Can Charitable Choice Work?:
Covering Religionís Impact on Urban Affairs
and Social Services
Edited by Andrew Walsh, Associate Director of the Greenberg Center
(Hartford, CT: Pew Program on Religion and the News Media
and the Leonard E. Greenberg Center for the Study of Religion in Public Life, 2001).

TABLE OF CONTENTS
(Links to individual chapters require Acrobat Reader)


ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS

INTRODUCTION
Andrew Walsh

CHAPTER I
Still Gathering After All These Years: Congregations In Us Cities
By Nancy T. Ammerman

CHAPTER II
Religion and Regional Culture In Modern America
By Jan Shipps

CHAPTER III
After The Urban Exodus: Jews, Protestants and The Erosion Of Catholic Exceptionalism, 1950-2000.
By Gerald Gamm

CHAPTER IV
Latino Catholics and American Public Life
By Timothy Matovina

CHAPTER V
Historical Perspectives On Religion, Government and Social Welfare In America
By Peter Dobkin Hall

CHAPTER VI
Religious Congregations and Welfare Reform: Assessing the Potential
By Mark Chaves

CHAPTER VII
Black Churches and Civic Traditions: Outreach, Activism, and the Politics of Public Funding of Faith-Based Ministries
By Fredrick C. Harris

CHAPTER VIII
Charitable Choice: The Law As It Is and May Be
By Marc D. Stern

APPENDIX
Articles on Charitable Choice by Staff of the Greenberg Center:

Dennis R. Hoover, "Yes to Charitable Choice" The Nation, August 7/14, 2000, pp. 6-7, 28.
Mark Silk, "Old Alliance, New Ground Rules" Washington Post, February 18, 2001, Outlook; p. B3.
Dennis R. Hoover, "Faith-based Update: Bipartisan Breakdown" Religion in the News, Vol. 4 No. 2, Summer 2001, pp. 14-18.


The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Pew Charitable Trusts.

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