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Course Schedule for RELIGIOUS STUDIES - Fall 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3046 RELG-101-01 Intro to Religious Studies 1.00 LEC Jones, Tamsin TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course introduces students to the academic study of religion by focusing on those major themes that connect religious experiences from around the world. We will explore the complex ways in which issues in religion relate to topics such as spiritual beings, birth, death, ritual, the afterlife, ethics, and the good-life. Through a range of classical, modern, and ethnographic sources, students will gain an understanding of the ways in which scholars have sought to understand the social, political, economic, and cultural contexts in which various religious traditions are embedded.
2867 RELG-109-01 Jewish Tradition 1.00 LEC Kiener, Ronald TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 39
  A thematic introduction to the major concepts, ritual cycles, holidays, and beliefs of Judaism. Readings and course material will be taken from classic Jewish texts as well as modern secondary sources. (May be counted toward International Studies, Middle Eastern Studies and Jewish Studies.)
3047 RELG-110-01 Introduction to Christianity 1.00 LEC Jones, Tamsin TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 39
  How is Jesus of Nazareth understood throughout Christian history: martyr, zealot, insurgent, Marxist, capitalist, emperor, social worker, general, or savior? How is Christianity connected to both colonialism and liberation movements, the Inquisition and Civil Rights, anti-Semitism and religious tolerance, witch-hunts and female leadership? This course will offer a broad introduction to the diverse traditions and identities of global Christianity through a range of sources: literary, historical, and philosophical texts, art and architecture, as well as ethnography and film. We consider the ways in which Christianity is both a religion of protest, revolt and liberation, as well as a religion of empire and conquest.
2868 RELG-151-01 Religions of Asia 1.00 LEC Fifield, Justin TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  An introduction to the major religions of Asia: Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism, with special emphasis on how each of these modes of thought gives rise to a special vision of man in the universe, a complex of myth and practice, and a pattern of ethical behavior. (May be counted toward international studies/Asian studies.)
3706 RELG-200-01 The Occult in America 1.00 LEC Landry, Timothy TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  Since its inception, the United States has had a thriving community of individuals interested in those supernatural, mystical, and magical worlds, known collectively as the "Occult." Students will examine the significance of a wide range of occult practices, including the New Age movement, Neo-Paganism, Wicca, and Satanism. By exploring the practices and beliefs of American Occultists students will begin to unravel the occult's hidden role in the formation of American society, especially as it relates to issues of class, race, gender, and nationality. In so doing, students will seek to answer the question: What does it mean to be religious in America?
2869 RELG-211-01 Intro Hebrew Bible/Old Testame 1.00 LEC Hornung, Gabriel MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 39
  Where did the Bible come from? This class will examine the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) in its evolution and complexity. We will pay careful attention to the text's many powerful voices and striking literary features, its great figures such as Abraham, Moses, and David, and its relationship with the major historical events which shaped the life of ancient Israel and later Jewish and Christian tradition. (May be counted toward Jewish Studies and International Studies/Middle Eastern Studies.)
3708 RELG-233-01 Religion and the Body 1.00 LEC Fifield, Justin TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Religion is a powerful force in shaping the body. Through ascetic practices, rituals, dietary regimes, tattooing, piercing, and dress, religious traditions imagine, articulate, and transform the body in myriad ways. This course examines discourses and practices of the body in religious traditions throughout the world, with the goal to understand the role of religion in the social construction of the body and the phenomenological experience of embodiment.
3621 RELG-260-01 Meditation, Medicine, & Mind 1.00 SEM Fifield, Justin M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course examines the relationship between traditional meditation practices and their contemporary applications in therapeutic, clinical, and neuropsychological settings. We will question to what extent contemporary practices remain true to the historical traditions, and to what extent such a question even matters. If a meditative practice works in a clinical setting, without recourse to traditional understanding, is such an application valid? In what ways do modern institutions - the marketplace, the clinic, the laboratory - alter the way meditation is translated into the contemporary world? Readings will range across classic Asian texts, modern meditation manuals, and research from the fields of medicine and neuroscience.
3622 RELG-286-01 Islam in America 1.00 LEC Koertner, Mareike MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Islam has become the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse religious group in the United States. This course is divided into two parts: the first provides an historical survey of Islam in America, from its discovery to the present; the second part examines contemporary issues of Muslim American communities and their interactions with American society at large. Topics include religious movements among African-American and immigrant groups, educational, cultural and youth initiatives, Sufism, civil rights groups, progressive Muslims, women's and feminist movements, and Islam in popular culture and in the media.
