Graduate Studies Course Schedule

​This course schedule lists all graduate courses now scheduled to be offered in the term selected. After selecting the desired term, please scroll down until you see the courses listed for your program. (Co-listing of courses for undergraduate credit is not displayed.) All information is drawn from the Registrar’s official course schedule and is automatically updated accordingly. For summer terms only, the last column on the right uses "Qtr1" and "Qtr2" to indicate Summer Session I or Summer Session II, respectively.

Course schedules for summer and fall, 2015 are now final. Online registration for continuing, matriculated graduate students will begin on April 20, 2015. Since several new courses are offered, please check with your academic adviser in advance if you have any questions about course selection.
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Course Listing for Graduate Courses - Fall 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Qtr
2836 AMST-801-01 Appr to Amer Studies 1.00 LEC Miller,Karen Li T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar, which is required of all American studies graduate students, examines a variety of approaches to the field. Readings may include several “classic” texts of 18th- and 19th-century American culture and several key works of American studies scholarship from the formative period of the field after World War II, as well as more recent contributions to the study of the United States. Topics will include changing ideas about the content, production, and consumption of American culture; patterns of ethnic identification and definition; the construction of categories like “race” and “gender”; and the bearing of class, race, gender, and sexuality on individuals’ participation in American society and culture. Undergraduates who wish to enroll in this course must obtain permission of their adviser and the instructor.
3468 AMST-826-01 Nuclear America 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  In this course we will explore large- and small-scale cultural landscapes as they have been shaped by nuclear power, weapons, transportation, and waste. Among these landscapes are towns created for making nuclear weapons; open-air testing sites; military complexes, such as ports, bases, airfields, and silos; the West’s uranium mines, and the land, water, and Native American territory polluted by radioactive tailings; nuclear reactor sites, from New England’s regional power plants to those in metropolitan areas; and land and offshore storage sites for nuclear waste. Besides the physical changes to the American landscape, nuclear sites involve extensive secrecy, exclusion, and policing, and they are invested with fraught meanings. We will explore nuclear America through history, geography, art, literature, and film.
2915 AMST-835-01 Museum Exhibition 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  One of the most engaging ways to promote collections and explore a subject or theme is to create an exhibition, which is a genre in and of itself—telling a story with artifacts. Through critical readings students will explore the cultural and educational goals of exhibits, visitor needs and accessibility, design elements (including technology), and audience evaluation methods utilized at libraries, historic houses and historical sites, and history and cultural museums. Drawing from the extensive and wide-ranging collections in the Watkinson Library, students will conceive, write, and install an exhibition, design and publish a catalogue, and plan and implement an opening event to take place at the end of the semester in the Watkinson.
3493 AMST-842-01 From Poe to Game of Thrones 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  While modern American fantasy literature experienced sudden growth after the enormous popularity of J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings in the 1960s, American fantasy fiction has an extensive and separate tradition beginning in the nineteenth century with the works of Edgar Alan Poe. Moreover, it engaged social and environmental issues, from Henry George's Looking Backward to Andre Norton's Beastmaster. Women writers of fantasy since the 1930s, including C. L. Moore and Leigh Brackett, engaged issues of gender and equality. American traditions of humor and irreverence derived from Twain and Ade and folk traditions inform mid-century fantasy, while the social realism of Dos Passos finds rebirth in the darker stories of George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire series.
3469 AMST-849-01 Cult of Americanism in 20thCen 1.00 SEM Cohn,William H. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  In 1894, Teddy Roosevelt published "True Americanism" in Forum Magazine, declaring the absolute necessity of applying a "fervid Americanism" to the solution of every problem and evil facing the country, including "Americanizing" newcomers to our shore. Nearly 50 years later, the rhetoric of Americanism proposed by Time publisher Henry Luce in his February 1941 editorial in Life Magazine, "The American Century," aimed to persuade Americans that the country's involvement in World War II and in the post-war world were not only necessary but inevitable. The Luce publications after the war publicized the culture of Americanism that was an essential part of the anti-communism that supported the Cold War for over half a century. Leaving aside the idea of American exceptionalism—"the notion that the United States has had a special mission and virtue that makes it unique among nations"—our focus will be on the culture of Americanism as it was promulgated in the Luce publications and other media outlets during and after World War II, and the extent to which it encouraged postwar homogeneity while discouraging the expression of dissent and non-conformist ideas.
