Graduate Studies Course Schedule

​This course schedule lists all graduate courses now scheduled to be offered in the term selected. After selecting the desired term, please scroll down until you see the courses listed for your program. (Co-listing of courses for undergraduate credit is not displayed.) All information is drawn from the Registrar’s official course schedule and is automatically updated accordingly. For summer terms only, the last column on the right uses "Qtr1" and "Qtr2" to indicate Summer Session I or Summer Session II, respectively.

Important Notice: Registration for Summer and Fall 2017 will open on April 17th. Students  who have questions about which courses to take should consult their academic adviser.
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Course Listing for Graduate Courses - Fall 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Qtr
2687 AMST-801-01 Approaches to American Studies 1.00 LEC Miller,Karen Li R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar, which is required of all American studies graduate students, examines a variety of approaches to the field. Readings may include several “classic” texts of 18th- and 19th-century American culture and several key works of American studies scholarship from the formative period of the field after World War II, as well as more recent contributions to the study of the United States. Topics will include changing ideas about the content, production, and consumption of American culture; patterns of ethnic identification and definition; the construction of categories like “race” and “gender”; and the bearing of class, race, gender, and sexuality on individuals’ participation in American society and culture. Undergraduates who wish to enroll in this course must obtain permission of their adviser and the instructor.
3653 AMST-809-01 American Empire 1.00 SEM Baldwin,Davarian L. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 3
  Thomas Jefferson once boldly described the United States as an “empire of liberty.” But whether or not America has ever taken on the identity, ever functioned, as an empire has been one of the most hotly debated topics of our current global times. In this senior seminar we want to take both a historical and contemporary look at what happens when the foreign policy of the United States converges with the general practices of military engagement, occupation, nation-building, commercial market control, and/or annexation of “foreign lands.” Do such foreign relations constitute an empire? In this course we will examine a number of critical moments including the internal U.S. expansion into native American and Mexican lands, “Manifest Destiny” projects in the turn-of-the-twentieth century Caribbean and Asian Pacific, Marshall Plan policies in Cold War Europe, and “War on Terror” initiatives in the present day Middle East. What have been the aspirations of U.S. foreign policy, what have been the consequences, how do they affect the policies and practices “back home.” Have any of these experiences constituted an American Empire?
3214 AMST-809-02 Digital City 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 3
  With half the world's population now in cities, policymakers and activists are focused on the promise of technology to tackle issues from gentrification, pollution, access to public spaces, and walkability. How can digital platforms affect the growth of equal and just cities? How can critical interventions using such platforms work to recognize differences of gender, race, sexuality, and class in cities, and promote equality? What role do and should colleges play in supporting the growth of just and equal spaces? Focusing on Hartford and Trinity, this course connects global and national issues to the intimate experiences of everyday urban life. It pairs technical skills and social science data collection with urban theory and urban studies. Students contribute to an online archive examining the college-city relationship.
3654 AMST-824-01 American Comics 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course provides an introduction to Comic Art in North America, from the beginnings of the newspaper comic strip through the development of comic books, the growth of graphic novels, and current developments in electronic media. It focuses on the history and aesthetics of the medium, comparison between developments in the United States, Mexico, and French Canada, and the social and cultural contexts in which comic art is created and consumed. The first half of the semester concentrates on early and 20th-century comic strips and the development of the comic book form through the 1940s; the second on the social changes affecting comic art in the 1950s and 1960s, the development of a comic book subculture from the 1970s to the 21st century, the growth of independently published graphic novels and the independent comics, and contemporary electronic media developments.
3639 AMST-826-01 Nuclear America 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  In this course we will explore large- and small-scale cultural landscapes as they have been shaped by nuclear power, weapons, transportation, and waste. Among these landscapes are towns created for making nuclear weapons; open-air testing sites; military complexes, such as ports, bases, airfields, and silos; the West’s uranium mines, and the land, water, and Native American territory polluted by radioactive tailings; nuclear reactor sites, from New England’s regional power plants to those in metropolitan areas; and land and offshore storage sites for nuclear waste. Besides the physical changes to the American landscape, nuclear sites involve extensive secrecy, exclusion, and policing, and they are invested with fraught meanings. We will explore nuclear America through history, geography, art, literature, and film.