3714 RELG-304-01 Material Religion 1.00 SEM Landry, Timothy W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores the ways in which individuals from a variety of religious traditions experience religious belief, enact religious practice, and relate to the so-called “Divine” through material culture. Students will examine themes such as relics, clothing, bodies, blood, architecture, shrines, and charms. By reading ethnographic and theoretical texts, this course helps students to consider the role that material religion plays in enhancing or complicating prayer, ritual, and everyday religious piety.
2140 RELG-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Advanced work on an approved project under the guidance of a faculty member. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2141 RELG-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A teaching assistant works with a faculty member in the preparation and teaching of a course and receives academic credit for his or her work. See the Student Handbook for the specific guidelines. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2142 RELG-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis.
2225 RELG-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (two course credits are considered pending in the first semester; two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
2304 RELG-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (two course credits are considered pending in the first semester;two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
3627 FREN-235-01 Islam & France in Africa 1.00 SEM Mabrouk, Karim MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course focuses on French colonization in Muslim-majority the North and West African regions. Situating the French example within a broader narrative about the economic and political strategies inherent in the colonial project, we will pay particular attention to the issue of religion in the relationship between colonizer and colonized. This course will examine the nature of the French "civilizing mission" in Africa, and the Muslim-African response to the French presence, as Islam and its "symbols" played a major role in anti-colonial movements throughout the two regions. Among others, we will read works by authors Assia Djebar, Camara Laye, Gustave Flaubert and Fatima Mernissi. The course is taught in English, but students who have taken FREN 241 or a higher-level course can complete assignments in French.
3479 HIST-231-01 Abraham's Children 1.00 SEM Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Jews, Christians and Muslims all claimed Abraham as the founder of their particular form of monotheism. In the Middle Ages, men and women from all three groups had to negotiate relationships in war and peace. Jews lived among Christians and Muslims. Christians and Muslims fought in the Crusades, and all three groups traded with each other in the cosmopolitan cities of the Mediterranean. What kinds of worlds did these people live in? Were they worlds of prejudice and hatred or a pragmatic tolerance? How were the identities of Jews, Christians and Muslims shaped by their interactions during the Middle Ages? Are we still living with the results of those interactions?
3663 JWST-220-01 Mod Israeli Lit & Jew Heritage 1.00 LEC Ayalon, Michal W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Artists, and especially writers and poets, are the seismographs and mirrors of society, anticipating and reflecting its many forces and movements. During the past two hundred years Jewish life has been profoundly affected by such forces and movements as emancipation, the Enlightenment, assimilation, Zionism, and the Holocaust. A primary focus of modern Israeli writers is the birth of the State of Israel and its ongoing struggles, internally as well as with its Arab neighbors. One of the main ways Hebrew literature captures these significant changes is through the use of biblical themes, images and archetypes which resonate through the generations. This course will examine the ways in which modern Hebrew literature enriches and brings deeper understanding of collective Jewish experiences and detects and shapes the reality of modern Israel.
3628 LACS-235-01 Islam & France in Africa 1.00 SEM Mabrouk, Karim MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course focuses on French colonization in Muslim-majority the North and West African regions. Situating the French example within a broader narrative about the economic and political strategies inherent in the colonial project, we will pay particular attention to the issue of religion in the relationship between colonizer and colonized. This course will examine the nature of the French "civilizing mission" in Africa, and the Muslim-African response to the French presence, as Islam and its "symbols" played a major role in anti-colonial movements throughout the two regions. Among others, we will read works by authors Assia Djebar, Camara Laye, Gustave Flaubert and Fatima Mernissi. The course is taught in English, but students who have taken FREN 241 or a higher-level course can complete assignments in French.
3541 PHIL-282-01 Medieval Philosophy 1.00 LEC Ryan, Todd TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  A study of representative thinkers of the medieval period. Discussion will focus on such major issues as the existence of God, the problem of evil, the nature of universals, the relation between philosophical reason and religious faith. Attention will also be paid to the cultural, historical and religious climates which helped influence the unique scholastic doctrines under discussion. (Students enrolling in Philosophy 282 must also enroll in Philosophy 290-01L.) Enrollment limited.