Course Descriptions


All students must take a French course for the semester at the appropriate level.
 SELECT ONE COURSE FROM THIS ​SECTION 
(If you are a high level french student you can take two 300 level courses)

PARI 101: Intensive Elementary French (equivalent to French 101 at Trinity)
Offered fall and spring
Lecture
1.5 course credits = 5.25 credit hours​
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities, Second Language
 
Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand and speak French. Emphasis will be placed on ability to speak, while continually broadening students' knowledge of vocabulary, grammar, French and Francophone culture and current events. For students who have had some background, this course will emphasize oral practice; consolidate basic grammar skills and ability to read short texts. It will also introduce the ability to write short compositions.  There are four hours of class per week.
 
PARI 102: Intensive Elementary French (equivalent to French 102 at Trinity)
Offered fall and spring 

Lecture
1.5 course credits = 5.25 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities, Second Language
 
Paris 102 is a continuation of Paris 101, designed to help students develop a basic ability to read, write, understand and speak French. French 102 extends and reinforces the basic structures and skills learned in French 101, while continually broadening students' knowledge of vocabulary, grammar, French and Francophone culture and current events. There are four hours of class per week.
 
PARI 201:  Intermediate French (equivalent to French 201)
Offered fall and spring
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities
 
Review of basic grammatical concepts and development of fundamental language skills with increasing emphasis on written expression and spoken accuracy, while continually broadening students' knowledge of vocabulary, grammar, French and Francophone culture and current events.
 
PARI 202:  Intermediate French (equivalent to French 202)
Offered fall and spring
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities
 
Further reinforcement of written and spoken skills, with continuing practice in the use of complex grammatical structures and greater emphasis on the mastery of contemporary usage through extensive class discussion, reading, and writing. There are three hours of class work per week, while continually broadening students' knowledge of vocabulary, grammar, French and Francophone culture and current events.
 
PARI 301: French for Advanced Students
Offered fall and spring
Lecture
equivalent to FREN 241
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Pre-requisite: FREN 202 or higher

Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities, French major and minor , pre-requisite for FREN 251 and 252

Development of a high level of proficiency through the reading and analysis of contemporary texts and film in idiomatic French, with considerable emphasis on attainment of grammatical accuracy.

 
PARI 302: French Language and Culture: Paris Theatre Literature & Performance   
Offered Fall and spring
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities, French Studies major and minor 
 
Students will read and discuss French plays of various periods and attend theatrical performances of the plays they have studied. Students will do additional research and writing at the seminar level. This course counts for major credit in Modern Languages and Theater and fulfills the college’s general distribution requirement in the humanities.
  
PARI 335: La France Rebelle à Travers les Arts
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent​
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities, French Studies major and minor

What role have the creative arts played in the great social movements of twentieth and twenty-first centuries France? Through the study of media such as films, photographs, songs and literary works, this course will examine artists' testimonies and political practice in three major historical moments: 1936 and the rise of the Popular Front, the profound social upheaval of “Mai ‘68” and contemporary movements of rebellion such as “Nuit debout”. 

 
The courses below are taught in English unless otherwise indicated.
​SELECT 3-4 COURSES FROM THIS SECTION
 
PARI 209: A Cultural History of Paris Through Literature, 1700-1950
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, English 200-level cultural context
 
From eighteenth-century coffee houses and literary salons to Sylvia Beach’s Shakespeare & Company, Paris has been rich in attractions for aspiring and accomplished writers.  Yet, as much as literature was influenced by the city, the history of Paris has been shaped by authors from all over the globe, and its literary treatment as the City of Lights, metropolis, capital of progress, and lovers refuge continues to determine our conceptions of Paris.
 
This course studies the history of the city and the history of literature in the heyday of French power, from the Enlightenment to the mid-twentieth century.  It pays particular attention to how Parisian authors looked at the city and at how the Parisian experience allowed foreigners – especially Americans – to reconceive of what they left behind.  Key authors include Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Dumas, Balzac, Hugo, Baudelaire, Flaubert, Zola, James, Hemingway, and Baldwin.

