Graduate Studies Course Schedule

​This course schedule lists all graduate courses now scheduled to be offered in the term selected. After selecting the desired term, please scroll down until you see the courses listed for your program. (Co-listing of courses for undergraduate credit is not displayed.) All information is drawn from the Registrar’s official course schedule and is automatically updated accordingly. For summer terms only, the last column on the right uses "Qtr1" and "Qtr2" to indicate Summer Session I or Summer Session II, respectively.


Select a term:

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Course Listing for Graduate Courses - Fall 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Qtr
2563 AMST-801-01 Approaches to American Studies 1.00 LEC Soto,Gabriella A. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar, which is required of all American studies graduate students, examines a variety of approaches to the field. Readings may include several “classic” texts of 18th- and 19th-century American culture and several key works of American studies scholarship from the formative period of the field after World War II, as well as more recent contributions to the study of the United States. Topics will include changing ideas about the content, production, and consumption of American culture; patterns of ethnic identification and definition; the construction of categories like “race” and “gender”; and the bearing of class, race, gender, and sexuality on individuals’ participation in American society and culture. Undergraduates who wish to enroll in this course must obtain permission of their adviser and the instructor.
3737 AMST-805-01 Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums 1.00 SEM Baldwin,Davarian L. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  Colleges, universities, and their medical centers have become the dominant employers, real estate holders, policing agents, and educational and health care providers in major cities across the country. Meanwhile struggling areas have looked to sports stadiums and casinos as their salvation from poverty. What happened? "Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums" examines a world without factories, as higher education, healthcare, and tourism have become the face of today's urban economy. Located at the center of what has been called the "Knowledge Corridor" along I-91, the course draws special attention to Trinity College's past and present role in shaping greater Hartford.
3560 AMST-845-01 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
3670 AMST-853-01 American Slavery 1.00 SEM Gac,Scott M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This course covers important themes and developments in the history of slavery in the United States. From origins in indigenous communities, colonization, and the black Atlantic, human bondage shaped (and continues to shape) the legal and social framework for generations of Americans. Readings feature voices from slaveholders to the enslaved, politicians and activists, as well as some of the best work done by recent historians. This course fulfills transnational approaches.
  View syllabus
2267 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
2115 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2111 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2112 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2114 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
2113 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
2854 ENGL-801-01 Intro to Literary Theory 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students pursuing the thesis capstone.
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students pursuing the thesis capstone.
  This seminar is designed to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text.
3626 ENGL-825-01 Postmodernism in Film & Lit 1.00 SEM Rosen,David W: 6:30PM-9:10PM
M: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  “Postmodern” is the term used most often to describe the unique features of global culture (art, architecture, philosophy, cinema, literature) since the 1970s. And yet there is practically no agreement about what those features might be: is postmodernism ironic or serious, flat or deep, real or hyper-real, alive or defunct? In this course we will examine competing and often contradictory views of postmodernism, with the goal of developing a historical perspective on the contemporary world we live in now. Texts will be divided evenly between philosophy/theory (Lyotard, Baudrillard, Jameson, Fukuyama, Hutcheon), cinema (possible films: Bladerunner, Mulholland Drive, Pulp Fiction) and literature (possible authors: Borges, Pynchon, Barthelme, Murakami, Foster Wallace). The seminar will culminate with a field trip to New York City. English 425 and English 825 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 distribution requirement. For literature and film concentrators, this course fulfills the requirement of an advanced course toward the major, and counts as a course in literature and film. This course fulfills the requirements toward the film studies major. NOTE: Monday evenings screenings only.
3729 ENGL-831-01 19thC-Novel: Rdg Pract&Debates 1.00 SEM Savit-Woods,Livia Arndal R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  How do literature classes train us to read? Does this training prime us to ask certain kinds of questions to the exclusion of others? Is there anything we would see in, say, the nineteenth-century novel if we read it differently? Is reading differently possible? Over the last 25 years, these types of questions have been asked by literary critics with increasing intensity, particularly among scholars of the nineteenth century. In this class, we will read novels by Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, and Thomas Hardy alongside criticism on reading practices from D.A. Miller, Eve Kosofsky Sedgewick, Bruno Latour, Rita Felski, Sharon Marcus and Stephen Best, and Franco Moretti. This course is research intensive.
3557 ENGL-845-01 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
2116 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2118 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2289 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2621 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
2117 ENGL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
3153 NESC-800-01 Graduate Sem in Neurosciene 0.50 SEM Raskin,Sarah A. TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  This half-credit seminar will cover current topics in neuroscience, including issues in research methodology, ethics in research and public policy issues. In addition, time will be spent reviewing the literature and methodology of the theses of enrolled students. The course will be structured like a journal club with students preparing a discussion of one to two articles each week to be shared. Many of the articles may be drawn from the background literature of the thesis topic. Students will also attend presentations by neuroscience researchers and read and discuss pertinent research literature prior to each presentation.
