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Course Schedule for ANTHROPOLOGY - Fall 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2627 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Notar,Beth E. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2628 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Hussain,Shafqat TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2900 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Landry,Timothy R. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3501 ANTH-227-01 Intro to Political Ecology 1.00 LEC Hussain,Shafqat TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course covers social science approaches to issues concerning ecology, the environment, and nature. It looks at how social identities and cultural meaning are symbolically tied to the physical environment. Ecology and the environment are affected by larger political, social, and economic forces, so we will also broaden the analysis to include wider spatial and temporal scales. The course will also examine how sociology and geography relate to political ecology. Regional foci will include South and Southeast Asia, Africa, and Latin America.
3142 ANTH-245-01 Anth & Global Health 1.00 LEC Trostle,James A. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for Anthropology majors.
  This course examines the growing collaborative and critical roles of anthropology applied to international health. Anthropologists elicit disease taxonomies, describe help-seeking strategies, critique donor models, and design behavioral interventions. They ask about borders and the differences among conceptions of health and disease as global, international, or domestic topics. These issues will be explored through case studies of specific diseases, practices, therapies, agencies, and policies.
3502 ANTH-247-01 China through Film 1.00 LEC Notar,Beth E. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Film provides a vital medium for understanding changes in Chinese society and culture. Film illustrates shifts in political and economic systems, and reveals changes in the possibilities of individual and collective expression. In China, film has been used both as a tool of the state and as an implement of cultural critique. This course surveys five decades of Chinese film, focusing primarily on mainland films, but also looking at films from Hong Kong and Taiwan. No knowledge of Chinese language is necessary for the course.
3145 ANTH-250-01 Mobility and Sustainability 1.00 SEM Notar,Beth E. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  What is the relationship between mobility, community and sustainability? We will look at mobility in different cultures, ranging from hunter gathers to nomadic herders to suburban commuters. What are the characteristics of social life in cultures where people primarily walk, canoe or sail, rely on animal power, or travel in motorized vehicles? We will investigate how technological innovation, whether in the form of trains, buses, bicycles, cars or airplanes, can change people’s perceptions of both the surrounding landscape and themselves. We will also examine the kinds of infrastructure and resources needed for certain technologies of mobility, such as cars. Can we imagine motorized transport that is both environmentally and socially sustainable? Course materials will include books, articles and films. Students will conduct a mini research project related to the course.
3503 ANTH-253-01 Urban Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course will trace the social scientific (especially ethnographic and cultural) study of the modern city from its roots in the Industrial Revolution through the current urban transformations brought about by advanced capitalism and globalization. Why are cities organized as they are? How does their organization shape, and get shaped by, everyday practices of city inhabitants? This course will explore the roles of institutional actors (such as governments and corporations) in urban organization, and the effects of economic change, immigration, and public policy on the social organization and built environment of cities. It will examine social consequences of cities, including economic inequality, racial stratification, community formation, poverty, and urban social movements. Though it will focus on American urbanism, this course will also be international and ethnographic.
3504 ANTH-284-01 The Anthropology of Violence 1.00 LEC Beebe,Rebecca TR: 6:30PM-7:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course approaches the study of violence through texts, case studies, and films. Does aggression come from biology, culture or both? How is violence defined cross culturally? What constitutes legitimate violence? How has violence been used throughout history to establish, maintain and subvert power? We will examine forms of violence including state violence, war, interpersonal and domestic violence. We will also explore the consequences of violence on health, community and culture.
2901 ANTH-301-01 Ethnographic Methods & Writing 1.00 SEM Trostle,James A. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: Anthropology major or permission of instructor.
  This course will acquaint students with a range of research methods commonly used by anthropologists, and with the types of questions and designs that justify their use. It will describe a subset of methods (individual and group interviewing, and observation) in more detail, and give students practice in their use, analysis, and presentation. Through accompanying readings, the course will expose students to the controversies surrounding the practice of ethnography and the presentation of ethnographic authority. Students will conduct group field research projects during the course, and will develop and write up research proposals for projects they themselves could carry out in a summer or semester. It is recommended that students have already taken an anthropology course.
