Graduate Studies Course Schedule

​This course schedule lists all graduate courses now scheduled to be offered in the term selected. After selecting the desired term, please scroll down until you see the courses listed for your program. (Co-listing of courses for undergraduate credit is not displayed.) All information is drawn from the Registrar’s official course schedule and is automatically updated accordingly. For summer terms only, the last column on the right uses "Qtr1" and "Qtr2" to indicate Summer Session I or Summer Session II, respectively.

New Course in Public Policy for Fall 2014: PBPL 872, Implementing Obamacare in Connecticut, has just been added to the schedule for Fall 2014. The course will be offered by Dr. Ellen Andrews, executive director for the Connecticut Health Policy Project. Scroll down for details.

New Course in English for Fall 2014: ENGL 841, Writing for Film, has just been added to the schedule for Fall 2014. The course will be offered on Mondays at 6:30 p.m. by Prof. Robert Brink, MFA Columbia University. Scroll down for details.

All students: the schedule for Spring 2015 is somewhat fluid, but all courses listed now have been approved.

Select a term:

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Course Listing for Graduate Courses - Fall 2014
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Qtr
3120 AMST-801-01 Appr to Amer Studies 1.00 LEC McCombie,Mary E. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM MECC - 293  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  This seminar, which is required of all American studies graduate students, examines a variety of approaches to the field. Readings may include several “classic” texts of 18th- and 19th-century American culture and several key works of American studies scholarship from the formative period of the field after World War II, as well as more recent contributions to the study of the United States. Topics will include changing ideas about the content, production, and consumption of American culture; patterns of ethnic identification and definition; the construction of categories like “race” and “gender”; and the bearing of class, race, gender, and sexuality on individuals’ participation in American society and culture. Undergraduates who wish to enroll in this course must obtain permission of their adviser and the instructor.
3337 AMST-821-01 Nature & Health American Cult 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn T: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 305  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Since the industrial revolution, Americans have debated the proper balance of nature and health in an increasingly polluted country. This debate has been charged with competing discourses of nature and the environment, changing views of health and embodiment, and fraught notions of profit, interests, rights, and social justice in capitalist society. This course will explore that nexus, using such examples as nature cures, social Darwinist and nativist fear of contagion from immigrants and the poor, and contested standards of industrial and environmental health in twentieth- and twenty-first-century America.
3121 AMST-828-01 New England & the Blk Atlantic 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MECC - 293  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course will explore the trans-Atlantic cultural, economic, and political constellation that has linked Africa, Europe, and the Americas from the 15th century to the present. In particular, we will investigate some key aspects of New England’s part in the Black Atlantic, including slavery and the slave trade; literature, public speaking, and the arts; commerce and industry; and travel and migration. We will ground this study in past and present geographic sites of diaspora, racialization, and contestation, including ships and ports, the home, church, workplace, market, and performance spaces.
3225 AMST-835-01 Museum Exhibition 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM LIB - A66 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  One of the most engaging ways to promote collections and explore a subject or theme is to create an exhibition, which is a genre in and of itself—telling a story with artifacts. Through critical readings students will explore the cultural and educational goals of exhibits, visitor needs and accessibility, design elements (including technology), and audience evaluation methods utilized at libraries, historic houses and historical sites, and history and cultural museums. Drawing from the extensive and wide-ranging collections in the Watkinson Library, students will conceive, write, and install an exhibition, design and publish a catalogue, and plan and implement an opening event to take place at the end of the semester in the Watkinson.
3340 AMST-839-01 Nationalizing America 1932-60 1.00 SEM Leach,Eugene E. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - S204  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This course open to senior History majors only.
  This course examines the Depression and New Deal, World War II, and the Cold War. During this period, an activist welfare state/national security state, and a national mass culture took form, shaped by responses to economic crisis and economic opportunity, the gathering power of popular-culture media and advertising, and wars hot and cold. Both political topics (e.g., New Deal labor or civil rights policies, McCarthyism) and social and cultural topics (e.g., The World War II home front, changing gender roles, suburbanization) will be investigated. Course materials include fiction, movies, and other documents from the period, as well as outstanding works of historical analysis and synthesis.
3122 AMST-843-01 Spec, Soc Cntl & Spac of Disp 1.00 SEM McCombie,Mary E. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM MECC - 293  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course will analyze a range of built spaces, elite ones like museums and vernacular ones like shopping malls and casinos, to see how they reflect and shape our changing ideas of spectacle and display. Beginning with an examination of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition and the 1939 World’s Fair, we will examine how buildings exercise authority and shape our behavior. We will consider how displays of culture and commerce encode the agendas of capitalism, both literal and cultural, by looking at the packaging of commodities and of the materials within museums; retail entertainment architecture like those of Las Vegas and Disney and its fusion with the museum; and memorial museums and structures, particularly the Holocaust Museum.
