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Course Schedule for POLITICAL SCIENCE - Fall 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2979 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
3399 POLS-102-02 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Dudas,Mary J. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
3400 POLS-102-03 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Dudas,Mary J. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
2077 POLS-103-01 Intro Compar Politics 1.00 LEC Messina,Anthony M. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This section of POLS 103 is methodologically focused.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students
  This lecture course examines major themes and approaches within comparative politics. Its purpose is twofold: First, it provides the necessary theoretical and conceptual foundation for upper-level classes within this subfield. To this end, a broad array of key classics and recent works within comparative politics will be examined. Second, students will learn about the political and economic institutions that undergird foreign countries within a comparative framework. Readings will draw from various regions of the world, including Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Questions that will be discussed include, but are not limited to, the following: What role, if any, can the government play in promoting economic growth? Why do civil wars occur and what is the role of ethnicity in perpetuating conflict?
2796 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
2980 POLS-104-02 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
3401 POLS-219-01 History of Pol Thought I 1.00 LEC Smith,Gregory TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 70
  This course provides the historical background to the development of Western political thought from Greek antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. Readings from primary sources (Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, etc.) will help the students to comprehend the foundations of Western political philosophy and the continuity of tradition.
3402 POLS-222-01 Social Inequal United States 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102 or permission of instructor.
  This course considers the implications of social inequalities for American politics. Income and wealth disparities in the United States have grown rapidly since the 1970s, overlapping with social exclusions based on race, gender, and sexual orientation. The course explores the causes, consequences, and solutions to rising economic inequality at the national and local levels, examining particular instances from Connecticut and contextualizing them within a broader global context. We will pay particular attention to the role of public policies in creating or potentially mitigating inequalities among citizens. Throughout the course we will consider the implications of social inequality for American politics and discuss how the persistence of different forms of inequality squares with enduring ideals of equality and equal opportunity in the American political system.
3403 POLS-225-01 American Presidency 1.00 LEC McMahon,Kevin J. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An explanation of the institutional and political evolution of the presidency with an emphasis on the nature of presidential power in domestic and foreign affairs. Attention is also given to institutional conflicts with Congress and the courts. The nature of presidential leadership and personality is also explored.
3404 POLS-242-01 Pol Sci Research Methods 1.00 LEC Williamson,Abigail Fisher TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Why do people participate in politics? Which government policies best serve the public good? What prevents wars between nations? Political scientists employ a toolbox of research methods to investigate these and other fundamental questions. By learning the strengths and weaknesses of various qualitative and quantitative methods, students in this course will identify how best to answer the political questions about which they feel most passionate. They will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them observe, analyze, and report on political phenomena. Research skills will include field observation, interviewing, comparative case studies, and data analysis using statistical software. No previous statistical or programming experience is necessary.
2358 POLS-301-01 American Political Parties 1.00 LEC Evans,Diana TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  An analysis of American political parties, including a study of voting behavior, party organization and leadership, and recent and proposed reforms and proposals for reorganization of existing party structures.
2749 POLS-312-01 Politics: Mid East & N. Africa 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course offers an introduction to the comparative analysis of politics in the Middle East and North Africa. Organized thematically and conceptually, we examine topics ranging from state formation, nationalism, and civil-military relations, to oil and economic development, democratization efforts, political Islam, and regional concerns.
3405 POLS-316-01 Con Law II:Civ Lib & Civ Ri 1.00 SEM McMahon,Kevin J. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, and permission of instructor.
  An analysis and evaluation of decisions of courts (and related materials) dealing principally with freedom of expression and equal protection of the laws.
3406 POLS-316-02 Con Law II:Civ Lib & Civ Ri 1.00 SEM McMahon,Kevin J. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, and permission of instructor.
  An analysis and evaluation of decisions of courts (and related materials) dealing principally with freedom of expression and equal protection of the laws.
3407 POLS-332-01 Understanding Civil Conflict 1.00 SEM Carbonetti,Benjamin C. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  All seats are reserved for juniors and sophomores.
  NOTE: This course is only open to Juniors and Sophomores
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement.
  This course surveys the many causes and consequences of civil conflict and civil war. Major themes of the course include ethnic fractionalization, natural resources, climate change, colonial legacies, institutional design, globalization, intervention, international efforts in state building, gendered violence, and human rights. The course also examines the different theoretical and methodological approaches to studying civil conflict.
