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Course Schedule for URBAN STUDIES - Fall 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2343 URST-101-01 Introduction to Urban Studies 1.00 LEC Myers,Garth A. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: 3 seats reserved for Juniors, 10 seats for Sophomores, 10 seats for First-Year students, and 2 seats for HMTCA students.
  This course provides a general introduction to the interdisciplinary field of urban studies. Using a variety of Western and non-Western cities as illustrative examples, the course aims to give a broad survey and understanding of the distinctive characteristics of urban places. Students will learn definitions, concepts, and theories that are fundamental to the field. Topics covered include the role of planning in shaping cities, the economic structure and function of cities, the evolution of urban culture, community organization and development, gentrification and urban renewal, and urban governance policy.
3259 URST-101-02 Introduction to Urban Studies 1.00 LEC Cummins,Emily R. MW: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for Juniors, 10 seats for Sophomores, 10 seats for First-Year students
  This course provides a general introduction to the interdisciplinary field of urban studies. Using a variety of Western and non-Western cities as illustrative examples, the course aims to give a broad survey and understanding of the distinctive characteristics of urban places. Students will learn definitions, concepts, and theories that are fundamental to the field. Topics covered include the role of planning in shaping cities, the economic structure and function of cities, the evolution of urban culture, community organization and development, gentrification and urban renewal, and urban governance policy.
3556 URST-200-01 Hartford: Past and Present 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  Since Dutch fur traders arrived in the 1610s, Hartford and its region have been part of many core themes in American urban history. This course examines Hartford's rise as a financial and manufacturing center from the 1800s to early 1900s; the roles played by ethnicity, gender, religion, race and social class in urban and suburban politics, culture, civic institutions and neighborhoods; the evolution in urban planning, architecture, transportation and public spaces; and the impact of post-¬-1945 suburbanization, capitalist restructuring and globalization on the social, political and cultural profile of Hartford and its suburbs.
3710 URST-203-01 Urban Nightlife Since 1870 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students
  Using an array of studies, genres, and urban settings, from Havana to Chicago, Rio de Janeiro to London, Beirut to Shanghai, and Accra to Seoul, we examine the evolution of nightlife from the late 1800s to our presently globalized world, highlighting the central roles played by all manner of gender, sexual, racial\ethnic, and class identities. Throughout the semester, we will draw heavily on the rich scholarship in Queer Studies and Critical Race Studies that has helped recast urban nightlife as more than banal entertainment and debauchery. Instead, we will rethink nightlife, from before the Jazz Age to Stonewall and today, as a social arena where class, sexual norms, and racism can\are also subverted, helping propel broader dynamics of cultural, political, and social change.
2691 URST-206-01 Organizing by Neighborhood 1.00 SEM Lash,Alta WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course is not open to first-year students.
  Have you ever wondered why some neighborhoods thrive and others appear to fail? Are you mystified about what can be done to stem deterioration and provide decent, affordable housing and clean and safe neighborhoods? One way to explore answers to these questions is to intern with a community-based organization dedicated to working with a community as it defines and responds to its problems. In this seminar each student will do a community learning project/ internship at such an organization in Hartford. Equally important is a way to understand and interpret your experiences at the organization. The rich theoretical literature that you will read in this seminar on how neighborhoods are organized and function and on models of community responses to neighborhood conditions provides a lens through which to evaluate your experiences with your organization and community.
3167 URST-210-01 Sustainable Urban Development 1.00 LEC Cancelled GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  With the era in which city dwellers comprise a majority of the world's population has come a new urgency for understanding the balance between urban development and the environment. This course introduces students to the sub-field of urban studies which deals with sustainable development, including exploration of the debates on the meanings of sustainability and development in cities. Taking a comparative approach and a global perspective, topics to be examined may include the ecological footprint of cities, urban programs for sustainable urban planning, urban transportation and service delivery, energy issues, and the critical geopolitics of urban sustainability around the world. May be counted toward INTS major requirements.
3410 URST-302-01 Global Cities 1.00 SEM Myers,Garth A. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of 'developed' and 'developing' worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization.
2668 URST-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Prerequisite: Urban Studies 101 or permission of instructor.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2359 URST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2669 URST-498-01 Senior Thesis, Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
3472 AMST-325-01 New York and its Neighborhoods 1.00 SEM Manevitz,Alexander D. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Founded as a small Dutch colonial port city on a narrow island inhabited by Lenape Indians, New York City became the most populous city in the United States, as well as a global economic and cultural hub. In order to better understand New York’s complex and uneven urban growth, we will analyze the ways a diverse array of New Yorkers struggled to define themselves and their communities. As we explore the dynamic history of the city and its residents, we will become better scholars and more responsible urban citizens. Each class meeting will focus on one of New York City’s diverse neighborhoods, using it as a lens to illustrate and investigate important themes of urban and American history that extend well beyond the five boroughs.
3123 AMST-409-02 Digital City 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  With half the world's population now in cities, policymakers and activists are focused on the promise of technology to tackle issues from gentrification, pollution, access to public spaces, and walkability. How can digital platforms affect the growth of equal and just cities? How can critical interventions using such platforms work to recognize differences of gender, race, sexuality, and class in cities, and promote equality? What role do and should colleges play in supporting the growth of just and equal spaces? Focusing on Hartford and Trinity, this course connects global and national issues to the intimate experiences of everyday urban life. It pairs technical skills and social science data collection with urban theory and urban studies. Students contribute to an online archive examining the college-city relationship.
3626 CLCV-111-01 Intro Classical Art/Archaeolgy 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  A survey of the art and archaeology of the classical world, from the Neolithic period through the Roman Empire. Topics of discussion include sculpture, pottery, painting, architecture, town planning, burial practices, and major monuments, as well as archaeological method and theory.
3137 PBPL-264-01 Urban Policy/Politics America 1.00 LEC Moskowitz,Rachel L MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, or permission of instructor
  This course focuses on the development of urban policies and politics and their impact on urban America. Adopting both a historical and contemporary perspective on these issues will help us understand how the historical development of cities and specific policy choices shaped the urban problems and conflicts we see today. We will also study how the distribution of urban power affects urban policy outcomes. In addition, we will explore many contemporary urban policy issues, including public education, criminal justice, public housing, neighborhood decline, preservation, and gentrification, as well as downtown economic redevelopment. Central to these urban challenges are issues of race, ethnicity, equality, and fairness. We will consider how current policies may generate both potential solutions and new unintended problems for urban America.