Lecture Series

 Spring 2018

Lectures take place during Common Hour, 12:15p.m. - 1:15p.m. in Dangremond Family Commons.
A light lunch is provided.

FEBRUARY 22:

Political Economy of Snow Leapard Conservation in Pakistan

Shafqat Hussain, Associate Professor of Anthropology

Studies from Pakistan show that more than 50% of snow leopard diet is based in domestic livestock. Globally, this figure is about 25%. Apart from a small initiatives, there is no mechanism to compensate farmers for their losses against SL predation. One can say that poor mountain farmers unwittingly subsidize snow leopards in Pakistan. The major cost of conservation is borne by farmers. But most of the conservation money is spent on conservation institutions. In this way, the poor farmers indirectly subsidize conservation institutions.


 

MARCH 22:

The Task of Translator(s)

Shane Ewegen, Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
and Julia Goesser Assaiante, Lecturer in Language and Culture Studies

What is translation?  What happens when one language is transported into another?  And how does this process bear upon the meaning of the text- both in its original and translated guises?  In light of our recent work on a lengthy translation of lectures by the German philosopher Martin Heidegger, we will explore these and other questions, all with an eye toward considering what it is, exactly, one does when one translates.


 

April 19:

Transatlantic Pacts: America and the Production of Postwar French Literature

Sara Kippur, Charles A. Dana Research Associate Professor of Language and Culture Studies

This talk draws from research for my current book project in which I look at how American institutions (in the form of universities, publishing houses, and media industries) intervened in the reception, dissemination, and orientation of French letters from the postwar period to the present. In my talk, I'll focus on a few cases which highlight some of the ways in which cross-cultural collaborations between French writers and American editors have informed how, why, and where we read modern French literature.