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Course Schedule for ANTHROPOLOGY - Spring 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
4905 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Beebe,Rebecca MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: seats are reserved as follows: 5 seniors, 5 juniors, 10 sophomores, 20 first-year
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
4629 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
4859 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Hussain,Shafqat TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
4906 ANTH-215-01 Medical Anthropology 1.00 LEC Trostle,James A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Anthropology 101 (formerly 201) or other Anthropology course or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: 7 seats reserved for sophomores
  This course covers major topics in medical anthropology, including biocultural analyses of health and disease, the social patterning of disease, cultural critiques of biomedicine, and non-Western systems of healing. We will explore the major theoretical schools in medical anthropology, and see how they have been applied to specific pathologies, life processes, and social responses. Finally we will explore and critique how medical anthropology has been applied to health care in the United States and internationally. The course will sensitize students to cultural issues in sickness and health care, and provide some critical analytic concepts and tools.
4546 ANTH-227-01 Intro to Political Ecology 1.00 LEC Hussain,Shafqat TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course covers social science approaches to issues concerning ecology, the environment, and nature. It looks at how social identities and cultural meaning are symbolically tied to the physical environment. Ecology and the environment are affected by larger political, social, and economic forces, so we will also broaden the analysis to include wider spatial and temporal scales. The course will also examine how sociology and geography relate to political ecology. Regional foci will include South and Southeast Asia, Africa, and Latin America.
4907 ANTH-238-01 Economic Anthropology 1.00 LEC Notar,Beth E. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  We often assume that culture and the economy are separate, but all economic transactions contain cultural dimensions, and all cultural institutions exhibit economic features. This course provides an introduction to key debates and contemporary issues in economic anthropology. We will consider differences in the organization of production, distribution, and consumption in both subsistence and market economies and examine ways in which anthropologists have theorized these differences. Topics for discussion will include cultural conceptions of property and ownership, social transitions to market economies, the meanings of shopping, and the commodification of bodies and body parts such as organs and blood. Course materials will draw from ethnographic studies, newspaper articles, and documentary films.
5127 ANTH-243-01 Latin Amer & Caribbean Religio 1.00 SEM Landry,Timothy R. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course explores the ways in which global trends in religious practice have affected, inspired, and forever changed Latin American and Caribbean religion. Students will explore a variety of Latin American and Caribbean religions such as those of the Afro-Caribbean, so-called “folk Catholicism,” and the Amazon’s great Ayahuasca religions. In so doing, students will develop an appreciation for religious diversity and an understanding of the ways in which race, capitalism, colonialism, nationality, and emerging trends in global tourism continue to affect the ways Latin American and Caribbean peoples experience religion from across the region.
4393 ANTH-300-01 Junior Seminar 1.00 SEM Trostle,James A. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: Anthropology major or permission of instructor.
  A seminar designed for anthropology majors in their junior year. The course is designed to build knowledge of the discipline, including contemporary debates, the publication process, and the work of anthropologists beyond the academy (e.g. in business, public health, government and non-governmental organizations, etc.). Students write a research proposal for a potential senior thesis and interview a working anthropologist.
5041 ANTH-303-01 Urban China 1.00 SEM Notar,Beth E. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  What does it mean to live in one of the fastest growing cities in the fastest growing economy in the world? This course focuses on understanding the complex and ongoing transformations of Chinese cities, examining such topics as contestations over the urban environment and “public” space, the rise of China’s new middle class, new consumption patterns, rural to urban migration, and spaces of youth culture. Course materials will include ethnographies, journal and newspaper articles as well as documentary and feature film clips
5103 ANTH-314-01 Material Religion 1.00 LEC Landry,Timothy R. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores the ways in which individuals from a variety of religious traditions experience religious belief, enact religious practice, and relate to the so-called “Divine” through material culture. Students will examine themes such as relics, clothing, bodies, blood, architecture, shrines, and charms. By reading ethnographic and theoretical texts, this course helps students to consider the role that material religion plays in enhancing or complicating prayer, ritual, and everyday religious piety.
4276 ANTH-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chair are required for enrollment.
4200 ANTH-401-01 Adv Sem in Contemp Anth 1.00 SEM Hussain,Shafqat W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: Anthropology major or permission of instructor.
  Anthropologists are a contentious lot, often challenging the veracity and relevance of each other’s interpretations. In this seminar, students will examine recent manifestations of this vexatiousness. The seminar will consider such questions as: Can culture be regarded as collective and shared? What is the relationship between cultural ideas and practical action? How does one study culture in the postmodern world of "the celluloid, global ethnoscape"? Can the practice of anthropology be fully objective, or does it demand a politics—an understanding that ideas, ours and theirs, are historically situated, politicized realities? Is domination the same everywhere?
4277 ANTH-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
4278 ANTH-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.)
4226 AHIS-294-01 The Arts of Africa 1.00 LEC Gilbert,Michelle V. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An examination of the art and architecture of sub-Saharan Africa as modes of symbolic communication: the ritual context of art, the concept of the artist, the notion of popular art, and the decorated body.
