Graduate Studies Course Schedule

​This course schedule lists all graduate courses now scheduled to be offered in the term selected. After selecting the desired term, please scroll down until you see the courses listed for your program. (Co-listing of courses for undergraduate credit is not displayed.) All information is drawn from the Registrar’s official course schedule and is automatically updated accordingly. For summer terms only, the last column on the right uses "Qtr1" and "Qtr2" to indicate Summer Session I or Summer Session II, respectively.

Important Notice: The  course schedule for Spring 2017 is now official. Students  who have questions about which courses to take should consult their academic adviser.
Select a term:

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Course Listing for Graduate Courses - Fall 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Qtr
2687 AMST-801-01 Approaches to American Studies 1.00 LEC Miller,Karen Li R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar, which is required of all American studies graduate students, examines a variety of approaches to the field. Readings may include several “classic” texts of 18th- and 19th-century American culture and several key works of American studies scholarship from the formative period of the field after World War II, as well as more recent contributions to the study of the United States. Topics will include changing ideas about the content, production, and consumption of American culture; patterns of ethnic identification and definition; the construction of categories like “race” and “gender”; and the bearing of class, race, gender, and sexuality on individuals’ participation in American society and culture. Undergraduates who wish to enroll in this course must obtain permission of their adviser and the instructor.
3214 AMST-809-02 Digital City 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 3
  With half the world's population now in cities, policymakers and activists are focused on the promise of technology to tackle issues from gentrification, pollution, access to public spaces, and walkability. How can digital platforms affect the growth of equal and just cities? How can critical interventions using such platforms work to recognize differences of gender, race, sexuality, and class in cities, and promote equality? What role do and should colleges play in supporting the growth of just and equal spaces? Focusing on Hartford and Trinity, this course connects global and national issues to the intimate experiences of everyday urban life. It pairs technical skills and social science data collection with urban theory and urban studies. Students contribute to an online archive examining the college-city relationship.
2705 AMST-835-01 Museum Exhibition 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  One of the most engaging ways to promote collections and explore a subject or theme is to create an exhibition, which is a genre in and of itself—telling a story with artifacts. Through critical readings students will explore the cultural and educational goals of exhibits, visitor needs and accessibility, design elements (including technology), and audience evaluation methods utilized at libraries, historic houses and historical sites, and history and cultural museums. Drawing from the extensive and wide-ranging collections in the Watkinson Library, students will conceive, write, and install an exhibition, design and publish a catalogue, and plan and implement an opening event to take place at the end of the semester in the Watkinson.
2345 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
2174 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2170 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2171 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2173 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
2172 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
2175 ECON-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate director and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2176 ECON-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
3126 ENGL-801-01 Intro to Literary Theory 1.00 SEM Rosen,David T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students pursuing the thesis capstone.
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students pursuing the thesis capstone.
  This seminar is designed to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text.
3468 ENGL-848-01 Plants in Literature and Film 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: English 448 and English 848 are the same course.
  This course engages with the plant world through novels, poetry, philosophy, comics, and film. We will track major trends in the human understanding of plants, beginning in the late eighteenth century-when poets were eager to consider the line between the plant and animal kingdoms-and ending in the twentieth century-when popular culture was more likely to categorize plants as monstrous and 'other.' In rethinking the being and meaning of plants we will necessarily revisit the idea of 'the human' and 'the animal,' employing these categories while attending to borderline cases where their utility falters. Readings will focus on Romantic-era texts by Erasmus Darwin, William Cowper, Charlotte Smith, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Austen, before turning to horror films like "Little Shop of Horrors," "Invasion of the Body Snatchers," "The Thing From Another World," "The Happening" and "The Ruins." English 448 and English 848 are the same course. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
3534 ENGL-870-01 Film Theory: An Introduction 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course introduces the most important theoretical models which have been used to explain how films function as art, ideology, language, history, politics and philosophy. Some theorists are mainly concerned with the aesthetic potentials of the cinema: How do categories such as realism, authorship and genre explain and enhance our experience of films? Other theorists are focused on the relations between films and the societies that produce them, or on general processes of spectatorship: How do Hollywood films address their audiences? How do narrative structures shape our responses to fictional characters? As the variety of these questions suggests, film theory opens onto a wide set of practices and possibilities; though it always begins with what we experience at the movies, it is ultimately concerned with the wider world that we experience through the movies. Theorists to be examined include Munsterberg, Eisenstein, Burch, Kracauer, Balazs, Bazin, Altman, Gunning, Mulvey, Metz, Wollen, Havel, Benjamin, Pasolini, Deleuze and Jameson. (Note: English 470 and English 870 are the same course.) For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course fulfills requirements toward the film studies minor.
2177 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2179 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2367 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2762 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
2178 ENGL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2308 HIST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser, and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2307 HIST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2180 HIST-954-01 Thesis Part I 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Thesis Part I is an investigation and report on an original research topic. Conference hours are available by appointment. Registration for the thesis will not be considered final without the thesis approval form and the signatures of the thesis adviser, graduate adviser, and department chair. Please refer to the Graduate Studies Catalog for thesis requirements. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form and the thesis writer's packet. Two course credits. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2181 HIST-955-01 Thesis Part II 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Continuation of History 954. Two course credits.