3408 POLS-339-01 Contemp&Postmod Thought 1.00 LEC Smith,Gregory W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 105, 219 or 220.
  This course will deal with philosophical developments of moral and political significance in the 20th century. Using the writings of selected authors, such as Heidegger, Sartre, Gadamer, Marcuse, Strauss, Foucault, and Habermas, it will focus on various modern movements of thought: existentialism, critical theory, neo-Marxism, hermeneutics, feminism, deconstructionism, and postmodernism. Readings will be from primary sources.
2944 POLS-345-01 Debt and American Citizenship 1.00 SEM Laws,Serena MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is only open to Juniors and Sophomores.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement.
  This course considers the connections between debt and American citizenship, historically and in the present. We begin by examining the important role of debt in the form of indentured servitude as a key means for populating the American colonies. We then explore the gradual transformation of debt from a highly stigmatized condition to a routine part of life for most Americans through home mortgages, student loans and credit card debt. We consider how debt has been associated with decreased status-from debtors' prisons to low credit scores-yet also linked to creating opportunity, as with political movements demanding credit access for disadvantaged populations. Throughout the course we will be attentive to the role of politics and public policy in creating, mediating, and shaping debt relationships.
3139 POLS-369-01 Intl Human Rights Law 1.00 LEC Carbonetti,Benjamin C. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course offers a comprehensive survey of the evolution of international human rights law, focusing on the major actors and processes at work. Which rights do individual human beings have vis-a-vis the modern state? What is the relationship between domestic and international legal processes? Are regional human rights mechanisms like the European system more influential than international ones? More generally, how effective is contemporary international human rights in securing accountability and justice? We use specific cases and contemporary debates to study a range of treaties and emerging institutions, including ad hoc war crimes tribunals and the International Criminal Court.
2750 POLS-379-01 American Foreign Policy 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  This course offers an examination of postwar American foreign policy. After reviewing the major theoretical and interpretive perspectives, we examine the policymaking process, focused on the principal players in the executive and legislative branches, as well as interest groups and the media. We then turn to contemporary issues: the "war on terror," the Iraq war, humanitarian intervention, U.S. relations with other major powers, and America's future prospects as the dominant global power.
2214 POLS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2419 POLS-402-01 Sr Sem:Amer Govt Dem Rep 1.00 SEM Evans,Diana W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This seminar consists of an investigation of the nature and processes of representation of individuals and groups at the level of American national government, especially within the U.S. Congress. Topics dealt with include the concept of representation, the goals of representatives and represented, means by which government is influenced from the outside, and the implications for representation of recent campaign finance and congressional reforms. Enrollment limited.
3410 POLS-408-01 Sr Sem: Racial & Ethnic Pol 1.00 SEM Chambers,Stefanie TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This course examines the role of African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans in all areas of the American political system. We study each group and their roles as voters, party activists, candidates and public officials. By exploring the socio-historical context within which each group acts, we will also consider the non-traditional forms of political participation embraced by some of these groups and the reasons that minority groups have resorted to such strategies. The process of political socialization will also be considered, as will the political behavior, attitudes, and public policy opinions of these groups. Finally, we will also explore theories of racial and ethnic political coalitions and conflict.
2215 POLS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2216 POLS-490-01 Research Assistant 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3411 POLS-496-01 Senior Thesis Colloquium 1.00 SEM Williamson,Abigail Fisher TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This is a required colloquium for senior political science majors writing theses. The class will proceed in part through course readings about research methods and aims, and in part through offering students the opportunity to present and discuss their thesis projects. All students will be required to write a (non-introductory draft) chapter by semester's end.
2731 POLS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  For honors candidates (see description of Honors in Political Science following the “Areas of Concentration” section). Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment in honors.
3507 INTS-207-01 Global South 1.00 LEC Prashad,Vijay TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  In 1985, the South Commission reported that two-thirds of the world's people lived in distress. To rectify this, the Commission proposed a laundry list of reforms. At the same time, political and social movements in what had been the Third World grew apace. These movements and this report inaugurate the creation of the "Global South", which is both a place and a project. This course will investigate the contours of the Global South, the conferences held to alleviate its many problems (Beijing/Women, Johannesburg/Environment, Durban/Race), and the people who live in the "South".
3508 INTS-212-01 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Tabar,Linda TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.