Accommodating Students

Common academic accommodations and related learning disabilities

Extra time on exams and quizzes: faculty members arrange for students to be given time and a half or double time (depending on the accommodation) to complete their exams, quizzes (including pop quizzes)

  • Typical reason for this accommodation: students have learning disabilities that compromise their processing speed, making it difficult to complete exams in the allotted time; students have a reading disability and need additional time to process the information they are reading; students have an attentional disorder, making the ability to focus on the task at hand challenging

Reduced distraction space for exams: faculty members arrange for students to complete exams in an alternative reduced distraction setting

  • Typical reason for this accommodation: students have an attentional disorder, making the ability to focus difficult with outside distractions present

Extra set of notes: faculty members either provide students with a copy of their Power point presentations/lecture notes or arrange for another student in the class to share their notes via Lori Clapis, Coordinator of Accessibility Resources.

  • Typical reason for this accommodation: students have an attentional disorder, making it difficult to focus, leading to them missing chunks of information during lectures; students have a slower processing speed or auditory processing challenges, making it challenging to translate the information from the lecture to written notes

Use of a laptop for note-taking: students may use their laptop during lectures for note-taking 

  • Typical reason for this accommodation: students with a slower processing speed may find it challenging to keep up with handwritten notes

Use of a laptop for the written portion of exams: students may use their laptop to type out the written portions of exams

  • Typical reasons for this accommodation: students with a slower processing speed may find it challenging to hand write more lengthy portions of exams within the allotted amount of time; students with a Reading or Language disorder may be too distracted by compensating for difficulties that they run out of their allotted time or miss the main point of the assignment

Use of a recording device for lectures: students may use a device to record lectures

  • Typical reason for this accommodation: students with a slower processing speed, auditory processing challenges, or attentional difficulties may miss information during lectures and the recording device allows them to listen to parts of the lecture that they may have missed

Access to audiobooks: students are granted access to the college’s Bookshare account to obtain audio copies of their textbooks

  • Typical reasons for this accommodation: students with reading disorders may find it challenging to comprehend the written word; students with dyslexia may become distracted by their compensation strategies that they miss the main point of the text

Use of a simple, 4-function calculator: students may use a simple, 4-function calculator during exams

  • Typical reasons for this accommodation: students struggles with a slower processing speed/working memory or has a Math Disorder, making it more challenging and time consuming to mentally compute equations

Please note that the “typical reasons” listed are by no means an exhaustive list of potential difficulties. The most common reasons have been listed to help identify some learning disabilities a student may be struggling with. ​

What is involved in applying for academic accommodations at Trinity?

  • Students must submit an application to Lori Clapis, Coordinator of Accessibility Resources, along with a copy of the complete report of psycho-educational or neuropsychological testing.
  • The testing required in order to receive academic accommodations usually involves fairly exhaustive testing over the course of 1-2 days, and typically includes parent interviews. The most common of which – the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – assesses IQ, verbal comprehension, perceptual reasoning, working memory and processing speed
  • One of Trinity’s psychologists will carefully review testing and if appropriate, approve the requested accommodations.
  • For those students who have never explored applying for academic accommodations in college, refer them to the Coordinator of Accessibility Resources