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Course Schedule for POLITICAL SCIENCE - Spring 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1165 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
1907 POLS-102-02 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Bourbeau,James R. MW: 6:30PM-7:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
1908 POLS-103-01 Intro Compar Politics 1.00 LEC Matsuzaki,Reo TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  This lecture course examines major themes and approaches within comparative politics. Its purpose is twofold: First, it provides the necessary theoretical and conceptual foundation for upper-level classes within this subfield. To this end, a broad array of key classics and recent works within comparative politics will be examined. Second, students will learn about the political and economic institutions that undergird foreign countries within a comparative framework. Readings will draw from various regions of the world, including Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Questions that will be discussed include, but are not limited to, the following: What role, if any, can the government play in promoting economic growth? Why do civil wars occur and what is the role of ethnicity in perpetuating conflict?
1324 POLS-103-02 Intro Compar Politics 1.00 LEC Matsuzaki,Reo TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  NOTE: This class is methodologically focused.
  This lecture course examines major themes and approaches within comparative politics. Its purpose is twofold: First, it provides the necessary theoretical and conceptual foundation for upper-level classes within this subfield. To this end, a broad array of key classics and recent works within comparative politics will be examined. Second, students will learn about the political and economic institutions that undergird foreign countries within a comparative framework. Readings will draw from various regions of the world, including Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Questions that will be discussed include, but are not limited to, the following: What role, if any, can the government play in promoting economic growth? Why do civil wars occur and what is the role of ethnicity in perpetuating conflict?
1116 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
1359 POLS-104-02 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
1934 POLS-105-01 Intro Pol Philosophy 1.00 LEC Archer,Crina B. WF: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  An introduction to the philosophical study of political and moral life through a consideration of various topics of both current and historical interest. Topics include environmentalism, ancients and moderns, male and female, nature and nurture, race and ethnicity, reason and history, and reason and revelation.
2106 POLS-125-01 Introduction to Human Rights 1.00 LEC Carbonetti,Benjamin C. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course introduces students to the key concepts and debates in the study of Human Rights. For example, what are human rights standards and how have they evolved historically? Why do human rights violations occur and why is change sometimes possible? Is a human rights framework always desirable? In tackling such questions, the course surveys competing theories, including critical perspectives, applying these to a broad range of issues and concrete cases from around the world.
1935 POLS-220-01 Histry of Pol Thought II 1.00 LEC Smith,Gregory TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 70
  This course focuses on the development of modern political philosophy. All readings will be from primary sources that include, among others, Machiavelli, Descartes, Bacon, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, and Marcuse. Enrollment limited.
2209 POLS-237-01 Building the European Union 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. TR: 6:30PM-7:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  As an intergovernmental and supranational union of 27 democratic member countries, the contemporary European Union is arguably the boldest experiment in inter-state economic and political integration since the formation of the contemporary nation-state system during the mid-17th century. Against this backdrop, this course considers the project for greater economic, political, and security integration within its appropriate historical context, its current economic and political setting, and its projected future ambitions. As such, it will very much be concerned with recent events and important events-in-the-making, including the continuing conflict over the Lisbon Treaty and the EU's projected enlargement by several new members.
1556 POLS-242-01 Pol Sci Research Methods 1.00 LEC Williamson,Abigail Fisher MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  NOTE: This class is methodologically focused.
  NOTE: 18 seats are reserved for Political Science majors.
  Why do people participate in politics? Which government policies best serve the public good? What prevents wars between nations? Political scientists employ a toolbox of research methods to investigate these and other fundamental questions. By learning the strengths and weaknesses of various qualitative and quantitative methods, students in this course will identify how best to answer the political questions about which they feel most passionate. They will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them observe, analyze, and report on political phenomena. Research skills will include field observation, interviewing, comparative case studies, and data analysis using statistical software. No previous statistical or programming experience is necessary.
2241 POLS-309-01 Congress and Public Policy 1.00 LEC Bourbeau,James R. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102.
  A study of the structure and politics of the American Congress. This course examines the relationship between Congress members and their constituents; the organization and operation of Congress; the relationship between legislative behavior and the electoral incentive; and the place of Congress in national policy networks.
2222 POLS-313-01 Nationl & Europ Forgn Policies 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will investigate the relationship between European Union member states and EU foreign policy. It will question how EU member states reconcile their independent foreign policies with their membership in the European Union as well as their relationship with NATO. Students will have the opportunity to assess to what extent EU member states have Europeanized their foreign affairs policies in order to build a more coherent Common Security and Defense Policy (CDSP).
