Graduate Studies Course Schedule

​This course schedule lists all graduate courses now scheduled to be offered in the term selected. After selecting the desired term, please scroll down until you see the courses listed for your program. (Co-listing of courses for undergraduate credit is not displayed.) All information is drawn from the Registrar’s official course schedule and is automatically updated accordingly. For summer terms only, the last column on the right uses "Qtr1" and "Qtr2" to indicate Summer Session I or Summer Session II, respectively.

Although online registration is now closed, registration for graduate courses remains open until Monday, January 25 (when classes begin). Students should use the regular registration forms as appropriate and submit them by mail, email, fax, or in person to the Graduate Studies Office. For assistance, please contact Anique Thompson at (860) 297-2151.
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Course Listing for Graduate Courses - Spring 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Qtr
4748 AMST-802-01 Primary Research Matls 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn T: 6:30PM-9:30PM AAC - 231  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar is designed to enable students to identify, evaluate, and use a range of primary sources, from personal letters, vital records, and the census to photographs, oral history, and newspapers. Students will critically read secondary literature to explore how other scholars have used primary sources, and will develop research projects on topics of their own choosing, based on primary sources available in local archives and repositories. Course not open to undergraduates.
4749 AMST-803-01 Historiography&Historical Rsch 1.00 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  New England has had a sense of its boundaries, identity, and larger purposes since the mid-17th century and it began producing historical literature about itself earlier than other regions of what would become the United States. This course has a dual agenda—to study the evolution of historical consciousness in and about New England and to use the region’s rich and varied historical literature to prepare students for their own historical research on the region.
5249 AMST-809-01 Race, Gender, Global Security 1.00 SEM Heatherton,Christina W: 6:30PM-9:10PM SH - N215  
  Enrollment limited to 4
  Recent events have focused attention on questions of race, gender, social justice, and the militarization of police. This course will consider how notions of race and security that evolved in the late 20th and early 21st century U.S., have shaped political discourse, and how in turn, those ideas have circulated around the world. Through analyses of American Studies texts, documentaries, and popular culture, we will consider both emerging and prevailing definitions of security. By examining case studies in major global cities, including Los Angeles, we will explore how space has been organized around the logics of racialized threats and gendered notions of safety. For a cumulative paper, students will select a global city and offer history, context, and analysis of the production of insecure spaces.
5250 AMST-809-02 Queer America 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack M: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - T408  
  Enrollment limited to 4
  Drawing on interdisciplinary work in lgbtq studies, Queer America uses key spaces and scales as lenses and sites in this research seminar. From bars and community centers, neighborhoods and cruising grounds, to cities and rural Walmarts, websites and social media, students will employ queer theory to broaden their understandings of lgbtq spaces in the nation. The application of classic and cutting-edge work in geographies of lgbtq culture will challenge the seemingly normal histories and geographies of American life.
5251 AMST-819-01 Digital World of NE Artifacts 1.00 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This seminar offers students engagement in primary research in historical, literary, and material culture studies and current methods of visualizing data generated by that research to produce new modes of interpretation. Students will develop skills through a series of exercises based on the rich holdings of printed books, ephemera, maps, manuscripts and artifacts related to New England in the 17th -19th centuries in the Watkinson Library. They will work with a clearly defined body of material while studying visualization methodologies currently utilized in digital humanities projects; the final exercise is a portfolio, which will include a process journal, a reflection paper, and a "grant proposal" for a real-world project..
4801 AMST-825-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM Miller,Karen Li W: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - N130  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history.
5258 AMST-832-01 Economic History and Policy 1.00 LEC Jacobs,Cindy M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 311  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course attempts to provide the student with a basic yet thorough understanding of the growth and development of the American economy. At the outset of the course, we will discuss the role and importance of economic history and the methodology of economic historians. We will then study the colonial economy, the early national and antebellum years, the reunification era, the emergence of a modern U.S. economy, and the development of the post-WWII economy up to the present. The analysis will focus on key economic sectors - agriculture, commerce, money and banking, labor, government - and their growth and development.
