Course Descriptions

Trinity College Rome Campus courses are taught by a mixture of Trinity College Rome Campus faculty. 
Please note that all course information is subject to change at any time. To request syllabi, please contact the Trinity Rome Campus Coordinator. 
All students must receive approval for major, minor, and general requirements credit. .All students should receive approval from their major department for courses to count towards their major and work with their minor coordinator on their minor. 
Visiting students should receive approval for all courses through the appropriate process at their home institution. 


Regular Rome Campus Courses 

 
Drawing from Masterpieces (ROME 120)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: None
Additional fee required for supplies: $150
 
An introduction to drawing from masterpieces of sculpture, painting, and architecture, with emphases on observation, technique, interpretation, and aesthetic emotions. Rome's museums and cityscape of ruins and monuments will be our studio. We shall focus on the human figure, monumental forms, vantage points, choices of significant details, methods of composition, and techniques of linear and tonal drawing.​

Introduction to the Art of Rome (ROME 181)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: None
 
A survey of Roman art from the Ancient Republic through the seventeenth century. Topics include: religious art; the basilica; monumental architecture designed to express imperial and papal power; visual narrative in sculpture and painting; the rise of perspective and illusion in pictorial space; and the classical tradition. Reserved for students new to art history.

Economics of Art (ROME 208)
Term Offered: Fall ONLY
Lecture
1 course credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: Introductory Economics​
 
Is art just another commodity? Or is art beyond the normal laws of economics? This course will examine markets and policy in the arts to determine how and why the arts are special. Topics include the value of priceless art, the starving artist, subsidies for the arts, and the role of non-profits, patronage, and investing in art. There will be guest speakers from the Roman art world. (Trinity College Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101).​

Italian Cinema (ROME 217)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 course credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: None

Analysis and comparison of narrative and dramatic elements of Italian literature and cinema. This course will consider novels and their film versions, works in the two media by the same artist, and varying treatments of the same themes in literature and film. The course will focus in part on works set in Rome.

Art Conservation (ROME 224)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: None
 
An introduction to the history, theory, techniques, institutions and policies of art conservation. Students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of art by viewing masterpieces as complex, vulnerable materials that require our involvement in conservation if we are to grasp and preserve the artists’ message. We will examine firsthand outstanding examples of art conservation in several media and from different periods in history. Works may include ancient Etruscan tombs in Tarquinia, Egyptian paintings of the 3rd century, the huge Montelparo polyptych of the 15th century, Michelangelo’s frescoes in the Sistine Chapel, the Casina Pio IV (a beautiful 16th-century structure in the Vatican Gardens that has been comprehensively restored) and its stucco decorations, and gypsum casts of sculptures by Canova. We will discuss criteria and policies for selecting particular works of art for conservation (and necessarily neglecting others) when resources are scarce. We will also discuss preventive conservation, particularly the importance of environment and the ideal parameters for temperature humidity, air quality, and lighting. Slide lectures in the classroom alternate with on-site instruction at museums, monuments, and conservation workshops. 

Mussolini’s Rome (ROME 228)
Term Offered:  Fall 2018
Lecture
1 course credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: None

Few cities have been so transformed by ideology as Rome; its current state is a direct reflection of Fascist policy and propaganda during the period between the two World Wars. Although the emerging Fascist party initially embraced the bold, modernist forms of Futurism for its visual propaganda, Mussolini and his supporters preferred the stripped, monumental classicism known as Rationalism for their massive architectural and urban projects. This sensibility was ideally suited to Mussolini’s global ambitions, and talented architects flocked to the Fascist party as Rome was reshaped to reflect its status as resurgent Imperial power. This course will trace the rise and fall of Fascism, its influence upon the art and architecture of the Italian state, and its role in the physical transformation of Rome during the Fascist era.​

Ancient Art of Rome (ROME 230)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Seminar
 1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: None
 
Art and architecture in Rome, from the Etruscan age to the late Empire. Topics include: historical context; style; iconography; building typology and techniques; sculpture; painting; the development of artistic taste; and the use of art as propaganda. Fieldwork includes a trip to the Naples Archeological Museum, Pompeii, and Villa Jovis (Capri).

The City of Rome (ROME 250)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 course credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: None
 
We will trace the profile and examine the fabric of the Eternal City from ancient to contemporary times, from insula to borgata. We will explore the city not as a showplace of famous monuments but as a complex pattern of historical, political, and social elements that have shaped its distinctive character. Classroom lectures alternate with site visits in Rome. Assignments include readings from a variety of disciplines and field research.
 
