Marc-Yves Régis Photo Exhibition Opens at Trinity’s Broad Street Gallery October 20

‘Headstrong’ Documents Street Vendors who Carry Haiti’s Economic Burden on Their Heads

​Hartford, Connecticut, October 17, 2016 –

WHAT: “Headstrong,” a photographic exhibit featuring the work of Mark-Yves Régis. The photographer documents the street vendors who carry Haiti’s economic burden on their heads. Beyond their struggle and labor, their faces show determination, pride, sorrow, fear, and joy. Régis provides a window into a life of resiliency and tremendous effort for miniscule reward.

WHEN: Opening Reception: Thursday, October 20, 2016, 4:30-6:30 p.m.

Exhibition runs from October 20 to November 7, 2016. Open upon appointment. Contact 860-297-2095 or sara.kippur@trincoll.edu

WHERE: Broad Street Gallery, Trinity College

                        1283 Broad St., Hartford, Connecticut

 

Background:

Mark-Yves Régis’s dream of becoming a photojournalist became a reality years after a friend gave him a 110-model Instamatic camera as a Christmas gift. His love of photography led him to see a career in that field. He is a graduate of The Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale with an associate degree in photography. Over the years Régis worked for the Miami Herald, Los Angeles Times, and Hartford Courant newspapers. However, photojournalism does not sum up his entire career. He is the author of five books, the most recent of which is Headstrong Children: Carrying Haiti’s Economic Burdens.

Regis’s artistic photographs have been exhibited in many museums, including the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C., Zilkha Gallery at Wesleyan University, New Britain Museum of American Art, New Haven International Festival of Arts & Ideas, the Discovery Museum, and Bates College Museum of Art in Maine. He was the photographer for the book We Belong Here: Freedom Dreams, a celebration of local immigrant artists (Hartford Public Library). Regis is also the founder and director of Camp Hispaniola, Inc., which provides a week of summer camp for hundreds of children in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.