5097 AMST-844-01 The Gilded Age: 1865-1900 1.00 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The transformation of the United States into an urban industrial nation, with special attention to the social and cultural effects of industrialization. The course will begin by examining Reconstruction, but will concentrate on the years after 1877. Extensive readings in original source materials, including several novels, as well as in analytic histories.
4848 AMST-870-01 Native Amer Art & Storytelling 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher W: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - S204  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This seminar examines Native American Indian narrative artistic, pictorial, and literary traditions from North and Central America.Such traditions are inseparable from culture and performance, community and nation, human life and the physical world. The visual and tactile media considered include pictorial manuscripts, ceramics, bead- and shellwork, textiles, photographs, and paintings. The seminar will be interdisciplinary, with each unit including analyses of texts and visual materials and readings on aesthetics, translation, memory, and appropriation.
5130 AMST-880-01 New England Landscapes 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn M: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - N128  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course concerns historical geographies of New England, or the meeting of nature and human agency in “developing” the land and waters of the region. It explores such iconic landscapes as Native American fields and villages; New England’s villages and commons; farms, fields, factories, and forests; free-flowing and dammed rivers; seaports; cities; and tourist destinations. We will attempt to understand both how this region has been imagined and how its changing, often contested landscapes have been related to the political economy, social identities (such as class, race, and gender), and cultural values, metrics, and desires.
4423 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
4424 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4212 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4213 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
4219 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
4342 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
4214 ECON-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
5194 ENGL-812-01 Modern Poetry 1.00 SEM Rosen,David W: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 103  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course counts as a course in American literature or British literature for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, or media arts track.
  “It appears that poets in our civilization, as it exists at present, must be difficult.” When T. S. Eliot wrote these lines in 1921, “difficulty” was self-evidently a term of praise: it signaled a willingness to grapple with the intellectual, esthetic, moral, and erotic complexities of modernity. Today, however, that same difficulty gives poetry of the early 20th century its somewhat scary reputation. Why read tough texts when so much else goes down easily? A premise of this course is that the excitement, the beauty, and the sheer greatness of modern poetry are inseparable from the challenges it poses to the reader. Between 1885 and World War II, Eliot, Yeats, Pound, Crane, Moore, Bishop, Williams, Stevens, Frost, and Auden made poetry possible for modern life. We read their work. (Note: English 412 and English 812 are the same course.) For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of an advanced class in literature written after 1900. It also satisfies the requirement of a poetry course. For the English graduate program, this course counts as a course in American literature or British literature for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, or media arts track. This course is research intensive.
5104 ENGL-823-01 Southern Gothic Lit & Film 1.00 SEM Wall,Mary Beverly C. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM AAC - 231  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Southern Gothic literature and film provide an excellent case study for exploring theories of genre. With the tools of modern genre criticism, this course will seek to define and map a controversial and disputed literary and cinematic territory, one that focuses on a culture of terror and horror as it spins tales of murder, madness, freaks, and monsters. It is a narrative mode that pushes what Flannery O’Connor called “the limits of mystery” in attempts to deal with tragic extremes of human behavior and comic twists of the grotesque. Readings include works by Edgar Allan Poe, William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, Flannery O’Connor, Tennessee Williams, and Cormac McCarthy, along with contemporary Southern “pop-gothic” movies such as Deliverance, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, and Beasts of the Southern Wild. English 423 and English 823 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 distribution requirement. For literature and film concentrators, this course fulfills the requirement of an advanced course toward the major, and counts as a course in literature and film. For English graduate students, this course counts as a core course in the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track; it counts as an elective in the literary studies track.
