Course Descriptions

 Special Spring 2018 courses

Between Wars: American Writers in Paris, 1902-1939 (Visiting Faculty Professor Lucy Ferriss)
Our focus in this class is on the explosion of form and content that marked fiction, nonfiction, and poetry written by Americans living or sojourning in Paris during the Jazz Age and into the Depression. Influenced not only by the emergence of Modernism but also by Paris-centered explorations in other arts (music, dance, painting, photography), the writers who came to Paris for inspiration and collaboration produced works that set the course of American literature for the remainder of the 20th century. Our reading list includes Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises; Stein, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas; Flanner, Paris Was Yesterday; Barnes, Nightwood; Miller, Tropic of Cancer; short stories by Fitzgerald, Dos Passos, and Nin; and poetry by Pound and Cummings, among others. Films and excursions will connect these texts both to the geography of Paris and to other expatriate cultural figures of the time like Josephine Baker, Cole Porter, Erik Satie, Salvador Dali, Man Ray, Isadora Duncan, and the Ballets Russes. For English majors, this course would satisfy the requirements for post-1900 literature and for American literature.​

Writing in Place  (Visiting Faculty Professor Lucy Ferriss)
A creative writing workshop centered on the imaginative use of place. In poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, we will create lyric moments and narratives in which the sense of place--the contours of a neighborhood, weather, regional accents, architecture, winding streets, smells--takes priority. We will write often in plein air, recording our impressions as we settle into a place and then shaping the role of that place imaginatively in writing. Readings in English and in translation of authors whose vivid imagery is drawn from Paris and its environs. Field trips in and around Paris. This course will satisfy the requirement of a 300-level elective for literature students, and may be accepted in lieu of 270 for creative writing students.​

Kings and Courts​: France in the Age of Renaissance ( Visiting Faculty Professor Jean Cadogan)
 French national identity, culture and art begin in the late Middle Ages and emerge with absolute monarchy in the sixteenth century, the Renaissance. This course studies the art produced in the Paris of Louis IX, through developments in painting, sculpture, architecture and decorative arts up to the reign of Henri II in the late sixteenth century.  It includes cultural production in Paris and in the ducal courts of Burgundy, Berry and Anjou in the fifteenth century. The arts of the sixteenth century are studied in the context of wider European trends in Italy and the Netherlands.  The course includes weekly site visits to experience objects and monuments first hand in Paris and beyond.

​Royal Court to Belle ​Epoque: Becoming the City of Light (Visiting Faulty Professor Jean Cadogan)
This course studies the history of Paris as a center of cultural production from the construction of the cathedral of Notre Dame in 1163 through the Belle Époque. Highlighted is the role of the monarchy in the emergence of Paris as an artistic center, from the construction of defensive walls under Philippe-Auguste through the creations of the Château de Versailles and the works of the reign of Louis XIV. By the age of Marie Antoinette, French culture was preeminent in Europe. Transformations to the city and its institutions during the reigns of Napoleon I and Napoleon III resulted in the city as we know it today. The course features weekly site visits and walking tours.

All students must take a French course for the semester at the appropriate level.
 
PARI 101: Intensive Elementary French (equivalent to French 101 at Trinity)
Offered fall and spring
Lecture
1.5 course credits = 5.25 credit hours​
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities, Second Language
 
Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand and speak French. Emphasis will be placed on ability to speak, while continually broadening students' knowledge of vocabulary, grammar, French and Francophone culture and current events. For students who have had some background, this course will emphasize oral practice; consolidate basic grammar skills and ability to read short texts. It will also introduce the ability to write short compositions.  There are four hours of class per week.
 
PARI 102: Intensive Elementary French (equivalent to French 102 at Trinity)
Offered fall and spring 

Lecture
1.5 course credits = 5.25 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities, Second Language
 
Paris 102 is a continuation of Paris 101, designed to help students develop a basic ability to read, write, understand and speak French. French 102 extends and reinforces the basic structures and skills learned in French 101, while continually broadening students' knowledge of vocabulary, grammar, French and Francophone culture and current events. There are four hours of class per week.
 
