College Courses

College courses are non-departmental offerings that may represent a faculty member’s current research interest or a new subject with which the faculty member wishes to experiment. Such courses are often interdisciplinary in nature.

College courses ordinarily cannot be counted toward the fulfillment of the requirements of a major. College courses are taught both by people with appointments in a department and by people holding extra-departmental positions.

Fall Term

118. Neuroscience Across the Curriculum— This course supports a co-curricular initiative on neuroscience across the curriculum, focused on neuroscience and the arts. Students enrolled in any course affiliated with the initiative in Fall 2015 or Spring 2016 are eligible to enroll. Students enrolled in COLL XXX are expected to meet with the instructor for their regular affiliated class and develop an agreed co-curricular component which will entail some combination of the following: (a) required reading central to the theme; (b) attendance at events sponsored by the Co-Curricular Initiative; (c) a blog of reactions to these events ; (d) a pubic talk in the format of a TED-EX talk and/or (d) writing a substantial paper discussing an important issue. The evaluation of College Course work would be done by the Instructor of that Co-Curricular course. (0.5 course credit) –Staff

[171. The Mindfulness Project: Iaido]— The Mindfulness Project comprises students, faculty, chaplains, and staff who collaborate in an effort to draw members of the Trinity community into those practices and traditions which foster personal and communal well-being. The Mindfulness Project Courses invite interdisciplinary study and exploration across the fields of religion, philosophy, the performing arts, and Asian studies to gain an understanding of the integration of mind, body, and spirit, and to cultivate attention to our interdependence in a pluralistic, multicultural global community. Each student enrolls in a particular Mindfulness Project course and will attend ten one-hour studio sessions. In addition, all students in all courses will participate in four common lectures/workshops with assigned reading. They will also meet in two writing workshops. They will keep an online journal, and submit a paper at the end of the semester. Iaido is a Japanese way of mental presence and immediate reaction, exploring the peaceful art of drawing the katana sword through traditional practice and partner exercise. (0.5 course credit) (Enrollment limited)

[172. The Mindfulness Project: Yoga]— The Mindfulness Project comprises students, faculty, chaplains, and staff who collaborate in an effort to draw members of the Trinity community into those practices and traditions which foster personal and communal well-being. The Mindfulness Project Courses invite interdisciplinary study and exploration across the fields of religion, philosophy, the performing arts, and Asian studies to gain an understanding of the integration of mind, body, and spirit, and to cultivate attention to our interdependence in a pluralistic, multicultural global community. Each student enrolls in a particular Mindfulness Project course and will attend ten one-hour studio sessions. In addition, all students in all courses will participate in four common lectures/workshops with assigned reading. They will also meet in two writing workshops. They will keep an online journal, and submit a paper at the end of the semester. Yoga is a Hindu practice integrating body and mind through postures, breathing exercises, and disciplines of concentration. (0.5 course credit) (Enrollment limited)

[173. The Mindfulness Project: Zen Meditation]— The Mindfulness Project comprises students, faculty, chaplains, and staff who collaborate in an effort to draw members of the Trinity community into those practices and traditions which foster personal and communal well-being. The Mindfulness Project Courses invite interdisciplinary study and exploration across the fields of religion, philosophy, the performing arts, and Asian studies to gain an understanding of the integration of mind, body, and spirit, and to cultivate attention to our interdependence in a pluralistic, multicultural global community. Each student enrolls in a particular Mindfulness Project course and will attend ten one-hour studio sessions. In addition, all students in all courses will participate in four common lectures/workshops with assigned reading. They will also meet in two writing workshops. They will keep an online journal, and submit a paper at the end of the semester. A school of Mahayana Buddhism, Zen is a centuries-old form of meditation that is both simple and profound. (0.5 course credit) (Enrollment limited)

199. The Trinity Portfolio Program— Students will build an electronic portfolio of their academic work, working with a faculty portfolio advisor and a group of nine students. Students will select at least one piece of work from each class, review them with the group, and improve them when appropriate. Students will also produce an extracurricular writing specific to their class year and major. Students will be provided support in developing their portfolio for use in graduate school applications and job interviews and applications. (0.25 course credit) (Enrollment limited) –Barlow, Denning