5034 ENGL-863-01 Feminist Approaches to Literat 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 106  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For English majors, this course will satisfy the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This course will examine the sexual politics of literature, criticism, and literary history, focusing in particular on how feminist writers have negotiated the relationship between politics, the body, and eroticism. Topics to be studied include the absence of women from conventional literary histories, the theories (and influence) of Sigmund Freud, daughterhood, adolescence, and identity, the pleasures – and dangers – of romance plots, and feminist explorations of sexual power dynamics. Writers to be studied include Harriet Jacobs, Charlotte Bronte, Sarah Grand, Jeanette Winterson, Helen Cixous, Monique Wittig, Andrea Dworkin, and Maxine Hong Kingston. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
4830 ENGL-870-01 Film Theory: An Introduction 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash M: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 103  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course can count as an elective for the literary studies track, or a core course for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course can count as an elective for the literary studies track, or a core course for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
  This course introduces the most important theoretical models which have been used to explain how films function as art, ideology, language, history, politics and philosophy. Some theorists are mainly concerned with the aesthetic potentials of the cinema: How do categories such as realism, authorship and genre explain and enhance our experience of films? Other theorists are focused on the relations between films and the societies that produce them, or on general processes of spectatorship: How do Hollywood films address their audiences? How do narrative structures shape our responses to fictional characters? As the variety of these questions suggests, film theory opens onto a wide set of practices and possibilities; though it always begins with what we experience at the movies, it is ultimately concerned with the wider world that we experience through the movies. Theorists to be examined include Munsterberg, Eisenstein, Burch, Kracauer, Balazs, Bazin, Altman, Gunning, Mulvey, Metz, Wollen, Havel, Benjamin, Pasolini, Deleuze and Jameson. (Note: English 470 and English 870 are the same course.) For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection. For the English graduate program, this course can count as an elective for the literary studies track, or a core course for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track. This course fulfills requirements toward the film studies minor.
4450 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4225 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
4203 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4220 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
5439 ENGL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4215 HIST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser, and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4226 HIST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
4216 HIST-954-01 Thesis Part I 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Thesis Part I is an investigation and report on an original research topic. Conference hours are available by appointment. Registration for the thesis will not be considered final without the thesis approval form and the signatures of the thesis adviser, graduate adviser, and department chair. Please refer to the Graduate Studies Catalog for thesis requirements. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form and the thesis writer's packet. Two course credits. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
4217 HIST-955-01 Thesis Part II 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Continuation of History 954. Two course credits.
5469 NESC-800-01 Graduate Sem in Neurosciene 0.50 SEM Raskin,Sarah A. TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  This half-credit seminar will cover current topics in neuroscience, including issues in research methodology, ethics in research and public policy issues. In addition, time will be spent reviewing the literature and methodology of the theses of enrolled students. The course will be structured like a journal club with students preparing a discussion of one to two articles each week to be shared. Many of the articles may be drawn from the background literature of the thesis topic. Students will also attend presentations by neuroscience researchers and read and discuss pertinent research literature prior to each presentation.
5240 NESC-801-01 Neurochemistry 1.00 LEC Church,William H. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 205 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An interdisciplinary course investigating the chemical processes involved in central nervous system functioning and communication. Emphasis will be placed on the chemical aspects of synthesis, metabolism, and release of neurotransmitters. The role of neurochemistry in behavioral and neurological disease states will be evaluated. Current research topics in this area will also be presented.
5241 NESC-802-01 Cellular&MolecularNeurobiology 1.00 LEC Guardiola-Diaz,Hebe M. WF: 10:00AM-11:15AM LSC - 137  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  An advanced study of individual cells and small networks of cells in the nervous system. Specific topics include the development of neurons and glia, the cellular physiology of communication in the nervous system, and characterization of molecules responsible for unique properties of neurons. These cellular and molecular processes will be examined through lectures, student-led presentations, and laboratory experiments.
5239 NESC-874-01 Minds and Brains 1.00 SEM Lloyd,Dan MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM MC - 106  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  The neurosciences have made striking progress in recent years toward understanding the brains of animals and human beings. Through readings in philosophy and science we will consider what contribution this explosion of neuroscientific data can make to our understanding of the mind.
5238 NESC-892-01 Human Neuropsychology 1.00 SEM Raskin,Sarah A. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - N128 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  The course will begin with a cursory review of basic neuroanatomy, brain organization and topography, and neurotransmitters and neurotransmitter conductive systems. Next, an in-depth examination of physiological and neurological manifestations of cognitive and psychopathological disorders as well as behavioral correlates of neuropathological and pathophysiological disturbances will follow. Finally, a survey of current diagnostic procedures and treatment approaches will be presented. All course material augmented with, and accentuated by, illustrative clinical case material. Students should anticipate that special scheduling arrangements will be required for activities outside of regular class sessions.