2705 AMST-835-01 Museum Exhibition 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  One of the most engaging ways to promote collections and explore a subject or theme is to create an exhibition, which is a genre in and of itself—telling a story with artifacts. Through critical readings students will explore the cultural and educational goals of exhibits, visitor needs and accessibility, design elements (including technology), and audience evaluation methods utilized at libraries, historic houses and historical sites, and history and cultural museums. Drawing from the extensive and wide-ranging collections in the Watkinson Library, students will conceive, write, and install an exhibition, design and publish a catalogue, and plan and implement an opening event to take place at the end of the semester in the Watkinson.
  View syllabus
3652 AMST-853-01 American Slavery 1.00 SEM Gac,Scott M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 3
  This course covers important themes and developments in the history of slavery in the United States. From origins in indigenous communities, colonization, and the black Atlantic, human bondage shaped (and continues to shape) the legal and social framework for generations of Americans. Readings feature voices from slaveholders to the enslaved, politicians and activists, as well as some of the best work done by recent historians.
2345 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
2174 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2170 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2171 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2173 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
2172 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
3126 ENGL-801-01 Intro to Literary Theory 1.00 SEM Rosen,David T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students pursuing the thesis capstone.
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students pursuing the thesis capstone.
  This seminar is designed to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text.
3468 ENGL-848-01 Plants in Literature and Film 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: English 448 and English 848 are the same course.
  This course engages with the plant world through novels, poetry, philosophy, comics, and film. We will track major trends in the human understanding of plants, beginning in the late eighteenth century-when poets were eager to consider the line between the plant and animal kingdoms-and ending in the twentieth century-when popular culture was more likely to categorize plants as monstrous and 'other.' In rethinking the being and meaning of plants we will necessarily revisit the idea of 'the human' and 'the animal,' employing these categories while attending to borderline cases where their utility falters. Readings will focus on Romantic-era texts by Erasmus Darwin, William Cowper, Charlotte Smith, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Austen, before turning to horror films like "Little Shop of Horrors," "Invasion of the Body Snatchers," "The Thing From Another World," "The Happening" and "The Ruins." English 448 and English 848 are the same course. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
3534 ENGL-870-01 Film Theory: An Introduction 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course introduces the most important theoretical models which have been used to explain how films function as art, ideology, language, history, politics and philosophy. Some theorists are mainly concerned with the aesthetic potentials of the cinema: How do categories such as realism, authorship and genre explain and enhance our experience of films? Other theorists are focused on the relations between films and the societies that produce them, or on general processes of spectatorship: How do Hollywood films address their audiences? How do narrative structures shape our responses to fictional characters? As the variety of these questions suggests, film theory opens onto a wide set of practices and possibilities; though it always begins with what we experience at the movies, it is ultimately concerned with the wider world that we experience through the movies. Theorists to be examined include Munsterberg, Eisenstein, Burch, Kracauer, Balazs, Bazin, Altman, Gunning, Mulvey, Metz, Wollen, Havel, Benjamin, Pasolini, Deleuze and Jameson. (Note: English 470 and English 870 are the same course.) For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course fulfills requirements toward the film studies minor.
3647 ENGL-874-01 Race & Realism: African-Am Lit 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Coming of age in the ruins of Reconstruction, the encroachment of Jim Crow laws, and waves of great migration, African American writers of the early 20th century shaped American literature in powerful and often-forgotten ways. Their texts, published in the decades before the Harlem Renaissance, offer an opportunity to consider how people produce literature under the pressures of structural racism; how art might respond to the terrorism of state sanctioned violence; how genres might stretch to articulate the psychological complexities of social and self identities; and how writers appeal to audiences, construct communities, forge friendships, and speak truth to power, despite institutional ambivalence and resistance to their voices. Course readings will come from Charles Chesnutt, Pauline Hopkins, Alice Dunbar Nelson, WEB Du Bois and others. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written post-1900.
2177 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2179 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2367 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2762 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
2178 ENGL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
3576 NESC-800-01 Graduate Sem in Neurosciene 0.50 SEM Raskin,Sarah A. TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  This half-credit seminar will cover current topics in neuroscience, including issues in research methodology, ethics in research and public policy issues. In addition, time will be spent reviewing the literature and methodology of the theses of enrolled students. The course will be structured like a journal club with students preparing a discussion of one to two articles each week to be shared. Many of the articles may be drawn from the background literature of the thesis topic. Students will also attend presentations by neuroscience researchers and read and discuss pertinent research literature prior to each presentation.