Economics of Religion (ROME 258)
Term Offered: Spring ONLY
Lecture
1 course credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: Introductory Economics

The course provides deeper understanding of religious phenomena, behaviors and institutions in (post)modern societies. Economic tools of the analysis of human behavior are applied to explain individual behavior in religious contexts. Special attention will be devoted to phenomena that apparently defy the rational choice paradigm dominant in economic science, such as martyrdom. Attention will be also devoted to the impact of religious behaviors on economic performance, work ethic and market exchanges and institutions.  The course offers an introduction to methods offered by economic analysis for the study of religious phenomena.  The intervention of an outside speaker possibly from the Vatican with a direct expertise in financial issues will be organized. Note: students may enroll in only one of ROME 258 or ROME 358.  (Trinity College Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101).

Immigration and Mobility (ROME 261)-New Course Offering!
Term Offered: Fall and Spring 
Seminar
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 semester hours
Prerequisite: None
 
This course will offer a theoretical and hands-on trip through Italy, understood as a land of migration. In addition to more recent attention to the so called “migration crisis” in Italy, which has represented a unique and unprecedented case, Italy has had an important historical relationship with migration and issues related to migration (mobility, citizenship rights, border crossing). This journey shall be experience through the narration of different experiences that characterize the complex contemporary identity of Italy and its inhabitants: Italians abroad, Roma and Sinti, postcolonial citizens, historical migrant enclaves, the presence of refugees, asylum seekers, and irregular migrants.
The course will examine the concepts of citizenship and belonging in relation to Italy, their changing significance over time, their socio-political impact and their place in the contemporary Italian political discussion. The concept of border and policies on border crossing will be analyzed as crucial aspects for understanding how Italians conceive of mobility and their belonging to the nation-state: who has the right to be ‘inside’? When is a border  perceived as physical, and when does it become intangible?​


Urban and Global Rome (ROME 270)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: None
 
This is an interdisciplinary course that draws on perspectives from anthropology, sociology, political science, geography, economy and other relevant disciplines. It offers the students local perspectives on globalization as it allows global perspectives on the city of Rome. The intertwined processes of globalization and localization ("globalization") will be addressed via an in-depth study of the city and the social, cultural, political, demographic and economic transformations Rome is currently going through. On-site visits will enable students to experience alternative settings of the "Eternal City" and give them direct contact with local inhabitants and representatives of religious/ethnic minority groups.

Sports & Society in Modern Italy (ROME 285)
Term Offered: Fall 2018
Lecture
1 course credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: None

This course will examine the role of sport (with an emphasis on soccer and cycling) in Italian society from historical and contemporary perspectives. The course will consider the relationship between sports and issues such as gender, race, class, ethnicity, sexuality, nationalism, nation-building, the Italian economy, and the role of the media in order to determine how developments in sports have influenced, and been influenced by Italian politics and society.
 ​
Child Development (ROME 295)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity credit =  3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101
 
This course will follow the development of the child from the prenatal stage through adolescence, with emphasis on development in its various contexts with particular emphasis on the intersubjective context. It will explore the interrelationships between different aspects of development (cognitive, physical, social and emotional) in the formation of attachments, the regulation of emotions, the development of language and other cognitive functions and the child's growing place in the social world. The interaction of the child's various contexts and the interrelationship between different aspects of development will always be a central focus. Particular attention will be given to infant research and the implications of the findings of intersubjective infant researchers on later emerging characteristics of the growing child.​

Public Finance (ROME 306/ECON 306)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 course credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: Intermediate Microeconomics
 
 A course in the economics of taxation, government spending, governmental finance and related policy issues in comparative institutional perspective. Part I is a brief overview of the role of government from positive and normative perspectives. Part II develops the economics of public choice and public finance in a range of institutional settings: majority vs. unanimity voting, presidential vs. parliamentary democracy, federal vs. centralized states, dictatorships, and supranational institutions. Part III applies the tools developed in parts I and II to special topics, which may include health-care and pension systems, taxation, appropriations, expenditures, bureaucracy, the size of government, and corruption. Empirical examples are drawn from Italy and the EU, the U.S., and developing countries. (Trinity College Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301).​​

The European Union: History, Political Economy, and Society (ROME 327)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring 
Lecture
1 course credit =  3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: None

This course is organized around a series of controversies regarding the European Union.  The EU has become the world's largest market, with over 500 million people.  It is unique in world history in creating a form of government across 27 nation states without military conquest or force.  It has become an economic, diplomatic and arguably a political actor at a superpower level, though militarily it remains less important.  What is Europe exactly?  How far can it or should it expand?  Is Europe Christian, Secular, Liberal, Socialist?  Who else should join - Turkey, Russia, Israel, North African countries?  Is the European Social Model an alternative to American Free Market policies?  Can it Survive Globalization?  Can Europe replace the US a leader of the West?  How does the EU work-is it really democratic?  If so, how do the citizens of 27 countries influence their continental governmental bodies?  Who is in charge and how do the institutions of Europe work?  Is the Euro the future reserve money for the world economy, replacing the dollar?  
 