5493 NESC-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 10
5494 NESC-951-01 Independent Research 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
5495 NESC-953-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  First credit of a two semester, two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
5496 NESC-954-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  A continuation of NESC 953. Second credit of a two semester, two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
5548 NESC-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
5256 PBPL-802-01 Global Cities 1.00 SEM Myers,Garth A. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM 70VS - SEM  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of 'developed' and 'developing' worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization.
5117 PBPL-806-01 Methods of Research 1.00 LEC Schack,Ronald W. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM LIB - 02  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is intended to empower students to evaluate common forms of research critically, and to give them some experience in conducting research. Through a series of weekly assignments and class projects, students will be introduced to the shaping of research questions; hypothesis testing, writing a research paper, conducting interviews and surveys, giving a professional presentation, and presenting simple tabular data to prove a point. The course does not require an extensive mathematics background. Regular attendance and access to a computer, e-mail, and the Internet are expected.
4499 PBPL-808-01 Constutional Foundatns Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Horowitz,Amy R: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 205 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will examine the history, methods, and types of successful, formal, written argumentation in policy advocacy. Among the arenas explored will be courts of law, legislative bodies, and the broader field of public opinion. Most course material will be drawn from case studies.
5252 PBPL-815-01 The Policy & Pol of Educ Fin 1.00 SEM Ellis,Chad D. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM HHN - 105  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  One of the most important and contentious elements of education policy involves finance. Funding battles at the federal, state, and local levels have a direct impact on students, teachers, and schools. The sources of revenue, funding formulas, and budget priorities have implications not only for the operation of schools but for equity and social justice. This course will examine the legal, practical, and moral/ethical elements of education finance and efforts to reform the system. It will blend traditional seat time with online components and field work.
5257 PBPL-822-01 Economic History and Policy 1.00 LEC Jacobs,Cindy M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 311  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course attempts to provide the student with a basic yet thorough understanding of the growth and development of the American economy. At the outset of the course, we will discuss the role and importance of economic history and the methodology of economic historians. We will then study the colonial economy, the early national and antebellum years, the reunification era, the emergence of a modern U.S. economy, and the development of the post-WWII economy up to the present. The analysis will focus on key economic sectors - agriculture, commerce, money and banking, labor, government - and their growth and development.
4752 PBPL-825-01 Policy Implementation 1.00 SEM Feldman,Barry M. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 311  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Implementation is the action step in the public policy process that arguably is the most challenging and complex to do. It is the key to making something happen and is often the gauge the public uses to determine the overall effectiveness of government, in its broadest terms. This course is devoted exclusively to the study of policy implementation from the relevant literature, theoretical constructs, and the practical issues of attempting to implement public policy that often has vague and conflicting policy goals and inadequate resources. Students will examine a current public policy that was adopted by a town/city government in the Greater Hartford area, will ascertain whether the policy was implemented, analyze the challenges involved in the implementation, and meet and question government leaders involved in the policy implementation effort. The class will be conducted as a seminar, with fieldwork as necessary. A major research paper that reviews and analyzes the success of the town/city government in implementing the adopted policy studied during the semester comprises an important end product of the course.
5118 PBPL-828-01 Theory of Democratic Institut 1.00 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The course applies social choice theory to the study of four components of democratic policy making; voting, political strategy, theories of governance, and bureaucracy. The course emphasizes weekly readings and in-class discussion of central themes in the literature. Examination of the formal properties of voting rules leads to a deeper understanding of representation and political outcomes. The analysis of institutions offers lessons on the problems of delegation, policy design, implementation, and democratic administration.
4218 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4224 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4222 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
4223 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4221 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
5410 RHET-806-01 Composition Pedagogy 1.00 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Language and literacy have always served as lightning rods for social and political issues, as well as for conflicts of theory and practice in education. This course will explore the contemporary teaching of writing, with attention to the range of current pedagogies in US colleges. We will examine influences of 20th-century revival of rhetoric, process and post-process writing, cultural and feminist studies, cognitive theory, the digital revolution, and the implications of "the global turn" for 21st-century students and teachers of writing. For undergraduate English majors, this course counts as an elective.