Select a level: Select a term:
Only show courses available to first-year students.

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Course Schedule for WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY - Fall 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2833 WMGS-101-01 Women,Gender & Sexuality 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, 5 for juniors.
  This course introduces students to the study of women, gender, and sexuality, paying attention to issues of power, agency, and resistance. Using a variety of 19th- and 20th-century American materials, the course seeks to understand: women’s experiences and the way they have been shaped, normative and nonnormative alignments of sex, gender, and sexuality across different historical periods, and the intersection of gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation.
3665 WMGS-239-01 African-American Feminism 1.00 SEM Marcano,Donna TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course is a historical survey of the writings of African-American women as they have historically attempted to negotiate fundamental philosophical questions of the "race problem" and the "woman problem." To this extent, we will be inserting black women's voices into the philosophical canon of both race and feminism. Along with exploring and contextualizing the responses and dialogues of women writers, like Anna Julia Cooper with their more famous male contemporaries such as Du Bois, up to more contemporary articulations of black women's voices in what is known as hip-hop feminism, we will ask the question of whether there is a particular black feminist thought, epistemology, and thus philosophy.
3051 WMGS-245-01 The Hollywood Musical 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  Perhaps more than any other genre, the musical epitomized Hollywood’s “golden age.” This course traces the development of the enormously popular genre from its emergence at the beginning of the Great Depression to its decline amid the social upheavals of the 1960s. It pays particular attention to the genre’s queering of masculinity and femininity, as well as its relationship to camp modes of reception. Readings by Jane Feuer, Rick Altman, Richard Dyer, Janet Staiger, and Steven Cohan.
3661 WMGS-246-01 Sociology of Gender 1.00 LEC Spurgas,Alyson K. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Sex and gender are used as principles of social organization in all known societies. This course surveys research in the sociological study of gender with the goal of providing students with a theoretical grounding for analyzing gender from a sociological perspective. We will explore how our lives and the world around us are shaped by gender and how gender has been constructed over time. We will further examine how sociological research on gender helps us to understand power and inequality at various levels – institutional, organizational, and interactional—by examining various topics such as gender socialization, reproduction, education, work, and violence. We will also pay attention to how gender reinforces and builds upon other areas of inequality such as social class, race, ethnicity, and age.
3689 WMGS-248-01 Women, Gender, Sex in Religion 1.00 LEC Jones Farmer,Tamsin TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Why do particular embodiments render some people “other” within their religion? How are women represented in religious texts and images? How does gender determine what counts for religiously-sanctioned behavior? This course provides an overview of topics where issues of gender and sexuality intersect with particular religious traditions (including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Native American traditions). Topics include: purity and power, celibacy and virginity, marriage and reproduction, veiling and eating practices, violence and sacrifice, as well as the issue of religious leadership and ordination. This course may count towards the Women, Gender and Sexuality major.
3422 WMGS-301-01 Western Feminist Thought 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in one other course in Women Gender and Sexuality.
  An exploration of the main currents in American feminism, with occasional excursions into European thought. The course readings assume (rather than demonstrate) women’s historical subordination to man and put forward various explanations and strategies for change. Readings in J.S. Mill, C. P. Gilman, Emma Goldman, Simone de Beauvoir, Adrienne Rich, bell hooks, Mary Daly, Audre Lorde, and others. This course is not open to First-Year students.
3385 WMGS-321-01 Gender&Sexuality in ME History 1.00 SEM Antrim,Zayde R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course takes constructions of femininity and masculinity and related representations of male and female sexuality in both the pre-modern and modern Middle East, with an emphasis on the Arab world, as its focus. Through theoretical readings and primary sources, both written and visual, we will explore the ways in which gender and sexuality have shaped political, economic, and cultural life in the Middle East.
3658 WMGS-335-01 Mapping American Masculinities 1.00 SEM Corber,Robert J. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course examines the construction of masculinity in American society starting with Theodore Roosevelt’s call at the turn of the twentieth century for men to revitalize the nation by pursuing the “strenuous life." Through close readings of literary and filmic texts, it considers why American manhood has so often been seen as in crisis. It pays particular attention to the formation of non-normative masculinities (African-American, female, and gay) in relation to entrenched racial, class, and sexual hierarchies, as well as the impact of the feminist, civil rights, and gay liberation movements on the shifting construction of male identity. In addition to critical essays, readings also include Tarzan of the Apes, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, The Great Gatsby, The Sun also Rises, Native Son, Another Country, and Kiss Me Deadly (Spillane). Film screenings include Kiss Me Deadly (Aldrich), Shaft, Magnum Force, Philadelphia, Brokeback Mountain, Cleopatra Jones, and Boys Don’t Cry.
