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Course Schedule for WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY - Spring 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
5277 WMGS-335-01 Mapping American Masculinities 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - S205  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course examines the construction of masculinity in American society starting with Theodore Roosevelt’s call at the turn of the twentieth century for men to revitalize the nation by pursuing the “strenuous life." Through close readings of literary and filmic texts, it considers why American manhood has so often been seen as in crisis. It pays particular attention to the formation of non-normative masculinities (African-American, female, and gay) in relation to entrenched racial, class, and sexual hierarchies, as well as the impact of the feminist, civil rights, and gay liberation movements on the shifting construction of male identity. In addition to critical essays, readings also include Tarzan of the Apes, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, The Great Gatsby, The Sun also Rises, Native Son, Another Country, and Kiss Me Deadly (Spillane). Film screenings include Kiss Me Deadly (Aldrich), Shaft, Magnum Force, Philadelphia, Brokeback Mountain, Cleopatra Jones, and Boys Don’t Cry.
5096 WMGS-345-01 Film Noir 1.00 SEM Corber,Robert J. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM HL - 123  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course traces the development of film noir, a distinctive style of Hollywood filmmaking inspired by the hardboiled detective fiction of Dashiell Hammett, James Cain, and Raymond Chandler. It pays particular attention to the genre’s complicated gender and sexual politics. In addition to classic examples of film noir, the course also considers novels by Hammett, Cain, and Chandler.
4278 WMGS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
4279 WMGS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
4280 WMGS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single term thesis.
4367 WMGS-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (Two course credits are considered pending in the first semester; two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
4611 ANTH-207-01 Anth Persp Women & Gender 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM LSC - 138-9 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Using texts and films, this course will explore the nature of women’s lives in both the contemporary United States and a number of radically different societies around the world, including, for example, the !Kung San people of the Kalahari and the Mundurucù of Amazonian Brazil. As they examine the place of women in these societies, students will also be introduced to theoretical perspectives that help explain both variations in women’s status from society to society and "universal" aspects of their status.
5020 ARAB-224-01 Intro to Arab & ME Cinemas 1.00 LEC Hanna,Kifah W: 1:15PM-3:55PM LSC - 132 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course offers an overview of the social and artistic role of cinema in the Arab world. It presents a historical outlook on the rise and development of cinema in the broader Middle East and North Africa through an investigation of this genre and the use of critical and cultural theory. It examines the artistic and cultural relationship of cinema to the societies it represents by utilizing a variety of structured thematic viewpoints such as the configuration of society and community, children in times of war, feminist discourse, and homosexuality, in order to explore cinema as an integral part of Arabic popular culture. The lectures will be organized around weekly screening of films in addition to related critical readings. No previous knowledge of Arabic language is required. This course is also listed under the African studies concentration and Middle Eastern studies concentration of the International Studies program and under the Women, Gender, and Sexuality program.
4957 CLCV-241-01 Classical Ideals 1.00 LEC Risser,Martha K. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM SH - S201 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Representations of the human body in Greek and Roman art raise various issues including standards of beauty and their implications; social status; the athletic ideal; clothing and lack of clothing; character and emotions; gender and sexuality; and concepts of the "classical ideal" during and after antiquity. Through studies of classical sculpture, painting, and minor arts, this course will explore perceptions of the human body that persist in the Western tradition. Readings include studies in the history of art, critical approaches to conceptions of the human form, ancient medical texts, and classical poetry.
4967 ENGL-348-01 Women Writers of Middle Ages 1.00 LEC Fisher,Sheila M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM HL - 121 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  This course will study works in a variety of genres, from the lyric and the romance to the autobiography and the moral treatise, written by medieval women in England, Europe, and Asia. In addition to analyzing the texts themselves, we will be examining them within their social, historical, and political contexts as we discuss such issues as medieval women's literacy, education, and relationships to the male-authored literary traditions of their cultures. Through the term, we will be trying to determine the degree to which we can construct a recognizable woman's literary tradition for this period. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
5033 ENGL-463-01 Feminist Approaches to Literat 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For English majors, this course will satisfy the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This course will examine the sexual politics of literature, criticism, and literary history, focusing in particular on how feminist writers have negotiated the relationship between politics, the body, and eroticism. Topics to be studied include the absence of women from conventional literary histories, the theories (and influence) of Sigmund Freud, daughterhood, adolescence, and identity, the pleasures – and dangers – of romance plots, and feminist explorations of sexual power dynamics. Writers to be studied include Harriet Jacobs, Charlotte Bronte, Sarah Grand, Jeanette Winterson, Helen Cixous, Monique Wittig, Andrea Dworkin, and Maxine Hong Kingston. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
5144 HIST-224-01 Gender in Brazilian History 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Since colonization, Brazilian society stabilized specific roles for men and women in its national discourse. We will debate how gender roles marked the experiences of Brazilian indigenous, European and afro-descent populations before and after colonialism. Gender categories also affected the lives of enslaved and freed people, since they created specific experiences for black men and women, and peculiar ways of social uplift that depended on the gender of individuals. In the 20th Century, government propaganda produced a discourse of national identity that influenced the way in which Brazilian men and especially women were seemed national and internationally. The debates and demands carried by LGBT, feminists and other social movements in Brazil who are dedicated to equalizing the rights of people will also be discussed.