PARI 235:   A History of French Republican Values and Colonialism ​
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities, Political Science (pending dept approval)
France is often associated with political and social progress. Republicanism, Human Rights, Secularism, Liberty and Equality were values promoted by Enlightenment philosophers and the French Revolution. Major reforms of the school system, the separation of the Church and State and universal Healthcare embodied these ideals. However Republican values engendered negative side effects such as colonialism and Imperialism. The course will examine these aspects of the "French experiment" since the Revolution, linking them with contemporary debates such as post colonialism, immigration and Islam.​
 
PARI 237: Understanding Contemporary Paris: Urban and Global Processes
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Urban Studies Major or Minor, French Studies minor, Urban Studies, Political Science (pending department approval)
 
The course aims at providing a general overview of urban sociology; an introduction to core notions such as urban economics, segregation, ethnicity, stratification, crime, urban riots, local social policy, and urban politics.  In addition, the class will systematically compare US and French perspectives on the same issues. Field trips in Paris will be organized to train students to match concepts and theories with everyday experience. 
 
PARI 240: Paris Through the Looking Glass, Intercultural Psychology
Lecture
 (1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours)
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Eligible for Psychology major credit 
 
This course aims to introduce students to the field of cross-cultural psychology by offering them an understanding of culture’s impact on the psyche and various aspects of human interaction. This would include an in-depth look at the challenges of cross-cultural relationships in such areas as parenting, education and the workplace. The course’s interactive approach will combine theoretical knowledge in intercultural/cross-cultural psychology with students’ direct experiences while studying abroad in Paris to give them a better framework for understanding these experiences.​

PARI 251: Paris through its Art and Architecture: Gothic period to the French Revolution​
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global,  Art, 17th/18th /19th Cent. Art History Major, French Studies minor, Urban Studies.
 
Encompassing the period between the French Revolution in 1789 to the outbreak of the Second World War, that is from neoclassicism to surrealism, this course introduces students to the major artists and the main aesthetic trends in the field of painting, sculpture, architecture and the decorative arts in the modern period. Site specific, the lecture will concentrate on the artists who worked and on the events which took place in Paris. The goal is to understand why Paris was the art capital throughout the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century and how the atmosphere of the French capital contributed to the development of the ground breaking ideas of the avant-garde, attracting artists from all over the world.

PARI 285: A City in Focus: Photographing Paris
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, French Major Plan A, French Studies Minor

This new course will introduce the students to the semiotics of photography, (the codes according to which one can analyze and compose a photograph), and study its technical aspects. Students will examine representations of Paris by major photographers and visit museums and galleries. At the same time students will express their own vision of Paris through photography and the production of a portfolio. Students' photos will be presented in a class exhibition on Trinity campus and on the Trinity in Paris website.

 PARI 329: The First World War (1914-1918): A War of a New Kind, a War of Images
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global Engagement 


The seminar will study, on the one hand, the images commissioned by the combatant governments or published in the official press to report the conflict and to shape opinion (propaganda) while, on the other hand, viewing the independent responses to the war by artists who fought as volunteers or who experienced the inhumaity of the war and turned against it. The course will help students understand the First World War, its impact on modern European history and how it invoked questionable values we still struggle with today including nationalism, gender determination, glamorization, and manipulation.  The seminar is related to the Centennial of the Great War celebrated by many institutions in France. The students will make field trips to the International Museum of the Great War at Péronne and to temporary exhibits dedicated to the event (“1914 : l'Abîme” at the National Library; “Regards sur la Première Guerre Mondiale” at the Musée de l’Armée; «Paris, Londres et Berlin en 1914 » at the City Hall; “Hans Richter” at centre Pompidou Metz) and to the permanent collections of the Musée de l’Armée at Les Invalides in Paris.

This course is designed for students of history, American Studies, Political Science and Art History and addresses issues as well in art, journalism, literature and human rights.

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Direct Enrollment Options

In addition to Trinity in Paris-taught courses in French language, humanities and other disciplines, Trinity in Paris students have the option of enrolling directly in a French university:

For students who would like to take a course in the social sciences or humanities, courses are offered in English in the following areas: 
•    International relations
•    Political Science
•    British and American literature
•    History
•    Education
•    History of French Cinema
•    French Literature in Translation
 
For students taking courses in English at ICP they are required to take their language course and three electives on the Trinity in Paris program and then can take one course at ICP if they would like. 

(ILCF)
 
The ILCF is a division of ICP that offerscourses for foreign French students in the areas of French language and French culture. Courses are offered in both French and English in the following areas: 
•    French language
•    French culture
•    History of French Cinema
•    Best of French Literature (French literature survey course)
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