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Course Schedule for ANTHROPOLOGY - Spring 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
4295 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Trostle,James A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MECC - 246 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
4861 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MECC - 246 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
5172 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Hussain,Shafqat TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MECC - 246 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
4611 ANTH-207-01 Anth Persp Women & Gender 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM LSC - 138-9 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Using texts and films, this course will explore the nature of women’s lives in both the contemporary United States and a number of radically different societies around the world, including, for example, the !Kung San people of the Kalahari and the Mundurucù of Amazonian Brazil. As they examine the place of women in these societies, students will also be introduced to theoretical perspectives that help explain both variations in women’s status from society to society and "universal" aspects of their status.
4610 ANTH-227-01 Intro to Political Ecology 1.00 LEC Hussain,Shafqat TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 303 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course covers social science approaches to issues concerning ecology, the environment, and nature. It looks at how social identities and cultural meaning are symbolically tied to the physical environment. Ecology and the environment are affected by larger political, social, and economic forces, so we will also broaden the analysis to include wider spatial and temporal scales. The course will also examine how sociology and geography relate to political ecology. Regional foci will include South and Southeast Asia, Africa, and Latin America.
5248 ANTH-284-01 The Anthropology of Violence 1.00 LEC Beebe,Rebecca M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 303 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course approaches the study of violence through texts, case studies, and films. Does aggression come from biology, culture or both? How is violence defined cross culturally? What constitutes legitimate violence? How has violence been used throughout history to establish, maintain and subvert power? We will examine forms of violence including state violence, war, interpersonal and domestic violence. We will also explore the consequences of violence on health, community and culture.
4373 ANTH-300-01 Junior Seminar 1.00 SEM Trostle,James A. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 205  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: Anthropology major or permission of instructor.
  A seminar designed for anthropology majors in their junior year. The course is designed to build knowledge of the discipline, including contemporary debates, the publication process, and the work of anthropologists beyond the academy (e.g. in business, public health, government and non-governmental organizations, etc.). Students write a research proposal for a potential senior thesis and interview a working anthropologist.
5171 ANTH-308-01 Anthropology of Place 1.00 SEM Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM GW - L GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  This course explores the increasingly complex ways in which people in industrial and non-industrial societies locate themselves with respect to land and landscape. Contrary to some widespread assumptions regarding the fit between identity and place (i.e., ethnicity and nationalism), we study a range of settings in which people actively construct, contest, and reappropriate the spaces of modern life. Through texts, seminar discussions, films, and a field-based research project as the major exercise, students will explore a number of issues, including cultural persistence and the loss of place; the meaning of the frontier and indigenous land rights struggles; gender and public space; the deterritorialization of culture (i.e., McDonald’s in Hong Kong); and the cultural costs of an increasingly "fast" and high-tech world.
5174 ANTH-324-01 Religion in the City 1.00 SEM Landry,Timothy R. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM MC - 205 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Observers of cities have long predicted that the rise of urbanism will slowly but continually lead not only to the gradual decentralization of religion but also to increased secularization. However, today we find thriving religious communities in cities. This course will explore a range of urban religious experiences in the classroom and in the city ranging from Hartford to New York. In so doing, we will study cases of people who (re)imagine cityscapes in ways that support religious practice; we will examine the importance of cities in creating a space where diasporic religions can thrive; and we will chart the ways in which urban diversity provides the perfect space for an upsurge in religious practice. Students will examine urban religion ranging from Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, to Vodou and Santeria.
4244 ANTH-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chair are required for enrollment.
4161 ANTH-401-01 Adv Sem in Contemp Anth 1.00 SEM Hussain,Shafqat W: 1:15PM-3:55PM MECC - 293 WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: Anthropology major or permission of instructor.
  Anthropologists are a contentious lot, often challenging the veracity and relevance of each other’s interpretations. In this seminar, students will examine recent manifestations of this vexatiousness. The seminar will consider such questions as: Can culture be regarded as collective and shared? What is the relationship between cultural ideas and practical action? How does one study culture in the postmodern world of "the celluloid, global ethnoscape"? Can the practice of anthropology be fully objective, or does it demand a politics—an understanding that ideas, ours and theirs, are historically situated, politicized realities? Is domination the same everywhere?
