Graduate Studies Course Schedule

​This course schedule lists all graduate courses now scheduled to be offered in the term selected. After selecting the desired term, please scroll down until you see the courses listed for your program. (Co-listing of courses for undergraduate credit is not displayed.) All information is drawn from the Registrar’s official course schedule and is automatically updated accordingly. For summer terms only, the last column on the right uses "Qtr1" and "Qtr2" to indicate Summer Session I or Summer Session II, respectively.

Important Notice: The  course schedule for Summer and Fall 2016 is now official. Students  who have questions about which courses to take should consult their academic adviser.
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Course Listing for Graduate Courses - Spring 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Qtr
4598 AMST-802-01 Primary Research Matls 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar is designed to enable students to identify, evaluate, and use a range of primary sources, from personal letters, vital records, and the census to photographs, oral history, and newspapers. Students will critically read secondary literature to explore how other scholars have used primary sources, and will develop research projects on topics of their own choosing, based on primary sources available in local archives and repositories. Course not open to undergraduates.
5182 AMST-809-01 Race, Gender, Global Security 1.00 SEM Heatherton,Christina T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 3
  NOTE: There are 3 graduate student seats available for this course that is cross-listed with AMST409-01.
  Recent events have focused attention on questions of race, gender, social justice, and the militarization of police. This course will consider how notions of race and security that evolved in the late 20th and early 21st century U.S., have shaped political discourse, and how in turn, those ideas have circulated around the world. Through analyses of American Studies texts, documentaries, and popular culture, we will consider both emerging and prevailing definitions of security. By examining case studies in major global cities, including Los Angeles, we will explore how space has been organized around the logics of racialized threats and gendered notions of safety. For a cumulative paper, students will select a global city and offer history, context, and analysis of the production of insecure spaces.
5184 AMST-809-02 SrSem: Spectacle of Disability 1.00 SEM Cancelled Y  
  Enrollment limited to 3
  NOTE: There are 3 graduate student seats available for this course that is cross-listed with AMST409-02. .
  This course examines how people with disabilities are represented in American literature and culture. Whether it is the exceptional savant who is heralded as a hero because of her "special" abilities or the critically injured person whose disability relegates him to the sidelines of society even though his ability to overcome everyday challenges is applauded from a distance, definitions of disabilities (both generally and explicitly) tell us a great deal about the concept of normalcy and the expectations that we attach to this term. In addition, the various narratives associated with different disabilities and their origins are shaped by other aspects of identity, such as socio-economic class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender. We will look at a variety of mediums including fiction, non-fiction, film, television, and memoirs in order to examine how these representations, along with the material realities of disabled people, frame our society's understanding of disability and the consequences of these formulations. We look at texts and cases such as Million Dollar Baby, the Terry Schiavo case, Born on a Blue Day, Forrest Gump, the American Disabilities Act, the Christopher Reeves story, and Radio.
5183 AMST-809-03 Queer America 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 3
  NOTE: There are 3 graduate student seats available for this course that is cross-listed with AMST409-03.
  NOTE: There are 3 graduate student seats available for this course that is cross-listed with AMST409-03.
  Drawing on interdisciplinary work in lgbtq studies, Queer America uses key spaces and scales as lenses and sites in this research seminar. From bars and community centers, neighborhoods and cruising grounds, to cities and rural Walmarts, websites and social media, students will employ queer theory to broaden their understandings of lgbtq spaces in the nation. The application of classic and cutting-edge work in geographies of lgbtq culture will challenge the seemingly normal histories and geographies of American life.
  View syllabus
5201 AMST-812-01 Popular Narratives of US Hist 1.00 SEM Manevitz,Alexander D. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 3
  History surrounds us in popular culture—from hit Broadway musicals like Hamilton and video games like the Assassin’s Creed series today to the earliest American novels. Though some have dismissed these media as “non-scholarly,” they are the main source of history for many who might not be interested in a traditional scholarly monograph and should be taken seriously. We will spend the semester learning how to analyze the unexpected history presented through these methods, and investigating the possibilities and pitfalls of communicating American history in these different forms. In conversation with practitioners of narrative, experimental, and popular history, students will create a final project of their own design that pushes on the boundaries of how we communicate history and how we define our audience.
5186 AMST-820-01 The Child in American Culture 1.00 LEC Miller,Karen Li T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  We will examine representations of "the Child" in American culture from the Puritan period to the present. How have conceptions of childhood changed over time? How do economic status and labor influence depictions of children? What are some symbolic roles of the Child in our culture? Our course will focus on literary texts, archival materials, and visual culture, including art, photographs, and other media.
4613 AMST-825-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM Miller,Karen Li R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history.
