Graduate Studies Course Schedule

​This course schedule lists all graduate courses now scheduled to be offered in the term selected. After selecting the desired term, please scroll down until you see the courses listed for your program. (Co-listing of courses for undergraduate credit is not displayed.) All information is drawn from the Registrar’s official course schedule and is automatically updated accordingly. For summer terms only, the last column on the right uses "Qtr1" and "Qtr2" to indicate Summer Session I or Summer Session II, respectively.

New Course in Public Policy for Fall 2014: PBPL 872, Implementing Obamacare in Connecticut, has just been added to the schedule for Fall 2014. The course will be offered by Dr. Ellen Andrews, executive director for the Connecticut Health Policy Project. Scroll down for details.

New Course in English for Fall 2014: ENGL 841, Writing for Film, has just been added to the schedule for Fall 2014. The course will be offered on Mondays at 6:30 p.m. by Prof. Robert Brink, MFA Columbia University. Scroll down for details.

All students: the schedule for Spring 2015 is somewhat fluid, but all courses listed now have been approved.

Select a term:

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Course Listing for Graduate Courses - Spring 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Qtr
2020 AMST-802-01 Primary Research Matls 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar is designed to enable students to identify, evaluate, and use a range of primary sources, from personal letters, vital records, and the census to photographs, oral history, and newspapers. Students will critically read secondary literature to explore how other scholars have used primary sources, and will develop research projects on topics of their own choosing, based on primary sources available in local archives and repositories. Course not open to undergraduates.
2021 AMST-803-01 Historiography&Historical Rsch 1.00 SEM Walsh,Andrew H. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  New England has had a sense of its boundaries, identity, and larger purposes since the mid-17th century and it began producing historical literature about itself earlier than other regions of what would become the United States. This course has a dual agenda—to study the evolution of historical consciousness in and about New England and to use the region’s rich and varied historical literature to prepare students for their own historical research on the region.
2085 AMST-823-01 The History of American Sports 1.00 SEM Goldstein,Warren T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course will examine American sports from their beginnings in Puritan-era games to the multi-billion-dollar industries of today. We will begin by looking at the relationship between work, play, and religion in the colonies. We will trace the beginnings of horseracing, baseball, and boxing, and their connections to saloons, gambling, and the bachelor subculture of the Victorian underworld. We will study the rise of respectable sports in the mid- and late 19th century; follow baseball as it became the national pastime; see how college football took over higher education; and account for the rise of basketball. We will look at sports and war, sports and moral uplift, and sports and the culture of consumption. Finally, we will examine the rise of mass leisure, the impact of radio and television, racial segregation and integration, the rise of women’s sports, battles between players and owners in the last 25 years, and the entrance of truly big money into professional sports. Readings in primary and secondary sources will emphasize the historical experience of sports in the United States so that students can develop a framework for understanding current events, including the NHL lockout, the Kobe Bryant affair, and the controversies over steroids.
2374 AMST-825-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history.
2139 AMST-838-01 America Collects Itself 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Collecting American history is as alive and well in America today as it was soon after the republic was constituted. In the late 18th-century Americans became enamored of “writing” the new nation’s history, both in the literal sense of creating narratives, and the figurative sense of collecting the books and documents which would inform and underpin those narratives. The first institution created specifically to collect and preserve American history was the Massachusetts Historical Society, founded in 1791, during George Washington’s presidency. This course will trace the conscious collecting (by both individuals and institutions) of documents and artifacts from the 18th century to the present day relating to "America," as that term was variously defined over time.
2130 AMST-868-01 Amer Labor & Cultural Politics 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course will address the importance of the American labor movement in producing, contesting, and amplifying meaning within larger contexts of class, knowledge, and power. Although many such meanings arise within the expected domains of work, pay, and workers, and serve as crucial resources for communities and unions, they also are closely related to projects of achieving justice for larger imagined communities (e.g., “the people”). Readings will provide a broad overview of labor movements since the Civil War as well as close study of selected cultural work, such as challenging class subordination, shaping and contesting racialization, engendering and valorizing work, interrogating the wage relation, pursuing contradictory visions of authority and modernization, and seeking reform within today’s increasingly hostile political climates and structures.
