Select a level: Select a term:
Only show courses available to first-year students.

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Course Schedule for WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY - Fall 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2929 WMGS-101-01 Women,Gender & Sexuality 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students.
  This course introduces students to the study of women, gender, and sexuality, paying attention to issues of power, agency, and resistance. Using a variety of 19th- and 20th-century American materials, the course seeks to understand: women’s experiences and the way they have been shaped, normative and nonnormative alignments of sex, gender, and sexuality across different historical periods, and the intersection of gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation.
3391 WMGS-245-01 The Hollywood Musical 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Perhaps more than any other genre, the musical epitomized Hollywood’s “golden age.” This course traces the development of the enormously popular genre from its emergence at the beginning of the Great Depression to its decline amid the social upheavals of the 1960s. It pays particular attention to the genre’s queering of masculinity and femininity, as well as its relationship to camp modes of reception. Readings by Jane Feuer, Rick Altman, Richard Dyer, Janet Staiger, and Steven Cohan.
3096 WMGS-315-01 Women in America 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An examination of women’s varied experiences in the public and private spheres, from their own perspective as well as that of the dominant society. The experiences of women of different classes and races will be compared, as will the relationship between images of women and changing realities of their lives. Emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries.
3097 WMGS-319-01 The Woman's Film 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective.
  In the 1930s Hollywood created a new genre, the woman’s picture or “weepie,” designed specifically for female audiences. This course examines the development of this enormously popular genre from the 1930s to the 1960s, including important cycles of women’s pictures such as the female gothic and the maternal melodrama. It pays particular attention to the genre’s exploration of female sexuality and its homoerotic organization of the look. It also considers the genre’s role in the formation of contemporary theories of female spectatorship. Film screenings include both versions of Imitations of Life, These Three, Stage Door, Blonde Venus, Stella Dallas, Mildred Pierce, Rebecca, Suspicion, Gaslight, The Old Maid, Old Acquaintance, The Great Lie, Letter from an Unknown Woman, All that Heaven Allows, and Marnie. Readings by Doane, Williams, Modleski, de Lauretis, Jacobs, and White.
3365 WMGS-342-01 History of Sexuality 1.00 SEM Antrim,Zayde MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: This course fulfills the senior seminar requirement for WMGS majors/minors and one of the 300-level seminar requirements for HIST majors.
  This course examines the ways in which notions of the body, gender, sexual desire, and sexuality have been organized over space and time. Taking as a starting point the geographical regions of the Middle East, Asia, and Latin America in the ancient and medieval periods, the course seeks to de-center discourses of Western sexual modernity. It then addresses the ways in which colonialism, racism, nationalism, and globalization have depended on and disrupted normative ideas about modern sexuality, including the hetero/homosexual binary. Throughout the course we will ask how historians use theoretical and primary sources to construct a history of sexuality. Course expectations include a final research paper.
2225 WMGS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2228 WMGS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2226 WMGS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single term thesis.
2227 WMGS-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (Two course credits are considered pending in the first semester; two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester).
3476 AMST-212-02 Disability Studies:Theory&Hist 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course offers a rigorous interdisciplinary introduction to Disability Studies. We will look at the history of disability studies as it emerged in relation to the Civil Rights movement. We will consider how the efforts of disability activists and scholars have shaped disability studies and how this field informs and is also informed by other disciplines, such as Performance and Trauma Studies. We will examine how disability has been defined over time and how particular definitions of disability intersect with other aspects of identity, such as socio-economic class, race and/or ethnicity, sexuality and gender. In addition to reading and critiquing history and theory, we will also look at a variety of “disability texts” that will include various genres, such as fiction, memoir, film, and drama.
3595 CLCV-224-01 Sex&Sxlties Ancnt Gre&Rm 1.00 LEC Ramgopal,Sailakshmi MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Do current Western attitudes toward sex and sexuality have a history? How and why did ancient Greek society glorify and institutionalize homosexuality and consider it superior to heterosexuality? What were the origins and evolution of Greek and Roman sexual attitudes and practices, and in what ways did Roman sexuality differ from Greek? This course will examine ancient Greek and Roman sexual values and practices in order to illuminate contemporary attitudes toward sex and the body. Readings will include selections from Homer, Sappho, Plato, Juvenal, Martial, Petronius, Catullus, and other ancient writers, as well as modern critical analyses. This course is intended for and open to all students. There is no prerequisite for enrollment.
3430 ENGL-451-01 Queer Harlem Renaissance 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: Note: English 451 and English 851 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research-intensive.
