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Course Schedule for ANTHROPOLOGY - Spring 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
4667 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Beebe, Rebecca MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
4568 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro, Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
4643 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Trostle, James TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
5016 ANTH-207-01 Anth Persp Women & Gender 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein, Jane TBA TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Using texts and films, this course will explore the nature of women’s lives in both the contemporary United States and a number of radically different societies around the world, including, for example, the !Kung San people of the Kalahari and the Mundurucù of Amazonian Brazil. As they examine the place of women in these societies, students will also be introduced to theoretical perspectives that help explain both variations in women’s status from society to society and "universal" aspects of their status.
4668 ANTH-215-01 Medical Anthropology 1.00 LEC Trostle, James TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Anthropology 101 or other Anthropology course or permission of instructor.
  This course covers major topics in medical anthropology, including biocultural analyses of health and disease, the social patterning of disease, cultural critiques of biomedicine, and non-Western systems of healing. We will explore the major theoretical schools in medical anthropology, and see how they have been applied to specific pathologies, life processes, and social responses. Finally we will explore and critique how medical anthropology has been applied to health care in the United States and internationally. The course will sensitize students to cultural issues in sickness and health care, and provide some critical analytic concepts and tools.
5017 ANTH-228-01 Anth from Margins/South Asia 1.00 LEC Hussain, Shafqat TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course will examine how the northwestern and northern mountainous regions of South Asia have been constructed in the Western popular imagination, both in literary texts and in academic debates. Starting with the era of the Great Game in the late 19th century and ending with the current "war on terror," the course will explore the transformation and continuation of past social and political conditions, and their representations within the region. This will help illuminate some of the enduring themes in anthropological debates, such as culture contact; empires, territories, and resources; and human agency.
4884 ANTH-236-01 Religions of Africa 1.00 SEM Landry, Timothy TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is an exploration of the ways in which Africans make sense of their worlds through religion. By reading a wide range of ethnographic and historical texts, students will consider the challenges that post-colonial politics present to understanding religion in Africa and in the diaspora Students will examine a variety of African religious traditions ranging from indigenous practices to the ways in which Christianity and Islam have developed uniquely African beliefs. In so doing, students will frame African religions as global phenomena while considering the historical and contemporary salience of the many canonical themes found in African religion such as spirit possession, divination, healing, magic, witchcraft, sorcery, and animal sacrifice.
4669 ANTH-238-01 Economic Anthropology 1.00 LEC Notar, Beth MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  We often assume that culture and the economy are separate, but all economic transactions contain cultural dimensions, and all cultural institutions exhibit economic features. This course provides an introduction to key debates and contemporary issues in economic anthropology. We will consider differences in the organization of production, distribution, and consumption in both subsistence and market economies and examine ways in which anthropologists have theorized these differences. Topics for discussion will include cultural conceptions of property and ownership, social transitions to market economies, the meanings of shopping, and the commodification of bodies and body parts such as organs and blood. Course materials will draw from ethnographic studies, newspaper articles, and documentary films.
5018 ANTH-254-01 The Meaning of Work 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein, Jane TBA TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course takes a cross-cultural look at the ways in which people define work in daily life. Drawing upon diverse sources, including ethnography, fiction, biography and investigative journalism, it will examine the ways in which people labor to make a living and to sustain their households. Students will consider such key questions as: What makes work meaningful? How are occupational communities formed? How is work gendered? How have global forces reshaped the nature of work? How do people experience the lack of work? Examples will be drawn from different work environments, including mining, fishing, agriculture, industry, service work, domestic work and intellectual work.
4376 ANTH-300-01 Junior Seminar 1.00 SEM Notar, Beth W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Seats Reserved for Anthropology majors.
  A seminar designed for anthropology majors in their junior year. The course is designed to build knowledge of the discipline, including contemporary debates, the publication process, and the work of anthropologists beyond the academy (e.g. in business, public health, government and non-governmental organizations, etc.). Students write a research proposal for a potential senior thesis and interview a working anthropologist.
5019 ANTH-310-01 Anth of Development 1.00 SEM Hussain, Shafqat TBA TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This seminar will explore international economic and social development from an anthropological perspective. We will critically examine concepts of development, underdevelopment, and progress. We will compare how multilateral lenders and small nongovernmental organizations employ development rhetoric and methods. We will examine specific case studies of development projects in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, asking what has been attained, and what is attainable.
4264 ANTH-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chair are required for enrollment.
4192 ANTH-401-01 Adv Sem in Contemp Anth 1.00 SEM Hussain, Shafqat W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Seats Reserved for Anthropology majors.
  Anthropologists are a contentious lot, often challenging the veracity and relevance of each other’s interpretations. In this seminar, students will examine recent manifestations of this vexatiousness. The seminar will consider such questions as: Can culture be regarded as collective and shared? What is the relationship between cultural ideas and practical action? How does one study culture in the postmodern world of "the celluloid, global ethnoscape"? Can the practice of anthropology be fully objective, or does it demand a politics—an understanding that ideas, ours and theirs, are historically situated, politicized realities? Is domination the same everywhere?
4265 ANTH-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
4266 ANTH-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.)
4217 AHIS-294-01 The Arts of Africa 1.00 LEC Gilbert, Michelle R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An examination of the art and architecture of sub-Saharan Africa as modes of symbolic communication: the ritual context of art, the concept of the artist, the notion of popular art, and the decorated body.
4947 EDUC-305-01 Immigrants & Education 1.00 SEM Staff, Trinity W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200, or majoring in International Studies, or permission of instructor
  This course examines the experience of immigrants in education in comparative perspective, focusing on questions of citizenship and belonging. How do schools respond to the challenges and opportunities of large-scale migration, cultural diversity, and inequality and attempt to produce national and/or global citizens? How do immigrants in schools negotiate and respond to global and national forces as they craft their own identities and forms of belonging? We will examine the experience of immigrant groups in the United States and in several countries in Europe, including France, Spain, the U.K., and Denmark. The course will include a community learning component in which students will conduct interviews with immigrants who have been involved in U.S. education institutions.
4778 INTS-262-01 People/Culture of Caribb 1.00 LEC Desmangles, Leslie TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A review of the attempt to develop generalizations about the structure of Caribbean society. Theoretical materials will focus on the historical role of slavery, the nature of plural societies, race, class, ethnicity, and specific institutions such as the family, the schools, the church, and the political structure.
5192 INTS-311-01 Global Feminism 1.00 LEC Mitchell-Eaton, Emily MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines how the struggles of diverse gender based movements (religious and secular, urban and rural, black and white), from the Americas to the Middle East and Asia, shed light on vexing social problems like the lack of sexual and reproductive rights, political and social representation, and equal opportunities. Using historical and contemporary examples of women’s organizing and theorizing, course materials interrogate the meaning of ‘feminism’, the relationship between the gendered self and society, the impact of race, class, and cultural differences on women’s solidarity, the challenge of women’s (and gender based) activism to state and social order, the impact of women's networking, and the possibilities for achieving a transnational, cross-cultural or global ‘feminism.’