2200 POLS-317-01 Amer Political Thought 1.00 LEC Archer,Crina B. F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A study of the development of American political thought: the colonial period; the Revolution; Jeffersonian democracy; the defense of slave society; social Darwinism; the Populist and Progressive reform movements; and current theories of conservatism, liberalism, and the Left.
1936 POLS-322-01 Intl Political Economy 1.00 LEC Kamola,Isaac A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 104.
  This course examines the interplay of politics and economics in the current world system since the European expansion in the 16th century. Focus will be on the penetration and colonization of Latin America, Asia, and Africa; economic relations in the industrialized world and between the north and the south; the role of international institutions such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund; the role of international trade and transnational corporations; the changing division of labor in the world economy; and current problems of the world economy.
2277 POLS-331-01 Comparative Politics East Asia 1.00 SEM Matsuzaki,Reo TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is open to sophomores and juniors only.
  This course is comprised of two distinct components. In part I, students will be introduced to key political and economic events in post-World War II East Asia. Specifically, the focus will be on the following countries and territories: Japan, South and North Korea, Taiwan, and China. In part II, students will study thematic and theoretical issues concerning East Asia that have received scholarly attention in recent years. Topics that will be discussed include the following: rapid economic growth and its consequences; economic integration under globalization; political liberalization and democratization; identity politics and nationalism; and human security. With its focus on major conceptual and theoretical debates within the comparative politics subfield, this course will provide useful background for those contemplating a senior thesis on an East Asian country.
2223 POLS-332-01 Understanding Civil Conflict 1.00 LEC Carbonetti,Benjamin C. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is only open to Juniors and Sophomores.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement.
  This course surveys the many causes and consequences of civil conflict and civil war. Major themes of the course include ethnic fractionalization, natural resources, climate change, colonial legacies, institutional design, globalization, intervention, international efforts in state building, gendered violence, and human rights. The course also examines the different theoretical and methodological approaches to studying civil conflict.
1937 POLS-339-01 Contemp&Postmod Thought 1.00 LEC Smith,Gregory TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 105, 219 or 220.
  This course will deal with philosophical developments of moral and political significance in the 20th century. Using the writings of selected authors, such as Heidegger, Sartre, Gadamer, Marcuse, Strauss, Foucault, and Habermas, it will focus on various modern movements of thought: existentialism, critical theory, neo-Marxism, hermeneutics, feminism, deconstructionism, and postmodernism. Readings will be from primary sources.
1938 POLS-373-01 Law, Politics and Society 1.00 LEC McMahon,Kevin J. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course examines the role of law in American society and politics. We will approach law as a living museum displaying the central values, choices, purposes, goals, and ideals of our society. Topics covered include: the nature of law; the structure of American law; the legal profession, juries, and morality; crime and punishment; courts, civil action, and social change; and justice and democracy. Throughout, we will be concerned with law and its relation to cultural change and political conflict.
1939 POLS-385-01 Crossing Borders 1.00 LEC Messina,Anthony M. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course investigates the primary economic, humanitarian, and political forces that are driving and sustaining the complex phenomenon of contemporary transnational migration. Within this context, several key questions are addressed: Have the forces of globalization and the entanglements of international commitments and treaty obligations significantly compromised the policy-making prerogatives of the traditional nation state? What are the benefits and costs of migration for the immigration receiving countries? Is a liberal immigration regime desirable and, if so, can it be politically sustained?
1164 POLS-392-01 Legislative Internship 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 14
  The Trinity College Legislative Internship is a special program designed for those students who want to observe politics and government firsthand. Student interns work full time for individual legislators and are eligible for up to four course credits, three for a letter grade and one pass/fail. One of the graded credits is a political science credit. In addition to working approximately 35 to 40 hours per week for a legislator, each intern participates in a seminar in which interns present papers and discuss issues related to the legislative process. Although there are no prerequisite courses for enrollment in this program, preference will be given to juniors and seniors. Students majoring in areas other than political science are encouraged to apply. Candidates for this program, which is limited to 14 students, should contact the Political Science Department in April or September. The program will accommodate some students who wish to work part time (20 hours per week) for two graded course credits.
1163 POLS-394-01 Legislative Internship 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 14
1162 POLS-396-01 Legislative Internship 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 14
1161 POLS-398-01 Legislative Internship 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 14
1294 POLS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1975 POLS-404-01 Theory & Pol of African Decol 1.00 SEM Kamola,Isaac A. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 103 or 104.
  NOTE: This course is open only to Senior or Junior Political Science majors.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Senior Seminar requirement.
