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Course Schedule for WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY - Fall 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3746 WMGS-150-01 Before Lady Gaga and Beyoncé 1.00 LEC Woldu, Gail TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 39
  A broad survey of the music and music-making traditions of European and North American women from antiquity to the present. We explore the work and lives of women active as composers and performers in a range of genres, including the classical traditions, blues, jazz, and hip hop. No previous training or experience in music is required.
3692 WMGS-201-01 Gender & Sexuality/Transnatl 1.00 LEC Zhang, Shunyuan TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This broadly interdisciplinary course provides students with an introduction to the field of gender and sexuality studies. It pays particular attention to transnational approaches. Materials are drawn from a variety of disciplines and may include films, novels, ethnographies, oral histories, and legal cases.
3745 WMGS-212-01 Disability Studies:Theory&Hist 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course offers a rigorous interdisciplinary introduction to Disability Studies. We will look at the history of disability studies as it emerged in relation to the Civil Rights movement. We will consider how the efforts of disability activists and scholars have shaped disability studies and how this field informs and is also informed by other disciplines, such as Performance and Trauma Studies. We will examine how disability has been defined over time and how particular definitions of disability intersect with other aspects of identity, such as socio-economic class, race and/or ethnicity, sexuality and gender. In addition to reading and critiquing history and theory, we will also look at a variety of “disability texts” that will include various genres, such as fiction, memoir, film, and drama.
3720 WMGS-260-01 Sexual Diversity and Society 1.00 LEC Valocchi, Stephen TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  Sexuality has often been considered to be a natural, biological instinct-a drive that is fueled by hormones, genes or deep psychic impulses. During the last twenty years, however, scholars (including sociologists) have challenged this view of sexuality. Instead, they argue that how we organize our sexuality-our desires, ideas, value systems, practices and identities-are profoundly shaped by social and cultural influences. Although this course focuses on the social construction of homosexuality, we will also examine the many ways that normative as well as nonnormative sexualities are socially constructed. We will also examine the many ways that the social construction of sexuality is informed by class, gender, race and ethnicity. Using materials from sociology and from the many other disciplines that are working in the areas of lesbian and gay studies and queer theory, we will explore the impact that history, economics, social structure and cultural logics have had on sexual behaviors, identities, and belief systems. Enrollment limited.
3711 WMGS-310-01 Queer China 1.00 SEM Zhang, Shunyuan TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores non-mainstream gendered and sexual practices in China and other Sinophone cultures over the past hundred years. It will draw from a variety of materials-textual, visual, and video-and highlight interdisciplinary methodological and analytic approaches. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which non-normative gender expressions and sexual practices have been represented, embodied, and regulated over space and time.
3747 WMGS-316-01 Global Gender Inequalities 1.00 LEC Andersson, Tanetta MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course broadly addresses women’s low status and power worldwide. Topics include issues such as son preference, gendered violence, maternal health and reproductive rights, sexual rights, work and household labor, globalization, politics, human rights, and women’s global activism. Utilizing a transnational sociological feminist perspective, students learn how gender inequality intersects with not only culture but also nationalism, racism, and economic injustice in various countries and regions of the world (Southeast Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and South America). At several key points, students engage in critical comparison between examples of gender oppression and exploitation observed in both the United States and other societies (i.e., gendered violence), which reveal a false binary in the discourse of progress often drawn between “us” and “them.”
3512 WMGS-342-01 History of Sexuality 1.00 SEM Antrim, Zayde MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the ways in which notions of the body, gender, sexual desire, and sexuality have been organized over space and time. Taking as a starting point the geographical regions of the Middle East, Asia, and Latin America in the ancient and medieval periods, the course seeks to de-center discourses of Western sexual modernity. It then addresses the ways in which colonialism, racism, nationalism, and globalization have depended on and disrupted normative ideas about modern sexuality, including the hetero/homosexual binary. Throughout the course we will ask how historians use theoretical and primary sources to construct a history of sexuality. Course expectations include a final research paper.
2147 WMGS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2150 WMGS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2148 WMGS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single term thesis.
2149 WMGS-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (Two course credits are considered pending in the first semester; two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester).
