Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for SOCIOLOGY - Fall 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2228 SOCL-101-01 Principles of Sociology 1.00 LEC Williams,Johnny Eric TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first-year students.
  The course will deal with questions such as these: What are the underlying causes of our major social problems? Are inequality and the exercise of power by some over others inevitable in all social life? How important in human life are cultural and social factors compared to the influence of biological inheritance, personality and economic constraints? What are the origins of, prospects for, and results of attempts at deliberate social change? To what extent can we realistically expect to achieve our democratic ideals of freedom and equality in contemporary societies? The course addresses the basic concerns, ideas and methods of sociology both as a scientific and a humanistic discipline.
2352 SOCL-101-02 Principles of Sociology 1.00 LEC Andersson,Tanetta E. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first-year students.
  The course will deal with questions such as these: What are the underlying causes of our major social problems? Are inequality and the exercise of power by some over others inevitable in all social life? How important in human life are cultural and social factors compared to the influence of biological inheritance, personality and economic constraints? What are the origins of, prospects for, and results of attempts at deliberate social change? To what extent can we realistically expect to achieve our democratic ideals of freedom and equality in contemporary societies? The course addresses the basic concerns, ideas and methods of sociology both as a scientific and a humanistic discipline.
3524 SOCL-202-01 Clas & Contemp Theory 1.00 LEC Spurgas,Alyson K. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Sociology course or permission of instructor.
  Critical examination of the major theoretical perspectives current in sociology (structure functionalism, interactionism, conflict theory, exchange theory, and ethnomethodology) and consideration of their implications for core problems: such as social order and social change that concern all sociologists. Also, emphasis upon the methods of theory construction, the relationship between theory and research, and the significance of the classic (e.g., Durkheim’s Suicide) for sociologists now.
2614 SOCL-210-01 Statistics for Social Sciences 1.00 LEC Andersson,Tanetta E. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Sociology course or permission of instructor.
  This course is an introduction to statistical methods, their conceptual underpinnings, and their use in analyzing social science data. Topics include basic presentation and graphing of data, descriptive statistics, probability theory, the normal distribution, one and two sample t-tests and tests of proportions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing, chi-square tests, and an introduction to linear regression. The course will emphasize the logic and practice of statistical analysis as it applies to the social sciences. Students will also learn to carry out basic statistical analysis with the aid of computer software. This course is intended for students who want a practical introduction to statistical methods and who plan to major in a social science.
3525 SOCL-246-01 Sociology of Gender 1.00 LEC Spurgas,Alyson K. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Sex and gender are used as principles of social organization in all known societies. This course surveys research in the sociological study of gender with the goal of providing students with a theoretical grounding for analyzing gender from a sociological perspective. We will explore how our lives and the world around us are shaped by gender and how gender has been constructed over time. We will further examine how sociological research on gender helps us to understand power and inequality at various levels – institutional, organizational, and interactional—by examining various topics such as gender socialization, reproduction, education, work, and violence. We will also pay attention to how gender reinforces and builds upon other areas of inequality such as social class, race, ethnicity, and age.
3526 SOCL-316-01 Global Gender Inequalities 1.00 LEC Andersson,Tanetta E. MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course broadly addresses women’s low status and power worldwide. Topics include issues such as son preference, gendered violence, maternal health and reproductive rights, sexual rights, work and household labor, globalization, politics, human rights, and women’s global activism. Utilizing a transnational sociological feminist perspective, students learn how gender inequality intersects with not only culture but also nationalism, racism, and economic injustice in various countries and regions of the world (Southeast Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and South America). At several key points, students engage in critical comparison between examples of gender oppression and exploitation observed in both the United States and other societies (i.e., gendered violence), which reveal a false binary in the discourse of progress often drawn between “us” and “them.”
2755 SOCL-322-01 The Sociology of Food 1.00 SEM Tiamzon,Trisha J. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101 or permission of instructor
  NOTE: This course is not open to first-year students.
  The way we experience food—what we eat, where it comes from, how we eat, who we eat with, why we eat what we do—is social and cultural. This course will introduce and utilize some key cultural perspectives in sociology to help us address these questions about the food/society relationship. In particular we will focus on the development of tastes, the construction of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ food’, the role of food in identity, and the global food system. Our approach will be both theoretical and empirical as we investigate social meanings, practices, and structural conditions surrounding the food/society relationship. As part of the course, students will conduct their own research.
3527 SOCL-336-01 Race Racism & Democracy 1.00 LEC Williams,Johnny Eric TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Sociology course or permission of the instructor. This course is not open to first-year students.
  This course is designed to explore various efforts to reconcile ideals of equality with persistent and perpetual forms of racial oppression. By examining the history and culture of the U.S. and other democratic societies, this course analyzes the central paradox that emerges when societies maintain racial inequality but articulate principles of equality, freedom, and justice for all. Hence we will examine the differences between what people say and what they actually do, and how congruencies and incongruencies between the structure of institutions and culture force one to distinguish myth from reality. This is done so that students can better understand how the structure and process of politics govern the everyday lives of oppressed racial groups in capitalist democracies.
2207 SOCL-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2208 SOCL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Credit does not count toward the major. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2227 SOCL-490-01 Research Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  From time to time the opportunity exists for students to assist professors in their research. Hours and duties will be determined on the basis of project needs and student interests. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2260 SOCL-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Written report on original research project. Students should consult with the faculty supervisor before registration, i.e., during the previous spring term. Required of all candidates for honors; elective for others. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this year