3533 AMST-874-01 From Poe to Game of Thrones 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  While modern American fantasy literature experienced sudden growth after the enormous popularity of J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings in the 1960s, American fantasy fiction has an extensive and separate tradition beginning in the nineteenth century with the works of Edgar Alan Poe. Moreover, it engaged social and environmental issues, from Henry George’s Looking Backward to Andre Norton’s Beastmaster. Women writers of fantasy since the 1930s, including C. L. Moore and Leigh Brackett, engaged issues of gender and equality. American traditions of humor and irreverence derived from Twain and Ade and folk traditions inform mid-century fantasy, while the social realism of Dos Passos finds rebirth in the darker stories of George R. R. Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire series.
3503 AMST-875-01 Made in New England 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Commodities—things produced, exchanged, and consumed—link places to the larger world. In this course, we will examine how natural resources and material goods have become marketable commodities through social, economic, political, technological, environmental, and cultural processes. Looking especially at things grown and made in past and present New England for capitalist exchange, we will explore how they have shaped and signified local communities while connecting them to global geographies of markets, power, and meaning.
2365 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
2167 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2163 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2164 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2166 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
2165 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
2168 ECON-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate director and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2169 ECON-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2969 ENGL-801-01 Theories& Methods of Litry Std 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students and we recommend that entering students enroll in this course during their first year of graduate study.
  This seminar is designed to introduce students to the field of literary studies at the graduate level, to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will write weekly, have opportunities to lead class discussion, and work in stages to compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text. (Note: English 401 and English 801 are the same course.) For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course is also research intensive. For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students and we recommend that entering students enroll in this course during their first year of graduate study.
3481 ENGL-818-01 17th Century Poetry 1.00 SEM Wheatley,Chloe T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  The poets of the early modern period made their contribution to an English literary tradition against a dynamic context of religious, political, and social change. Poets studied in this course will include Lanyer, Jonson, Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, Marvell, Philips, Bradstreet, and Milton. English 418 and English 818 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. For the English graduate program, this course fulfills the requirement of a course emphasizing English literature or a cultural context for the literary studies track. It counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
3385 ENGL-873-01 Dickens/Chaplin 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash M: 6:30PM-9:30PM
T: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400 elective. For literature and film concentrators, this course counts as a course in literature and film. Film screening only on Tuesday evenings.
  This course treats the work of Charles Dickens and Charles Chaplin from a critical perspective that recognizes their striking similarities. Charles Dickens was the most popular artist of the 19th century; the fictional world and characters he created made sense of modern life for millions around the world, and the adjective "Dickensian" testifies to how familiar his blend of comedy and melodrama has become. Charles Chaplin is remarkably analogous to Dickens; as the 20th century's most popular artist, his work addressed fundamental issues of contemporary social life, and also employed a blend of comedy and melodrama that merited its own adjective: "Chaplinesque". The course examines the evolution of these two major figures over the course of their careers. This is a research-intensive seminar.
2170 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2172 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2417 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
3129 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
2171 ENGL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2321 HIST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser, and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2320 HIST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2173 HIST-954-01 Thesis Part I 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Thesis Part I is an investigation and report on an original research topic. Conference hours are available by appointment. Registration for the thesis will not be considered final without the thesis approval form and the signatures of the thesis adviser, graduate adviser, and department chair. Please refer to the Graduate Studies Catalog for thesis requirements. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form and the thesis writer's packet. Two course credits. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2174 HIST-955-01 Thesis Part II 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Continuation of History 954. Two course credits.