5188 AMST-871-01 Science Fiction and Society 1.00 LEC Couch,N. C. Christopher W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  American science fiction literature has never been about the future, but always about the social and cultural moments in which it is created, packaged, and sold. This course will examine the roots of modern American science fiction in Victorian adventure fiction, the rise of mass-market magazine fiction and the development of technophiliac hard SF in the Depression, Cold War SF, the disillusionment of sixties experimentation and the rise of cyberpunk, and the revival of scientific or hard SF in contemporary writing, particularly those authors who examine environmental collapse and renewal. Authors to be considered include Heinlein, LeGuin, Dick, Haldeman, and Brin. The course will include consideration of how SF is written, edited, and published.
4401 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
4402 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4245 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4246 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
4252 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
4368 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
4247 ECON-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
5237 ENGL-802-01 Digital Rhetoric 1.00 SEM Tarsa,Rebecca G. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Interested undergraduates may enroll in this course with permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Interested undergraduates may enroll in this course with permission of instructor.
  This course surveys the foundational scholarship of digital writing and rhetoric beginning with the digital turn of the 1990s, with particular focus on new media pedagogy, digital literacy, and design theory. Students will study and compose with these new technologies and practices, creating both traditional and new media texts. This course wills also trace the impact of today's ever-evolving writing technologies: how they shape literacy development, engagement, and output; their potential to shift and refigure power dynamics and rhetorical agency; and their practical consequences for daily social and civic life.
5159 ENGL-824-01 Reading Victorian Narratives 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: English 424 and English 824 are the same course.
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature between 1700-1900.
  NOTE: This is a research intensive course.
  This course offers an advanced investigation into major writers and issues from the British Victorian period (1837-1901). We will concentrate on texts—fiction, non-fictional prose, poetry—in which notions of propriety and morality are in productive dialogue with crimes, threatening secrets, and subversive passions. In seminar sessions and in written work we will interrogate textual constructions of sexuality and gender, considering the potential for slippage between high-conservative ideals and actual lived experiences. Our readings will be informed by a range of modern critical, theoretical, and socio-historical examinations of Victorian literature and culture. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature between 1700-1900. It is research intensive.
5160 ENGL-839-12 The Documentary 1.00 SEM Riggio,Milla C. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: English439-16 and English 839012 are the same course.
  NOTE: English439-16 and English 839012 are the same course.
  NOTE: English439-16 and English 839012 are the same course.
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement , or a core course for the literature and film concentration.
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement , or a core course for the literature and film concentration.
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement , or a core course for the literature and film concentration.
  NOTE: This is a research intensive course.
  NOTE: This is a research intensive course.
  NOTE: This is a research intensive course.
  Documentary films chronicle varied cultural, social, and political realities, from coal miners’ strikes and social revolutions to the development of musical genres. Documentary styles range from fictionalized recreations (docudramas) to narrative reenactments to non-narrative commentaries. This course will examine key documentary strategies through representative films, which may include Harlan County USA (Barbara Kopple, 1976) and Shut Up and Sing (Kopple and Cecilia Peck, 2006), Journalist and the Jihadi: The Murder of Daniel Pearl (Ahmad Jamal and Ramesh Sharma, 2006): segments of The Battle of Algiers, Poto Mitan: Haitian Women, Pillars of the Global Economy (Renee Bergan and Mark Schuller), Jazz (selected episodes) (Ken Burns, 2001), Say Amen, Somebody (George Nierenberg, 1982), An Inconvenient Truth (Davis Guggenheim, 2008), and Fair Game (Doug Liman, 2010). Note: English 439-16 and English 839-12 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement, or a core course for the literature and film concentration.
5161 ENGL-847-01 Serials 1.00 SEM Henton,Alice M.H. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: English 447 and English 847 are the same course.
  NOTE: for undergraduate English majors, this course emphasizes critical reflection.
  NOTE: This is a research intensive course.
  Where most of the literature we encounter has a clear beginning, middle, and end, serial literature is open-ended and potentially infinite. What exactly is so fascinating about the prospect of “one story, told piece by piece?” In this course, we will examine American serials, beginning with early-18th and 19th-century magazine novels and ending with Sarah Koenig’s 21st-century podcast phenomenon, Serial. As we look at the various incarnations of serialized texts, we’ll think about their implications with the help of narrative theory. What exactly does the term serial imply? A genre? A technique? What accounts for the popularity of serialized texts? What might the next iteration look like? It is research-intensive. For English majors, this course emphasizes critical reflection.
5162 ENGL-861-01 World Cinema Auteurs 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash T: 6:30PM-9:10PM
M: 6:30PM-9:10PM
TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: English 461 and English 861 are the same course.
  NOTE: This is an advanced undergraduate/graduate hybrid course - while not required, some prior experience with film analysis, film theory, or World Cinema is strongly recommended.
