Computer Science

Associate Professor Yoon, Chair∙∙; Professor Morelli; Associate Professors Miyazaki (acting chair, spring 2015) and Spezialetti; Visiting Lecturers Brown and Budd

Computer science is a broad discipline that employs a variety of approaches in an effort to advance our understanding and use of computing. Study in computer science can range from mathematical work aimed at understanding the theoretical and practical limits of what can be computed, to experimental work aimed at understanding the functioning of existing computer languages and systems, to design work aimed at building algorithms and computer systems that help people solve problems.

The Computer Science Department offers both a bachelor of arts and a bachelor of science degree in computer science. While both degrees are designed for students undertaking an in-depth study of computer science, the degrees reflect two different visions of that goal. The B.S. degree focuses on the study of computer science and mathematics courses and is designed for students who want to pursue such interests as software engineering, scientific or mathematical computing, or graduate studies in computer science or a closely related discipline. The B.A. degree reflects a more broad-based view of computing education and includes cognate courses that enable students to develop writing and reasoning skills in the context of fields other than computer science. This degree will prepare students for career paths in such areas as project management and information systems as well as post-graduate studies in law, business, and medicine.

The interdisciplinary computing major is a second way of combining an interest in computing with study in another discipline. For more information about this program, see p. 390.

Degree requirements

Bachelor of arts in computer science

Bachelor of science in computer science



Foundational
requirement

CPSC 115L
CPSC 215L
CPSC 203
CPSC 275L

CPSC 115L
CPSC 215L
CPSC 203
CPSC 275L

Breadth
requirement

One course in each of the following areas (selected from the list below):
Systems, Theory, Software

One course in each of the following areas (selected from the list below):
Systems, Theory, Software

Elective
requirement

Two additional courses selected from the designated elective courses listed below, at most one of which may be CPSC 110-x

Three additional courses selected from the designated elective courses listed below, at most one of which may be CPSC 110-x

Senior
exercise

Two-semester senior seminar (CPSC 403* and 404*)
Two-semester senior project (CPSC 498 and 499)

Two-semester senior seminar (CPSC 403* and 404*)
Two-semester senior project (CPSC 498 and 499)

Mathematics
requirement

Calculus I (MATH 131 or MATH 125 and 126)

Calculus I (MATH 131 or MATH 125 and 126)
Calculus II (MATH 132 or MATH 142)

Cognate
requirement

One non-computer science course that is designated as writing intensive
One additional numeric or symbolic reasoning course from the following list: POLS 241, PSYC 221L, SOCL 201L, PHIL 390, any math course numbered 107 or higher

* Fulfills the Writing Intensive Part II requirement.


Computer science breadth requirements

Select one from each category below.

Graduate school preparation—Students planning to attend graduate school in computer science are advised to take the following courses, which are needed for successful admission to and progress in graduate school: CPSC 219, 315, 316, 320, and MATH 228. A minimum grade of C- must be maintained in all courses counted toward the major.

Admission to the major—To be admitted to the major, students must receive a grade of C- or better in CPSC 215L and a grade of C- or better in CPSC 203. Upon submission of the declaration of major form to the department chair, an adviser in the department will be assigned.

Senior project—The senior project (CPSC 498 and CPSC 499) is an independent project that must extend over two semesters. The project is conducted under the supervision of a faculty adviser and performed in conjunction with the senior seminar (CPSC 403 and CPSC 404).

Honors—Honors are awarded to qualified students by a vote of the faculty. Typically, honors will be awarded to students who maintain a B+ average in all computer science courses numbered 200 and above and who complete the CPSC 403, 404 and 498, 499 sequences with a grade of A- or better.

Study away—Students are strongly urged to consult with their adviser as early as possible in the process of preparing to study abroad. Students should have completed the foundation requirement (CPSC 115L, CPSC 215L, CPSC 275L, and CPSC 203) before studying abroad. Students must consult with their faculty advisers to identify classes that will be acceptable for transfer credits from their study-abroad institution. Students must fulfill the yearlong requirement of computer science seminar (CPSC 403 and 404) and the associated senior project during their senior year at Trinity.

Fall Term

Spring Term