobility]— View course description in department listing on p. 830. Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Sociology course or permission of the instructor. This course is not open to first-year students.

[Theater & Dance 270. Arts in Action: Moving into the Community]— View course description in department listing on p. 843.

Spring Term

200. Analyzing Schools— This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments. This course has a community learning component. (1.25 course credits) (SOC) (Enrollment limited) –Cotto, Dyrness

218. Special Education— How are children labeled (or mislabeled) as having learning and developmental disabilities, autism, or attention deficit disorder? How have definitions and diagnoses of learning disorders changed over time? How have standardized evaluations and assessments impacted those diagnoses? How does the law seek to ensure the accommodation of the needs of individuals with disabilities? Students will critically analyze research on psychology as it pertains to learners, examine special education case law and advocacy, and explore current issues in special education. Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or Psychology 295 or permission of instructor. (SOC) (Enrollment limited) –Mackey

300. Education Reform: Past and Present— How do we explain the rise and decline of education reform movements? How do we evaluate their level of “success” from different sources of evidence? Drawing upon primary source materials and historical interpretations, this course examines a broad array of elementary, secondary, and higher education reform movements from the mid-19th century to the present, analyzing social, material, and ideological contexts. This intermediate-level seminar explores a topic common to all branches of educational studies from both theoretical and comparative perspectives. Prerequisite: C- or better in EDUC200, or American Studies major or Public Policy and Law major. (HUM) (Enrollment limited) –Dougherty

307. Latinos in Education: Local Realities, Transnational Perspectives— This course investigates the education of Latinos, the largest and fastest growing minority group in the United States. By examining both the domestic and transnational contexts, we explore these central questions: How do cultural constructions of Latinos (as immigrants and natives, citizens and non-citizens) shape educational policy and teaching practices? What views of citizenship and identity underlie school programs such as bilingual education, as well as Latino responses to them? This course fulfills the related field requirement for Hispanic studies majors. It will also include a community learning component involving a qualitative research project in a Hartford school or community organization. This course has a community learning component. Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or International Studies, Language and Culture Studies, Hispanic Studies, or Anthropology major, or permission of instructor. (GLB5) (Enrollment limited) –Dyrness

308. Cities, Suburbs, and Schools— How did city dwellers’ dreams of better schooling, along with public policy decisions in housing and transportation, contribute to the rise of suburbia in the 20th century? How do city-suburban disparities affect teaching and learning in classrooms today? What promise do Sheff v O’Neill remedies for racial isolation, such as magnet schools at the Learning Corridor, hold for the future? Students will investigate these questions while developing their skills in oral history, ethnographic fieldwork, and geographical information system (GIS) software. Community learning experiences will be integrated with seminar readings and research projects. This course has a community learning component. Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or participation in The Cities Program or permission of instructor. (SOC) (Enrollment limited) –Dougherty

[309. Race, Class, and Educational Policy]— How do competing theories explain educational inequality? How do different policies attempt to address it? This class will consider the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the examination of educational inequality. Possible topics include economic and cultural capital, racial/gender/sexual identity formation, desegregation, multiculturalism, detracking, school choice, school-family relationships, and affirmative action. Student groups will expand upon the readings by proposing, implementing, and presenting their research analysis from a community learning project. This course has a community learning component. Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or permission of instructor. (SOC) (Enrollment limited)

310. Testing: From IQ to Common Core— Standardized testing is ubiquitous in education today. Across the globe, policymakers and the public use the results of standardized tests to draw conclusions about the educational progress of children, schools, and even entire countries. This course will examine the history, application, and mechanics of standardized testing in the United States and abroad in places such as China and Finland. Particular emphasis will be on the role of testing in educational reform efforts and movements in the city of Hartford. Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or permission of instructor. (SOC) (Enrollment limited) –Cotto

