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Tours

(See Organ Crawl information at the bottom of this page.)

Explore Newport history! We’re pleased to offer the following three tours to conference participants. Each tour includes transport by trolley and a guide. Tours are based on a 20-person minimum, with a maximum of 30. If the minimum is not met, the tour will be canceled and refunds provided.

To register for Newport tours:
Please call or email Pamela Bristah at Wellesley College, 781-283-2076, pbristah@wellesley.edu and tell her in which tour you are interested. She will respond with your registration number, and with instructions for payment.
Reservations deadline: Thursday, Dec. 20, 2007

Payment deadline: checks must be received by Friday, Jan. 11, 2008

Newport Art Museum

Tour #1: Newport in the 18th and 19th Centuries

This tour begins with the Touro Synagogue. Dedicated in 1763, it is the oldest synagogue in the United States, housed in a Georgian structure designed by Peter Harrison, a renowned 18th-century American architect. Next is the Redwood Library and Athenaeum, also the work of Peter Harrison. Founded in 1747, Redwood is one of the oldest lending libraries in America, and the oldest library building in continuous use in the country. MLA attendees will receive a private tour, and will view music-related rare materials from the library’s vaults. The tour concludes with the Newport Art Museum, which collects and exhibits current and historical art, emphasizing the artistic heritage of Newport, Rhode Island, and southeastern New England.
Wednesday, February 20, 2008, 1PM – 5:00PM, $49.00

 

the Breakers
Tour #2: Life in the Gilded Age

This tour begins with a driving tour of Ocean Drive and Bellevue Avenue, and continues with Beechwood, home of Mrs. Astor, the leader of Newport Society at the turn of the century. Actors and actresses will welcome you to the year 1891 as they portray members of the Astor family, their friends, and domestic staff.  The tour concludes with The Breakers, an Italian Renaissance palazzo built for the Vanderbilts in 1895, sited on 11 acres overlooking the famous Cliff Walk. With 70 rooms, The Breakers is the largest of Newport’s summer “cottages.”
Wednesday, February 20, 2008, 1PM – 4:30PM, $49.00



Tour #3: The Vanderbilt’s Newport

This tour begins with a driving tour of Ocean Drive and Bellevue Avenue, and continues with Marble House, a Beaux Arts mansion built by Richard Morris Hunt, also the architect for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and inspired by the Petit Trianon at Versailles, the Temple of Apollo, and the Temple of the Sun at Heliopolis. The tour concludes with The Breakers, an Italian Renaissance palazzo built for the Vanderbilts in 1895, sited on 11 acres overlooking the famous Cliff Walk. With 70 rooms, The Breakers is the largest of Newport’s summer “cottages.”
Wednesday, February 20, 2008, 1PM – 4:30PM, $49.00


For more information about Newport Mansions, see: http://www.newportmansions.org 


Organ Crawl

We are pleased to offer a Newport organ crawl to conference participants, including members of the Organ Music Round Table, on Wednesday, February 20, 2008. The fee for the crawl includes transportation by mini-coach and a Newport tour guide. Tours are based on a 12-person minimum, with a maximum of 24 participants. If the minimum is not met, the tour will be canceled and refunds provided. Price per person is $25.00. To ensure the necessity of staying on schedule, participants should plan to arrive at the hotel lobby by 11:45 am. The mini-coach leaves the Hyatt Regency promptly at noon, with return scheduled back at the hotel for 5:00 pm.

To register for organ crawl:
Please email or call Marlene Wong at Smith College, mmwong@smith.edu, (413) 585-2931. She will respond with registration number and instructions for payment.
Reservations deadline: Thursday, Dec. 20, 2007
Payment deadline: checks must be received by Friday, January 11, 2008.

This organ crawl begins at St. George’s School, Middletown, RI, about one mile from downtown Newport, overlooking scenic sea side beaches.
 
St. George’s Chapel is a classic Gothic cathedral built in 1928 and designed by Ralph Adams Cram (1863-1942). The chapel houses a state-of-the-art pipe organ built by Garland Pipe Organs Inc. of Fort Worth, Texas. (See specifications here.)

A chapel tour will also be offered by archivist, Jack Doll. All participants interested in going to the top of the chapel tower should wear pants and flat shoes. “It’s quite a view.”

The crawl continues with a guided driving tour of Ocean Drive and Bellevue Avenue, arriving at historic Trinity Church in downtown Newport.

Founded in 1698, Trinity Church has been home to historically important musicians, most notably the "American Pachelbel," Charles Theodore Pachelbel (1690-1750), son of Johann Pachelbel (1653-1706), and William Selby (1738-1798). It has been said that Handel played Trinity Church’s Richard Bridge (fl.1730-d.1758) organ in England before its arrival in Newport in February, 1734. The center façade of the original instrument is intact in the church and some of the pipes would sound if blown through. The original console is preserved and currently on display at the Newport Historical Society’s Museum of Newport History.

The crawl ends at Emmanuel Church, also in downtown Newport. Consecrated in 1902, the current building was (like St. George’s Chapel) designed (after fifteenth century Gothic Revival churches) by Ralph Adams Cram. The four story tower houses two bells (constructed by Whitechapel Bell Foundry in London, England) -- the first just over three tons and the other weighing approximately a thousand pounds. The bells are used to this day, particularly at the conclusion of wedding celebrations. In 1996, Emmanuel’s buildings were placed on the National Register of Historic Places.