  The process of African decolonization was among the most important political events of the 20th century-in just three decades more than fifty new countries won independence from European imperial powers. This class reads the diverse group of African intellectuals writing during this period, whose work shaped how people thought about the anti-colonial project and world politics more generally. The course starts with an overview of colonialism's historical and intellectual legacy before examining how these theorists tackled three central political questions, namely: how to forge an independent African nation-state, how to create a post-colonial African identity, and how to establish an independent economy. Readings will include Aime Cesaire, Franz Fanon, Steve Biko, Amilcar Cabral, Walter Rodney, Albert Memmi, Léopold Sédar Senghor, Julius Nyerere, Thomas Sankara, among others.
1736 POLS-406-01 Sr Sem: Why Political Phil? 1.00 SEM Smith,Gregory M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This seminar will be devoted to a close reading of a major political philosopher in the Western tradition.
1762 POLS-415-01 Sr Sem: War, Peace & Strategy 1.00 SEM Flibbert,Andrew MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This seminar explores the problem of war in international relations, including its nature, forms, strategy, causes, prevention, and ethics. Is international politics bound to remain inherently conflictual in a world of sovereign states, or is war becoming obsolete in an era of institutional innovation and normative change? To address this and related questions, we read and engage a wide range of classic and contemporary texts from political science and beyond. Special attention is devoted to the strategic logic that connects the use of military force with political objectives, hopes, and fears.
1295 POLS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1872 POLS-490-01 Research Assistant 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1873 POLS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  For honors candidates (see description of Honors in Political Science following the “Areas of Concentration” section). Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment in honors.
2220 CLCV-242-01 Kings, Tyrants, Emperors 1.00 LEC Regan,Amanda R. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  From the Homeric lords to the pharaoh-kings of Hellenistic Egypt to the emperors of Rome, one-person rule played an essential part in both political discourse and political reality in the ancient Mediterranean world. What differentiated a good autocrat from a bad one—a “king” from a “tyrant”, in the developing political rhetoric of classical antiquity, which we have inherited? Investigations in this course may include the terminology for such autocrats, primarily “king”, “tyrant”, and “emperor”; theoretical treatments of autocratic rule by Plato, Aristotle, and Polybius; and the representation of autocrats in literary and visual art, historical sources, and archaeological remains.
1963 INTS-213-01 Worldly Islam 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 5 seats are reserved fpr Sophomores.
  This course explores the diverse domestic, regional, and international politics of the Islamic world. A rich historical perspective illuminates contemporary political struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human rights and needs. (Also offered under Political Science and Middle Eastern Studies.)
1967 INTS-315-01 Global Ideologies 1.00 SEM Prashad,Vijay TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  From the 1920s to the 1980s, the countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America forged a "Third World project." This project came undone in the 1980s, as debt, war and corruption overwhelmed the three continents. Along came neo-liberalism and globalization, which emerged as the dominant ideologies of the time. With the rise of Bolivarianism in Latin America, and with the financial crisis, neo-liberalism has lost its shine. This course will trace the "Third World project," neo-liberalism, and the emergent ideology of the Global South.
1584 PBPL-220-01 Research and Evaluation 1.00 SEM Williamson,Abigail Fisher MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 22
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, and permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Students taking this course should not enroll in POLS 242.
  Which policy interventions actually work and which fail to meet their goals? Answering this question is essential to improving public and non-profit services and securing further funding for worthwhile projects. This course aims to give students the ability to comprehend policy research and evaluation, as well as the tools to design and conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them to design evaluations or analyze data to assess the effectiveness of policies. Topics will include data analysis using statistical software, but no previous programming experience is necessary.
2104 PBPL-351-01 Managing Diversity in the City 1.00 SEM Williamson,Abigail Fisher MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Political Science 102 or Public Policy and Law 201, or consent of instructor.
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for Public Policy and Law majors.
  Drawing on literature related to federalism, urban politics, and state and local policy, this course will examine how cities have responded to diverse newcomers, from the early twentieth century's machine politics, through the Great Migration of African-Americans to northern cities, to the dispersion of new immigrant populations since the late 1980s. Using this historical perspective, we will consider how local policies shape processes of social and political incorporation, as well as how the presence of newcomers shapes the on-going development of local policies. The course will incorporate case studies of policy decision-making, devoting particular attention to the city of Hartford.
2025 PBPL-377-01 Law, Gender & Supreme Court 1.00 LEC Fulco,Adrienne TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, or permission of instructor
  This course introduces students to contemporary gender issues as they have been treated both in the law and in the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. We will explore some of the historical antecedents to contemporary legal gender questions and then examine in detail the following areas of controversy: sex discrimination, marriage equality, reproductive rights, and Title IX.