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Course Schedule for ANTHROPOLOGY - Fall 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2752 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MECC - 220 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2753 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Notar,Beth E. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM SH - N217 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3561 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Landry,Timothy R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MECC - 232 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2748 ANTH-228-01 Anth from Margins/South Asia 1.00 LEC Hussain,Shafqat TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM HL - 121  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course will examine how the northwestern and northern mountainous regions of South Asia have been constructed in the Western popular imagination, both in literary texts and in academic debates. Starting with the era of the Great Game in the late 19th century and ending with the current "war on terror," the course will explore the transformation and continuation of past social and political conditions, and their representations within the region. This will help illuminate some of the enduring themes in anthropological debates, such as culture contact; empires, territories, and resources; and human agency.
3562 ANTH-241-01 Women in the Caribbean 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 303 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course explores the diverse lives of women of the Caribbean. We will begin with feminist theories of women and power and trace how those understandings have emerged and changed over time. We will use ethnographies to examine women’s lives in both historical and contemporary Caribbean settings, and explore major theoretical approaches in feminist and Caribbean anthropology. We will analyze how women’s experiences have been shaped by multiple forces, including slavery and emancipation, fertility and constructs of motherhood, gender and violence, race and identity, tourism and sex work, illness and poverty, globalization and labor.
3563 ANTH-245-01 Anth & Global Health 1.00 LEC Trostle,James A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 303 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course examines the growing collaborative and critical roles of anthropology applied to international health. Anthropologists elicit disease taxonomies, describe help-seeking strategies, critique donor models, and design behavioral interventions. They ask about borders and the differences among conceptions of health and disease as global, international, or domestic topics. These issues will be explored through case studies of specific diseases, practices, therapies, agencies, and policies.
3043 ANTH-250-01 Mobility and Sustainability 1.00 SEM Notar,Beth E. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM SH - S204 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  What is the relationship between mobility, community and sustainability? We will look at mobility in different cultures, ranging from hunter gathers to nomadic herders to suburban commuters. What are the characteristics of social life in cultures where people primarily walk, canoe or sail, rely on animal power, or travel in motorized vehicles? We will investigate how technological innovation, whether in the form of trains, buses, bicycles, cars or airplanes, can change people’s perceptions of both the surrounding landscape and themselves. We will also examine the kinds of infrastructure and resources needed for certain technologies of mobility, such as cars. Can we imagine motorized transport that is both environmentally and socially sustainable? Course materials will include books, articles and films. Students will conduct a mini research project related to the course.
3564 ANTH-254-01 The Meaning of Work 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MC - 303 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course takes a cross-cultural look at the ways in which people define work in daily life. Drawing upon diverse sources, including ethnography, fiction, biography and investigative journalism, it will examine the ways in which people labor to make a living and to sustain their households. Students will consider such key questions as: What makes work meaningful? How are occupational communities formed? How is work gendered? How have global forces reshaped the nature of work? How do people experience the lack of work? Examples will be drawn from different work environments, including mining, fishing, agriculture, industry, service work, domestic work and intellectual work.
3565 ANTH-301-01 Ethnographic Methods & Writing 1.00 SEM Notar,Beth E. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM GW - L SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: Anthropology major or permission of instructor.
  This course will acquaint students with a range of research methods commonly used by anthropologists, and with the types of questions and designs that justify their use. It will describe a subset of methods (individual and group interviewing, and observation) in more detail, and give students practice in their use, analysis, and presentation. Through accompanying readings, the course will expose students to the controversies surrounding the practice of ethnography and the presentation of ethnographic authority. Students will conduct group field research projects during the course, and will develop and write up research proposals for projects they themselves could carry out in a summer or semester. It is recommended that students have already taken an anthropology course.
2126 ANTH-302-01 History of Anth Thought 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - N215 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course explores the anthropological tradition as it has changed from the late 19th century until the present. Students will read works of the major figures in the development of the discipline, such as Bronislaw Malinowski, Franz Boas, Margaret Mead, and Claude Levi-Strauss. They will learn not only what these anthropologists had to say about reality, but why they said it when they did. In this sense, the course turns an anthropological eye on anthropology itself.
3566 ANTH-310-01 Anth of Development 1.00 SEM Hussain,Shafqat TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM GW - L SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This seminar will explore international economic and social development from an anthropological perspective. We will critically examine concepts of development, underdevelopment, and progress. We will compare how multilateral lenders and small nongovernmental organizations employ development rhetoric and methods. We will examine specific case studies of development projects in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, asking what has been attained, and what is attainable.
3218 ANTH-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chair are required for enrollment.
2815 ANTH-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2308 ANTH-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and program director are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
3267 EDUC-316-01 Educ&Soc Change Across Globe 1.00 LEC Dyrness,Andrea TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MECC - 270 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Educational Studies or International Studies Course.
  Through a comparative framework, this course examines the relationship between education and social change in various regions of the world. How do governments use schooling to produce certain kinds of citizens, and how do grassroots movements use education to resist these agendas? What role does education play in promoting democracy versus social and economic inequality? Students will conduct independent research on education in a country of their choice to contribute to the comparative framework.
2458 MUSC-113-01 Introduction to World Music 1.00 LEC Galm,Eric A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM AAC - 320 GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-year students.
  A comprehensive survey of global musical traditions that encompasses rural and urban music from Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean, India, Asia, and the Americas. This course is designed to highlight the central role of musical expression in human life, exploring musical sound and movement in sacred, secular, ritual, and non-ritual contexts. No previous musical knowledge is required. Students are expected to learn basic listening skills and identify musical styles. The course culminates in a final research project about a world music tradition, ensemble, performer, or other related topic. Also listed in International Studies-African studies, International Studies-Asian studies, and International Studies-Latin American and Caribbean studies.
3456 RELG-281-01 Anthropology of Religion 1.00 LEC Landry,Timothy R. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM 70VS - SEM GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Introduction to the foundations of religion through an examination of religious phenomena prevalent in traditional cultures. Some of the topics covered in this course include a critical examination of the idea of primitivity, the concepts of space and time, myths, symbols, ideas related to God, man, death, and rituals such as rites of passage, magic, sorcery, witchcraft, and divination. (May be counted toward anthropology and international studies/comparative development.)