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Course Schedule for EDUCATIONAL STUDIES - Fall 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2714 EDUC-200-01 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LEC Wong,Jia-Hui Stefanie TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 32
  NOTE: 6 seats are reserved for Sophomores and 6 seats are reserved for First Year Students.
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
2717 EDUC-200-20 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LAB Wong,Jia-Hui Stefanie TBA TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 32
  NOTE: Each student must reserve a 3-hour block of time in their weekly schedule (anytime between 9am-3pm weekdays) for a community learning placement in a neighborhood Hartford public school, to be arranged by the instructor during the first week of the course.
  NOTE: This is the placement section for the EDUC 200 lecture.
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
3426 EDUC-309-01 Race Class & Educ Policy 1.00 SEM Cancelled SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or permission of instructor.
  How do competing theories explain educational inequality? How do different policies attempt to address it? This class will consider the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the examination of educational inequality. Possible topics include economic and cultural capital, racial/gender/sexual identity formation, desegregation, multiculturalism, detracking, school choice, school-family relationships, and affirmative action. Student groups will expand upon the readings by proposing, implementing, and presenting their research analysis from a community learning project.
3427 EDUC-320-01 Anthropology & Education 1.00 SEM Wong,Jia-Hui Stefanie TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or Anthropology 101 or permission of instructor.
  The anthropology of education has a rich history of investigating the links between culture, learning, and schooling. Anthropologists studying education have sought to illuminate learning and educational achievement as social processes and cultural products that cannot be understood apart from the socio-cultural contexts in which they occur. In this upper-level seminar, we will explore selected works in the anthropology of education, both classic and contemporary, in order to understand the unique contributions anthropology makes to the study of education, and in particular, the experience of minority groups in education. We will explore topics such as race, gender, and language in education and how they have been addressed by anthropologists. Students will have an opportunity to read critically a variety of detailed ethnographic and qualitative studies focusing on formal schooling and informal education in the United States and in other countries. Reviewing these studies, we will explore the central questions: What is a cultural analysis of schooling? What unique insights does ethnography (anthropology's signature method) offer into key educational problems? And finally, how can a cultural analysis of schooling inform efforts to create a more socially just educational system?
2283 EDUC-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2089 EDUC-400-01 Senior Research Seminar 1.00 SEM Dougherty,John A. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This seminar is open to senior Educational Studies majors only.
  To fulfill the senior exercise requirement, students carry out an independent research project that builds upon acquired skills and evolving interests. The weekly seminar provides a thematic focus as well as a continuous forum for both support and critical feedback from peers, in preparation for a public presentation of the student’s work at the end of the semester. Each year, the seminar will be organized around a broad theme in educational studies.
2284 EDUC-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2901 ANTH-301-01 Ethnographic Methods & Writing 1.00 SEM Trostle,James A. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Seats Reserved for Anthropology majors.
  This course will acquaint students with a range of research methods commonly used by anthropologists, and with the types of questions and designs that justify their use. It will describe a subset of methods (individual and group interviewing, and observation) in more detail, and give students practice in their use, analysis, and presentation. Through accompanying readings, the course will expose students to the controversies surrounding the practice of ethnography and the presentation of ethnographic authority. Students will conduct group field research projects during the course, and will develop and write up research proposals for projects they themselves could carry out in a summer or semester. It is recommended that students have already taken an anthropology course.
2880 PBPL-220-01 Research and Evaluation 1.00 SEM Moskowitz,Rachel L MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  Which policy interventions actually work and which fail to meet their goals? Answering this question is essential to improving public and non-profit services and securing further funding for worthwhile projects. This course aims to give students the ability to comprehend policy research and evaluation, as well as the tools to design and conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them to design evaluations or analyze data to assess the effectiveness of policies. Topics will include data analysis using statistical software, but no previous programming experience is necessary.
2085 PBPL-323-01 The Legal History of Race Rela 1.00 SEM Stevens,Barry K.
Fulco,Adrienne
T: 6:45PM-9:25PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 123, 201, 202 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Contact Prof. Fulco for permission.
