Graduate Studies Course Schedule

​This course schedule lists all graduate courses now scheduled to be offered in the term selected. After selecting the desired term, please scroll down until you see the courses listed for your program. (Co-listing of courses for undergraduate credit is not displayed.) All information is drawn from the Registrar’s official course schedule and is automatically updated accordingly. For summer terms only, the last column on the right uses "Qtr1" and "Qtr2" to indicate Summer Session I or Summer Session II, respectively.

Important Notice: Registration for Summer and Fall 2017 will open on April 17th. Students  who have questions about which courses to take should consult their academic adviser.
Select a term:

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Course Listing for Graduate Courses - Spring 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Qtr
4547 AMST-802-01 Primary Research Matls 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar is designed to enable students to identify, evaluate, and use a range of primary sources, from personal letters, vital records, and the census to photographs, oral history, and newspapers. Students will critically read secondary literature to explore how other scholars have used primary sources, and will develop research projects on topics of their own choosing, based on primary sources available in local archives and repositories. Course not open to undergraduates.
4556 AMST-825-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM Miller,Karen Li R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history.
5131 AMST-870-01 Native Amer Art & Storytelling 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This seminar examines Native American Indian narrative artistic, pictorial, and literary traditions from North and Central America.Such traditions are inseparable from culture and performance, community and nation, human life and the physical world. The visual and tactile media considered include pictorial manuscripts, ceramics, bead- and shellwork, textiles, photographs, and paintings. The seminar will be interdisciplinary, with each unit including analyses of texts and visual materials and readings on aesthetics, translation, memory, and appropriation.
5138 AMST-880-01 New England Landscapes 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course concerns historical geographies of New England, or the meeting of nature and human agency in “developing” the land and waters of the region. It explores such iconic landscapes as Native American fields and villages; New England’s villages and commons; farms, fields, factories, and forests; free-flowing and dammed rivers; seaports; cities; and tourist destinations. We will attempt to understand both how this region has been imagined and how its changing, often contested landscapes have been related to the political economy, social identities (such as class, race, and gender), and cultural values, metrics, and desires.
4382 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
4383 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4234 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4235 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
4241 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
4352 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
5170 ENGL-813-01 Native American Lit & Theory 1.00 SEM Wyss,Hilary E. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  We are currently in an extraordinary intellectual and artistic moment for Native American communities. In this course, we will turn our attention to forms of Native textual production from the colonial period to today. We will not only educate ourselves in the richness and variety of Native expression, we will also grapple with our assumptions about what constitutes Native American literature, using recent Native American scholarship to guide us. Along the way we will sample various forms of expression from origin stories to ledger drawings, poems, novels, autobiographies, and critical nonfiction. Our efforts in this class will be collaborative; while we will share core readings, you should expect to do several outside readings and class reports. This seminar is research-intensive. For English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 requirement, or a course emphasizing critical reflection.
5167 ENGL-820-01 Shakespeare 1.00 SEM Fox,Elizabeth L. R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  In this course, we will focus on a selection of Shakespeare’s plays, from early comedies to later tragedies and romances. Students will gain a broad familiarity with Shakespearean texts and contexts, from the sixteenth century to the present, deepening their understanding of Shakespeare’s drama and its cultural significance through close examination of both primary and secondary sources, as well as film and stage adaptations. This seminar is research-intensive. For English majors, it fulfills the requirement for an upper-level course in pre-1700 literature.
5050 ENGL-821-01 1890's British Literature 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  The 1890s was a time of literary flourishing in the face of deep cultural and social anxiety. The British Empire was hovering on the edge of collapse; the fin de siècle was felt to be the end of an era. Yet even as some saw degeneration at hand, others saw opportunity, experimentation, rebellion, new beginnings. "New Women" posed a vocal threat to gender roles while Oscar Wilde and his fellow “decadents” asked a nation to rethink art and brought conversations about sexuality to the breakfast table. This course examines the literature, art, and culture of a remarkable decade. Students will read fiction, prose, poetry and drama, producing two research papers, several shorter papers, and an in-class research presentation. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written from 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