204. Leadership and Wilderness— This course, for students acting as leaders for the Quest program, aims to expand and deepen two aspects of their experiences in Quest through readings, discussion, and writing. In the course students will read two books focused on leadership skills and a geologic history of wilderness in the northeast. Seminar meetings will be held before and after students participate in the outdoor component of the Quest program on the Appalachian Trail in northwest Connecticut, providing opportunities to think beforehand about and revisit afterwards issues connected with Quest. Students are expected to do the readings, participate actively in seminar discussions, and write a paper on a topic related to their experiences and reading. Participants are also required to complete successfully the field portion of the course, consisting of a 7-day wilderness/leadership training and 10-day leadership program. (0.5 course credit) (Enrollment limited) –Gourley

210L. Theory of Games and Experimental Game Theory— This course will introduce students to the theory of experimental games and the practice of experimental economics. Students will compare various game theoretical predictions with the actual behavior of players in the laboratory setting. Through experimentation, we will study the adaptation processes and learning that players exhibit in competitive strategic interactions, and the rationale behind traits such as reciprocity, fairness, trust, and altruism considered to be irrational by traditional theory. (0.5 course credit) (Enrollment limited) –Schneider

215. A Critical Approach to Economic Organizations Internship— This seminar meets once a week to discuss students’ experiences working as interns in economic organizations. The seminar discussions will integrate student experiences with the various readings covered in the course. Students will be asked to critically analyze the organizations in which they are interning and the environment in which their work takes place. Topics will include the organizational structure of the office, the relations among employees, the ethical and interpersonal problems faced by various groups of workers, gender struggles in the workplace, and issues associated with employing interns. Students are expected to fully participate in seminar discussions. Students need to submit a completed internship contract form to the Career Development Center. Students will not be enrolled until the contract has been approved. (Enrollment limited) –Levine

301. Community Action Integrated Internship— Internship or field work placement, with a required academic component to be determined by the faculty sponsor and student. –Staff

[307. The Emergence of the Modern Mind]— An investigation of some of the major texts illustrating the evolving construct of modernity in Western civilization. Among authors to be studied are Descartes, Locke, Voltaire, and Rousseau. Lectures and class discussions; written work consists of a bibliography, four essays, and a final examination. Only open to juniors and seniors, with preference given to the latter. This course is open to seniors only. (Enrollment limited)

399. Independent Study— (0.5 - 1 course credit) –Staff

Spring Term

[115. Sustainability in Action]— In this College course students will develop their term projects from the fall semester FYSM 157: “Cycling, Sustainability, and the City of Hartford”. Three students will continue to maintain the Trinity community garden. Another group of three students will continue their good work with the West Hartford Bicycle Advisory Committee. Students will meet with the instructors weekly to discuss readings about sustainability and to report on their project activities. Students will post to the Moodle forum each week about readings and discussions and they will submit a final paper reflecting on their course projects. Prerequisite: C- or better in First Year Seminar 157 or consent of instructor. (0.5 course credit) (Enrollment limited)

118. Neuroscience Across the Curriculum— This course supports a co-curricular initiative on neuroscience across the curriculum, focused on neuroscience and the arts. Students enrolled in any course affiliated with the initiative in Fall 2015 or Spring 2016 are eligible to enroll. Students enrolled in COLL XXX are expected to meet with the instructor for their regular affiliated class and develop an agreed co-curricular component which will entail some combination of the following: (a) required reading central to the theme; (b) attendance at events sponsored by the Co-Curricular Initiative; (c) a blog of reactions to these events ; (d) a pubic talk in the format of a TED-EX talk and/or (d) writing a substantial paper discussing an important issue. The evaluation of College Course work would be done by the Instructor of that Co-Curricular course. (0.5 course credit) –Staff