2140 AMST-870-01 Nat Amer Pictorial Narrative 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This seminar examines Native American Indian narrative artistic, pictorial, and literary traditions from North and Central America.Such traditions are inseparable from culture and performance, community and nation, human life and the physical world. The visual and tactile media considered include pictorial manuscripts, ceramics, bead- and shellwork, textiles, photographs, and paintings. The seminar will be interdisciplinary, with each unit including analyses of texts and visual materials and readings on aesthetics, translation, memory, and appropriation.
1473 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
1474 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1232 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1233 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
1239 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
1378 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
1234 ECON-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2142 ENGL-802-01 Rhetoric & Media Arts 1.00 SEM Wall,Mary Beverly C. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For English graduate students, this course is required for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track; it counts as an elective for the literary studies track.
  Aristotle defined Rhetoric over 2,000 years ago as “the art of discovering, in any given case, the available means of persuasion.” This seminar is designed to introduce the theoretical traditions of this art of persuasion and its development across the media arts from classical to contemporary times. Students will examine representative examples of literary texts, political discourse, contemporary films, and digital modes of communication in popular culture and the public sphere. Emphasis will be placed on exploring media semiotics and the dynamics of evolving cultural concepts of page, voice, and screen—ranging from classical orations to televised speeches and hypertext webs. Students will write weekly, have opportunities to lead class discussion, and develop a substantial project on a rhetorical topic of interest to them. English 402 and English 802 are the same course. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective. For the English graduate program, this course is required for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track; it counts as an elective for the literary studies track.
2084 ENGL-804-01 Women and Empire 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course satisfies the requirement of a course in British literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
  This course examines women's involvement in and relationship to British imperialism in the 19th and 20th centuries. What part did ideologies of femininity play in pro-imperialist discourse? In what ways did women writers attempt to “feminize” the imperialist project? What was the relationship between the emerging feminist movement and imperialism at the turn of the 20th century? How have women writers resisted and complicated imperialist axiomatics? How – and in what language – do women authors from once-colonized countries write about the history and experiences of imperialism? Authors to be studied include Charlotte Brontë, Flora Annie Steel, Rudyard Kipling, Jean Rhys, Jamaica Kincaid, Louise Bennett, Nuala Ni Dhomhnail and Jhumpa Lahiri. English 404 and English 804 are the same course. For English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement. This course is also research intensive. For the English graduate program, this course satisfies the requirement of a course in British literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
2317 ENGL-809-01 Non-Fiction Screenwriting 1.00 SEM Brink,Robert W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Analyzing contemporary nonfiction audiovisual scripts through the prism of classical persuasive rhetoric and modern visual communication theory, students will build both an intellectual framework and the practical skills that are in high demand in business, education, marketing, documentary and news writing. Specifically, students will develop pitching and writing skills, learn formatting conventions and sources for professional advancement while developing a written portfolio of four nonfiction pieces for audiovisual media. Reading assignments include selections ranging from Aristotle to Vorkapich. Guest presenters will include writer/producers from news, documentary, marketing, advertising, and educational video fields. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective. This course counts as an advanced film course for literature and film majors.
2128 ENGL-848-01 Plant Lives in Lit and Film 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program this course satisfies the requirement of a course in British literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track. English 448 and English 848 are the same course.