2137 ANTH-302-01 History of Anth Thought 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course explores the anthropological tradition as it has changed from the late 19th century until the present. Students will read works of the major figures in the development of the discipline, such as Bronislaw Malinowski, Franz Boas, Margaret Mead, and Claude Levi-Strauss. They will learn not only what these anthropologists had to say about reality, but why they said it when they did. In this sense, the course turns an anthropological eye on anthropology itself.
3505 ANTH-308-01 Anthropology of Place 1.00 SEM Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  This course explores the increasingly complex ways in which people in industrial and non-industrial societies locate themselves with respect to land and landscape. Contrary to some widespread assumptions regarding the fit between identity and place (i.e., ethnicity and nationalism), we study a range of settings in which people actively construct, contest, and reappropriate the spaces of modern life. Through texts, seminar discussions, films, and a field-based research project as the major exercise, students will explore a number of issues, including cultural persistence and the loss of place; the meaning of the frontier and indigenous land rights struggles; gender and public space; the deterritorialization of culture (i.e., McDonald’s in Hong Kong); and the cultural costs of an increasingly "fast" and high-tech world.
3482 ANTH-369-01 The Cradle of Voodoo 1.00 LEC Landry,Timothy R. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is a survey of Vodún, the West African religious complex known commonly as “Voodoo.” With a focus on the Republic of Bénin students will examine the ebb and flow of Dahomey, the country’s most powerful and famous African empire. Students will explore the ways in which Vodúnisants mobilize the spirit worlds to heal their families; use complex systems of magic and witchcraft to overcome obstacles; and venerate their dead using elaborate masquerades during which the dead are reanimated to dance in spectacular displays of power. This course is designed as a precursor to the J-term course, “West Africa Abroad” where students will travel to Bénin to explore the topics of this course first hand.
2817 ANTH-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chair are required for enrollment.
2673 ANTH-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
3263 ANTH-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.)
3123 AMST-409-02 Digital City 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  With half the world's population now in cities, policymakers and activists are focused on the promise of technology to tackle issues from gentrification, pollution, access to public spaces, and walkability. How can digital platforms affect the growth of equal and just cities? How can critical interventions using such platforms work to recognize differences of gender, race, sexuality, and class in cities, and promote equality? What role do and should colleges play in supporting the growth of just and equal spaces? Focusing on Hartford and Trinity, this course connects global and national issues to the intimate experiences of everyday urban life. It pairs technical skills and social science data collection with urban theory and urban studies. Students contribute to an online archive examining the college-city relationship.
3427 EDUC-320-01 Anthropology & Education 1.00 SEM Dyrness,Andrea TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or Anthropology 101 (formerly 201), or permission of instructor.
  The anthropology of education has a rich history of investigating the links between culture, learning, and schooling. Anthropologists studying education have sought to illuminate learning and educational achievement as social processes and cultural products that cannot be understood apart from the socio-cultural contexts in which they occur. In this upper-level seminar, we will explore selected works in the anthropology of education, both classic and contemporary, in order to understand the unique contributions anthropology makes to the study of education, and in particular, the experience of minority groups in education. We will explore topics such as race, gender, and language in education and how they have been addressed by anthropologists. Students will have an opportunity to read critically a variety of detailed ethnographic and qualitative studies focusing on formal schooling and informal education in the United States and in other countries. Reviewing these studies, we will explore the central questions: What is a cultural analysis of schooling? What unique insights does ethnography (anthropology's signature method) offer into key educational problems? And finally, how can a cultural analysis of schooling inform efforts to create a more socially just educational system?
2396 MUSC-113-01 Introduction to World Music 1.00 LEC Galm,Eric A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-year students.
  A comprehensive survey of global musical traditions that encompasses rural and urban music from Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean, India, Asia, and the Americas. This course is designed to highlight the central role of musical expression in human life, exploring musical sound and movement in sacred, secular, ritual, and non-ritual contexts. No previous musical knowledge is required. Students are expected to learn basic listening skills and identify musical styles. The course culminates in a final research project about a world music tradition, ensemble, performer, or other related topic. Also listed in International Studies-African studies, International Studies-Asian studies, and International Studies-Latin American and Caribbean studies.