Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for SOCIOLOGY - Fall 2014
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2022 SOCL-101-01 Principles of Sociology 1.00 LEC Williams,Johnny Eric TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MECC - 246 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first-year students.
  The course will deal with questions such as these: What are the underlying causes of our major social problems? Are inequality and the exercise of power by some over others inevitable in all social life? How important in human life are cultural and social factors compared to the influence of biological inheritance, personality and economic constraints? What are the origins of, prospects for, and results of attempts at deliberate social change? To what extent can we realistically expect to achieve our democratic ideals of freedom and equality in contemporary societies? The course addresses the basic concerns, ideas and methods of sociology both as a scientific and a humanistic discipline.
2258 SOCL-101-02 Principles of Sociology 1.00 LEC Tiamzon,Trisha J. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM SH - N217 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first-year students.
  The course will deal with questions such as these: What are the underlying causes of our major social problems? Are inequality and the exercise of power by some over others inevitable in all social life? How important in human life are cultural and social factors compared to the influence of biological inheritance, personality and economic constraints? What are the origins of, prospects for, and results of attempts at deliberate social change? To what extent can we realistically expect to achieve our democratic ideals of freedom and equality in contemporary societies? The course addresses the basic concerns, ideas and methods of sociology both as a scientific and a humanistic discipline.
2457 SOCL-101-03 Principles of Sociology 1.00 LEC Tiamzon,Trisha J. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM LSC - 134 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first-year students.
  The course will deal with questions such as these: What are the underlying causes of our major social problems? Are inequality and the exercise of power by some over others inevitable in all social life? How important in human life are cultural and social factors compared to the influence of biological inheritance, personality and economic constraints? What are the origins of, prospects for, and results of attempts at deliberate social change? To what extent can we realistically expect to achieve our democratic ideals of freedom and equality in contemporary societies? The course addresses the basic concerns, ideas and methods of sociology both as a scientific and a humanistic discipline.
2311 SOCL-202-01 Clas & Contemp Theory 1.00 LEC Miceli,Melinda S. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM MC - 303 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Sociology course or permission of instructor.
  Critical examination of the major theoretical perspectives current in sociology (structure functionalism, interactionism, conflict theory, exchange theory, and ethnomethodology) and consideration of their implications for core problems: such as social order and social change that concern all sociologists. Also, emphasis upon the methods of theory construction, the relationship between theory and research, and the significance of the classic (e.g., Durkheim’s Suicide) for sociologists now.
2855 SOCL-210-01 Statistics for Social Sciences 1.00 LEC Andersson,Tanetta E. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM LIB - 02 NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Sociology course or permission of instructor.
  This course is an introduction to statistical methods, their conceptual underpinnings, and their use in analyzing social science data. Topics include basic presentation and graphing of data, descriptive statistics, probability theory, the normal distribution, one and two sample t-tests and tests of proportions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing, chi-square tests, and an introduction to linear regression. The course will emphasize the logic and practice of statistical analysis as it applies to the social sciences. Students will also learn to carry out basic statistical analysis with the aid of computer software. This course is intended for students who want a practical introduction to statistical methods and who plan to major in a social science.
2548 SOCL-214-01 Racism 1.00 LEC Williams,Johnny Eric TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM LSC - AUD SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  A cross-national comparison of racial and ethnic differences as sources of conflict and inequality within and between societies. We will also consider the role of race and ethnicity as a basis for group and national solidarity. Topics will include the persistence of ethnic and racial loyalties in regard to language, marital choice, and politics; a comparison of social mobility patterns among various ethnic and racial groups; ethnicity and race as reactionary or revolutionary ideologies; and the issues and facts regarding assimilation and pluralism in different societies.
2278 SOCL-227-01 From Hartford to World Cities 1.00 LEC Chen,Xiangming M: 1:15PM-3:55PM HL - 14 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  The 21st century is truly a global urban age characterized by the simultaneous decline and revival of post-industrial cities in the United States and the co-existence of boom and poverty in the rapidly industrializing cities in developing countries, as well as by how globalization is exerting a growing impact on urban places and processes everywhere. This course adopts an integrated and comparative approach to studying the local and global characteristics, conditions, and consequences of the growth and transformation of cities and communities. Using Hartford—Trinity's hometown—as a point or place of departure, the course takes students to a set of world or global cities outside the United States, especially a few dynamic mega-cities in developing countries to explore the differences and surprising similarities among them.
3174 SOCL-246-01 Sociology of Gender 1.00 LEC Andersson,Tanetta E. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM MC - 106 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Sex and gender are used as principles of social organization in all known societies. This course surveys research in the sociological study of gender with the goal of providing students with a theoretical grounding for analyzing gender from a sociological perspective. We will explore how our lives and the world around us are shaped by gender and how gender has been constructed over time. We will further examine how sociological research on gender helps us to understand power and inequality at various levels – institutional, organizational, and interactional—by examining various topics such as gender socialization, reproduction, education, work, and violence. We will also pay attention to how gender reinforces and builds upon other areas of inequality such as social class, race, ethnicity, and age.
3175 SOCL-260-01 Sexual Diversity and Society 1.00 LEC Valocchi,Stephen M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 225 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Sexuality has often been considered to be a natural, biological instinct-a drive that is fueled by hormones, genes or deep psychic impulses. During the last twenty years, however, scholars (including sociologists) have challenged this view of sexuality. Instead, they argue that how we organize our sexuality-our desires, ideas, value systems, practices and identities-are profoundly shaped by social and cultural influences. Although this course focuses on the social construction of homosexuality, we will also examine the many ways that normative as well as nonnormative sexualities are socially constructed. We will also examine the many ways that the social construction of sexuality is informed by class, gender, race and ethnicity. Using materials from sociology and from the many other disciplines that are working in the areas of lesbian and gay studies and queer theory, we will explore the impact that history, economics, social structure and cultural logics have had on sexual behaviors, identities, and belief systems. Enrollment limited.
3176 SOCL-312-01 Social Class & Mobility 1.00 LEC Valocchi,Stephen M. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM 70VS - SEM SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Sociology course or permission of the instructor. This course is not open to first-year students.
  This course is an introduction to the theory and research on stratification and mobility in modern societies. Every society distributes resources unequally. This distribution affects not only economic outcomes such as wages, profits, and material well being, but also social and political outcomes such as protest, voting behavior, and self-esteem. This course will explore why this occurs, the types of inequalities that exist, and the consequences of inequality for the distribution of power and for democratic processes in American society. Specific topics include class, occupational, race and gender inequalities, and the social, psychological, and cultural consequences of inequality.
3478 SOCL-322-01 The Sociology of Food 1.00 SEM Tiamzon,Trisha J. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM MC - 309 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101 or permission of instructor
  NOTE: This course is not open to first-year students.
  The way we experience food—what we eat, where it comes from, how we eat, who we eat with, why we eat what we do—is social and cultural. This course will introduce and utilize some key cultural perspectives in sociology to help us address these questions about the food/society relationship. In particular we will focus on the development of tastes, the construction of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ food’, the role of food in identity, and the global food system. Our approach will be both theoretical and empirical as we investigate social meanings, practices, and structural conditions surrounding the food/society relationship. As part of the course, students will conduct their own research.
2236 SOCL-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2237 SOCL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Credit does not count toward the major. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2257 SOCL-490-01 Research Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  From time to time the opportunity exists for students to assist professors in their research. Hours and duties will be determined on the basis of project needs and student interests. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2312 SOCL-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Written report on original research project. Students should consult with the faculty supervisor before registration, i.e., during the previous spring term. Required of all candidates for honors; elective for others. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this year