3656 WMGS-359-01 Feminist Political Theory 1.00 LEC Terwiel,Anna TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course examines debates in feminist political theory. Topics will include liberal and socialist feminist theory, as well as radical, postcolonial, and postmodern feminist theory. We will also consider feminist perspectives on issues of race and sex, pornography, law and rights, and “hot button” issues like veiling. We will pay particular attention to the question of what feminism means and should mean in increasingly multicultural, global societies. Readings will include work by Mary Wollstonecraft, Carol Gilligan, Catherine MacKinnon, Chandra Mohanty, Wendy Brown, Audre Lorde, Patricia Williams, & Judith Butler.
2211 WMGS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2214 WMGS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2212 WMGS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single term thesis.
2213 WMGS-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (Two course credits are considered pending in the first semester; two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester).
3426 EDUC-309-01 Race Class & Educ Policy 1.00 SEM Cancelled SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or permission of instructor.
  How do competing theories explain educational inequality? How do different policies attempt to address it? This class will consider the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the examination of educational inequality. Possible topics include economic and cultural capital, racial/gender/sexual identity formation, desegregation, multiculturalism, detracking, school choice, school-family relationships, and affirmative action. Student groups will expand upon the readings by proposing, implementing, and presenting their research analysis from a community learning project.
3660 ENGL-307-01 Early American Women's Lit 1.00 SEM Wyss,Hilary E. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: This is a research-intensive seminar. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
  Although early American literature often revolves around "Founding Fathers," in this course we will examine the writing of women. Writing poetry, journals, novels, travel diaries and letters, colonial women had a lot to say about their world and were extraordinarily creative in finding ways to say it-even when the society they lived in suggested it was "improper" for them to write. Along with elite white women, Native Americans, free African Americans, slaves, and indentured servants all wrote as well. As we explore this writing, we will think about what the texts these women produced tell us about the early American experience-how people thought of their place in the world, and what role women imagined for themselves in this newly developing society. This is a research-intensive seminar. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
3709 HIST-203-01 Urban Nightlife Since 1870 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students
  Using an array of studies, genres, and urban settings, from Havana to Chicago, Rio de Janeiro to London, Beirut to Shanghai, and Accra to Seoul, we examine the evolution of nightlife from the late 1800s to our presently globalized world, highlighting the central roles played by all manner of gender, sexual, racial\ethnic, and class identities. Throughout the semester, we will draw heavily on the rich scholarship in Queer Studies and Critical Race Studies that has helped recast urban nightlife as more than banal entertainment and debauchery. Instead, we will rethink nightlife, from before the Jazz Age to Stonewall and today, as a social arena where class, sexual norms, and racism can\are also subverted, helping propel broader dynamics of cultural, political, and social change.
3650 INTS-336-01 Women, War, and Violence 1.00 SEM Cancelled GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the intersections of imperialist wars, global capitalism, militarism, and patriarchal violence. Using a feminist anti-racist, anti-imperialist lens, it explores the rise of public sexual violence in the Middle East. Examining US imperialism, Israeli colonialism, and neoliberal capitalism as male and white projects, the course looks at how these systems re-entrench local patriarchal forces and exacerbate the conditions that promote sexual violence against women. Examining cases ranging from the US occupation of Iraq, to Egypt, Palestine and elsewhere in the region, the course considers the implications of the US neoconservative project of a “New Middle East,” the rise of imperial feminism, NGO’s, and ISIS for Arab women’s movements and the politics of women’s everyday lives.
3526 SOCL-316-01 Global Gender Inequalities 1.00 LEC Andersson,Tanetta E. MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course broadly addresses women’s low status and power worldwide. Topics include issues such as son preference, gendered violence, maternal health and reproductive rights, sexual rights, work and household labor, globalization, politics, human rights, and women’s global activism. Utilizing a transnational sociological feminist perspective, students learn how gender inequality intersects with not only culture but also nationalism, racism, and economic injustice in various countries and regions of the world (Southeast Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and South America). At several key points, students engage in critical comparison between examples of gender oppression and exploitation observed in both the United States and other societies (i.e., gendered violence), which reveal a false binary in the discourse of progress often drawn between “us” and “them.”
3710 URST-203-01 Urban Nightlife Since 1870 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students
  Using an array of studies, genres, and urban settings, from Havana to Chicago, Rio de Janeiro to London, Beirut to Shanghai, and Accra to Seoul, we examine the evolution of nightlife from the late 1800s to our presently globalized world, highlighting the central roles played by all manner of gender, sexual, racial\ethnic, and class identities. Throughout the semester, we will draw heavily on the rich scholarship in Queer Studies and Critical Race Studies that has helped recast urban nightlife as more than banal entertainment and debauchery. Instead, we will rethink nightlife, from before the Jazz Age to Stonewall and today, as a social arena where class, sexual norms, and racism can\are also subverted, helping propel broader dynamics of cultural, political, and social change.