Course Schedule


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Course Schedule for RELIGION - Spring 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
5470 RELG-181-01 Introduction to Islam 1.00 LEC Koertner,Mareike MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM MC - 225 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This survey course explores the diversity of Muslim experiential and intellectual approaches to the key sacred sources of the religion, the Qur'an, and the figure of the Prophet. The course addresses pre-Islamic Arabia and the rise of Islam; Muhammad and the Qur'an; prophetic traditions and jurisprudence; theology and mysticism; art and poetry; basic beliefs and practices of the Muslim community; responses to colonialism and modernity; and Islam in the United States.
5087 RELG-212-01 New Testament 1.00 LEC Young,Stephen L. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM HIL - DININGROOM HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  An examination of the New Testament in the context of the first century C.E. to study the formation and themes of these early Christian writings. The course will stress the analysis of texts and discussion of their possible interpretations. How did the earliest writings about Jesus present him? Who was Paul? Is it more accurate to call him the founder of Christianity instead of Jesus? How do we understand Gospels that are not in the New Testament? We will attend to these and other social, political, and historical issues for studying the New Testament and Early Christianity.
4831 RELG-223-01 Maj Relgious Thinkers of West 1.00 LEC Jones Farmer,Tamsin TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM 70VS - SEM HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course is only open to Religion majors or Guided Studies students.
  A study of the shared (and contested) sites of ancient and medieval Jewish, Christian, and Muslim thought. The course will focus on various topics including the construction of religious identity through the identification of the “other” as well as debates over proper interpretation of scripture, the name and the nature of God, and the relationship between reason and revelation. Readings include the Babylonian Talmud, Philo, Origen, Augustine, Maimonides, Avicenna, Averroes, Aquinas, and Luther.
5088 RELG-226-01 Christian Mysticism 1.00 LEC Jones Farmer,Tamsin TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM 70VS - SEM HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  An inquiry into the phenomenon of mystical experience exemplified in the Christian tradition as direct encounter with God. The course offers psychological and theological analyses of mysticism and its specifically Christian manifestations. Students will read works from Catholic, Orthodox, Anglican, Lutheran, Quaker, and sectarian mystics such as Pseudo-Dionysius, Gregory of Nyssa, Bernard, Julian of Norwich, Teresa of Avila, Jacob Boehme, George Herbert, Simone Weil, and contemporary mystics.
5246 RELG-230-01 Bible, Creation and Evolution 1.00 SEM Young,Stephen L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM HL - 123  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The Bible has different and even conflicting accounts of creation. We will explore the creation myths in the Bible, how they relate to other ancient creation mythologies, and what social and political effects these myths had. We will also examine the social, political, and legal contours of the Bible, Creationism, and debates about evolution in American culture and public policy. What is going on when people talk about God, creation, and human origins – whether in biblical times or in American culture?
5089 RELG-254-01 Buddhist Art 1.00 LEC Findly,Ellison Banks TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - N217 GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A survey of the art of Buddhism in Asia with special attention given to the development of the Buddha image, the stupa, and a wide array of deities and saints. Using painting, sculpture, architecture, and contemporary expressions of ritual, dance, and theater, the course will cover many of the traditions in South, East, and Central Asia. (May be counted toward international studies/Asian studies, art history, and international studies/comparative development studies.)
5090 RELG-256-01 Buddhist Thought 1.00 LEC Findly,Ellison Banks TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - N217 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  An examination of fundamental concepts in Buddhist philosophy as they reflect an ongoing conflict between faith and reason: the non-self, dependent origination, karma, and nirvana. Special emphasis will be placed on the meaning of these concepts for the Buddhist way of life. Readings from classical Theravada and Mahayana texts. (May be counted toward international studies/Asian studies.)
4191 RELG-262-01 Religion in America 1.00 LEC Kirkpatrick,Frank TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MECC - 246 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  The historical role of religion in shaping American life and thought, with special attention to the influence of religious ideologies on social values and social reform. (May be counted toward American Studies.)