3560 AMST-845-01 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
3556 ENGL-445-01 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 requirement. This course is research intensive.
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
3557 ENGL-845-01 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
3733 HIST-203-01 Urban Nightlife since 1850 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students
  Dance music scenes and their urban spaces are social arenas in which discriminatory norms of sexism, homophobia, racism, nationalism and elitism can be subverted and transformed. Using New York City as our base in comparison to cities like Accra, Berlin, Chicago, Havana, London, Philadelphia, Rio de Janeiro, and Shanghai, we examine urban nightlife's music scenes, from the 1800s to the present, highlighting the roles played by the evolution of capitalism, and regional and international migrations. To do this, we tap into a growing, innovative research in Critical Race Studies, Ethnic Studies, Feminist Studies, Queer Studies, and Urban Studies, which has recast nightlife as far more than banal entertainment and debauchery, viewing it instead as a force propelling broader dynamics of cultural, political, and social change.
3735 HIST-247-01 Latinas/Latinos in USA 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-year students
  Today, 1 in 5 Americans are Latinas\Latinos (Latinx), projected to approach 1 in 3 by the 2060s, and their status is a hotly-contested topic in American politics. Yet public discussions often lack a basic understanding of Latinx's centuries-long roots in North America, or their great diversity in terms of culture, social-class, gender, race, ethnicity and politics. Inspired by the title of a 2001 book, this newly-updated course focuses on three historical contexts: the 19th-century wars of territorial conquest that forcibly put over one million Latinx within U.S. borders; the formation of early Latinx American identities and civil rights movements (1920s-1970s); and contemporary debates on globalization, immigration, legal and cultural citizenship, and transnational, gender\sexual, racial\ethnic identities.
3588 ITAL-277-01 Wmn, Italy & the Mediterranean 1.00 LEC di Florio Gula, Martina MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 3 seats reserved for first year students
  This course examines the cultural, political, and social identity of women in contemporary Italy as represented in literature and in film. Italy is also a country of mass migration and, therefore, many recent migrant women from the Mediterranean region are also writing about their experience and about life in Italy. Topics include: Women writers as active agents of social and political change in patriarchal Italy, the clash of cultural identities and roles, and the impact of post-colonial theory and practice on gender in Italy. Authors and filmmakers include Ribka Sibhatu, Randa Ghazy, Gabriella Ghermandi and Cristina Ali Farah
3589 LACS-277-01 Wmn, Italy & the Mediterranean 1.00 LEC di Florio Gula, Martina MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 3 seats reserved for first year students
  This course examines the cultural, political, and social identity of women in contemporary Italy as represented in literature and in film. Italy is also a country of mass migration and, therefore, many recent migrant women from the Mediterranean region are also writing about their experience and about life in Italy. Topics include: Women writers as active agents of social and political change in patriarchal Italy, the clash of cultural identities and roles, and the impact of post-colonial theory and practice on gender in Italy. Authors and filmmakers include Ribka Sibhatu, Randa Ghazy, Gabriella Ghermandi and Cristina Ali Farah
3654 SOCL-272-01 Social Movements 1.00 LEC Spurgas, Alyson TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  The sociological study of social movements concentrates on collective action by groups that use institutionalized and non-institutionalized action to promote or inhibit social and political change. This course, then, examines collective action as diverse as peasant rebellions against urbanization and commercialization in 18th-century France to the organized militancy of lesbians and gays in 20th-century U.S. We will read historical and sociological research that addresses the following questions: why collective action emerged, how it was organized, what its goals were and if it achieved those goals, how members were recruited and maintained, and how elites and non-elites responded to its activities.
3734 URST-203-01 Urban Nightlife since 1850 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 17
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students
  Dance music scenes and their urban spaces are social arenas in which discriminatory norms of sexism, homophobia, racism, nationalism and elitism can be subverted and transformed. Using New York City as our base in comparison to cities like Accra, Berlin, Chicago, Havana, London, Philadelphia, Rio de Janeiro, and Shanghai, we examine urban nightlife's music scenes, from the 1800s to the present, highlighting the roles played by the evolution of capitalism, and regional and international migrations. To do this, we tap into a growing, innovative research in Critical Race Studies, Ethnic Studies, Feminist Studies, Queer Studies, and Urban Studies, which has recast nightlife as far more than banal entertainment and debauchery, viewing it instead as a force propelling broader dynamics of cultural, political, and social change.