2182 HIST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
3576 NESC-800-01 Graduate Sem in Neurosciene 0.50 SEM Raskin,Sarah A. TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  This half-credit seminar will cover current topics in neuroscience, including issues in research methodology, ethics in research and public policy issues. In addition, time will be spent reviewing the literature and methodology of the theses of enrolled students. The course will be structured like a journal club with students preparing a discussion of one to two articles each week to be shared. Many of the articles may be drawn from the background literature of the thesis topic. Students will also attend presentations by neuroscience researchers and read and discuss pertinent research literature prior to each presentation.
3258 NESC-862-01 Neuroethology 1.00 LEC Swart,Charles C. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will explore the control of animal behavior by the nervous system from an evolutionary perspective. Topics to be covered include motor control (orientation, navigation, pursuit and escape behavior), communication systems (mate searching, territoriality, and social interactions), resource location and ingestion, circadian and other rhythmic behaviors and learning and memory. Examples will be drawn from a wide variety of vertebrate and invertebrate animals as appropriate to the topic. For select topics special attention will be paid to experimental design and data analysis. Text readings and selected primary research articles will guide discussion of each topic. In addition to exams and quizzes, students will write several short essays and one term paper during the course of the semester.
2939 NESC-951-01 Independent Research 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2940 NESC-953-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  First credit of a two semester, two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2941 NESC-954-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  A continuation of NESC 953. Second credit of a two semester, two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2942 NESC-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2634 PBPL-800-01 Introduction to Public Policy 1.00 SEM Feldman,Barry M. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This is the introductory course in public policy. It builds on the notion than an interesting reason to study public policy is that public policy making is about problem solving. It introduces and examines issues such as how we think society is better in one state than another; what means should we use to solve problems; what is government’s appropriate role in society; how should the public be engaged in solving common problems. The course will be taught from the perspective of what researchers tell us about the theory and process of making public policy, and how practitioners go about solving problems. The interesting question is whether theory informs practice, or the contrary. Or are the theory and practice of public policy making truly different? The course will explain the roles of certain government institutions and “actors” such as elected officials, appointed public managers, interest group leaders, citizens, and the media in the public policy process. An integral part of the course involves learning how to write in a concise, well-reasoned, professional manner by producing policy memos pertaining to public sector case studies as discussed in class.
3190 PBPL-832-01 Contemp Issues Education Pol 1.00 SEM Ellis,Chad D. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Education policy is constantly shifting and is influenced by myriad social and political factors. This course examines the role of public education in American society and employs a sociological lens to the various factors influencing public education. It will follow contemporary trends in education policy at the national, state, and local level. Frequent guest speakers will provide context and perspectives on how contemporary issues are affecting various stakeholders in the area of public education.
2850 PBPL-836-01 Moral Theory and Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Wade,Maurice L. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The purpose of this course is to assist students in acquiring the skill in ethical reasoning and analysis needed for mature participation in society’s continuing debates over moral issues of public concern. The course will begin by examining some types of ethical theories and will proceed to consider a number of controversial social issues. Abortion, euthanasia, racial and sexual discrimination, world hunger, treatment of animals, and capital punishment are among the topics to be considered.
2882 PBPL-840-01 Budget Mgt & Public Policy 1.00 SEM Schack,Ronald W. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will focus on the practical aspects of pubic budgeting, finance, and financial management in the policy making process. It will begin with the "how to's" of budget development, from estimating and projecting revenues to deconstructing expenditures in order to develop the best estimates. Where appropriate, elements of public finance theory will be introduced and discussed as it relates to practical budget and financial management Both the bonding process and the complications related to third party service provision will be addressed. We will utilize practical tools for budget and financial management, such as results-based accountability, performance contracting, and reviewing budget to actual data together with projected to actual service data on a regular basis.
2881 PBPL-846-01 Policy Analysis 1.00 SEM Fotos III,Michael M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  In policy analysis, we focus on the problems of empirical policy analysis: defining the problem, framing the questions to be answered, picking the location and scope of the study, selecting the metrics of analysis, aligning metrics with public values, collecting evidence, and transforming the evidence into data. The readings and weekly discussions are avenues for students to query themselves on the problems they must solve to advance their own research agendas. Students will complete a major project in empirical policy analysis. Enrollment limited.
3191 PBPL-849-01 Health Care Regulation&Policy 1.00 SEM Gaul,Tanya K. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will offer an overview of the basic concepts and principles of health care regulation and policy that are necessary to understand the health care sector in the United States. This course will focus on the purposes of health care regulation, the key components of regulation and the processes by which regulation is developed and implemented. Various spheres of health care regulation will be analyzed, including both governmental and private parties involved int he regulatory process. Emphasis will be on policy issues and conflicts that underlie health care regulation.
3225 PBPL-865-01 Media & Presidential Election 1.00 SEM McEnroe,Colin T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  In this course, students will use the current presidential election as a living laboratory as they explore the role of the media in shaping perceptions, presenting content, and providing criticism. Students will follow the election in each news medium (including the Internet), interview consultants and "spin doctors," analyze television broadcasts, including television election ads, and prepare a talk radio show. The course will focus also on such issues as media bias, corporate ownership, and FCC regulation. We will also look at the nature of "content" in the political process and how it corresponds (or doesn’t) to literary notions of "text."
2183 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2184 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2185 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
2203 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2186 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15