5200 RELG-265-01 Religion and American Politics 1.00 LEC Silk,Mark R. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM HIL - DININGROOM HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Since the earliest days of the American republic, religion has played a significant role in the country’s politics. This course will trace that role, beginning with the Constitution’s proscription of religious tests for office to the current “God Gap” between the Democratic and Republican parties. Subjects to be covered include ethno-religious voting patterns, social movements, American civil religion, and religion in wartime.
5092 RELG-280-01 Muhammad and the Qur’an 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course examines the nature of revelation and prophetic authority in Islam through a close reading of the Qur’an and the life of the Prophet Muhammad. Topics include the history of the sacred text, connection to Jewish and Christian scripture, history and methods of interpretation, its role in Muslim faith, rituals, and Islamic law. Questions of canon, translation, gender, and piety are also explored across a wide historic and geographic spectrum. We will also look at manifestations of the Qu’ran in the literature, visual arts, and music of the Muslim world.
5093 RELG-282-01 Modern Islamic Movements 1.00 LEC Koertner,Mareike MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM HIL - DININGROOM HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course examines the rise and ideological foundation of modern Islamic movements, including the Muslim Brotherhood, Hizbollah, Hamas, al-Qa’ida, and ISIS. We will study the emergence of Islamic fundamentalism in its historical and political context as well as major intellectual figures of these movements, and take a close look at the notion of jihad in classical and modern legal contexts.
5247 RELG-285-01 Religions of Africa 1.00 SEM Landry,Timothy R. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM MC - 205 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is an exploration of the ways in which Africans make sense of their worlds through religion. By reading a wide range of ethnographic and historical texts, students will consider the challenges that post-colonial politics present to understanding religion in Africa and in the diaspora Students will examine a variety of African religious traditions ranging from indigenous practices to the ways in which Christianity and Islam have developed uniquely African beliefs. In so doing, students will frame African religions as global phenomena while considering the historical and contemporary salience of the many canonical themes found in African religion such as spirit possession, divination, healing, magic, witchcraft, sorcery, and animal sacrifice.
5095 RELG-286-01 Islam in America 1.00 LEC Koertner,Mareike TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 313 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Islam has become the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse religious group in the United States. This course is divided into two parts: the first provides an historical survey of Islam in America, from its discovery to the present; the second part examines contemporary issues of Muslim American communities and their interactions with American society at large. Topics include religious movements among African-American and immigrant groups, educational, cultural and youth initiatives, Sufism, civil rights groups, progressive Muslims, women's and feminist movements, and Islam in popular culture and in the media.
5177 RELG-324-01 Suffering Religion 1.00 SEM Jones Farmer,Tamsin TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM SH - N217 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  What does religion have to say about suffering and its function in the spiritual life – is it a “natural” part of human existence, divine gift or punishment, or a preventable tragedy? What does it mean when religion is experienced as suffering or as trauma? This course explores these questions within the Greco-Roman, Jewish and Christian traditions. After introducing some of the classic texts on suffering, the course examines suffering as both a logical and a moral problem for religious thought. It then considers some of the resources that religious traditions have brought to bear on different kinds of suffering – physical pain, trauma, grief or loss, and mental suffering or depression.
4756 RELG-338-01 Christian Social Ethics 1.00 SEM Kirkpatrick,Frank M: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - S205 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An in-depth exploration of the historical teachings of, and contemporary controversies within, Christianity on selected moral issues in sexuality, economics, business, medicine, ecology, race, war and pacifism, and foreign policy. Special attention will be given to problems in contemporary American society.
4271 RELG-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Advanced work on an approved project under the guidance of a faculty member. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4272 RELG-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A teaching assistant works with a faculty member in the preparation and teaching of a course and receives academic credit for his or her work. See the Student Handbook for the specific guidelines. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4273 RELG-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis.