4943 EDUC-305-01 Immigrants & Education 1.00 SEM Dyrness,Andrea W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200, or majoring in International Studies, or permission of instructor
  This course examines the experience of immigrants in education in comparative perspective, focusing on questions of citizenship and belonging. How do schools respond to the challenges and opportunities of large-scale migration, cultural diversity, and inequality and attempt to produce national and/or global citizens? How do immigrants in schools negotiate and respond to global and national forces as they craft their own identities and forms of belonging? We will examine the experience of immigrant groups in the United States and in several countries in Europe, including France, Spain, the U.K., and Denmark. The course will include a community learning component in which students will conduct interviews with immigrants who have been involved in U.S. education institutions.
5045 INTS-234-01 Gender and Education 1.00 LEC Bauer,Janet L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  What is gender equity in schooling and what impact does this have on gender equity more broadly? Different disciplinary perspectives on the impact of gender in learning, school experience, performance and achievement will be explored in elementary, secondary, post-secondary, and informal educational settings. The legal and public policy implications of these findings (such as gender-segregated schooling, men’s and women’s studies programs, curriculum reform, Title IX, affirmative action and other proposed remedies) will be explored. Findings on socialization and schooling in the U.S. will be contrasted with those from other cultures.
5046 INTS-235-01 Youth Culture in the Muslim Wo 1.00 SEM Bauer,Janet L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Increasingly much of the Muslim world is young and with the expansion of media and cyberspace technologies, the circulation of globalized youth culture increasingly challenges taken-for-granted notions in local societies. This course examines the impact of youth and youth culture on personal, social, and political expression in a variety of Muslim communities around the world. We will examine intergenerational struggles over marriage, gender, and sexuality, the renegotiation of religion and morality, and the often 'revolutionary' disputes over conventional politics as conveyed through music, texts, fashion, personal memoirs, and cyberspace blogging.
5048 INTS-249-01 Immigrants & Refugees 1.00 SEM Bauer,Janet L. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  The post-cold war world is one of changing national boundaries and governments, environmental devastation and internal conflicts, resulting in an apparently unprecedented flow of people from their native homelands. At a time when multiculturalism is not a popular model for national integration, immigrants, refugees, and other sojourners find themselves in new places creating new lives for themselves. The processes by which this occurs illustrate some of the basic social, cultural, and political dilemmas of contemporary societies. Using historical and contemporary case studies from Europe and the Americas, this course looks at issues of flight, resettlement, integration, cultural adaptation, and public policy involved in creating culturally diverse nations. Questions to be raised include what are the conditions under which people leave, who can become a (authentic) member of society, what rights do non-citizens versus citizens have, are borders sacrosanct, are ethnic and racial diversity achievable or desirable, is multiculturalism an appropriate model, do people want to assimilate, what are the cultural consequences of movement, and how can individuals reconstruct their identities and feel they belong? This course includes a community learning component. (Also offered under American Studies, Public Policy & Law, and Women, Gender, & Sexuality.)
5049 INTS-250-01 Hartford Global Migration Lab 0.50 LAB Bauer,Janet L. TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in International Studies 249 or 250.
  Optional Community Learning Component integrated with INTS249: Immigrants and Refugees and INTS250: Global Migration to provide field-based, participatory research experience with community partners on the consequences of global migration in the greater Hartford area.
5051 INTS-262-01 People/Culture of Caribb 1.00 LEC Desmangles,Leslie G. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A review of the attempt to develop generalizations about the structure of Caribbean society. Theoretical materials will focus on the historical role of slavery, the nature of plural societies, race, class, ethnicity, and specific institutions such as the family, the schools, the church, and the political structure.
5122 INTS-311-01 Global Feminism 1.00 LEC Tabar,Linda W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines how the struggles of diverse gender based movements (religious and secular, urban and rural, black and white), from the Americas to the Middle East and Asia, shed light on vexing social problems like the lack of sexual and reproductive rights, political and social representation, and equal opportunities. Using historical and contemporary examples of women’s organizing and theorizing, course materials interrogate the meaning of ‘feminism’, the relationship between the gendered self and society, the impact of race, class, and cultural differences on women’s solidarity, the challenge of women’s (and gender based) activism to state and social order, the impact of women's networking, and the possibilities for achieving a transnational, cross-cultural or global ‘feminism.’
4756 MUSC-222-01 Investigating Music & Culture 1.00 SEM Galm,Eric A. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 14
  This course is an in-depth introduction to the study of music and culture. This course will focus on the gathering of primary-source materials and relate them to broader historical and cultural contexts. Through this process, students will develop interviewing techniques, learn how to document with video and audio recording equipment, and practice incorporating data into comprehensive research projects. Students will develop these techniques through participation with a Hartford-based arts organization. Also listed under Anthropology.