  This course approaches the Harlem Renaissance or "the New Negro" Movement through the lens of sexuality, paying particular attention to the ways in which understandings of racial identity were filtered through representations of sex and gender. We will consider how writers of the Harlem Renaissance explored notions of sexuality and gender given the history of slavery and exploitation that generated rigid formulations of race and gender. How did cultural producers challenge, reinforce, question and imagine sexuality and its intersection with other aspects of identity, such as class, gender, and national origins. Writers/artists include, Wallace Thurman, Carl Van Vechten, Bessie Smith, Angelina Weld Grimke, Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Langston Hughes, and Bruce Nugent.
3442 ENGL-851-01 Queer Harlem Renaissance 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: English 451 and English 851 are the same course. This course is research intensive. For the M.A. pursuing the pedagogy capstone, this course counts as an elective in ethnic literatures of the U.S..
  This course approaches the Harlem Renaissance or "the New Negro" Movement through the lens of sexuality, paying particular attention to the ways in which understandings of racial identity were filtered through representations of sex and gender. We will consider how writers of the Harlem Renaissance explored notions of sexuality and gender given the history of slavery and exploitation that generated rigid formulations of race and gender. How did cultural producers challenge, reinforce, question and imagine sexuality and its intersection with other aspects of identity, such as class, gender, and national origins. Writers/artists include, Wallace Thurman, Carl Van Vechten, Bessie Smith, Angelina Weld Grimke, Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Langston Hughes, and Bruce Nugent.
3506 INTS-131-01 Modern Iran 1.00 LEC Bauer,Janet L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course provides an introduction to 20th-century Iranian society, culture, and politics, examining secular and religious debates over gender roles, modernity, Islamism, democracy, and the West.
3671 INTS-307-01 Women's Rights as Human Rights 1.00 SEM Bauer,Janet L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course is a cross-cultural investigation of the gendered nature of human rights and of the changes in different societies that have resulted from struggles for human rights for women. Topics covered will include rights to protection against sexual abuse and gender violence (such as female genital mutilation), subsistence rights, reproductive rights, human rights and sexual orientation, and the rights of female immigrants and refugees. The course will make use of formal legal documents as well as cultural materials such as novels, films, personal testimonies, religious rituals, and folk traditions in music.
3511 INTS-336-01 Women, War, and Violence 1.00 SEM Tabar,Linda W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the intersections of imperialist wars, global capitalism, militarism, and patriarchal violence. Using a feminist anti-racist, anti-imperialist lens, it explores the rise of public sexual violence in the Middle East. Examining US imperialism, Israeli colonialism, and neoliberal capitalism as male and white projects, the course looks at how these systems re-entrench local patriarchal forces and exacerbate the conditions that promote sexual violence against women. Examining cases ranging from the US occupation of Iraq, to Egypt, Palestine and elsewhere in the region, the course considers the implications of the US neoconservative project of a “New Middle East,” the rise of imperial feminism, NGO’s, and ISIS for Arab women’s movements and the politics of women’s everyday lives.
3124 SOCL-260-01 Sexual Diversity and Society 1.00 LEC Valocchi,Stephen M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Sexuality has often been considered to be a natural, biological instinct-a drive that is fueled by hormones, genes or deep psychic impulses. During the last twenty years, however, scholars (including sociologists) have challenged this view of sexuality. Instead, they argue that how we organize our sexuality-our desires, ideas, value systems, practices and identities-are profoundly shaped by social and cultural influences. Although this course focuses on the social construction of homosexuality, we will also examine the many ways that normative as well as nonnormative sexualities are socially constructed. We will also examine the many ways that the social construction of sexuality is informed by class, gender, race and ethnicity. Using materials from sociology and from the many other disciplines that are working in the areas of lesbian and gay studies and queer theory, we will explore the impact that history, economics, social structure and cultural logics have had on sexual behaviors, identities, and belief systems. Enrollment limited.
3478 SOCL-272-01 Social Movements 1.00 LEC Valocchi,Stephen M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  The sociological study of social movements concentrates on collective action by groups that use institutionalized and non-institutionalized action to promote or inhibit social and political change. This course, then, examines collective action as diverse as peasant rebellions against urbanization and commercialization in 18th-century France to the organized militancy of lesbians and gays in 20th-century U.S. We will read historical and sociological research that addresses the following questions: why collective action emerged, how it was organized, what its goals were and if it achieved those goals, how members were recruited and maintained, and how elites and non-elites responded to its activities.