  This course engages with the plant world through novels, poetry, philosophy, film, and painting. We will track major trends in the human understanding of plants, allowing us to analyze how plants are represented in art and popular culture. In rethinking the being and meaning of plants we will necessarily revisit the idea of ‘the human’ and ‘the animal,’ employing these categories while attending to borderline cases where their utility falters. Readings may include well-known Romantic texts like Wordsworth’s “The Thorn,” Shelley’s “The Sensitive Plant,” and Austen’s Mansfield Park, as well as Erasmus Darwin’s epic “The Loves of the Plants”; essays by John Wilkins, Michael Pollan, and Michael Marder; and horror films like “The Happening” and “The Ruins.” English 448 and English 848 are the same course. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive. For the English graduate program this course satisfies the requirement of a course in British literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
2121 ENGL-870-01 Film Theory: An Introduction 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course can count as an elective for the literary studies track, or a core course for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course can count as an elective for the literary studies track, or a core course for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
  This course introduces the most important theoretical models which have been used to explain how films function as art, ideology, language, history, politics and philosophy. Some theorists are mainly concerned with the aesthetic potentials of the cinema: How do categories such as realism, authorship and genre explain and enhance our experience of films? Other theorists are focused on the relations between films and the societies that produce them, or on general processes of spectatorship: How do Hollywood films address their audiences? How do narrative structures shape our responses to fictional characters? As the variety of these questions suggests, film theory opens onto a wide set of practices and possibilities; though it always begins with what we experience at the movies, it is ultimately concerned with the wider world that we experience through the movies. Theorists to be examined include Munsterberg, Eisenstein, Burch, Kracauer, Balazs, Bazin, Altman, Gunning, Mulvey, Metz, Wollen, Havel, Benjamin, Pasolini, Deleuze and Jameson. (Note: English 470 and English 870 are the same course.) For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection. For the English graduate program, this course can count as an elective for the literary studies track, or a core course for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track. This course fulfills requirements toward the film studies minor.
1512 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1245 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
1223 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
1240 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
1235 HIST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser, and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1246 HIST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
1236 HIST-954-01 Thesis Part I 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Thesis Part I is an investigation and report on an original research topic. Conference hours are available by appointment. Registration for the thesis will not be considered final without the thesis approval form and the signatures of the thesis adviser, graduate adviser, and department chair. Please refer to the Graduate Studies Catalog for thesis requirements. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form and the thesis writer's packet. Two course credits. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
1237 HIST-955-01 Thesis Part II 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Continuation of History 954. Two course credits.
2261 NESC-816-01 Neural Engineering 1.00 SEM Blaise,J. Harry TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  This introductory course uses an integrative and cross-disciplinary approach to survey basic principles and modern theories and methods in several important areas of neural engineering. Course topics include: neural prosthetics, neural stimulation, neurophysiology, neural signal detection, and analysis and computational neural networks. The practicalities of the emerging technology of brain-computer interface as well as other research topics in neural engineering will be discussed. Students will also have the opportunity to perform hands-on computer simulation and modeling of neural circuits and systems.
2262 NESC-862-01 Neuroethology 1.00 LEC Swart,Charles C. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will explore the control of animal behavior by the nervous system from an evolutionary perspective. Topics to be covered include motor control (orientation, navigation, pursuit and escape behavior), communication systems (mate searching, territoriality, and social interactions), resource location and ingestion, circadian and other rhythmic behaviors and learning and memory. Examples will be drawn from a wide variety of vertebrate and invertebrate animals as appropriate to the topic. For select topics special attention will be paid to experimental design and data analysis. Text readings and selected primary research articles will guide discussion of each topic. In addition to exams and quizzes, students will write several short essays and one term paper during the course of the semester.
2259 NESC-865-01 Cognitive/SocialNeuroscience 1.00 SEM Raskin,Sarah A. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  This course examines the way in which brain function influences mental processes and overt action. We will consider a range of cognitive and social functions, primarily from the perspective of neuroscience and draw on such related disciplines as cognitive psychology, social psychology, and computational analysis as needed. The functions to be reviewed include perception, attention, memory, thinking, emotional processing, group behavior, stereotyping and empathy. We will apply these to consider topics such as substance abuse, discrimination, child development, and mental illness.
2260 NESC-874-01 Minds and Brains 1.00 SEM Lloyd,Dan MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  The neurosciences have made striking progress in recent years toward understanding the brains of animals and human beings. Through readings in philosophy and science we will consider what contribution this explosion of neuroscientific data can make to our understanding of the mind.