3378 AMST-858-01 Creating the New Right Mvmt 1.00 SEM Cohn,William H. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 106  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This seminar will examine the political and cultural environment that supported and sustained the New Right political movement that emerged after World War II and became fully formed during the Reagan years and more recently in the Tea Party Movement supported by non-profit political action committees. The key to conservative success lay in their hopes to replace the narrative of American liberalism—now progressivism—with its emphasis on democratic-egalitarian concepts, with a narrative more in keeping with conservative thinking that stresses the self-governing individual, minimum government activity, and entrepreneurial and market freedom. We want to focus our discussion and research on cultural change in America and the responses to those changes by the American people as well as by the two major political parties.
2443 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
2201 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2197 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2198 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2200 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
2199 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
2202 ECON-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate director and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2203 ECON-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
3299 ENGL-801-01 Theories& Methods of Litry Std 1.00 SEM Rosen,David M: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 106  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students and we recommend that entering students enroll in this course during their first year of graduate study.
  This seminar is designed to introduce students to the field of literary studies at the graduate level, to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will write weekly, have opportunities to lead class discussion, and work in stages to compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text. (Note: English 401 and English 801 are the same course.) For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course is also research intensive. For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students and we recommend that entering students enroll in this course during their first year of graduate study.
3290 ENGL-814-01 Remixing Literature, Part II 1.00 SEM Wall,Mary Beverly C. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 106  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For graduate English students, this course counts as a core course for the Writing, Rhetoric, and Media Arts track or as an elective for the Literary Studies track.
  Has "the remix" always been an essential art form in literature? This course will research new examples of classic literary works and their cultural adaptations and appropriations across multiple media arts, ranging from redactions of oral folktales to cinema blockbusters, digital mashups, and transmedia storytelling. Source texts will include Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur, Shakespeare's Hamlet, Austen's Sense and Sensibility, Bronte's Wuthering Heights, and Stoker's Dracula. We will study these texts and linked remixes, explore the reasons for their continued popularity, and address topics in creativity, originality, and remix theory. Students will help choose contemporary remixes and have opportunities to experiment individually and in small groups with crafting their own literary remixes and mashups. English 414 and English 814 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course counts as an elective or fulfills the requirement of an advanced course for literature and film concentrators. For the English graduate program, this course counts as a core course for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track or as an elective for the literary studies track.
3313 ENGL-839-12 The Documentary 1.00 SEM Riggio,Milla C. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 106  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: Forr the English graduate program, this course counts as a core course for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track; it counts as an elective for the literary studies track.
  Documentary films chronicle varied cultural, social, and political realities, from coal miners’ strikes and social revolutions to the development of musical genres. Documentary styles range from fictionalized recreations (docudramas) to narrative reenactments to non-narrative commentaries. This course will examine key documentary strategies through representative films, which may include Harlan County USA (Barbara Kopple, 1976) and Shut Up and Sing (Kopple and Cecilia Peck, 2006), Journalist and the Jihadi: The Murder of Daniel Pearl (Ahmad Jamal and Ramesh Sharma, 2006): segments of The Battle of Algiers, Poto Mitan: Haitian Women, Pillars of the Global Economy (Renee Bergan and Mark Schuller), Jazz (selected episodes) (Ken Burns, 2001), Say Amen, Somebody (George Nierenberg, 1982), An Inconvenient Truth (Davis Guggenheim, 2008), and Fair Game (Doug Liman, 2010). Note: English 839-12 and English 439-16 are the same course. For the English graduate program, this course counts as a core course for the writing, rhetoric and media arts track; it counts as an elective for the literary studies track. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement, or a core course for the literature and film concentration.
3485 ENGL-841-01 Writing for Film 1.00 SEM Brink,Robert M: 6:30PM-9:30PM UNASSIGNED -  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This is a hybrid graduate/advanced undergraduate course. Coursework involves reading relevant dramatic and cinematic theory, studying three produced screenplays and one unproduced script by a major writer, and completing weekly writing assignments. While studying screenplay format, three-act story structure, character development, dialogue, action, and style, students will develop a writing process grounded in the oral tradition. Reading and listening to work aloud in class will develop a supportive “writers room.” Readings will range from John Howard Lawson’s theory of screenwriting to Ed Spiegel’s The Innocence of the Eye. Writing exercises will consist of short film scripts. Students will have a choice of final projects: either a feature film treatment or a fully realized screenplay for a short film. For undergraduate students, the course may be counted as an advanced Creative Writing workshop or an elective for the English major. For graduate students, this course counts as a core course in the Writing, Rhetoric, and Media Arts track and an elective in the Literary Studies track.
3314 ENGL-868-16 Walt Whitman & Emily Dickinson 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 103 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course satisfies the requirements of a course in American literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course satisfies the requirements of a course in American literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