PARI 201:  Intermediate French (equivalent to French 201)
Offered fall and spring
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities
 
Review of basic grammatical concepts and development of fundamental language skills with increasing emphasis on written expression and spoken accuracy, while continually broadening students' knowledge of vocabulary, grammar, French and Francophone culture and current events.
 
PARI 202:  Intermediate French (equivalent to French 202)
Offered fall and spring
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities
 
Further reinforcement of written and spoken skills, with continuing practice in the use of complex grammatical structures and greater emphasis on the mastery of contemporary usage through extensive class discussion, reading, and writing. There are three hours of class work per week, while continually broadening students' knowledge of vocabulary, grammar, French and Francophone culture and current events.
 
PARI 301: French for Advanced Students
Offered fall and spring
Lecture
equivalent to FREN 241
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Pre-requisite: FREN 202 or higher

Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities, French major and minor , pre-requisite for FREN 251 and 252

Development of a high level of proficiency through the reading and analysis of contemporary texts and film in idiomatic French, with considerable emphasis on attainment of grammatical accuracy.

 
PARI 302: French Language and Culture: Paris Theatre Literature & Performance   
Offered Fall and spring
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities, French Studies major and minor 
 
Students will read and discuss French plays of various periods and attend theatrical performances of the plays they have studied. Students will do additional research and writing at the seminar level. This course counts for major credit in Modern Languages and Theater and fulfills the college’s general distribution requirement in the humanities.
 
PARI 303: Paris Tales
Offered Spring Only
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent.
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities, French Studies najor and minor 
 
The course “Paris Tales” aims to familiarize students with a variety of literary texts in French that are relevant to the urban experience in Paris. The course will feature the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. Authors will include familiar names such as Balzac, Zola, Flaubert but also contemporary writers such as Perec and Nobel prize winner Modiano.

PARI 335: La France Rebelle à Travers les Arts
Offered Fall Only
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent​
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities, French Studies major and minor

What role have the creative arts played in the great social movements of twentieth and twenty-first centuries France? Through the study of media such as films, photographs, songs and literary works, this course will examine artists' testimonies and political practice in three major historical moments: 1936 and the rise of the Popular Front, the profound social upheaval of “Mai ‘68” and contemporary movements of rebellion such as “Nuit debout”. 

 
The courses below are taught in English unless otherwise indicated.
 
PARI  150 - Phantom(s) of the Opera ​
Offered Special Fall 2017 Offering
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global and Art
 

Immerse yourself in the performance and history of opera in Paris. Even better, attend performances at the Opéra Bastille, Palais Garnier, Versailles, and Opéra-Comique.


PARI 228 - Cabarets and Cellars: American Popular Culture in Paris, 1920-1960 
Offered Special Fall 2017 Offering 
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global and Art
 

Explore the music of American jazz, blues, classical, and folk musicians who performed in Paris in the mid 20th century. This course will consider what it meant to be an American in Paris and how American culture informed French culture. 


PARI 209: A Cultural History of Paris Through Literature, 1700-1950
Offered Fall 2017 ONLY
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, English 200-level cultural context
 
From eighteenth-century coffee houses and literary salons to Sylvia Beach’s Shakespeare & Company, Paris has been rich in attractions for aspiring and accomplished writers.  Yet, as much as literature was influenced by the city, the history of Paris has been shaped by authors from all over the globe, and its literary treatment as the City of Lights, metropolis, capital of progress, and lovers refuge continues to determine our conceptions of Paris.
 
This course studies the history of the city and the history of literature in the heyday of French power, from the Enlightenment to the mid-twentieth century.  It pays particular attention to how Parisian authors looked at the city and at how the Parisian experience allowed foreigners – especially Americans – to reconceive of what they left behind.  Key authors include Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Dumas, Balzac, Hugo, Baudelaire, Flaubert, Zola, James, Hemingway, and Baldwin.