4245 ANTH-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
4246 ANTH-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.)
4192 AHIS-294-01 The Arts of Africa 1.00 LEC Gilbert,Michelle V. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM HHN - 105 GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An examination of the art and architecture of sub-Saharan Africa as modes of symbolic communication: the ritual context of art, the concept of the artist, the notion of popular art, and the decorated body.
4709 EDUC-307-01 Latinos in Ed: Local Realities 1.00 LEC Dyrness,Andrea W: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - N128 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or International Studies, Language and Culture Studies, Hispanic Studies, or Anthropology major, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course is not open to first year students.
  This course investigates the education of Latinos, the largest and fastest growing minority group in the United States. By examining both the domestic and transnational contexts, we explore these central questions: How do cultural constructions of Latinos (as immigrants and natives, citizens and non-citizens) shape educational policy and teaching practices? What views of citizenship and identity underlie school programs such as bilingual education, as well as Latino responses to them? This course fulfills the related field requirement for Hispanic studies majors. It will also include a community learning component involving a qualitative research project in a Hartford school or community organization.
5224 INTS-218-01 Wmn, Gndr & Fam in Middle East 1.00 LEC Tabar,Linda TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - S201 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  As an introduction to the lives of women in the ‘men’s world’ of the Middle East, this course examines the impact of global sociopolitical and economic transformations on gender relations, sexuality, adolescence, family structure, local culture, and feminist movements across the Middle East and North Africa. Case studies survey male and female perspectives in a variety of ethnic/religious communities (Muslim, Jewish, Christian) and types of societies (Bedouin, agricultural, urban).
5085 INTS-262-01 People/Culture of Caribb 1.00 LEC Desmangles,Leslie G. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MECC - 246 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A review of the attempt to develop generalizations about the structure of Caribbean society. Theoretical materials will focus on the historical role of slavery, the nature of plural societies, race, class, ethnicity, and specific institutions such as the family, the schools, the church, and the political structure.
5225 INTS-311-01 Global Feminism 1.00 LEC Tabar,Linda W: 1:15PM-3:55PM CT - 210 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines how the struggles of diverse gender based movements (religious and secular, urban and rural, black and white), from the Americas to the Middle East and Asia, shed light on vexing social problems like the lack of sexual and reproductive rights, political and social representation, and equal opportunities. Using historical and contemporary examples of women’s organizing and theorizing, course materials interrogate the meaning of ‘feminism’, the relationship between the gendered self and society, the impact of race, class, and cultural differences on women’s solidarity, the challenge of women’s (and gender based) activism to state and social order, the impact of women's networking, and the possibilities for achieving a transnational, cross-cultural or global ‘feminism.’
5441 LING-101-01 Introduction to Linguistics 1.00 LEC Lahti,Katherine MF: 2:40PM-3:55PM CT - 210 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  A general introduction to the study of language. First we will study the fundamental components of language (sounds, words, sentences). We will then examine the crucial question of how words and sentences manage to mean anything. The latter part of the course will be devoted to theoretical approaches to the nature of language, to how and why languages change over time, and to the ways language determines and reflects the structures of society.
5044 MUSC-222-01 Investigating Music & Culture 1.00 SEM Galm,Eric A. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM AAC - 120 Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 14
  This course is an in-depth introduction to the study of music and culture. This course will focus on the gathering of primary-source materials and relate them to broader historical and cultural contexts. Through this process, students will develop interviewing techniques, learn how to document with video and audio recording equipment, and practice incorporating data into comprehensive research projects. Students will develop these techniques through participation with a Hartford-based arts organization. Also listed under Anthropology.
5247 RELG-285-01 Religions of Africa 1.00 SEM Landry,Timothy R. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM MC - 205 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is an exploration of the ways in which Africans make sense of their worlds through religion. By reading a wide range of ethnographic and historical texts, students will consider the challenges that post-colonial politics present to understanding religion in Africa and in the diaspora Students will examine a variety of African religious traditions ranging from indigenous practices to the ways in which Christianity and Islam have developed uniquely African beliefs. In so doing, students will frame African religions as global phenomena while considering the historical and contemporary salience of the many canonical themes found in African religion such as spirit possession, divination, healing, magic, witchcraft, sorcery, and animal sacrifice.