  This course will examine the interaction between the American social and legal systems in the treatment of race relations. The seminar will analyze major Supreme Court cases on equal rights and race relations with an emphasis on the historical and social contexts in which the decisions were rendered. The Socratic method will be used for many of the classes, placing importance on classroom discussion among the students and the lecturer. The goals of the course are to expose the students to the basis of the legal system and the development of civil rights legislations sharpen legal and critical analysis, improve oral expression, and develop a concise and persuasive writing style.
2113 PSYC-221-01 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LEC Reuman,David A. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 36
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
2114 PSYC-221-20 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LAB Senland,Amie K. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
2115 PSYC-221-21 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LAB Senland,Amie K. T: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
3578 PSYC-246-01 Community Psychology 1.00 LEC Holt,Laura J. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course is not open to first-year students.
  In this course we will explore the major theories and principles of community psychology, a branch of psychology that explores how societal, cultural, and environmental factors impact people's psychological well-being. Topics will include community-based prevention of psychological disorders, health promotion, citizen participation and empowerment, the value of diversity, and the role of social support in buffering stress. We will also examine the goals and methods of community research, with an emphasis on the development, implementation, and evaluation of community-based programs. Given our proximity to numerous vibrant organizations in Hartford, this course requires that students participate in a community learning activity so that they may gain first-hand experience with community collaboration and put their classroom learning into practice. Enrollment limited.
2100 PSYC-295-01 Child Development 1.00 LEC Anselmi,Dina L. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  A survey of the biological, cognitive, and social factors that influence the process of development. The course will focus on both theoretical and empirical issues in child development and will include topics such as attachment, emotion regulation, language, cognition, and socialization. The course will highlight how cultural factors, along with biology interact to influence both the process and the outcomes of development. This course includes a community learning component, where students will choose a problem of interest and after talking with community experts, propose a solution to that problem.
2097 PSYC-295-20 Child Development-Lab 0.25 LAB Anselmi,Dina L. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 295, or concurrent enrollment.
  An introduction to the major scientific methods of observation, interviews, and experimentation that are used to study developmental questions in the areas of language, memory and concept development, sex-role stereotyping, prosocial development and play. Students will study infant and preschool children at the child care center located on campus. Laboratory can be taken concurrent or subsequent to Psychology 295.
3582 PSYC-384-01 Cultural Psychology 1.00 SEM Outten,Henry R. WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 226.
  Cultural psychology focuses on how sociocultural contexts and cultural practices affect and reflect the human psyche. Our understanding of cultural influences on psychological processes related to topics like the self, emotion, relationships, perception, multicultural issues, and health, will be informed by theoretical and empirical research. We will explore various cultural contexts, including Latino, Asian, African, European, and North American cultures. We will examine major issues in cultural psychology, including the methodological challenges that researchers face when trying to bring a cultural level of analysis to psychological processes.
3525 SOCL-246-01 Sociology of Gender 1.00 LEC Spurgas,Alyson K. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Sex and gender are used as principles of social organization in all known societies. This course surveys research in the sociological study of gender with the goal of providing students with a theoretical grounding for analyzing gender from a sociological perspective. We will explore how our lives and the world around us are shaped by gender and how gender has been constructed over time. We will further examine how sociological research on gender helps us to understand power and inequality at various levels – institutional, organizational, and interactional—by examining various topics such as gender socialization, reproduction, education, work, and violence. We will also pay attention to how gender reinforces and builds upon other areas of inequality such as social class, race, ethnicity, and age.
3661 WMGS-246-01 Sociology of Gender 1.00 LEC Spurgas,Alyson K. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Sex and gender are used as principles of social organization in all known societies. This course surveys research in the sociological study of gender with the goal of providing students with a theoretical grounding for analyzing gender from a sociological perspective. We will explore how our lives and the world around us are shaped by gender and how gender has been constructed over time. We will further examine how sociological research on gender helps us to understand power and inequality at various levels – institutional, organizational, and interactional—by examining various topics such as gender socialization, reproduction, education, work, and violence. We will also pay attention to how gender reinforces and builds upon other areas of inequality such as social class, race, ethnicity, and age.