[320. Anthropology and Education]— The anthropology of education has a rich history of investigating the links between culture, learning, and schooling. Anthropologists studying education have sought to illuminate learning and educational achievement as social processes and cultural products that cannot be understood apart from the socio-cultural contexts in which they occur. In this upper-level seminar, we will explore selected works in the anthropology of education, both classic and contemporary, in order to understand the unique contributions anthropology makes to the study of education, and in particular, the experience of minority groups in education. We will explore topics such as race, gender, and language in education and how they have been addressed by anthropologists. Students will have an opportunity to read critically a variety of detailed ethnographic and qualitative studies focusing on formal schooling and informal education in the United States and in other countries. Reviewing these studies, we will explore the central questions: What is a cultural analysis of schooling? What unique insights does ethnography (anthropology’s signature method) offer into key educational problems? And finally, how can a cultural analysis of schooling inform efforts to create a more socially just educational system? Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or Anthropology 101 (formerly 201), or permission of instructor. (Enrollment limited)

[350. Teaching and Learning]— This seminar will explore theoretical, policy, and practical issues of teaching and learning. Who should teach in public schools, and what kind of preparation is necessary? What type of curriculum should be taught, and how do different interest groups shape that decision? How should we assess the quality of student learning? Finally, how do debates on all of these questions influence the nature of teachers’ work and classroom life? For the community learning component, students will design, teach, and evaluate curricular units in cooperation with neighborhood schools and after school programs. This course has a community learning component. Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or permission of instructor. (SOC) (Enrollment limited)

399. Independent Study— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment. (1 - 2 course credits) –Staff

466. Teaching Assistantship— Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment. (0.5 - 1 course credit) –Staff

Courses Originating in Other Departments

[Anthropology 301. Ethnographic Methods and Writing]— View course description in department listing on p. 281. Prerequisite: Anthropology major or permission of instructor.

[Economics 318. Basic Econometrics]— View course description in department listing on p. 383. Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 and a C- or better in Economics 218 (formerly 109) or Mathematics 207 or Mathematics 306.

[English 318. Literacy and Literature]— View course description in department listing on p. 439. Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.

Hispanic Studies 280. Hispanic Hartford— View course description in department listing on p. 650. Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221 or 224, or permission of instructor. –Aponte-Aviles

History 299. What is History?— View course description in department listing on p. 539. Prerequisite: This course is open only to History majors and minors. –Wickman

[International Studies 235. Youth Culture in the Muslim World]— View course description in department listing on p. 584.

[International Studies 250. Global Migration]— View course description in department listing on p. 585.

[International Studies 250L. Hartford Global Migration Lab]— View course description in department listing on p. 585. Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in International Studies 249 or 250.

[International Studies 311. Global Feminism]— View course description in department listing on p. 586.

Philosophy 374. Minds and Brains— View course description in department listing on p. 725. –Lloyd

[Political Science 326. Women and Politics]— View course description in department listing on p. 761. Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102 or permission of instructor.

Political Science 346. World Economy of Higher Education— View course description in department listing on p. 762. –Kamola

Psychology 221. Research Design and Analysis— View course description in department listing on p. 781. Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101. –Chapman, Reuman

[Psychology 223. Intersecting Identities: The Asian American Experience]— View course description in department listing on p. 781.

[Psychology 246. Community Psychology]— View course description in department listing on p. 782. This course is not open to first-year students.

Psychology 315. Development and Culture— View course description in department listing on p. 783. Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 226 or 295 –Anselmi

[Psychology 332. Psychological Assessment]— View course description in department listing on p. 784. Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 221L and four other courses in Psychology.

[Psychology 415. Development and Culture]— View course description in department listing on p. 786. Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 226 or 295

Sociology 201. Research Methods in the Social Sciences— View course description in department listing on p. 832. Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 210 or Mathematics 107, Mathematics 207, or permission of instructor. –Tiamzon

Sociology 246. Sociology of Gender— View course description in department listing on p. 832. –Andersson

Sociology 312. Social Class and Mobility— View course description in department listing on p. 833. Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Sociology course or permission of the instructor. This course is not open to first-year students. –Valocchi

Sociology 351. Society, State, and Power— View course description in department listing on p. 834. Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Sociology course or permission of the instructor. This course is not open to first-year students. –Williams

Theater & Dance 270. Arts in Action: Moving into the Community— View course description in department listing on p. 848. –Staff

[Theater & Dance 332. Education Through Movement]— View course description in department listing on p. 848.