PARI 328: The Founding Fathers in Paris 1776-1789
Offered Spring Only
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, History 300 major credit with permission of the Chair of the Department of History, American Studies Major as a 300-level course, French Studies minor, Public Policy as a 300 level
 
Three of America’s founding fathers: Benjamin Franklin, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson lived in France in the decade marked by the Declaration of Independence and the fall of the Bastille (1776 until 1789). All three men were ‘foreigners’ in France, symbols of the New World; they both created and reflected the notion of ‘Americans in Paris.’ At the same time, the exceptional intellectual character of the Founding Fathers contributed to the political revolutions that gave birth to the sister republics of France and America. This course will examine careers of Franklin, Jefferson and Adams at the court of Versailles. The fundamental role of the Marquis de Lafayette in French and American history will be examined. The course will include visits to several museums of eighteenth century France (Musée Carnavalet, Cognac Jay) and walking tours of the city that  follow the footsteps of the eighteenth century Americans in Paris. 

PARI 329: The First World War (1914-1918): A War of a New Kind, a War of Images
Offered Fall Only
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global Engagement 


The seminar will study, on the one hand, the images commissioned by the combatant governments or published in the official press to report the conflict and to shape opinion (propaganda) while, on the other hand, viewing the independent responses to the war by artists who fought as volunteers or who experienced the inhumaity of the war and turned against it. The course will help students understand the First World War, its impact on modern European history and how it invoked questionable values we still struggle with today including nationalism, gender determination, glamorization, and manipulation.  The seminar is related to the Centennial of the Great War celebrated by many institutions in France. The students will make field trips to the International Museum of the Great War at Péronne and to temporary exhibits dedicated to the event (“1914 : l'Abîme” at the National Library; “Regards sur la Première Guerre Mondiale” at the Musée de l’Armée; «Paris, Londres et Berlin en 1914 » at the City Hall; “Hans Richter” at centre Pompidou Metz) and to the permanent collections of the Musée de l’Armée at Les Invalides in Paris.

This course is designed for students of history, American Studies, Political Science and Art History and addresses issues as well in art, journalism, literature and human rights.

 
PARI 235:   A History of French Republican Values and Colonialism ​
​​Offered Fall Only 
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Humanities
France is often associated with political and social progress. Republicanism, Human Rights, Secularism, Liberty and Equality were values promoted by Enlightenment philosophers and the French Revolution. Major reforms of the school system, the separation of the Church and State and universal Healthcare embodied these ideals. However Republican values engendered negative side effects such as colonialism and Imperialism. The course will examine these aspects of the "French experiment" since the Revolution, linking them with contemporary debates such as post colonialism, immigration and Islam.​



PARI 325:   French and European Politics
​​Offered Spring Only 
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Political Science comparative politics 300-level​

It is hard to think of a more different country from the USA within the Western Democratic world than France. Centralization vs. federalism, multiparty system vs. bipolar party system, regulated vs. deregulated political campaigns, everything seems to distinguish French politics and public policies from their American counterparts. This class will focus on numerous issues related to French political life, using a comparative approach with the United States : political structure, elections, parties, local powers, political sociology, public opinion.

​​

 
PARI 237: Understanding Contemporary Paris: Urban and Global Processes
Offered Fall and spring
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Urban Studies Major or Minor, French Studies minor, Urban Studies
 
The course aims at providing a general overview of urban sociology; an introduction to core notions such as urban economics, segregation, ethnicity, stratification, crime, urban riots, local social policy, and urban politics.  In addition, the class will systematically compare US and French perspectives on the same issues. Field trips in Paris will be organized to train students to match concepts and theories with everyday experience. 

 
PARI 251: Paris through its Art and Architecture: Gothic period to the French Revolution​
Offered Fall Only
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global,  Art, 17th/18th /19th Cent. Art History Major, French Studies minor, Urban Studies.
 
