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Course Schedule for URBAN STUDIES - Fall 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2892 URST-101-01 Introduction to Urban Studies 1.00 LEC Gamble, Julie TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for Juniors, 10 seats for Sophomores, 10 seats for First-Year students
  This course provides a general introduction to the interdisciplinary field of urban studies. Using a variety of Western and non-Western cities as illustrative examples, the course aims to give a broad survey and understanding of the distinctive characteristics of urban places. Students will learn definitions, concepts, and theories that are fundamental to the field. Topics covered include the role of planning in shaping cities, the economic structure and function of cities, the evolution of urban culture, community organization and development, gentrification and urban renewal, and urban governance policy.
3135 URST-200-01 Hartford: Past and Present 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 17
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  Focusing on both Hartford and its region since the 1630s, this course explores key themes in American urban, social, economic, cultural, and political history, paying close attention to issues of race\ethnicity, gender\sexuality, class relations, religion, and urbanism. We first examine interactions between Native groups, English settlers, African slaves, and their descendants, from the Colonial Era to the Early Republic (1630s-1830s). We then explore urban cultures, abolitionism, European and African American migration, and Hartford's as a global financial and manufacturing center (1830s-1940s). Finally, from the 1940s to the present, topics include suburbanization, deindustrialization, racial segregation, Civil Rights movements, West Indian and Puerto Ricans migration, neoliberalism, globalization, and relations between Hartford and its suburbs. We also track Trinity College's history since 1823.
3472 URST-201-01 From Hartford to World Cities 1.00 LEC Gamble, Julie TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  The 21st century is truly a global urban age characterized by the simultaneous decline and revival of post-industrial cities in the United States and the co-existence of boom and poverty in the rapidly industrializing cities in developing countries, as well as by how globalization is exerting a growing impact on urban places and processes everywhere. This course adopts an integrated and comparative approach to studying the local and global characteristics, conditions, and consequences of the growth and transformation of cities and communities. Using Hartford—Trinity's hometown—as a point or place of departure, the course takes students to a set of world or global cities outside the United States, especially a few dynamic mega-cities in developing countries to explore the differences and surprising similarities among them.
3734 URST-203-01 Urban Nightlife since 1850 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 17
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students
  Dance music scenes and their urban spaces are social arenas in which discriminatory norms of sexism, homophobia, racism, nationalism and elitism can be subverted and transformed. Using New York City as our base in comparison to cities like Accra, Berlin, Chicago, Havana, London, Philadelphia, Rio de Janeiro, and Shanghai, we examine urban nightlife's music scenes, from the 1800s to the present, highlighting the roles played by the evolution of capitalism, and regional and international migrations. To do this, we tap into a growing, innovative research in Critical Race Studies, Ethnic Studies, Feminist Studies, Queer Studies, and Urban Studies, which has recast nightlife as far more than banal entertainment and debauchery, viewing it instead as a force propelling broader dynamics of cultural, political, and social change.
2565 URST-206-01 Organizing by Neighborhood 1.00 SEM Lash, Alta WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course is not open to first-year students.
  Have you ever wondered why some neighborhoods thrive and others appear to fail? Are you mystified about what can be done to stem deterioration and provide decent, affordable housing and clean and safe neighborhoods? One way to explore answers to these questions is to intern with a community-based organization dedicated to working with a community as it defines and responds to its problems. In this seminar each student will do a community learning project/ internship at such an organization in Hartford. Equally important is a way to understand and interpret your experiences at the organization. The rich theoretical literature that you will read in this seminar on how neighborhoods are organized and function and on models of community responses to neighborhood conditions provides a lens through which to evaluate your experiences with your organization and community.
3644 URST-243-01 Barcelona: Reading the City 1.00 SEM Subirana-Ortin, Jaume MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  In this course we will analyze the various cultural processes-such as literature, art, architecture, film and sports-through which urban identities are formed. The particular object of our study will be the city Barcelona and its inhabitants. Using a wide variety of written and spoken texts, including books, films, tourist guides and advertising, we will analyze the genesis the various, and at times conflicting, representations of that 2000 year-old Mediterranean city and its people.
3011 URST-302-01 Global Cities 1.00 SEM Myers, Garth TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: Open to URST Majors Only
  This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of 'developed' and 'developing' worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization.
2547 URST-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Prerequisite: Urban Studies 101 or permission of instructor.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2281 URST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2548 URST-498-01 Senior Thesis, Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
3058 AMST-325-01 New York and its Neighborhoods 1.00 SEM Manevitz, Alexander W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Founded as a small Dutch colonial port city on a narrow island inhabited by Lenape Indians, New York City became the most populous city in the United States, as well as a global economic and cultural hub. In order to better understand New York’s complex and uneven urban growth, we will analyze the ways a diverse array of New Yorkers struggled to define themselves and their communities. As we explore the dynamic history of the city and its residents, we will become better scholars and more responsible urban citizens. Each class meeting will focus on one of New York City’s diverse neighborhoods, using it as a lens to illustrate and investigate important themes of urban and American history that extend well beyond the five boroughs.
3694 AMST-405-01 Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums 1.00 SEM Baldwin, Davarian T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Colleges, universities, and their medical centers have become the dominant employers, real estate holders, policing agents, and educational and health care providers in major cities across the country. Meanwhile struggling areas have looked to sports stadiums and casinos as their salvation from poverty. What happened? "Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums" examines a world without factories, as higher education, healthcare, and tourism have become the face of today's urban economy. Located at the center of what has been called the "Knowledge Corridor" along I-91, the course draws special attention to Trinity College's past and present role in shaping greater Hartford.
3467 LAAL-200-01 Action Research Methods Htfd 1.00 LEC Brown, Megan M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://commons.trincoll.edu/action-lab/apply
  What is the role of academic research in social change? How can students and community groups collaborate effectively to co-create, implement, and use research projects to solve social problems? In this course, students will study the theories and methods of interdisciplinary action research. Emphasizing ethical collaboration, students will learn research design strategies, methods, tools, and research tools in order to work with community partners to solve pressing problems. Students will learn to use a variety of statistical, geographic, and interview data to answer questions, make recommendations, and tell stories about the issues that are most relevant to Hartford.
3468 LAAL-201-01 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Brown, Megan T: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://commons.trincoll.edu/action-lab/apply
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
3470 LAAL-201-02 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Brown, Megan W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://commons.trincoll.edu/action-lab/apply
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
3471 LAAL-201-03 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Brown, Megan R: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://commons.trincoll.edu/action-lab/apply
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.
3469 LAAL-201-04 Hartford Research Project 1.00 SEM Brown, Megan W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://commons.trincoll.edu/action-lab/apply
  In this project-based class, students and faculty fellows will work in teams with Hartford community partners to research social problems and develop solutions. The projects we undertake are defined by Hartford community partners. Sample projects may include: analysis of mortgage lending disparities, focus groups on civic engagement, neighborhood public history projects, and urban development case studies. Students will learn and apply project management techniques, work collaboratively with community groups to develop research questions, select appropriate methods, and communicate results with media appropriate various audiences.