  Nothing that precedes them in the American literary tradition quite prepares us for the poems of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. We will steep ourselves in the verse of these two literary iconoclasts. At the same time, we will trace the critical history of both, reading essays from the 19th century to the present which have made the complex works and lives of Whitman and Dickinson more legible. The final class period will be reserved for reading selections from 20th-century poets--not all of them American--who have openly professed a debt to Whitman's and Dickinson's experimental and often exhilarating poems. Note: English 868-16 and English 468-06 are the same course. For the English graduate program, this course satisfies the requirements of a course in American literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
2205 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2207 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2510 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
2206 ENGL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
2381 HIST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser, and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2380 HIST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2208 HIST-954-01 Thesis Part I 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Thesis Part I is an investigation and report on an original research topic. Conference hours are available by appointment. Registration for the thesis will not be considered final without the thesis approval form and the signatures of the thesis adviser, graduate adviser, and department chair. Please refer to the Graduate Studies Catalog for thesis requirements. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form and the thesis writer's packet. Two course credits. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2209 HIST-955-01 Thesis Part II 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Continuation of History 954. Two course credits.
2210 HIST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
2994 PBPL-800-01 Introduction to Public Policy 1.00 SEM Feldman,Barry M. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 311  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This is the introductory course in public policy. It builds on the notion than an interesting reason to study public policy is that public policy making is about problem solving. It introduces and examines issues such as how we think society is better in one state than another; what means should we use to solve problems; what is government’s appropriate role in society; how should the public be engaged in solving common problems. The course will be taught from the perspective of what researchers tell us about the theory and process of making public policy, and how practitioners go about solving problems. The interesting question is whether theory informs practice, or the contrary. Or are the theory and practice of public policy making truly different? The course will explain the roles of certain government institutions and “actors” such as elected officials, appointed public managers, interest group leaders, citizens, and the media in the public policy process. An integral part of the course involves learning how to write in a concise, well-reasoned, professional manner by producing policy memos pertaining to public sector case studies as discussed in class.
2211 PBPL-828-01 Theory of Democratic Institut 1.00 SEM Fotos III,Michael T: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 309  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The course applies social choice theory to the study of four components of democratic policy making; voting, political strategy, theories of governance, and bureaucracy. The course emphasizes weekly readings and in-class discussion of central themes in the literature. Examination of the formal properties of voting rules leads to a deeper understanding of representation and political outcomes. The analysis of institutions offers lessons on the problems of delegation, policy design, implementation, and democratic administration.
  View syllabus
3352 PBPL-832-01 Contemp Issues Education Pol 1.00 SEM Ellis,Chad D. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 309  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Education policy is constantly shifting and is influenced by myriad social and political factors. This course examines the role of public education in American society and employs a sociological lens to the various factors influencing public education. It will follow contemporary trends in education policy at the national, state, and local level. Frequent guest speakers will provide context and perspectives on how contemporary issues are affecting various stakeholders in the area of public education.
3438 PBPL-836-01 Moral Theory and Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Wade,Maurice L. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 225  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  The purpose of this course is to assist students in acquiring the skill in ethical reasoning and analysis needed for mature participation in society’s continuing debates over moral issues of public concern. The course will begin by examining some types of ethical theories and will proceed to consider a number of controversial social issues. Abortion, euthanasia, racial and sexual discrimination, world hunger, treatment of animals, and capital punishment are among the topics to be considered.
3443 PBPL-872-01 Implementing ObamaCare in CT 1.00 SEM Andrews,Ellen M. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 213  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was designed to be the largest expansion of health care coverage in US history and to fix our troubled health care system. This class will compare the goals of the ACA to its early performance, public perception, and look into the future. We will explore the competing interests and impacts of stakeholders, explore barriers and facilitators of reform, and the impact of the outside forces on implementation. The class will focus in depth on Connecticut’s experience implementing the ACA. By the end of the class, students will have a practical understanding of ACA implementation in this state including the process, the players, how to track progress, and how to participate in the process.
3227 PBPL-891-01 Health Policy 1.00 SEM Hughes,James J. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 213  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course addresses current major U.S. health policy issues and the critical processes and forces that shape them. Major health policy issues addressed include: Medicare, Medicaid, the uninsured, public health, the impact of welfare policy on health care, managed care development and regulation, state and federal health care reform and others. The course discusses the politics of health policy in terms of legislative and executive processes at the state and federal level; key forces involved including economic, social, ethical and political factors; and central players of importance, including special interest groups, lobbyists, the press, elected officials, legislative staff and public agencies.
2212 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2213 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2214 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
2232 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
2215 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20