  NOTE: Evening meetings of this class are for film screenings only.
  NOTE: For undergraduate English major, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
  NOTE: This is a research intensive course.
  This advanced course offers an in-depth exploration of the work of major auteur-directors from the domain of World Cinema, cinema from countries other than the United States or Europe. Three or four auteurs grouped by country, region or culture (e.g. Japan, India, Iran, Brazil, West Africa, or the Three Chinas: PRC, Hong Kong, and Taiwan) will be examined in their aesthetic, cultural and geo-political dimensions using the cutting-edge new methodologies of comparative and experimental cinephilia. Note: This advanced undergraduate/graduate hybrid course - while not required, some prior experience with film analysis, film theory, or World Cinema is strongly recommended. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research-intensive.
4426 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4258 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
4236 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4253 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
4248 HIST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser, and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4259 HIST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
4249 HIST-954-01 Thesis Part I 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Thesis Part I is an investigation and report on an original research topic. Conference hours are available by appointment. Registration for the thesis will not be considered final without the thesis approval form and the signatures of the thesis adviser, graduate adviser, and department chair. Please refer to the Graduate Studies Catalog for thesis requirements. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form and the thesis writer's packet. Two course credits. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
4250 HIST-955-01 Thesis Part II 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Continuation of History 954. Two course credits.
5366 NESC-816-01 Neural Engineering 1.00 SEM Blaise,J. Harry TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This introductory course uses an integrative and cross-disciplinary approach to survey basic principles and modern theories and methods in several important areas of neural engineering. Course topics include: neural prosthetics, neural stimulation, neurophysiology, neural signal detection, and analysis and computational neural networks. The practicalities of the emerging technology of brain-computer interface as well as other research topics in neural engineering will be discussed. Students will also have the opportunity to perform hands-on computer simulation and modeling of neural circuits and systems.
4894 NESC-874-01 Minds and Brains 1.00 SEM Lloyd,Dan MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  The neurosciences have made striking progress in recent years toward understanding the brains of animals and human beings. Through readings in philosophy and science we will consider what contribution this explosion of neuroscientific data can make to our understanding of the mind.
4819 PBPL-806-01 Methods of Research 1.00 LEC Schack,Ronald W. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is intended to empower students to evaluate common forms of research critically, and to give them some experience in conducting research. Through a series of weekly assignments and class projects, students will be introduced to the shaping of research questions; hypothesis testing, writing a research paper, conducting interviews and surveys, giving a professional presentation, and presenting simple tabular data to prove a point. The course does not require an extensive mathematics background. Regular attendance and access to a computer, e-mail, and the Internet are expected.
4462 PBPL-808-01 Constutional Foundatns Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Horowitz,Amy R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will examine the history, methods, and types of successful, formal, written argumentation in policy advocacy. Among the arenas explored will be courts of law, legislative bodies, and the broader field of public opinion. Most course material will be drawn from case studies.
4601 PBPL-825-01 Policy Implementation 1.00 SEM Feldman,Barry M. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Implementation is the action step in the public policy process that arguably is the most challenging and complex to do. It is the key to making something happen and is often the gauge the public uses to determine the overall effectiveness of government, in its broadest terms. This course is devoted exclusively to the study of policy implementation from the relevant literature, theoretical constructs, and the practical issues of attempting to implement public policy that often has vague and conflicting policy goals and inadequate resources. Students will examine a current public policy that was adopted by a town/city government in the Greater Hartford area, will ascertain whether the policy was implemented, analyze the challenges involved in the implementation, and meet and question government leaders involved in the policy implementation effort. The class will be conducted as a seminar, with fieldwork as necessary. A major research paper that reviews and analyzes the success of the town/city government in implementing the adopted policy studied during the semester comprises an important end product of the course.
5229 PBPL-827-01 Education Law 1.00 SEM Ellis,Chad D. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is designed for those interested in an introduction to and overview of education law. It will provide a survey of statute and case law related to the structure and organization of schools and districts, constitutional law in schools, teacher and student rights, special education, and school finance. Our discussions will focus not only on the legal foundations but the social implications of education law. Of particular note will be the ways in which law can both help and inhibit efforts to build greater equity in education.
  View syllabus
4820 PBPL-828-01 Theory of Democratic Institut 1.00 SEM Fotos III,Michael T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The course applies social choice theory to the study of four components of democratic policy making; voting, political strategy, theories of governance, and bureaucracy. The course emphasizes weekly readings and in-class discussion of central themes in the literature. Examination of the formal properties of voting rules leads to a deeper understanding of representation and political outcomes. The analysis of institutions offers lessons on the problems of delegation, policy design, implementation, and democratic administration.
4251 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4257 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4255 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
4256 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4254 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15