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Course Schedule for ANTHROPOLOGY - Fall 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2510 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Notar, Beth MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2511 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Staff, Trinity TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2721 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein, Jane TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3629 ANTH-101-04 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro, Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3707 ANTH-200-01 The Occult in America 1.00 LEC Landry, Timothy TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  Since its inception, the United States has had a thriving community of individuals interested in those supernatural, mystical, and magical worlds, known collectively as the "Occult." Students will examine the significance of a wide range of occult practices, including the New Age movement, Neo-Paganism, Wicca, and Satanism. By exploring the practices and beliefs of American Occultists students will begin to unravel the occult's hidden role in the formation of American society, especially as it relates to issues of class, race, gender, and nationality. In so doing, students will seek to answer the question: What does it mean to be religious in America?
3641 ANTH-219-01 Body Politics 1.00 LEC Kohler, Anne TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  The anthropology of the body examines how social inequality is written on and gets into the body and influences people’s everyday lives. We will explore how day-to-day bodily experience is configured differently across cultures and lifeworlds, and how this influences perceptions of organ donation, life and death, pregnancy and reproductive rights, disability, addiction and recovery, and mental illness. If we understand how humans incorporate inequity into their bodies, can this help remediate social inequality?
3083 ANTH-227-01 Intro to Political Ecology 1.00 LEC Hussain, Shafqat TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course covers social science approaches to issues concerning ecology, the environment, and nature. It looks at how social identities and cultural meaning are symbolically tied to the physical environment. Ecology and the environment are affected by larger political, social, and economic forces, so we will also broaden the analysis to include wider spatial and temporal scales. The course will also examine how sociology and geography relate to political ecology. Regional foci will include South and Southeast Asia, Africa, and Latin America.
2864 ANTH-250-01 Mobility and Sustainability 1.00 SEM Notar, Beth MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: Seats reserved as follows: 7 seniors, 6 juniors, 4 sophomores, 2 first years
  What is the relationship between mobility, community and sustainability? We will look at mobility in different cultures, ranging from hunter gathers to nomadic herders to suburban commuters. What are the characteristics of social life in cultures where people primarily walk, canoe or sail, rely on animal power, or travel in motorized vehicles? We will investigate how technological innovation, whether in the form of trains, buses, bicycles, cars or airplanes, can change people’s perceptions of both the surrounding landscape and themselves. We will also examine the kinds of infrastructure and resources needed for certain technologies of mobility, such as cars. Can we imagine motorized transport that is both environmentally and socially sustainable? Course materials will include books, articles and films. Students will conduct a mini research project related to the course.
3086 ANTH-284-01 The Anthropology of Violence 1.00 LEC Beebe, Rebecca TR: 6:30PM-7:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for Anthropology majors
  This course approaches the study of violence through texts, case studies, and films. Does aggression come from biology, culture or both? How is violence defined cross culturally? What constitutes legitimate violence? How has violence been used throughout history to establish, maintain and subvert power? We will examine forms of violence including state violence, war, interpersonal and domestic violence. We will also explore the consequences of violence on health, community and culture.
2722 ANTH-301-01 Ethnographic Methods & Writing 1.00 SEM Notar, Beth M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Seats Reserved for Anthropology majors.
  This course will acquaint students with a range of research methods commonly used by anthropologists, and with the types of questions and designs that justify their use. It will describe a subset of methods (individual and group interviewing, and observation) in more detail, and give students practice in their use, analysis, and presentation. Through accompanying readings, the course will expose students to the controversies surrounding the practice of ethnography and the presentation of ethnographic authority. Students will conduct group field research projects during the course, and will develop and write up research proposals for projects they themselves could carry out in a summer or semester. It is recommended that students have already taken an anthropology course.
2083 ANTH-302-01 History of Anth Thought 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein, Jane W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course explores the anthropological tradition as it has changed from the late 19th century until the present. Students will read works of the major figures in the development of the discipline, such as Bronislaw Malinowski, Franz Boas, Margaret Mead, and Claude Levi-Strauss. They will learn not only what these anthropologists had to say about reality, but why they said it when they did. In this sense, the course turns an anthropological eye on anthropology itself.
3508 ANTH-304-01 Material Religion 1.00 SEM Landry, Timothy W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores the ways in which individuals from a variety of religious traditions experience religious belief, enact religious practice, and relate to the so-called “Divine” through material culture. Students will examine themes such as relics, clothing, bodies, blood, architecture, shrines, and charms. By reading ethnographic and theoretical texts, this course helps students to consider the role that material religion plays in enhancing or complicating prayer, ritual, and everyday religious piety.
3507 ANTH-305-01 Identities in Britain&Ireland 1.00 SEM Nadel-Klein, Jane TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Using ethnographies, nonfiction, novels and films, this course introduces students to the complex negotiations that go into being "British" or "Irish" in the world today. We will apply anthropological theories of identity as a social process to textual and visual material, challenging conventional notions of ethnicity as primordial or fixed. Discussions will address issues of postcolonialism, borders and boundaries, gender and race, and relations between persons and landscapes.
2669 ANTH-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND Notar, Beth TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chair are required for enrollment.
2552 ANTH-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2896 ANTH-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.)
3026 EDUC-320-01 Anthropology & Education 1.00 SEM Wong, Jia-Hui Stefanie TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or Anthropology 101 or permission of instructor.
  The anthropology of education has a rich history of investigating the links between culture, learning, and schooling. Anthropologists studying education have sought to illuminate learning and educational achievement as social processes and cultural products that cannot be understood apart from the socio-cultural contexts in which they occur. In this upper-level seminar, we will explore selected works in the anthropology of education, both classic and contemporary, in order to understand the unique contributions anthropology makes to the study of education, and in particular, the experience of minority groups in education. We will explore topics such as race, gender, and language in education and how they have been addressed by anthropologists. Students will have an opportunity to read critically a variety of detailed ethnographic and qualitative studies focusing on formal schooling and informal education in the United States and in other countries. Reviewing these studies, we will explore the central questions: What is a cultural analysis of schooling? What unique insights does ethnography (anthropology's signature method) offer into key educational problems? And finally, how can a cultural analysis of schooling inform efforts to create a more socially just educational system?