4274 RELG-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (two course credits are considered pending in the first semester;two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
5174 ANTH-324-01 Religion in the City 1.00 SEM Landry,Timothy R. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM MC - 205 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Observers of cities have long predicted that the rise of urbanism will slowly but continually lead not only to the gradual decentralization of religion but also to increased secularization. However, today we find thriving religious communities in cities. This course will explore a range of urban religious experiences in the classroom and in the city ranging from Hartford to New York. In so doing, we will study cases of people who (re)imagine cityscapes in ways that support religious practice; we will examine the importance of cities in creating a space where diasporic religions can thrive; and we will chart the ways in which urban diversity provides the perfect space for an upsurge in religious practice. Students will examine urban religion ranging from Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, to Vodou and Santeria.
4907 CLCV-308-01 Archaeology of Greek Religion 1.00 SEM Risser,Martha K. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM SH - S201  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course examines the material evidence for ancient Greek religion, cults, and rituals; methods of approaching ancient religion and analyzing cult practices through art, architecture, and artifacts; exploration of votive, sacrificial, and feasting practices; distinctions between sacred and civic space in ancient Greece; differences between urban, extra-urban, rural, and panhellenic sanctuaries; the role of the city in establishing, maintaining, and supporting religious places and practices. There are no pre-requisites for this course.
4065 GDST-242-01 Hist Pat Eur Dev I 1.00 LEC Elukin,Jonathan TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MC - 225 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Only students in the Humanities Gateway Program are allowed to enroll in this course.
  A critical introduction to selected themes in the political, social and religious history of Europe during the Middle Ages. Issues to be discussed include: the nature of “feudal” society, the formation of the medieval state, with particular emphasis on the growth of law, the nature of kingship, and warfare. The course will also study conversion to Christianity, the evolution of Christian beliefs and practices, the history of the Papacy, European Christian contacts with the “Other,” including Jews, Muslims, heretics, and Byzantine Christians, the evolution of the medieval economy (rural life, trade, and towns), and the transition from a “medieval” to an “early modern” society. The course will be taught largely from primary source materials with supplementary readings in secondary scholarship.
5145 HIST-231-01 Abraham's Children 1.00 SEM Elukin,Jonathan TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM HIL - DININGROOM HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Jews, Christians and Muslims all claimed Abraham as the founder of their particular form of monotheism. In the Middle Ages, men and women from all three groups had to negotiate relationships in war and peace. Jews lived among Christians and Muslims. Christians and Muslims fought in the Crusades, and all three groups traded with each other in the cosmopolitan cities of the Mediterranean. What kinds of worlds did these people live in? Were they worlds of prejudice and hatred or a pragmatic tolerance? How were the identities of Jews, Christians and Muslims shaped by their interactions during the Middle Ages? Are we still living with the results of those interactions?
4494 JWST-220-01 Mod Israeli Lit & Jew Heritage 1.00 LEC Ayalon,Michal TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM CT - 210 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Artists, and especially writers and poets, are the seismographs and mirrors of society, anticipating and reflecting its many forces and movements. During the past two hundred years Jewish life has been profoundly affected by such forces and movements as emancipation, the Enlightenment, assimilation, Zionism, and the Holocaust. A primary focus of modern Israeli writers is the birth of the State of Israel and its ongoing struggles, internally as well as with its Arab neighbors. One of the main ways Hebrew literature captures these significant changes is through the use of biblical themes, images and archetypes which resonate through the generations. This course will examine the ways in which modern Hebrew literature enriches and brings deeper understanding of collective Jewish experiences and detects and shapes the reality of modern Israel.
5255 JWST-261-01 Abraham's Children 1.00 SEM Elukin,Jonathan TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM HIL - DININGROOM HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Jews, Christians and Muslims all claimed Abraham as the founder of their particular form of monotheism. In the Middle Ages, men and women from all three groups had to negotiate relationships in war and peace. Jews lived among Christians and Muslims. Christians and Muslims fought in the Crusades, and all three groups traded with each other in the cosmopolitan cities of the Mediterranean. What kinds of worlds did these people live in? Were they worlds of prejudice and hatred or a pragmatic tolerance? How were the identities of Jews, Christians and Muslims shaped by their interactions during the Middle Ages? Are we still living with the results of those interactions?