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Course Schedule for ANTHROPOLOGY - Fall 2014
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2960 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan MW: 6:30PM-7:45PM MECC - 270 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 45
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2961 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Notar,Beth E. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM HL - 14 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 45
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2942 ANTH-228-01 Anth from Margins/South Asia 1.00 LEC Hussain,Shafqat TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM LSC - 132  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course will examine how the northwestern and northern mountainous regions of South Asia have been constructed in the Western popular imagination, both in literary texts and in academic debates. Starting with the era of the Great Game in the late 19th century and ending with the current "war on terror," the course will explore the transformation and continuation of past social and political conditions, and their representations within the region. This will help illuminate some of the enduring themes in anthropological debates, such as culture contact; empires, territories, and resources; and human agency.
3413 ANTH-245-01 Anth & Global Health 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan T: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 303 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course examines the growing collaborative and critical roles of anthropology applied to international health. Anthropologists elicit disease taxonomies, describe help-seeking strategies, critique donor models, and design behavioral interventions. They ask about borders and the differences among conceptions of health and disease as global, international, or domestic topics. These issues will be explored through case studies of specific diseases, practices, therapies, agencies, and policies.
3396 ANTH-250-01 Mobility and Sustainability 1.00 SEM Notar,Beth E. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM AAC - 231 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  What is the relationship between mobility, community and sustainability? We will look at mobility in different cultures, ranging from hunter gathers to nomadic herders to suburban commuters. What are the characteristics of social life in cultures where people primarily walk, canoe or sail, rely on animal power, or travel in motorized vehicles? We will investigate how technological innovation, whether in the form of trains, buses, bicycles, cars or airplanes, can change people’s perceptions of both the surrounding landscape and themselves. We will also examine the kinds of infrastructure and resources needed for certain technologies of mobility, such as cars. Can we imagine motorized transport that is both environmentally and socially sustainable? Course materials will include books, articles and films. Students will conduct a mini research project related to the course.
2155 ANTH-302-01 History of Anth Thought 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MECC - 293 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course explores the anthropological tradition as it has changed from the late 19th century until the present. Students will read works of the major figures in the development of the discipline, such as Bronislaw Malinowski, Franz Boas, Margaret Mead, and Claude Levi-Strauss. They will learn not only what these anthropologists had to say about reality, but why they said it when they did. In this sense, the course turns an anthropological eye on anthropology itself.
3399 ANTH-308-01 Anthropology of Place 1.00 SEM Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 205 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  This course explores the increasingly complex ways in which people in industrial and non-industrial societies locate themselves with respect to land and landscape. Contrary to some widespread assumptions regarding the fit between identity and place (i.e., ethnicity and nationalism), we study a range of settings in which people actively construct, contest, and reappropriate the spaces of modern life. Through texts, seminar discussions, films, and a field-based research project as the major exercise, students will explore a number of issues, including cultural persistence and the loss of place; the meaning of the frontier and indigenous land rights struggles; gender and public space; the deterritorialization of culture (i.e., McDonald’s in Hong Kong); and the cultural costs of an increasingly "fast" and high-tech world.
3089 ANTH-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2361 ANTH-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and program director are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
3166 INTS-218-01 Wmn, Gndr & Fam in Middle East 1.00 LEC Bauer,Janet L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 303 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 7 seats are reserved for first-year students
  As an introduction to the lives of women in the ‘men’s world’ of the Middle East, this course examines the impact of global sociopolitical and economic transformations on gender relations, sexuality, adolescence, family structure, local culture, and feminist movements across the Middle East and North Africa. Case studies survey male and female perspectives in a variety of ethnic/religious communities (Muslim, Jewish, Christian) and types of societies (Bedouin, agricultural, urban).
3111 INTS-249-01 Immigrants & Refugees 1.00 SEM Bauer,Janet L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 303 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  The post-cold war world is one of changing national boundaries and governments, environmental devastation and internal conflicts, resulting in an apparently unprecedented flow of people from their native homelands. At a time when multiculturalism is not a popular model for national integration, immigrants, refugees, and other sojourners find themselves in new places creating new lives for themselves. The processes by which this occurs illustrate some of the basic social, cultural, and political dilemmas of contemporary societies. Using historical and contemporary case studies from Europe and the Americas, this course looks at issues of flight, resettlement, integration, cultural adaptation, and public policy involved in creating culturally diverse nations. Questions to be raised include what are the conditions under which people leave, who can become a (authentic) member of society, what rights do non-citizens versus citizens have, are borders sacrosanct, are ethnic and racial diversity achievable or desirable, is multiculturalism an appropriate model, do people want to assimilate, what are the cultural consequences of movement, and how can individuals reconstruct their identities and feel they belong? This course includes a community learning component. (Also offered under American Studies, Public Policy & Law, and Women, Gender, & Sexuality.)
3168 INTS-250-20 Hartford Global Migration Lab 0.50 LAB Bauer,Janet L. TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in International Studies 249 or 250.
  Optional Community Learning Component integrated with INTS249: Immigrants and Refugees and INTS250: Global Migration to provide field-based, participatory research experience with community partners on the consequences of global migration in the greater Hartford area.
3169 INTS-262-01 People/Culture of Caribb 1.00 LEC Desmangles,Leslie G. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 225 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A review of the attempt to develop generalizations about the structure of Caribbean society. Theoretical materials will focus on the historical role of slavery, the nature of plural societies, race, class, ethnicity, and specific institutions such as the family, the schools, the church, and the political structure.
3477 LING-101-01 Introduction to Linguistics 1.00 LEC Lahti,Katherine MF: 2:40PM-3:55PM TC - 142 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  A general introduction to the study of language. First we will study the fundamental components of language (sounds, words, sentences). We will then examine the crucial question of how words and sentences manage to mean anything. The latter part of the course will be devoted to theoretical approaches to the nature of language, to how and why languages change over time, and to the ways language determines and reflects the structures of society.
2559 MUSC-113-01 Introduction to World Music 1.00 LEC Galm,Eric A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM AAC - 101 GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-year students.
  A comprehensive survey of global musical traditions that encompasses rural and urban music from Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean, India, Asia, and the Americas. This course is designed to highlight the central role of musical expression in human life, exploring musical sound and movement in sacred, secular, ritual, and non-ritual contexts. No previous musical knowledge is required. Students are expected to learn basic listening skills and identify musical styles. The course culminates in a final research project about a world music tradition, ensemble, performer, or other related topic. Also listed in International Studies-African studies, International Studies-Asian studies, and International Studies-Latin American and Caribbean studies.