3595 NESC-801-01 Neurochemistry 1.00 LEC Cancelled Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An interdisciplinary course investigating the chemical processes involved in central nervous system functioning and communication. Emphasis will be placed on the chemical aspects of synthesis, metabolism, and release of neurotransmitters. The role of neurochemistry in behavioral and neurological disease states will be evaluated. Current research topics in this area will also be presented.
3260 NESC-848-01 Focus Mind: Psychol Attention 1.00 SEM Grubb,Michael A. WF: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  More than 100 years ago, William James famously declared, “Everyone knows what attention is. It is the taking possession by the mind, in clear and vivid form, of one out of what seem several simultaneously possible objects or trains of thought.” And while James’ conception of attention resonates with a colloquial understanding of the term that’s still in use today, empirical treatment of attention in the psychological and neuroscientific literature suggests that consensus on what attention is and what attention does has not yet been reached. Using primary sources, scholarly reviews, and popular science pieces, we will work toward a more nuanced understanding of what attention is and delve deeply into what it means to selectively focus the mind in a world full of distraction.
3583 NESC-862-01 Neuroethology 1.00 LEC Swart,Charles C. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course will explore the control of animal behavior by the nervous system from an evolutionary perspective. Topics to be covered include motor control (orientation, navigation, pursuit and escape behavior), communication systems (mate searching, territoriality, and social interactions), resource location and ingestion, circadian and other rhythmic behaviors and learning and memory. Examples will be drawn from a wide variety of vertebrate and invertebrate animals as appropriate to the topic. For select topics special attention will be paid to experimental design and data analysis. Text readings and selected primary research articles will guide discussion of each topic. In addition to exams and quizzes, students will write several short essays and one term paper during the course of the semester.
2753 NESC-951-01 Independent Research 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2754 NESC-953-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  First credit of a two semester, two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2755 NESC-954-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  A continuation of NESC 953. Second credit of a two semester, two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2756 NESC-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Two credit thesis in Neuroscience. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2517 PBPL-800-01 Principles and Practice 1.00 SEM O'Brien,Patrick R. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will focus on both micro- and macro-level elements of the public policy process, from problem identification through post-implementation evaluation. In addition to core theoretical text-based discussion, students will be exposed to models of research and reporting used in the various fields of public policy. Students will apply their learning through case-study analysis. They will be required to complete an independent research project through which they will examine a particular area of policy (e.g., healthcare, education, housing, etc.) and to analyze a specific program through one or more of the lenses discussed in class.
3724 PBPL-806-01 Methods of Research 1.00 LEC Fotos III,Michael MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is intended to empower students to evaluate common forms of research critically, and to give them some experience in conducting research. Through a series of weekly assignments and class projects, students will be introduced to the shaping of research questions; hypothesis testing, writing a research paper, conducting interviews and surveys, giving a professional presentation, and presenting simple tabular data to prove a point. The course does not require an extensive mathematics background. Regular attendance and access to a computer, e-mail, and the Internet are expected.
3723 PBPL-815-01 The Policy & Pol of Educ Fin 1.00 SEM Ellis,Chad D. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  One of the most important and contentious elements of education policy involves finance. Funding battles at the federal, state, and local levels have a direct impact on students, teachers, and schools. The sources of revenue, funding formulas, and budget priorities have implications not only for the operation of schools but for equity and social justice. This course will examine the legal, practical, and moral/ethical elements of education finance and efforts to reform the system. It will blend traditional seat time with online components and field work.
2690 PBPL-836-01 Moral Theory and Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Wade,Maurice L. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The purpose of this course is to assist students in acquiring the skill in ethical reasoning and analysis needed for mature participation in society’s continuing debates over moral issues of public concern. The course will begin by examining some types of ethical theories and will proceed to consider a number of controversial social issues. Abortion, euthanasia, racial and sexual discrimination, world hunger, treatment of animals, and capital punishment are among the topics to be considered.
2884 PBPL-849-01 Health Care Regulation&Policy 1.00 SEM Gaul,Tanya K. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will offer an overview of the basic concepts and principles of health care regulation and policy that are necessary to understand the health care sector in the United States. This course will focus on the purposes of health care regulation, the key components of regulation and the processes by which regulation is developed and implemented. Various spheres of health care regulation will be analyzed, including both governmental and private parties involved int he regulatory process. Emphasis will be on policy issues and conflicts that underlie health care regulation.
3738 PBPL-860-01 Public Management 1.00 SEM Fitzpatrick,Sean M. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will survey the core principles and practices of management in the public sector. Many modern commentators have argued that public institutions must be "run like a business" to achieve its mission in an efficient and accountable way. Is this argument valid? If not, how must the management of public institutions adapt or depart from basic business principles? Course readings will focus on key elements of successful management in the public sphere, including financial and budgetary oversight, capital planning, public transparency and inclusion, and workforce management. Students will engage with course material through a series of short essays or policy memoranda, an independent research project analyzing the management of an individual public institution or agency, and making recommendations for enhancements to its management structure and practices.
2119 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2120 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2121 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
2139 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2122 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15