Encompassing the period between the French Revolution in 1789 to the outbreak of the Second World War, that is from neoclassicism to surrealism, this course introduces students to the major artists and the main aesthetic trends in the field of painting, sculpture, architecture and the decorative arts in the modern period. Site specific, the lecture will concentrate on the artists who worked and on the events which took place in Paris. The goal is to understand why Paris was the art capital throughout the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century and how the atmosphere of the French capital contributed to the development of the ground breaking ideas of the avant-garde, attracting artists from all over the world.

PARI 252: Paris through its Art and Architecture: French Revolution - Surrealism
Offered  Spring Only (NOT BEING OFFEReD SPRING 2018)
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global,  Art, 17th/18th /19th Cent. Art History Major, French Studies minor, Urban Studies.
 
Encompassing the period between the French Revolution in 1789 to the outbreak of the Second World War, that is from neoclassicism to surrealism, this course introduces students to the major artists and the main aesthetic trends in the field of painting, sculpture, architecture and the decorative arts in the modern period. Site specific, the lecture will concentrate on the artists who worked and on the events which took place in Paris. The goal is to understand why Paris was the art capital throughout the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century and how the atmosphere of the French capital contributed to the development of the ground breaking ideas of the avant-garde, attracting artists from all over the world.


PARI 285: A City in Focus: Photographing Paris
Offered Fall Only
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Global, French Major Plan A, French Studies Minor

This new course will introduce the students to the semiotics of photography, (the codes according to which one can analyze and compose a photograph), and study its technical aspects. Students will examine representations of Paris by major photographers and visit museums and galleries. At the same time students will express their own vision of Paris through photography and the production of a portfolio. Students' photos will be presented in a class exhibition on Trinity campus and on the Trinity in Paris website.
 
PARI 289:   Drawing Paris: Carnet de Voyage
Offered Spring Only
Lecture
1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours
Fulfills following requirements: Art History requirement in Studio Art. Not eligible for Studio Art major or minor credit
 
In this Studio Arts course taught in Paris, students will create a Carnet de Voyage (Travel Journal). They will work with traditional media (pencils, watercolors, pastels) on their journal, following the traditions of nineteenth-century artists. The journal must accompany the students not only in class, but also on their program trips and explorations of the city. Students will begin from observing, first, the structure of the Paris and then their experience living in France. The goal is for students living in a world flooded by computers and digital images to observe and draw, learning from the senses: observing, smelling, touching, hearing, tasting and describing the city of Paris. Special emphasis will be focused on drawing after works of art in museums, especially of sculptures or details of architecture in the streets. Drawing from nature is also encouraged.
 
Following the example of nineteenth-century artists, we will enrich our Carnet de Voyage by experimenting with other medium. In the studio, students will work from their journal to make larger drawings or paintings. They will learn how to use each technique.
 
 
PARI: 240 Paris Through the Looking Glass, Intercultural Psychology
Offered Fall and Spring
Lecture
(1 Trinity credit = 3.5 credit hours)
Fulfills following requirements: Global, Eligible for Psychology major credit 
 
This course aims to introduce students to the field of cross-cultural psychology by offering them an understanding of culture’s impact on the psyche and various aspects of human interaction. This would include an in-depth look at the challenges of cross-cultural relationships in such areas as parenting, education and the workplace. The course’s interactive approach will combine theoretical knowledge in intercultural/cross-cultural psychology with students’ direct experiences while studying abroad in Paris to give them a better framework for understanding these experiences.
 

Direct Enrollment Options

In addition to Trinity in Paris-taught courses in French language, humanities and other disciplines, Trinity in Paris students have the option of enrolling directly in a French university:

For students who would like to take a course in the social sciences or humanities, courses are offered in English in the following areas: 
•    International relations
•    Political Science
•    British and American literature
•    History
•    Education
•    History of French Cinema
•    French Literature in Translation
 
For students taking courses in English at ICP they are required to take their language course and three electives on the Trinity in Paris program and then can take one course at ICP if they would like. 

(ILCF)
 
The ILCF is a division of ICP that offerscourses for foreign French students in the areas of French language and French culture. Courses are offered in both French and English in the following areas: 
•    French language
•    French culture
•    History of French Cinema
•    Best of French Literature (French literature survey course)
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