5201 HIST-247-01 Latinos/Latinas in USA 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - S204 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Who are “Latinos/Latinas” and how have they come to constitute a central ethnic/racial category in the contemporary United States? This is the organizing question around which this course examines the experiences of major Latino/Latina groups—Chicanos/Mexicanos, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans—and new immigrants from Central America and the Caribbean. We study U.S. colonialism and imperialism in the Old Mexican North and the Caribbean; migration and immigration patterns and policies; racial, gender, and class distinctions; cultural and political expressions and conflicts; return migrations and transnationalism; and inter-ethnic relations and the construction of pan-Latino/Latina diasporic identities.
5224 INTS-218-01 Wmn, Gndr & Fam in Middle East 1.00 LEC Tabar,Linda TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - S201 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  As an introduction to the lives of women in the ‘men’s world’ of the Middle East, this course examines the impact of global sociopolitical and economic transformations on gender relations, sexuality, adolescence, family structure, local culture, and feminist movements across the Middle East and North Africa. Case studies survey male and female perspectives in a variety of ethnic/religious communities (Muslim, Jewish, Christian) and types of societies (Bedouin, agricultural, urban).
5225 INTS-311-01 Global Feminism 1.00 LEC Tabar,Linda W: 1:15PM-3:55PM CT - 210 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines how the struggles of diverse gender based movements (religious and secular, urban and rural, black and white), from the Americas to the Middle East and Asia, shed light on vexing social problems like the lack of sexual and reproductive rights, political and social representation, and equal opportunities. Using historical and contemporary examples of women’s organizing and theorizing, course materials interrogate the meaning of ‘feminism’, the relationship between the gendered self and society, the impact of race, class, and cultural differences on women’s solidarity, the challenge of women’s (and gender based) activism to state and social order, the impact of women's networking, and the possibilities for achieving a transnational, cross-cultural or global ‘feminism.’
5019 LACS-224-01 Intro to Arab & ME Cinemas 1.00 LEC Hanna,Kifah W: 1:15PM-3:55PM LSC - 132 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course offers an overview of the social and artistic role of cinema in the Arab world. It presents a historical outlook on the rise and development of cinema in the broader Middle East and North Africa through an investigation of this genre and the use of critical and cultural theory. It examines the artistic and cultural relationship of cinema to the societies it represents by utilizing a variety of structured thematic viewpoints such as the configuration of society and community, children in times of war, feminist discourse, and homosexuality, in order to explore cinema as an integral part of Arabic popular culture. The lectures will be organized around weekly screening of films in addition to related critical readings. No previous knowledge of Arabic language is required. This course is also listed under the African studies concentration and Middle Eastern studies concentration of the International Studies program and under the Women, Gender, and Sexuality program.
5295 MUSC-133-01 Blues Women to Nicki Minaj 1.00 LEC Woldu,Gail H. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM AAC - 112 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  This course explores the music of black American women in music fro the era of blues queens of the 1920s through Nicki Minaj. Along the way we will listen to and read about the music of blues greats Ma Rainey and Bessie smith; trailblazer Marian Anderson; jazz legends Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, and Dinah Washington; Motown superstar Dina Ross and the fabulous Supremes; disco queen Donna summer; gospel and sould diva Aretha Franklin; rocker Tina Turner; and, ultimately, women in hip-hop, among them Queen Latifa, Lil Kim, and Nicki Minaj. Because context is critical to understanding of the music of these women, course readings will situate the women in their social and musical times.
4991 POLS-359-01 Feminist Political Theory 1.00 LEC Maxwell,Lida E. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM LSC - 131 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course examines debates in feminist political theory. Topics will include liberal and socialist feminist theory, as well as radical, postcolonial, and postmodern feminist theory. We will also consider feminist perspectives on issues of race and sex, pornography, law and rights, and “hot button” issues like veiling. We will pay particular attention to the question of what feminism means and should mean in increasingly multicultural, global societies. Readings will include work by Mary Wollstonecraft, Carol Gilligan, Catherine MacKinnon, Chandra Mohanty, Wendy Brown, Audre Lorde, Patricia Williams, & Judith Butler.
5127 SOCL-246-01 Sociology of Gender 1.00 LEC Andersson,Tanetta E. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - N130 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Sex and gender are used as principles of social organization in all known societies. This course surveys research in the sociological study of gender with the goal of providing students with a theoretical grounding for analyzing gender from a sociological perspective. We will explore how our lives and the world around us are shaped by gender and how gender has been constructed over time. We will further examine how sociological research on gender helps us to understand power and inequality at various levels – institutional, organizational, and interactional—by examining various topics such as gender socialization, reproduction, education, work, and violence. We will also pay attention to how gender reinforces and builds upon other areas of inequality such as social class, race, ethnicity, and age.