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Course Schedule for URBAN STUDIES - Fall 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2367 URST-101-01 Introduction to Urban Studies 1.00 LEC Myers,Garth A. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 3 seats reserved for Juniors, 10 seats for Sophomores, 10 seats for First-Year students, and 2 seats for HMTCA students.
  This course provides a general introduction to the interdisciplinary field of urban studies. Using a variety of Western and non-Western cities as illustrative examples, the course aims to give a broad survey and understanding of the distinctive characteristics of urban places. Students will learn definitions, concepts, and theories that are fundamental to the field. Topics covered include the role of planning in shaping cities, the economic structure and function of cities, the evolution of urban culture, community organization and development, gentrification and urban renewal, and urban governance policy.
3654 URST-101-02 Introduction to Urban Studies 1.00 LEC Cummins,Emily R. TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course provides a general introduction to the interdisciplinary field of urban studies. Using a variety of Western and non-Western cities as illustrative examples, the course aims to give a broad survey and understanding of the distinctive characteristics of urban places. Students will learn definitions, concepts, and theories that are fundamental to the field. Topics covered include the role of planning in shaping cities, the economic structure and function of cities, the evolution of urban culture, community organization and development, gentrification and urban renewal, and urban governance policy.
3431 URST-200-01 Hartford: Past and Present 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  NOTE: 5 seats are reserved for first year students, 4 seats reserved for sophomores.
  Since Dutch fur traders arrived in the 1610s, Hartford and its region have been part of many core themes in American urban history. This course examines Hartford's rise as a financial and manufacturing center from the 1800s to early 1900s; the roles played by ethnicity, gender, religion, race and social class in urban and suburban politics, culture, civic institutions and neighborhoods; the evolution in urban planning, architecture, transportation and public spaces; and the impact of post-¬-1945 suburbanization, capitalist restructuring and globalization on the social, political and cultural profile of Hartford and its suburbs.
2752 URST-206-01 Organizing by Neighborhood 1.00 SEM Lash,Alta WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course is not open to first-year students.
  Have you ever wondered why some neighborhoods thrive and others appear to fail? Are you mystified about what can be done to stem deterioration and provide decent, affordable housing and clean and safe neighborhoods? One way to explore answers to these questions is to intern with a community-based organization dedicated to working with a community as it defines and responds to its problems. In this seminar each student will do a community learning project/ internship at such an organization in Hartford. Equally important is a way to understand and interpret your experiences at the organization. The rich theoretical literature that you will read in this seminar on how neighborhoods are organized and function and on models of community responses to neighborhood conditions provides a lens through which to evaluate your experiences with your organization and community.
3536 URST-210-01 Sustainable Urban Development 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  With the era in which city dwellers comprise a majority of the world's population has come a new urgency for understanding the balance between urban development and the environment. This course introduces students to the sub-field of urban studies which deals with sustainable development, including exploration of the debates on the meanings of sustainability and development in cities. Taking a comparative approach and a global perspective, topics to be examined may include the ecological footprint of cities, urban programs for sustainable urban planning, urban transportation and service delivery, energy issues, and the critical geopolitics of urban sustainability around the world. May be counted toward INTS major requirements.
3065 URST-217-01 Hist Urbanism Eastern Europe 1.00 LEC Kananovich,Uladzimir MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course will examine the economic, social, and cultural history of East European urban development during the medieval and early modern periods. We will focus on local governance, urban landscape and planning, social and educational institutions, commercial and artisan activities, religious and ethnic communities, and a new type of citizen: the burgher. To better understand urban life in the important towns of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (contemporary Belarus, Lithuania, and a part of Ukraine), we will draw comparison to the major centers of Danzig-Gdansk, Königsberg-Królewiec, and Kraków in central Europe and Russian towns like Great Novgorod and Moscow. The varied sources of information for the course include diaries, testaments, memories, private correspondence, engravings, drawings, and architectural monuments.
3361 URST-320-01 Urban Research Practicum 1.00 SEM Myers,Garth A. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in URST 101 and URST201
  This research seminar is designed to prepare students for conducting urban research, in Hartford or in any city. The course will include an in-depth survey of methods and approaches in the field. Students will develop research proposals and conduct research projects for term papers. The seminar is geared both for seniors working to produce honors theses and urban studies majors and minors planning on conducting independent study projects. The aim is to foster skill development and enhance training in research methodologies and techniques, including projects with applied components, community learning connections, and/or pure research endeavors.
2728 URST-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Prerequisite: Urban Studies 101 or permission of instructor.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2387 URST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2729 URST-498-01 Senior Thesis, Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
3480 AMST-409-02 The Digital Image of the City 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  With half the world’s population now in cities, policymakers and activists are focused on the promise of smart urbanism. Smart urbanism deploys technology and data to tackle issues from gentrification and pollution to access to public spaces and improved walkability. How does this focus affect the growth of equal and just cities? Focused on US cities, namely Hartford and New York, this course connects global and national issues to the intimate experiences of everyday urban life. It pairs specific technical skills such as social science data collection and geographic information systems (GIS) mapping with urban theory and urban studies. The course project will bring together the theory, literature, and your own research, data analysis, and maps into a smart city recommendation for the city.
3642 ENGL-359-01 Vic London: Lit of Chgng City 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
  NOTE: This course is research-intensive.
  London grew from a city of one million in 1800 to over four million inhabitants by the year of Queen Victoria’s death. We will investigate literary responses to the rapid transformation of the city, focusing on how different urban spaces and occupations were represented. Questions to be addressed include: what were the hopes of urbanization, and what were its problems? How was the relationship between the center, the suburbs, and the slums conceptualized? How was the urban interior represented, and what about the urban garden? Writers to be studied include Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, and Jane Ellen Panton; students will complete a research paper on Victorial London at the end of the course. This is a research-intensive seminar. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
3569 INTS-255-01 Chinese Modernization 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  The road to modernization for China has been full of quakes, storms and struggles. The struggles are ongoing, but the most difficult times have passed. This course will explore China's road to modernization since 1949, with a close examination of Mao Zedong, DEng Xiaoping and the social movements such as the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, post-Mao reforms and the Tiananmen event.
3497 PBPL-264-01 Urban Policy/Politics America 1.00 LEC Moskowitz,Rachel L MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, or permission of instructor
  This course focuses on the development of urban policies and politics and their impact on urban America. Adopting both a historical and contemporary perspective on these issues will help us understand how the historical development of cities and specific policy choices shaped the urban problems and conflicts we see today. We will also study how the distribution of urban power affects urban policy outcomes. In addition, we will explore many contemporary urban policy issues, including public education, criminal justice, public housing, neighborhood decline, preservation, and gentrification, as well as downtown economic redevelopment. Central to these urban challenges are issues of race, ethnicity, equality, and fairness. We will consider how current policies may generate both potential solutions and new unintended problems for urban America.