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Course Schedule for ANTHROPOLOGY - Spring 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1323 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Trostle,James A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 45
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
1398 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 45
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2154 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 45
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
1815 ANTH-207-01 Anth Persp Women & Gender 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Using texts and films, this course will explore the nature of women’s lives in both the contemporary United States and a number of radically different societies around the world, including, for example, the !Kung San people of the Kalahari and the Mundurucù of Amazonian Brazil. As they examine the place of women in these societies, students will also be introduced to theoretical perspectives that help explain both variations in women’s status from society to society and "universal" aspects of their status.
2155 ANTH-215-01 Medical Anthropology 1.00 LEC Trostle,James A. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Anthropology 101 (formerly 201) or other Anthropology course or permission of instructor.
  This course covers major topics in medical anthropology, including biocultural analyses of health and disease, the social patterning of disease, cultural critiques of biomedicine, and non-Western systems of healing. We will explore the major theoretical schools in medical anthropology, and see how they have been applied to specific pathologies, life processes, and social responses. Finally we will explore and critique how medical anthropology has been applied to health care in the United States and internationally. The course will sensitize students to cultural issues in sickness and health care, and provide some critical analytic concepts and tools.
1814 ANTH-227-01 Intro to Political Ecology 1.00 LEC Hussain,Shafqat TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course covers social science approaches to issues concerning ecology, the environment, and nature. It looks at how social identities and cultural meaning are symbolically tied to the physical environment. Ecology and the environment are affected by larger political, social, and economic forces, so we will also broaden the analysis to include wider spatial and temporal scales. The course will also examine how sociology and geography relate to political ecology. Regional foci will include South and Southeast Asia, Africa, and Latin America.
2156 ANTH-244-01 Borderlands of E & SEast Asia 1.00 SEM Notar,Beth E. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  As multinational logging and tourism encroach upon land, and as governments attempt to control borders and restrict cultural practices, borderland peoples of East and Southeast Asia are struggling for their livelihoods and self-determination. This course examines these economic, political and cultural struggles comparatively, over time and across regions. We will investigate government policies of assimilation and modernization, and local responses and resistance. We will discuss such topics as environmental degradation, ethno-tourism, prostitution, HIV infection, and drug smuggling. Readings will include ethnography and memoir, and will be complemented by film and slides.
1418 ANTH-300-01 Junior Seminar 1.00 SEM Trostle,James A. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: Anthropology major or permission of instructor.
  A seminar designed for anthropology majors in their junior year. The course is designed to build knowledge of the discipline, including contemporary debates, the publication process, and the work of anthropologists beyond the academy (e.g. in business, public health, government and non-governmental organizations, etc.). Students write a research proposal for a potential senior thesis and interview a working anthropologist.
1416 ANTH-301-01 Ethnographic Methods & Writing 1.00 LEC Notar,Beth E. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: Anthropology major or permission of instructor.
  This course will acquaint students with a range of research methods commonly used by anthropologists, and with the types of questions and designs that justify their use. It will describe a subset of methods (individual and group interviewing, and observation) in more detail, and give students practice in their use, analysis, and presentation. Through accompanying readings, the course will expose students to the controversies surrounding the practice of ethnography and the presentation of ethnographic authority. Students will conduct group field research projects during the course, and will develop and write up research proposals for projects they themselves could carry out in a summer or semester. It is recommended that students have already taken an anthropology course.
2157 ANTH-305-01 Identities in Britain&Ireland 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Using ethnographies, nonfiction, novels and films, this course introduces students to the complex negotiations that go into being "British" or "Irish" in the world today. We will apply anthropological theories of identity as a social process to textual and visual material, challenging conventional notions of ethnicity as primordial or fixed. Discussions will address issues of postcolonialism, borders and boundaries, gender and race, and relations between persons and landscapes.
2158 ANTH-310-01 Anth of Development 1.00 SEM Hussain,Shafqat TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This seminar will explore international economic and social development from an anthropological perspective. We will critically examine concepts of development, underdevelopment, and progress. We will compare how multilateral lenders and small nongovernmental organizations employ development rhetoric and methods. We will examine specific case studies of development projects in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, asking what has been attained, and what is attainable.
