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Course Schedule for ANTHROPOLOGY - Fall 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2686 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MECC - 246 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2687 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Trostle,James A. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM MECC - 246 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3179 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Landry,Timothy R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MECC - 246 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3502 ANTH-245-01 Anth & Global Health 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 303 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for Anthropology majors.
  This course examines the growing collaborative and critical roles of anthropology applied to international health. Anthropologists elicit disease taxonomies, describe help-seeking strategies, critique donor models, and design behavioral interventions. They ask about borders and the differences among conceptions of health and disease as global, international, or domestic topics. These issues will be explored through case studies of specific diseases, practices, therapies, agencies, and policies.
3505 ANTH-250-01 Mobility and Sustainability 1.00 SEM Notar,Beth E. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM HHN - 105 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  What is the relationship between mobility, community and sustainability? We will look at mobility in different cultures, ranging from hunter gathers to nomadic herders to suburban commuters. What are the characteristics of social life in cultures where people primarily walk, canoe or sail, rely on animal power, or travel in motorized vehicles? We will investigate how technological innovation, whether in the form of trains, buses, bicycles, cars or airplanes, can change people’s perceptions of both the surrounding landscape and themselves. We will also examine the kinds of infrastructure and resources needed for certain technologies of mobility, such as cars. Can we imagine motorized transport that is both environmentally and socially sustainable? Course materials will include books, articles and films. Students will conduct a mini research project related to the course.
3183 ANTH-301-01 Ethnographic Methods & Writing 1.00 SEM Notar,Beth E. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM HHN - 105 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: Anthropology major or permission of instructor.
  This course will acquaint students with a range of research methods commonly used by anthropologists, and with the types of questions and designs that justify their use. It will describe a subset of methods (individual and group interviewing, and observation) in more detail, and give students practice in their use, analysis, and presentation. Through accompanying readings, the course will expose students to the controversies surrounding the practice of ethnography and the presentation of ethnographic authority. Students will conduct group field research projects during the course, and will develop and write up research proposals for projects they themselves could carry out in a summer or semester. It is recommended that students have already taken an anthropology course.
2149 ANTH-302-01 History of Anth Thought 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 205 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course explores the anthropological tradition as it has changed from the late 19th century until the present. Students will read works of the major figures in the development of the discipline, such as Bronislaw Malinowski, Franz Boas, Margaret Mead, and Claude Levi-Strauss. They will learn not only what these anthropologists had to say about reality, but why they said it when they did. In this sense, the course turns an anthropological eye on anthropology itself.
3535 ANTH-305-01 Identities in Britain&Ireland 1.00 SEM Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MC - 311 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Using ethnographies, nonfiction, novels and films, this course introduces students to the complex negotiations that go into being "British" or "Irish" in the world today. We will apply anthropological theories of identity as a social process to textual and visual material, challenging conventional notions of ethnicity as primordial or fixed. Discussions will address issues of postcolonialism, borders and boundaries, gender and race, and relations between persons and landscapes.
3500 ANTH-330-01 Anthropology of Food 1.00 SEM Beebe,Rebecca MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM LSC - 131 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: 7 seats reserved for Anthropology majors.
  Because food is necessary to sustain biological life, its production and provision occupy humans everywhere. Due to this essential importance, food also operates to create and symbolize collective life. This seminar will examine the social and cultural significance of food. Topics to be discussed include the evolution of human food systems, the social and cultural relationships between food production and human reproduction, the development of women’s association with the domestic sphere, the meaning and experience of eating disorders, the connection between ethnic cuisines, nationalist movements and social classes, and the causes of famine.
2913 ANTH-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chair are required for enrollment.
2733 ANTH-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
3659 ANTH-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.)
3480 AMST-409-02 The Digital Image of the City 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack M: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 305 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  With half the world’s population now in cities, policymakers and activists are focused on the promise of smart urbanism. Smart urbanism deploys technology and data to tackle issues from gentrification and pollution to access to public spaces and improved walkability. How does this focus affect the growth of equal and just cities? Focused on US cities, namely Hartford and New York, this course connects global and national issues to the intimate experiences of everyday urban life. It pairs specific technical skills such as social science data collection and geographic information systems (GIS) mapping with urban theory and urban studies. The course project will bring together the theory, literature, and your own research, data analysis, and maps into a smart city recommendation for the city.
3506 INTS-131-01 Modern Iran 1.00 LEC Bauer,Janet L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM LSC - 138-9 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course provides an introduction to 20th-century Iranian society, culture, and politics, examining secular and religious debates over gender roles, modernity, Islamism, democracy, and the West.
3466 LING-101-01 Introduction to Linguistics 1.00 LEC Lahti,Katherine MF: 2:40PM-3:55PM LSC - 132 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  A general introduction to the study of language. First we will study the fundamental components of language (sounds, words, sentences). We will then examine the crucial question of how words and sentences manage to mean anything. The latter part of the course will be devoted to theoretical approaches to the nature of language, to how and why languages change over time, and to the ways language determines and reflects the structures of society.
2430 MUSC-113-01 Introduction to World Music 1.00 LEC Galm,Eric A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM AAC - 112 GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-year students.
  A comprehensive survey of global musical traditions that encompasses rural and urban music from Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean, India, Asia, and the Americas. This course is designed to highlight the central role of musical expression in human life, exploring musical sound and movement in sacred, secular, ritual, and non-ritual contexts. No previous musical knowledge is required. Students are expected to learn basic listening skills and identify musical styles. The course culminates in a final research project about a world music tradition, ensemble, performer, or other related topic. Also listed in International Studies-African studies, International Studies-Asian studies, and International Studies-Latin American and Caribbean studies.
3526 RELG-281-01 Anthropology of Religion 1.00 LEC Desmangles,Leslie G. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - N215 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Introduction to the foundations of religion through an examination of religious phenomena prevalent in traditional cultures. Some of the topics covered in this course include a critical examination of the idea of primitivity, the concepts of space and time, myths, symbols, ideas related to God, man, death, and rituals such as rites of passage, magic, sorcery, witchcraft, and divination. (May be counted toward anthropology and international studies/comparative development.)