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Course Schedule for POLITICAL SCIENCE - Fall 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3315 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM MC - AUD SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
3614 POLS-102-02 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Dudas,Mary J. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM SH - S201 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 30 seats are reserved for first-year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
2044 POLS-103-01 Intro Compar Politics 1.00 LEC Messina,Anthony M. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM SH - N129 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This section of POLS 103 is methodologically focused.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students
  This lecture course examines major themes and approaches within comparative politics. Its purpose is twofold: First, it provides the necessary theoretical and conceptual foundation for upper-level classes within this subfield. To this end, a broad array of key classics and recent works within comparative politics will be examined. Second, students will learn about the political and economic institutions that undergird foreign countries within a comparative framework. Readings will draw from various regions of the world, including Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Questions that will be discussed include, but are not limited to, the following: What role, if any, can the government play in promoting economic growth? Why do civil wars occur and what is the role of ethnicity in perpetuating conflict?
2988 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - N130 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
3316 POLS-104-02 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM CT - 308 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
3317 POLS-105-01 Intro Pol Philosophy 1.00 LEC Dudas,Mary J. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM SH - S201 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  An introduction to the philosophical study of political and moral life through a consideration of various topics of both current and historical interest. Topics include environmentalism, ancients and moderns, male and female, nature and nurture, race and ethnicity, reason and history, and reason and revelation.
3318 POLS-219-01 History of Pol Thought I 1.00 LEC Smith,Gregory TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM LSC - AUD SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 70
  This course provides the historical background to the development of Western political thought from Greek antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. Readings from primary sources (Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, etc.) will help the students to comprehend the foundations of Western political philosophy and the continuity of tradition.
2234 POLS-241-01 Emp Pol Mthd & Data Anal 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM LIB - 03 NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An introduction to the design and execution of empirical political research involving computer analysis. The course covers the normative and empirical arguments at the foundation of the science of politics and the methods evolving from these arguments, and it trains students in the use of computers and statistical software. Course work includes reading, discussion, and completion of a research project in which the theory learned in class is put into practice. No programming experience required.
3319 POLS-250-01 Political Freedom 1.00 LEC Maxwell,Lida E. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM LSC - 133 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: 8 seats are reserved for sophomores, 6 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  In this political theory course, we will examine the experience and dilemmas of political freedom as thematized in political theory and practice. While philosophers have traditionally defined freedom as a problem of will or consciousness, this course will focus on how these philosophical framings of freedom may obscure our understanding of the specificity of the problems and promise of political freedom. Drawing from an eclectic mix of genres – literature, political theory, memoir, and theatre – we will ask what political freedom is, what it means, how it arises, what blocks it, and how we might sustain it. Readings will include texts by Sophocles, Hannah Arendt, Frederick Douglass, Vaclav Havel, Alexis de Tocqueville, and Fyodor Dostoevsky.
2351 POLS-301-01 American Political Parties 1.00 LEC Evans,Diana TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MC - 307 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  An analysis of American political parties, including a study of voting behavior, party organization and leadership, and recent and proposed reforms and proposals for reorganization of existing party structures.
3320 POLS-305-01 Intl Organizations 1.00 LEC Molles,Elitsa V. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM SH - N130 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 104.
  This course explores the dynamics of international organizations, examining a broad range of institutions in world politics. In particular, we draw on a variety of perspectives—from mainstream International Relations theory to organizational analysis—to understand questions of institutional emergence, design, and effectiveness. Using case studies and simulations, students are encouraged to think concretely about the challenges facing international organizations.
2848 POLS-312-01 Politics: Mid East & N. Africa 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM CT - 210 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course offers an introduction to the comparative analysis of politics in the Middle East and North Africa. Organized thematically and conceptually, we examine topics ranging from state formation, nationalism, and civil-military relations, to oil and economic development, democratization efforts, political Islam, and regional concerns.
3372 POLS-317-01 Amer Political Thought 1.00 SEM Dudas,Mary J. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM MECC - 260 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is only open to Juniors and Sophomores.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement.
  A study of the development of American political thought: the colonial period; the Revolution; Jeffersonian democracy; the defense of slave society; social Darwinism; the Populist and Progressive reform movements; and current theories of conservatism, liberalism, and the Left.
3322 POLS-322-01 Intl Political Economy 1.00 LEC Kamola,Isaac A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM LSC - 133 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 104.
  This course examines the interplay of politics and economics in the current world system since the European expansion in the 16th century. Focus will be on the penetration and colonization of Latin America, Asia, and Africa; economic relations in the industrialized world and between the north and the south; the role of international institutions such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund; the role of international trade and transnational corporations; the changing division of labor in the world economy; and current problems of the world economy.
3323 POLS-329-01 Political Philosophy & Ethics 1.00 LEC Smith,Gregory TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MECC - 246  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 105, 219, or 220.
  This course will engage the literature of ethical theory and ethical debate. The course attempts to enlighten the place ethical reasoning plays in political science, political life and the tradition of political philosophy. Readings in the course will differ from year to year but may include such authors as Aristotle, Cicero, Aquinas, Kant, Mill, Rawls, Nietzsche. In different years the course may focus on various themes which could include topics such as feminism, gentlemanliness, Eudaimonism, utilitarianism and deontology, ethics and theology, legal and business ethics, or the place of ethics in the discipline of Political Science.
