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Course Schedule for EDUCATIONAL STUDIES - Fall 2014
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3322 EDUC-200-01 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LEC Dyrness,Andrea TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM HL - 14 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 32
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
3410 EDUC-200-02 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LEC Leventhal-Weiner,Rachel G. WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM MECC - 270 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 32
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
3355 EDUC-200-20 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LAB Dyrness,Andrea TBA TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 32
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
3411 EDUC-200-21 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LAB Dyrness,Andrea TBA TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 32
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
3189 EDUC-315-01 Higher Education in America 1.00 SEM Leventhal-Weiner,Rachel G. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM SH - S204  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200, or juniors / seniors with permission of instructor.
  America has developed one of the largest and most diverse systems of higher education in the world, with curricula that range from the study of Greek, Latin, and antiquity to the decorating of cakes. Despite this diffuseness, American higher education enjoys an enviable global reputation and each year the number of students from around the world applying to colleges and universities in the United States far surpasses the number of American students seeking to matriculate abroad. This course will examine the forces that shaped the development of American higher education from its origins to the present, and then focus on several salient issues (such as diversity, student misbehavior, academic freedom, and athletics) that vex and enrich modern institutions. Students will be required to conduct a field research project that analyzes a current issue and compares how two or more institutions have reacted.
2339 EDUC-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2093 EDUC-400-01 Senior Research Seminar 1.00 SEM Leventhal-Weiner,Rachel G. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 313 Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  This seminar is open to senior Educational Studies majors only.
  To fulfill the senior exercise requirement, students carry out an independent research project that builds upon acquired skills and evolving interests. The weekly seminar provides a thematic focus as well as a continuous forum for both support and critical feedback from peers, in preparation for a public presentation of the student’s work at the end of the semester. Each year, the seminar will be organized around a broad theme in educational studies.
2340 EDUC-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2542 AMST-357-01 Race and Urban Space 1.00 LEC Baldwin,Davarian L. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 311 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Scholars and now even the larger public have conceded that race is a social construct. However, many are just beginning to fully explore how the specific dimensions and use of space is mediated by the politics of racial difference and racial identification. Therefore, this course seeks to explore how racism and race relations shape urban spatial relations, city politics, and the built environment and how the historical development of cities has shaped racial identity as lived experience. Covering the 20th century, the course examines three critical junctures: Ghettoization (1890s-1940s); Metropolitan Formation (1940s-1990s); and Neo-Liberal Gentrification (present).
3412 HIST-299-01 Historiography 1.00 LEC Kete,Kathleen TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - T121 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: This course is open only to History majors and minors.
  A study of the character and range of activities undertaken by historians. Students will critically evaluate the way in which historians treat evidence and draw conclusions. Topics considered will include an introduction of some of the subdisciplines within the field and an examination of a number of important exchanges on matters of substance and method currently under debate among historians.
2082 PBPL-323-01 The Legal History of Race Rela 1.00 SEM Stevens,Barry K.
Fulco,Adrienne
T: 6:45PM-9:25PM MC - 102 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 113 or 201 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Contact Prof. Fulco for permission.
  This course will examine the interaction between the American social and legal systems in the treatment of race relations. The seminar will analyze major Supreme Court cases on equal rights and race relations with an emphasis on the historical and social contexts in which the decisions were rendered. The Socratic method will be used for many of the classes, placing importance on classroom discussion among the students and the lecturer. The goals of the course are to expose the students to the basis of the legal system and the development of civil rights legislations sharpen legal and critical analysis, improve oral expression, and develop a concise and persuasive writing style.
2277 POLS-241-01 Emp Pol Mthd & Data Anal 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena M: 2:40PM-3:55PM
W: 2:40PM-3:55PM
CT - 210 NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An introduction to the design and execution of empirical political research involving computer analysis. The course covers the normative and empirical arguments at the foundation of the science of politics and the methods evolving from these arguments, and it trains students in the use of computers and statistical software. Course work includes reading, discussion, and completion of a research project in which the theory learned in class is put into practice. No programming experience required.
2123 PSYC-221-01 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LEC Casserly,Elizabeth D. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM MC - 106 NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 36
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
2124 PSYC-221-20 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LAB Chapman,Barbara L. T: 1:30PM-4:10PM LIB - 02 NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
2125 PSYC-221-21 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LAB Chapman,Barbara L. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM LIB - 02 NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
2105 PSYC-295-01 Child Development 1.00 LEC Anselmi,Dina L. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM LSC - 138-9 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 50
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  A survey of the biological, cognitive, and social factors that influence the process of development. The course will focus on both theoretical and empirical issues in child development and will include topics such as attachment, emotion regulation, language, cognition, and socialization. The course will highlight how cultural factors, along with biology interact to influence both the process and the outcomes of development. This course includes a community learning component, where students will choose a problem of interest and after talking with community experts, propose a solution to that problem.
2102 PSYC-295-20 Child Development-Lab 0.25 LAB Anselmi,Dina L. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM LSC - 135  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An introduction to the major scientific methods of observation, interviews, and experimentation that are used to study developmental questions in the areas of language, memory and concept development, sex-role stereotyping, prosocial development and play. Students will study infant and preschool children at the child care center located on campus.
2548 SOCL-214-01 Racism 1.00 LEC Williams,Johnny Eric TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM LSC - AUD SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  A cross-national comparison of racial and ethnic differences as sources of conflict and inequality within and between societies. We will also consider the role of race and ethnicity as a basis for group and national solidarity. Topics will include the persistence of ethnic and racial loyalties in regard to language, marital choice, and politics; a comparison of social mobility patterns among various ethnic and racial groups; ethnicity and race as reactionary or revolutionary ideologies; and the issues and facts regarding assimilation and pluralism in different societies.
3174 SOCL-246-01 Sociology of Gender 1.00 LEC Andersson,Tanetta E. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM MC - 106 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Sex and gender are used as principles of social organization in all known societies. This course surveys research in the sociological study of gender with the goal of providing students with a theoretical grounding for analyzing gender from a sociological perspective. We will explore how our lives and the world around us are shaped by gender and how gender has been constructed over time. We will further examine how sociological research on gender helps us to understand power and inequality at various levels – institutional, organizational, and interactional—by examining various topics such as gender socialization, reproduction, education, work, and violence. We will also pay attention to how gender reinforces and builds upon other areas of inequality such as social class, race, ethnicity, and age.
3176 SOCL-312-01 Social Class & Mobility 1.00 LEC Valocchi,Stephen M. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM 70VS - SEM SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Sociology course or permission of the instructor. This course is not open to first-year students.
  This course is an introduction to the theory and research on stratification and mobility in modern societies. Every society distributes resources unequally. This distribution affects not only economic outcomes such as wages, profits, and material well being, but also social and political outcomes such as protest, voting behavior, and self-esteem. This course will explore why this occurs, the types of inequalities that exist, and the consequences of inequality for the distribution of power and for democratic processes in American society. Specific topics include class, occupational, race and gender inequalities, and the social, psychological, and cultural consequences of inequality.