2208 PBPL-806-01 Methods of Research 1.00 LEC Schack,Ronald W. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is intended to empower students to evaluate common forms of research critically, and to give them some experience in conducting research. Through a series of weekly assignments and class projects, students will be introduced to the shaping of research questions; hypothesis testing, writing a research paper, conducting interviews and surveys, giving a professional presentation, and presenting simple tabular data to prove a point. The course does not require an extensive mathematics background. Regular attendance and access to a computer, e-mail, and the Internet are expected.
1593 PBPL-808-01 Constutional Foundatns Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Horowitz,Amy R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will examine the history, methods, and types of successful, formal, written argumentation in policy advocacy. Among the arenas explored will be courts of law, legislative bodies, and the broader field of public opinion. Most course material will be drawn from case studies.
2170 PBPL-822-01 Economic History and Policy 1.00 LEC Jacobs,Cindy M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course attempts to provide the student with a basic yet thorough understanding of the growth and development of the American economy. At the outset of the course, we will discuss the role and importance of economic history and the methodology of economic historians. We will then study the colonial economy, the early national and antebellum years, the reunification era, the emergence of a modern U.S. economy, and the development of the post-WWII economy up to the present. The analysis will focus on key economic sectors - agriculture, commerce, money and banking, labor, government - and their growth and development.
2026 PBPL-825-01 Policy Implementation 1.00 SEM Feldman,Barry M. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Implementation is the action step in the public policy process that arguably is the most challenging and complex to do. It is the key to making something happen and is often the gauge the public uses to determine the overall effectiveness of government, in its broadest terms. This course is devoted exclusively to the study of policy implementation from the relevant literature, theoretical constructs, and the practical issues of attempting to implement public policy that often has vague and conflicting policy goals and inadequate resources. Students will examine a current public policy that was adopted by a town/city government in the Greater Hartford area, will ascertain whether the policy was implemented, analyze the challenges involved in the implementation, and meet and question government leaders involved in the policy implementation effort. The class will be conducted as a seminar, with fieldwork as necessary. A major research paper that reviews and analyzes the success of the town/city government in implementing the adopted policy studied during the semester comprises an important end product of the course.
2270 PBPL-833-01 Introduction to Urban Planning 1.00 SEM Staff,Trinity T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course provides an overview of urban planning. Students will be introduced to key theories and concepts as well as methods and empirical case studies in this multidimensional field. Lectures and seminar discussions concentrate on applications of urban planning theories and concepts as practiced by urban planners. Topics discussed in the course may include regional, environmental, metropolitan, transportation, spatial, and land-use planning issues. Empirical emphasis is expected to be on Hartford and other Connecticut cities, but the course may discuss other American or international urban areas. The course is an elective geared toward public policy graduate students with an interest in urban policy, regardless of their track. This course may be of interest to American studies graduate students as well (permission of adviser required).
2275 PBPL-835-01 Pandemics,Emer Dis,Pub Hlth 1.00 SEM Schaller,Barry R. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course examines critical issues in public health - arising from both national and global events (such as the recent outbreak of Ebola) - from the viewpoints of public health law, ethics, and public policy. The course will explore policy implications of epidemics and chronic diseases that beset the world's most vulnerable populations. The course will also consider the public health problems that many people in our own country face on a day-to-day basis. Questions include: What issues should be considered public health problems? What is our responsibility to people outside as well as inside the U.S.? The objective of the course is to provide a sound basis for applying ethical principles, along with law and public policy, to public health problems.
1329 PBPL-846-01 Policy Analysis 1.00 SEM Fotos III,Michael T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  In policy analysis, we focus on the problems of empirical policy analysis: defining the problem, framing the questions to be answered, picking the location and scope of the study, selecting the metrics of analysis, aligning metrics with public values, collecting evidence, and transforming the evidence into data. The readings and weekly discussions are avenues for students to query themselves on the problems they must solve to advance their own research agendas. Students will complete a major project in empirical policy analysis. Enrollment limited.
1238 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1244 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1242 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
1243 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
1241 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 20