151. French Film Festival— A half-credit course offered in conjunction with the annual spring French Film Festival. Class meetings and film screenings will take place in the second week of April. Two mandatory workshops will take place prior to and following the festival at a time to be announced. Students are required to attend all film showings. One absence will be allowed. Students taking the course for credit in French will be required to do all written work in French and to attend French language versions of the two supplemental workshops. (0.5 course credit) (Enrollment limited) –Humphreys, Kippur

[171. The Mindfulness Project: Iaido]— The Mindfulness Project comprises students, faculty, chaplains, and staff who collaborate in an effort to draw members of the Trinity community into those practices and traditions which foster personal and communal well-being. The Mindfulness Project Courses invite interdisciplinary study and exploration across the fields of religion, philosophy, the performing arts, and Asian studies to gain an understanding of the integration of mind, body, and spirit, and to cultivate attention to our interdependence in a pluralistic, multicultural global community. Each student enrolls in a particular Mindfulness Project course and will attend ten one-hour studio sessions. In addition, all students in all courses will participate in four common lectures/workshops with assigned reading. They will also meet in two writing workshops. They will keep an online journal, and submit a paper at the end of the semester. Iaido is a Japanese way of mental presence and immediate reaction, exploring the peaceful art of drawing the katana sword through traditional practice and partner exercise. (0.5 course credit) (Enrollment limited)

[199. The Trinity Portfolio Program]— Students will build an electronic portfolio of their academic work, working with a faculty portfolio advisor and a group of nine students. Students will select at least one piece of work from each class, review them with the group, and improve them when appropriate. Students will also produce an extracurricular writing specific to their class year and major. Students will be provided support in developing their portfolio for use in graduate school applications and job interviews and applications. (0.25 course credit) (Enrollment limited)

[202. Research Interviewing: Learning From Strangers]— Students in this course will practice research interviewing skills by becoming part of the student research team who conducts Trinity’s senior exit interviews and processes the data from these interviews. Each student will conduct between 3 to 5 interviews with graduating seniors, transcribe the recordings from these interviews, and participate in the early coding and analysis of the transcriptions. Students looking to develop their abilities to work on a team, talk to strangers, manage large amounts of textual information and identify the themes that emerge from personal narratives should take this class. Prerequisite: C- or better in FYSM 107 or permission of instructor (0.5 course credit) (Enrollment limited)

210L. Theory of Games and Experimental Game Theory— This course will introduce students to the theory of experimental games and the practice of experimental economics. Students will compare various game theoretical predictions with the actual behavior of players in the laboratory setting. Through experimentation, we will study the adaptation processes and learning that players exhibit in competitive strategic interactions, and the rationale behind traits such as reciprocity, fairness, trust, and altruism considered to be irrational by traditional theory. (0.5 course credit) (Enrollment limited) –Schneider

215. A Critical Approach to Economic Organizations Internship— This seminar meets once a week to discuss students’ experiences working as interns in economic organizations. The seminar discussions will integrate student experiences with the various readings covered in the course. Students will be asked to critically analyze the organizations in which they are interning and the environment in which their work takes place. Topics will include the organizational structure of the office, the relations among employees, the ethical and interpersonal problems faced by various groups of workers, gender struggles in the workplace, and issues associated with employing interns. Students are expected to fully participate in seminar discussions. Students need to submit a completed internship contract form to the Career Development Center. Students will not be enrolled until the contract has been approved. (Enrollment limited) –Levine

[220. Research Methods and Information Resources]— Do you want to be great at researching information for your courses? Would you like to search library databases in your major as well as a librarian does? Would you like to be a Master Googler? If your answer to any of these questions is yes, then you should take this course. Information is everywhere. But, let’s face it–it’s not always easy to find the exact information you need, when you need it. This course will provide you with the tools and concepts to become a versatile researcher. You will learn to interpret and use a wide variety of resources, understand the ways that information is organized for researchers in different disciplines, and develop effective strategies for evaluating, managing, and sharing information. (0.5 course credit) (Enrollment limited)

301. Community Action Integrated Internship— Internship or field work placement, with a required academic component to be determined by the faculty sponsor and student. –Staff

[399. Independent Study]— (0.5 - 1 course credit)

[466. Teaching Assistantship]— (0.5 - 1 course credit)