3509 POLS-332-01 Understanding Civil Conflict 1.00 SEM Carbonetti,Benjamin C. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 205  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  All seats are reserved for juniors and sophomores.
  This course surveys the many causes and consequences of civil conflict and civil war. Major themes of the course include ethnic fractionalization, natural resources, climate change, colonial legacies, institutional design, globalization, intervention, international efforts in state building, gendered violence, and human rights. The course also examines the different theoretical and methodological approaches to studying civil conflict.
3271 POLS-345-01 Debt and American Citizenship 1.00 SEM Laws,Serena MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM HHN - 105  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is only open to Juniors and Sophomores.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement.
  This course considers the connections between debt and American citizenship, historically and in the present. We begin by examining the important role of debt in the form of indentured servitude as a key means for populating the American colonies. We then explore the gradual transformation of debt from a highly stigmatized condition to a routine part of life for most Americans through home mortgages, student loans and credit card debt. We consider how debt has been associated with decreased status-from debtors' prisons to low credit scores-yet also linked to creating opportunity, as with political movements demanding credit access for disadvantaged populations. Throughout the course we will be attentive to the role of politics and public policy in creating, mediating, and shaping debt relationships.
3284 POLS-350-01 State-Bldg/Collapse Dev World 1.00 SEM Molles,Elitsa V. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM MC - 205  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  This course is only open to sophomores and juniors.
  NOTE: This course meets the requirement of a sophomore/junior seminar.
  What are states and nations and where do they come from? What key mechanisms, institutions, and actors participate in the state-building process? What are some of the major challenges to state-building and stability? Is the state declining in capacity and importance today? This seminar examines the central debates and dilemmas surrounding the modern state through a fusion of theory and real-life examples from around the world. Case studies are drawn from Eastern Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. The course places particular emphasis on the limitations and even failure of the state in a rapidly changing and unstable world.
3324 POLS-350-02 State-Bldg/Collapse Dev World 1.00 SEM Molles,Elitsa V. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM MC - 205  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  This course is only open to sophomores and juniors.
  What are states and nations and where do they come from? What key mechanisms, institutions, and actors participate in the state-building process? What are some of the major challenges to state-building and stability? Is the state declining in capacity and importance today? This seminar examines the central debates and dilemmas surrounding the modern state through a fusion of theory and real-life examples from around the world. Case studies are drawn from Eastern Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. The course places particular emphasis on the limitations and even failure of the state in a rapidly changing and unstable world.
3510 POLS-369-01 Intl Human Rights Law 1.00 LEC Carbonetti,Benjamin C. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 205 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course offers a comprehensive survey of the evolution of international human rights law, focusing on the major actors and processes at work. Which rights do individual human beings have vis-a-vis the modern state? What is the relationship between domestic and international legal processes? Are regional human rights mechanisms like the European system more influential than international ones? More generally, how effective is contemporary international human rights in securing accountability and justice? We use specific cases and contemporary debates to study a range of treaties and emerging institutions, including ad hoc war crimes tribunals and the International Criminal Court.
2851 POLS-379-01 American Foreign Policy 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM CT - 210 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  This course offers an examination of postwar American foreign policy. After reviewing the major theoretical and interpretive perspectives, we examine the policymaking process, focused on the principal players in the executive and legislative branches, as well as interest groups and the media. We then turn to contemporary issues: the "war on terror," the Iraq war, humanitarian intervention, U.S. relations with other major powers, and America's future prospects as the dominant global power.
2194 POLS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2442 POLS-402-01 Sr Sem:Amer Govt Dem Rep 1.00 SEM Evans,Diana W: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - S204 Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This seminar consists of an investigation of the nature and processes of representation of individuals and groups at the level of American national government, especially within the U.S. Congress. Topics dealt with include the concept of representation, the goals of representatives and represented, means by which government is influenced from the outside, and the implications for representation of recent campaign finance and congressional reforms. Enrollment limited.
3325 POLS-406-01 Sr Sem: Why Political Phil? 1.00 SEM Smith,Gregory W: 1:15PM-3:55PM GW - L WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This seminar will be devoted to a close reading of a major political philosopher in the Western tradition.
2195 POLS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2196 POLS-490-01 Research Assistant 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2853 POLS-496-01 Senior Thesis Colloquium 1.00 SEM Maxwell,Lida E. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM LIB - 103 WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This is a required colloquium for senior political science majors writing theses. The class will proceed in part through course readings about research methods and aims, and in part through offering students the opportunity to present and discuss their thesis projects. All students will be required to write a (non-introductory draft) chapter by semester's end.
2812 POLS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  For honors candidates (see description of Honors in Political Science following the “Areas of Concentration” section). Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment in honors.
2262 INTS-212-01 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM HL - 123 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 7 seats are reserved for sophomores.
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
2856 INTS-212-02 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM HL - 123 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 7 seats are reserved for sophomores
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
3535 INTS-213-01 Worldly Islam 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM HL - 123 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for sophomores.
  This course explores the diverse domestic, regional, and international politics of the Islamic world. A rich historical perspective illuminates contemporary political struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human rights and needs. (Also offered under Political Science and Middle Eastern Studies.)