Michelangelo and His World (ROME 340)
Term Offered: Fall ONLY
Seminar
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: One course in Art History
 
The life and works of Michelangelo painter, sculptor, and architect in historical context. Works include Bacchus, David, the early and late Pietà, the Sistine Chapel frescoes, the Medici Chapel, St. Peter’s dome, Moses, and the unfinished Slaves. Topics include Florence and Rome, genius and patronage, classicism and mannerism, and technique and neo-platonism. The academic excursion to Florence is an integral part of the course. The focus on Michelangelo is supplemented by contextual survey elements. The seminar component consists of reports and presentations on topics chosen in consultation with the instructor.
 
Bernini and His World (ROME 342)
Term Offered: Spring ONLY
Seminar
1 Trinity credit =3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: One course in Art History

The course will focus on the art of Gianlorenzo Bernini's oeuvre in the context of late-sixteenth and seventeenth-century Italian art and society. Students will investigate the artistic evolution of the sculptor/architect, the influence he exerted on his contemporaries, the legacy he left to posterity, as well as the literary and biographical texts that shaped the image of the artist as we have come to know him. The weekly lectures will be complemented by weekly on-site visits to museums (such as the Borghese Gallery and the Palazzo Barberini), churches (such as Sant' Andrea al Quirinale and St. Peter's Basilica) and sites usually inaccessible to general visitor (such as the Oratorio del Gonfalone, the Casino Rospigliosi and the archives of the Accademia di San Luca)/ The seminar component of the course consists of reports and on-site presentations by the students. 

In addition to the regular classes,  students visit the marble quarries in Carrera (from where Michelangelo and Bernini got their marble) and the Nicoli sculpture studio. While at the former site the class will be to see how marble is quarried and transported, at the latter venue students will learn about various types of marble used by artists to this day, sculpting tools and techniques, and sculpture reproduction on various scales from original plaster models.  On the way back to Rome, students will spend one night in the town of Orvieto where they will see Francesco Mochi’s famous sculpture ensemble The Archangel Gabriel and Virgin Mary as well as the impressive Baroque sculpture collection in the Church of Sant’Agostino, formerly located in the Orvieto cathedral.

Economics of Religion (ROME 358)
Term Offered: Spring ONLY
Lecture
Prof. Fabio Padovano 
1 course credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: Intermediate Microeconomics

The course provides deeper understanding of religious phenomena, behaviors and institutions in (post)modern societies. Economic tools of the analysis of human behavior are applied to explain individual behavior in religious contexts. Special attention will be devoted to phenomena that apparently defy the rational choice paradigm dominant in economic science, such as martyrdom. Attention will be also devoted to the impact of religious behaviors on economic performance, work ethic and market exchanges and institutions.  The course offers an introduction to methods offered by economic analysis for the study of religious phenomena.  The intervention of an outside speaker possibly from the Vatican with a direct expertise in financial issues will be organized. Supplementary work will employ intermediate microeconomic theory.  Note: students may enroll in only one of ROME 258 or ROME 358. (Trinity College Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301).​

 
ITALIAN LANGUAGE
 ***All students are required to take an Italian language course in Rome***


​Intensive Introductory Italian (ROME 101)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1.5 course credits = 5.25 credit hours
Prerequisite: None

A course designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Italian.
 
Advanced Introductory Italian (ROME 102)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1.5 course credits = 5.25 credit hours
Prerequisite: Italian 101 or equivalent

Continuation of 101, emphasizing conversation, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension.
 
Intermediate Italian I: Conversation and Composition (ROME 201)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 course credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: Italian 102 or equivalent
 
A course to develop conversational and writing skills. A brief review of grammar and syntax will be followed by readings from a variety of texts to foster a solid command of the written and spoken language.
 
Intermediate Italian II: Composition and Introduction to Literary Readings (ROME 202)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 course credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: Italian 102 or equivalent
 
Practice in oral and written expression on topics in Italian culture, incorporating an introduction to literary genres (theater, poetry, and prose).
 
Italian Culture (ROME 299)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 course credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: Intermediate Italian or its equivalent
 
Analysis and interpretation of elements of Italian culture. Topics may be drawn from literature, film, performing arts, fine arts, minor arts, anthropology, or contemporary media. Coursework is in Italian.

Intermediate Latin Tutorial (ROME 410)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours​
Prerequisite: None

The program can provide instruction in Latin at various levels for students whose majors require continued study in Rome. Students will be grouped according to broad ability levels in small group settings.

Advanced Latin Tutorial  (ROME 460)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours​​
Prerequisite: None

The program can provide instruction in Latin at various levels for students whose majors require continued study in Rome. Students will be grouped according to broad ability levels in small group settings.
 
Greek Tutorial (Available at Various Levels)
Term Offered: Fall and Spring
Lecture
Prof. TBA
Prerequisite: None
 
The program can provide instruction in Greek at various levels for students whose majors require continued study in Rome. Students will be grouped according to broad ability levels in small group settings.
 
 

 



 

 

 

 

 


 

 

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