Classics

Hobart Professor of Classical Languages Reger, Chair; Associate Professor Risser∙∙; Assistant Professors Ewegen and Safran; Visiting Assistant Professor Kaimowitz

The department offers two majors: classical studies and, in cooperation with the Department of Language and Culture studies, a “Plan B” major.

Within the liberal arts, classics is the discipline that represents the Greek and Roman foundations of Western civilization in their purest form, for it entails the study of Greek and Roman literature in the original languages and the analysis of objective remains recovered through archaeological exploration. The classical studies and “Plan B” majors at Trinity not only prepare students to read original Greek and Latin texts with confidence, but promote in them an awareness of intercultural and interdisciplinary learning, since the study of classics involves history, philosophy, literary criticism, art, and architecture.

The classical studies major—Twelve courses are required, and students must earn a grade of at least C- in each. The requirements include:

The Plan B major—Under this plan, students may combine ancient Greek or Latin with any of the languages taught in the Department of Language and Culture Studies. A minimum of seven courses in a primary language and five in a secondary language is required, as well as two courses in a cognate field or fields (e.g., ancient art, ancient history, archaeology). A paper integrating the three fields of study must be completed in one of the primary language upper-level courses. Except under exceptional circumstances, this project will be undertaken in the primary language section’s senior seminar and must be done at Trinity College.

The award of honors is determined by the excellence of the candidate’s work in courses and performance in the senior seminar.

For students who wish to pursue graduate study, command of both classical languages is essential; a reading knowledge of French and German is also recommended. For courses in Biblical Hebrew and Sanskrit, see the offerings of the Religion Department; for post-classical languages, see the Department of Language and Culture Studies.

For special programs at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies at Rome, Trinity College’s Rome Campus, or the summer excavations at Akko, Israel, see “Special Curricular Opportunities,” p. 31. The department also recommends programs in classics and ancient history offered by universities in the United Kingdom under the auspices of Arcadia University. For departmental prizes, see the section on prizes.

Minors—Four minors are housed in the Classics Department.

Ancient Greek—For students who wish to minor in ancient Greek, this is a sequence of six courses designed to develop linguistic skills to read ancient Greek literature in its original language. In addition, the minor will include either a .5-credit Language Across the Curriculum unit or a .5-credit integrating paper, typically written in conjunction with the last course taken for the minor. No more than one transfer credit may be applied to the “minor”.

Latin—For students who wish to minor in Latin, this is a sequence of six courses designed to develop linguistic skills to read ancient, and possibly medieval, Latin literature in its original language. In addition, the minor will include either a .5-credit Language Across the Curriculum unit or a .5-credit integrating paper, typically written in conjunction with the last course taken for the minor. No more than one transfer credit may be applied to the minor.

Classical antiquity—The purpose of the minor is to allow students to acquire a general knowledge of the achievements of ancient Greece and Rome, which traditionally have constituted, along with the Judeo-Christian tradition, the chief ingredients of Western civilization. Despite the advance of technology, shifts in educational and societal priorities, and an increasing awareness of other civilizations in the 20th century, Homer, Plato, Cicero, and Caesar remain lively figures, and the classical tradition still pervades our poetry and prose, our philosophy and law, our ideas of history, our conceptions of education, and our art and architecture. The student electing this minor will have the opportunity to become acquainted with the classical achievements in each of these areas and to shape that knowledge into an integrated view of antiquity. Students take six approved courses, then either take a short essay exam or submit an integrating paper.

Classical tradition—The minor in the classical tradition will establish a basic acquaintance with the history and cultural landmarks of ancient Greece and Rome, and promote a contextual understanding of later achievements significantly influenced by them, especially in literature and history, the arts, and philosophy. The minor is based on two groups of courses: the first comprises courses in the civilization of classical Greece and Rome, the second courses in subjects in which the presence of the Greek and Roman experience is felt. In addition, students take a short essay exam or submit an integrating paper.

The Classics Department also contributes courses to minors in architectural studies, Jewish studies, literature and psychology, mythology, and women, gender, and sexuality.

Classics

Fall Term

Spring Term

Greek

Fall Term

Spring Term

Latin

Fall Term

Spring Term

Classical Civilization

Fall Term

The following courses presuppose no knowledge of Greek and Latin.

Spring Term

The following courses presuppose no knowledge of Greek and Latin.