1269 ANTH-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chair are required for enrollment.
1178 ANTH-401-01 Adv Sem in Contemp Anth 1.00 SEM Hussain,Shafqat W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: Anthropology major or permission of instructor.
  Anthropologists are a contentious lot, often challenging the veracity and relevance of each other’s interpretations. In this seminar, students will examine recent manifestations of this vexatiousness. The seminar will consider such questions as: Can culture be regarded as collective and shared? What is the relationship between cultural ideas and practical action? How does one study culture in the postmodern world of "the celluloid, global ethnoscape"? Can the practice of anthropology be fully objective, or does it demand a politics—an understanding that ideas, ours and theirs, are historically situated, politicized realities? Is domination the same everywhere?
1270 ANTH-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1271 ANTH-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.)
1212 AHIS-294-01 The Arts of Africa 1.00 LEC Gilbert,Michelle V. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An examination of the art and architecture of sub-Saharan Africa as modes of symbolic communication: the ritual context of art, the concept of the artist, the notion of popular art, and the decorated body.
1978 EDUC-307-01 Latinos in Ed: Local Realities 1.00 LEC Dyrness,Andrea W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or International Studies, Language and Culture Studies, Hispanic Studies, or Anthropology major, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course is not open to first-year students.
  This course investigates the education of Latinos, the largest and fastest growing minority group in the United States. By examining both the domestic and transnational contexts, we explore these central questions: How do cultural constructions of Latinos (as immigrants and natives, citizens and non-citizens) shape educational policy and teaching practices? What views of citizenship and identity underlie school programs such as bilingual education, as well as Latino responses to them? This course fulfills the related field requirement for Hispanic studies majors. It will also include a community learning component involving a qualitative research project in a Hartford school or community organization.
2145 EDUC-320-01 Anthropology & Education 1.00 SEM Dyrness,Andrea TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or Anthropology 101 (formerly 201), or permission of instructor.
  The anthropology of education has a rich history of investigating the links between culture, learning, and schooling. Anthropologists studying education have sought to illuminate learning and educational achievement as social processes and cultural products that cannot be understood apart from the socio-cultural contexts in which they occur. In this upper-level seminar, we will explore selected works in the anthropology of education, both classic and contemporary, in order to understand the unique contributions anthropology makes to the study of education, and in particular, the experience of minority groups in education. We will explore topics such as race, gender, and language in education and how they have been addressed by anthropologists. Students will have an opportunity to read critically a variety of detailed ethnographic and qualitative studies focusing on formal schooling and informal education in the United States and in other countries. Reviewing these studies, we will explore the central questions: What is a cultural analysis of schooling? What unique insights does ethnography (anthropology's signature method) offer into key educational problems? And finally, how can a cultural analysis of schooling inform efforts to create a more socially just educational system?
1964 INTS-235-01 Youth Culture in the Muslim Wo 1.00 SEM Bauer,Janet L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Increasingly much of the Muslim world is young and with the expansion of media and cyberspace technologies, the circulation of globalized youth culture increasingly challenges taken-for-granted notions in local societies. This course examines the impact of youth and youth culture on personal, social, and political expression in a variety of Muslim communities around the world. We will examine intergenerational struggles over marriage, gender, and sexuality, the renegotiation of religion and morality, and the often 'revolutionary' disputes over conventional politics as conveyed through music, texts, fashion, personal memoirs, and cyberspace blogging.
1966 INTS-311-01 Global Feminism 1.00 LEC Bauer,Janet L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines how the struggles of diverse gender based movements (religious and secular, urban and rural, black and white), from the Americas to the Middle East and Asia, shed light on vexing social problems like the lack of sexual and reproductive rights, political and social representation, and equal opportunities. Using historical and contemporary examples of women’s organizing and theorizing, course materials interrogate the meaning of ‘feminism’, the relationship between the gendered self and society, the impact of race, class, and cultural differences on women’s solidarity, the challenge of women’s (and gender based) activism to state and social order, the impact of women's networking, and the possibilities for achieving a transnational, cross-cultural or global ‘feminism.’