Trinity Welcomes Students in NSF Teaching Experiences for Undergraduates Program

Participants Learn about School Choice and Hartford’s Sheff Case from Professor Jack Dougherty

​Hartford, Connecticut, June 15, 2016 – The National Science Foundation-Teaching Experiences for Undergraduates (NSF-TEU) kicked off on Monday, June 6, at Trinity College. The program brings together 12 undergraduate students from across the country in order to develop their knowledge and skill in teaching high school science. A major goal of the program is to support undergraduate science majors at small liberal arts colleges toward careers in teaching science. In order to accomplish this goal, the NSF-TEU students, who are all majoring in one science discipline, take a science pedagogy course with Dr. Kurt Love, director of science education for the Summer Teaching Experiences for Undergraduates Program. The students also will participate in a summer teaching practicum under the supervision of experienced local teachers from the Hartford Magnet Trinity College Academy (HMTCA) in Hartford.

National Science Foundation-Teaching Experiences for Undergraduates at Trinity College
​Back row, L-R: Dr. Kurt Love, director of science education for the Summer Teaching Experiences for Undergraduates Program; Jacob Abaraoha, Columbia University; Stanley Walker, Whitman College; Emma Micinski, Lawrence University; Jess Voight ’17, Trinity College; Alix Eisenbrey, Whitman College; and Maegan Nelson, Whitman College. Front row, L-R: Beth Tsuha, Grinnell College; Charlotte Gbomina, Grinnell College; Eleanor Gund, Harvey Mudd College; Connie Ky ’17, Trinity College; and Trinity College Associate Professor of Educational Studies Jack Dougherty. Not pictured: Carol Bowe, Bryn Mawr College; and Mariel Becker, Wesleyan University.
On Monday, June 13, the NSF-TEU students took a lunch break to learn and ask questions about school choice from Trinity College Associate Professor of Educational Studies Jack Dougherty, who researches this topic and has documented it on the Cities, Suburbs, and School Project site. Director of Urban Educational Initiatives Robert Cotto, Jr., also shared some points from his report, “Choice Watch,” published with CT Voices for Children. The talk was meant to introduce the NSF-TEU participants to the local educational context, specifically the Sheff v. O’Neill case that resulted in more than 40 interdistrict magnet schools in the Hartford region, including HMTCA.

The NSF-TEU program is a five-year grant-funded program that will bring promising undergraduates together to develop their teaching skills in high school science (at Trinity) and high school mathematics (at Vassar). Alison Draper, the director of Trinity College's Science Center and a lecturer in interdisciplinary science, is a co-PI on this NSF project.