3676 NESC-834-01 Current Issues in Cognition 1.00 SEM Casserly,Elizabeth D. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 1
  This seminar will explore current “hot topics” in cognitive research. For example, we’ll investigate how our minds interface with our bodies (How do we learn new skills like swinging a bat or doing gymnastics? How do people control the movement of artificial limbs or wheelchairs?) and how the different “pieces” of cognition interact (Can how well we hear impact memory? How does lack of sleep change the way we pay attention?). In class and in writing, we will analyze behavioral, neurological, and philosophical research in cognition and evaluate the impact of these issues for psychologists and for people’s lives in the “real world.”
3258 NESC-862-01 Neuroethology 1.00 LEC Swart,Charles C. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  This course will explore the control of animal behavior by the nervous system from an evolutionary perspective. Topics to be covered include motor control (orientation, navigation, pursuit and escape behavior), communication systems (mate searching, territoriality, and social interactions), resource location and ingestion, circadian and other rhythmic behaviors and learning and memory. Examples will be drawn from a wide variety of vertebrate and invertebrate animals as appropriate to the topic. For select topics special attention will be paid to experimental design and data analysis. Text readings and selected primary research articles will guide discussion of each topic. In addition to exams and quizzes, students will write several short essays and one term paper during the course of the semester.
3699 NESC-864-01 Neuropsychopharmacology 1.00 SEM Martinez,Luis A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This seminar will examine how drugs act upon, amplify, and modify neural functions, ultimately affecting mood and behavior. It will provide an introduction to the principles of pharmacology and neurochemistry. An in-depth study of the brain and behavioral mechanisms of drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, heroin, LSD, and alcohol, and the neurobiology of addiction. Additionally, we will examine the effects of prenatal exposure to these drugs.
2939 NESC-951-01 Independent Research 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2940 NESC-953-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  First credit of a two semester, two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2941 NESC-954-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  A continuation of NESC 953. Second credit of a two semester, two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2942 NESC-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2634 PBPL-800-01 Principles and Practice 1.00 SEM Ellis,Chad D. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will focus on both micro- and macro-level elements of the public policy process, from problem identification through post-implementation evaluation. In addition to core theoretical text-based discussion, students will be exposed to models of research and reporting used in the various fields of public policy. Students will apply their learning through case-study analysis. They will be required to complete an independent research project through which they will examine a particular area of policy (e.g., healthcare, education, housing, etc.) and to analyze a specific program through one or more of the lenses discussed in class.
2850 PBPL-836-01 Moral Theory and Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Wade,Maurice L. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The purpose of this course is to assist students in acquiring the skill in ethical reasoning and analysis needed for mature participation in society’s continuing debates over moral issues of public concern. The course will begin by examining some types of ethical theories and will proceed to consider a number of controversial social issues. Abortion, euthanasia, racial and sexual discrimination, world hunger, treatment of animals, and capital punishment are among the topics to be considered.
2881 PBPL-846-01 Policy Analysis 1.00 SEM Fotos III,Michael T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  In policy analysis, we focus on the problems of empirical policy analysis: defining the problem, framing the questions to be answered, picking the location and scope of the study, selecting the metrics of analysis, aligning metrics with public values, collecting evidence, and transforming the evidence into data. The readings and weekly discussions are avenues for students to query themselves on the problems they must solve to advance their own research agendas. Students will complete a major project in empirical policy analysis. Enrollment limited.
3191 PBPL-849-01 Health Care Regulation&Policy 1.00 SEM Gaul,Tanya K. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will offer an overview of the basic concepts and principles of health care regulation and policy that are necessary to understand the health care sector in the United States. This course will focus on the purposes of health care regulation, the key components of regulation and the processes by which regulation is developed and implemented. Various spheres of health care regulation will be analyzed, including both governmental and private parties involved int he regulatory process. Emphasis will be on policy issues and conflicts that underlie health care regulation.
2183 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2184 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2185 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
2203 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2186 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15