2175 HIST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
2766 PBPL-800-01 Introduction to Public Policy 1.00 SEM Feldman,Barry M. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This is the introductory course in public policy. It builds on the notion than an interesting reason to study public policy is that public policy making is about problem solving. It introduces and examines issues such as how we think society is better in one state than another; what means should we use to solve problems; what is government’s appropriate role in society; how should the public be engaged in solving common problems. The course will be taught from the perspective of what researchers tell us about the theory and process of making public policy, and how practitioners go about solving problems. The interesting question is whether theory informs practice, or the contrary. Or are the theory and practice of public policy making truly different? The course will explain the roles of certain government institutions and “actors” such as elected officials, appointed public managers, interest group leaders, citizens, and the media in the public policy process. An integral part of the course involves learning how to write in a concise, well-reasoned, professional manner by producing policy memos pertaining to public sector case studies as discussed in class.
3485 PBPL-827-01 Education Law 1.00 SEM Ellis,Chad D. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is designed for those interested in an introduction to and overview of education law. It will provide a survey of statute and case law related to the structure and organization of schools and districts, constitutional law in schools, teacher and student rights, special education, and school finance. Our discussions will focus not only on the legal foundations but the social implications of education law. Of particular note will be the ways in which law can both help and inhibit efforts to build greater equity in education.
3340 PBPL-836-01 Moral Theory and Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Wade,Maurice L. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The purpose of this course is to assist students in acquiring the skill in ethical reasoning and analysis needed for mature participation in society’s continuing debates over moral issues of public concern. The course will begin by examining some types of ethical theories and will proceed to consider a number of controversial social issues. Abortion, euthanasia, racial and sexual discrimination, world hunger, treatment of animals, and capital punishment are among the topics to be considered.
3492 PBPL-840-01 Budget Mgt & Public Policy 1.00 SEM Schack,Ronald W. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will focus on the practical aspects of pubic budgeting, finance, and financial management in the policy making process. It will begin with the "how to's" of budget development, from estimating and projecting revenues to deconstructing expenditures in order to develop the best estimates. Where appropriate, elements of public finance theory will be introduced and discussed as it relates to practical budget and financial management Both the bonding process and the complications related to third party service provision will be addressed. We will utilize practical tools for budget and financial management, such as results-based accountability, performance contracting, and reviewing budget to actual data together with projected to actual service data on a regular basis.
3489 PBPL-846-01 Policy Analysis 1.00 SEM Fotos III,Michael T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  In policy analysis, we focus on the problems of empirical policy analysis: defining the problem, framing the questions to be answered, picking the location and scope of the study, selecting the metrics of analysis, aligning metrics with public values, collecting evidence, and transforming the evidence into data. The readings and weekly discussions are avenues for students to query themselves on the problems they must solve to advance their own research agendas. Students will complete a major project in empirical policy analysis. Enrollment limited.
3534 PBPL-859-01 Budget Mgmt & Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Schack,Ronald W. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will focus on the practical aspects of pubic budgeting, finance, and financial management in the policy making process. It will begin with the “how to’s” of budget development, from estimating and projecting revenues to deconstructing expenditures in order to develop the best estimates. Where appropriate, elements of public finance theory will be introduced and discussed as it relates to practical budget and financial management. Both the bonding process and the complications related to third party service provision will be addressed. We will utilize practical tools for budget and financial management, such as results-based accountability, performance contracting, and reviewing budget to actual data together with projected to actual service data on a regular basis.
2917 PBPL-891-01 Health Policy 1.00 SEM Hughes,James J. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course addresses current major U.S. health policy issues and the critical processes and forces that shape them. Major health policy issues addressed include: Medicare, Medicaid, the uninsured, public health, the impact of welfare policy on health care, managed care development and regulation, state and federal health care reform and others. The course discusses the politics of health policy in terms of legislative and executive processes at the state and federal level; key forces involved including economic, social, ethical and political factors; and central players of importance, including special interest groups, lobbyists, the press, elected officials, legislative staff and public agencies.
2177 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2178 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2179 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
2197 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2180 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15