4404 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4247 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
4227 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4242 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
5084 NESC-800-01 Graduate Sem in Neurosciene 0.50 SEM Raskin,Sarah A. TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  This half-credit seminar will cover current topics in neuroscience, including issues in research methodology, ethics in research and public policy issues. In addition, time will be spent reviewing the literature and methodology of the theses of enrolled students. The course will be structured like a journal club with students preparing a discussion of one to two articles each week to be shared. Many of the articles may be drawn from the background literature of the thesis topic. Students will also attend presentations by neuroscience researchers and read and discuss pertinent research literature prior to each presentation.
4659 NESC-874-01 Minds and Brains 1.00 SEM Lloyd,Dan TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  The neurosciences have made striking progress in recent years toward understanding the brains of animals and human beings. Through readings in philosophy and science we will consider what contribution this explosion of neuroscientific data can make to our understanding of the mind.
5141 PBPL-802-01 Law & Environmental Policy 1.00 LEC Chambers JD,Joseph R: 6:45PM-9:25PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 3
  The course emphasizes how and why American environmental law has developed over the preceding three decades as a primary tool to achieve environmental goals. Topics include the analysis of policy options, "command-and-control" regulation, modification of liability rules, pollution prevention through non-regulatory means, and the environmental aspects of U.S. energy policies in relation to petroleum, electricity, and transportation. The course concludes by addressing transnational environmental issues such as atmospheric change, burgeoning population growth, depletion of forests and species, sustainable development, and the role of international legal institutions in relation to these pressing problems.
4631 PBPL-806-01 Methods of Research 1.00 LEC Ellis,Chad D. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is intended to empower students to evaluate common forms of research critically, and to give them some experience in conducting research. Through a series of weekly assignments and class projects, students will be introduced to the shaping of research questions; hypothesis testing, writing a research paper, conducting interviews and surveys, giving a professional presentation, and presenting simple tabular data to prove a point. The course does not require an extensive mathematics background. Regular attendance and access to a computer, e-mail, and the Internet are expected.
5136 PBPL-808-01 Constutional Foundatns Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Horowitz,Amy M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will examine the history, methods, and types of successful, formal, written argumentation in policy advocacy. Among the arenas explored will be courts of law, legislative bodies, and the broader field of public opinion. Most course material will be drawn from case studies.
5142 PBPL-820-01 Policy and Health Equity 1.00 SEM McGuire,Maryann R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The course will study the intersection of contemporary public health topics with societal factors and policies that influence the health of populations. A review of current U.S. policy approaches that address health care and social determinants of health will be covered. The key social determinants of health include: economic stability, neighborhoods and physical environment, education, food, race/ethnicity, social engagement and the health care system Through case studies, collaborative learning projects and class seminars, students will understand how these social determinants affect the health outcomes of populations and policy as well as program mechanisms that can improve outcomes. An overarching focus of this course will be on policy changes that can eliminate health inequalities.
4632 PBPL-828-01 Institutions and Public Policy 1.00 SEM Fotos III,Michael T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The course applies social choice theory to the study of four components of democratic policy making; voting, political strategy, theories of governance, and bureaucracy. The course emphasizes weekly readings and in-class discussion of central themes in the literature. Examination of the formal properties of voting rules leads to a deeper understanding of representation and political outcomes. The analysis of institutions offers lessons on the problems of delegation, policy design, implementation, and democratic administration.
5137 PBPL-840-01 Budget Mgt & Public Policy 1.00 SEM Jacobs,Cindy R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will focus on the practical aspects of pubic budgeting, finance, and financial management in the policy making process. It will begin with the "how to's" of budget development, from estimating and projecting revenues to deconstructing expenditures in order to develop the best estimates. Where appropriate, elements of public finance theory will be introduced and discussed as it relates to practical budget and financial management Both the bonding process and the complications related to third party service provision will be addressed. We will utilize practical tools for budget and financial management, such as results-based accountability, performance contracting, and reviewing budget to actual data together with projected to actual service data on a regular basis.
4240 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4246 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4244 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
4245 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4243 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15