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Course Schedule for POLITICAL SCIENCE - Fall 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3443 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Laws, Serena MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
3444 POLS-102-02 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Laws, Serena MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
2028 POLS-103-01 Intro Compar Politics 1.00 LEC Messina, Anthony MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This section of POLS 103 is methodologically focused.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course introduces the study of comparative politics which is a subfield of political science. More specifically, it introduces many of the key concepts and theoretical approaches that have been adopted in comparative politics and surveys the political institutions and politics of select foreign countries. Students of comparative politics primarily focus on the political processes and institutions within countries (whereas students of international relations primarily, but not exclusively, study interactions among countries). Inspired by current world events and puzzles, comparativists investigate such major questions as: Why are some countries or regions more democratic than others? How do different countries organize their politics, i.e., how and why do their political party systems, electoral rules, governmental institutions, etc. differ?
3445 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Lefebvre, Thomas MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  NOTE: Seats are reserved: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS Major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
3446 POLS-105-01 Intro Pol Philosophy 1.00 LEC Dudas, Mary MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  An introduction to the philosophical study of political and moral life through a consideration of various topics of both current and historical interest. Topics include environmentalism, ancients and moderns, male and female, nature and nurture, race and ethnicity, reason and history, and reason and revelation.
3447 POLS-219-01 History of Pol Thought I 1.00 LEC Smith, Gregory TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  This course provides the historical background to the development of Western political thought from Greek antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. Readings from primary sources (Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, etc.) will help the students to comprehend the foundations of Western political philosophy and the continuity of tradition.
3743 POLS-238-01 Prisons and Justice in America 1.00 LEC Terwiel, Anna TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This political theory course examines prisons and justice in the US. We will pursue two large questions: How did the prison come to exemplify criminal justice? And how does mass incarceration affect our understanding of the US as a liberal democracy? We will examine the theoretical underpinnings of the prison in rights discourse; the prison’s productive role in shaping conceptions of freedom and citizenship; and its relation to racism, biopower, and neoliberalism. We will also consider alternative visions of criminal justice: abolition democracy and restorative and transformative justice. Readings will include work by John Locke, Alexis de Tocqueville, Michel Foucault, Angela Davis, Michelle Alexander, Philip Pettit, and Andrew Dilts.
3744 POLS-238-02 Prisons and Justice in America 1.00 LEC Terwiel, Anna TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This political theory course examines prisons and justice in the US. We will pursue two large questions: How did the prison come to exemplify criminal justice? And how does mass incarceration affect our understanding of the US as a liberal democracy? We will examine the theoretical underpinnings of the prison in rights discourse; the prison’s productive role in shaping conceptions of freedom and citizenship; and its relation to racism, biopower, and neoliberalism. We will also consider alternative visions of criminal justice: abolition democracy and restorative and transformative justice. Readings will include work by John Locke, Alexis de Tocqueville, Michel Foucault, Angela Davis, Michelle Alexander, Philip Pettit, and Andrew Dilts.
3448 POLS-242-01 Pol Sci Research Methods 1.00 LEC Williamson, Abigail TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Why do people participate in politics? Which government policies best serve the public good? What prevents wars between nations? Political scientists employ a toolbox of research methods to investigate these and other fundamental questions. By learning the strengths and weaknesses of various qualitative and quantitative methods, students in this course will identify how best to answer the political questions about which they feel most passionate. They will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them observe, analyze, and report on political phenomena. Research skills will include field observation, interviewing, comparative case studies, and data analysis using statistical software. No previous statistical or programming experience is necessary.
3451 POLS-256-01 State & Society in Comp Persp 1.00 LEC Matsuzaki, Reo MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This methodologically focused course examines the various ways government officials and social forces interact as both collaborators and competitors in the exercise of political power and authority across the globe. First, we will examine the role of society in the maintenance of governance within democratic and authoritarian regimes. Second, students will investigate why some countries are able to achieve social cohesion and unity, while others fragment along ethnic and racial lines. The final portion of the course will focus on societies in conflict: We will explore how individuals may successfully challenge the authority of the state and force change in government policy through collective action, as well as the causes of civil wars and the factors that determine the timing and nature of their resolution.
3453 POLS-273-01 Law, Politics and Society 1.00 LEC Dudas, Mary MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course examines the role of law in American society and politics. We will approach law as a living museum displaying the central values, choices, purposes, goals, and ideals of our society. Topics covered include: the nature of law; the structure of American law; the legal profession, juries, and morality; crime and punishment; courts, civil action, and social change; and justice and democracy. Throughout, we will be concerned with law and its relation to cultural change and political conflict.
3742 POLS-301-01 Amer Political Parties & Elec 1.00 LEC Evans, Diana TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement. Closed to seniors.
  An analysis of American political parties, including a study of voting behavior, party organization and leadership, and recent and proposed reforms and proposals for reorganization of existing party structures.
3454 POLS-312-01 Politics: Mid East & N. Africa 1.00 LEC Flibbert, Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course offers an introduction to the comparative analysis of politics in the Middle East and North Africa. Organized thematically and conceptually, we examine topics ranging from state formation, nationalism, and civil-military relations, to oil and economic development, democratization efforts, political Islam, and regional concerns.
3455 POLS-313-01 Nationl & Europ Forgn Policies 1.00 LEC Lefebvre, Thomas MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will investigate the relationship between European Union member states and EU foreign policy. It will question how EU member states reconcile their independent foreign policies with their membership in the European Union as well as their relationship with NATO. Students will have the opportunity to assess to what extent EU member states have Europeanized their foreign affairs policies in order to build a more coherent Common Security and Defense Policy (CDSP).
3549 POLS-317-01 Amer Political Thought 1.00 SEM Dudas, Mary MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement. Closed to seniors.
  A study of the development of American political thought: the colonial period; the Revolution; Jeffersonian democracy; the defense of slave society; social Darwinism; the Populist and Progressive reform movements; and current theories of conservatism, liberalism, and the Left.
3797 POLS-330-01 US-China Relations 1.00 SEM Staff, Trinity TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  With China's ascent as a major political and economic power, the relationship between the U.S. and China became one of the most vital and yet extremely complex bilateral relationships in the world. The Trump administration tends to see China as a major challenger for American power and interests, while some of the biggest global challenges require good US-China cooperation. The course will take both a historical and a contemporary perspective on US-China relations. Key topics include: US-China economic relations, nuclear proliferation, the Taiwan question, counter-terrorism, regional security, cyberspace security, climate change, the Belt and Road Initiative, and human rights. The course invites students to think about the US-China relations from multiple perspectives and to form educated and informed views about this relationship.
3456 POLS-332-01 Understanding Civil Conflict 1.00 SEM Carbonetti, Benjamin TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused
  NOTE: This course is a sophomore/junior seminar
  This course surveys the many causes and consequences of civil conflict and civil war. Major themes of the course include ethnic fractionalization, natural resources, climate change, colonial legacies, institutional design, globalization, intervention, international efforts in state building, gendered violence, and human rights. The course also examines the different theoretical and methodological approaches to studying civil conflict.
3457 POLS-333-01 Global Food Politics 1.00 LEC Lefebvre, Thomas MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA FYR5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course investigates the fast-paced environment of global food politics, from the impact of states and international organizations on global food production and distribution, to international trade negotiations such as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T-TIP). It also considers the roles of corporations and NGOs, and the dispute resolution mechanisms such as the World Trade Organization (WTO) and arbitration of Investor-State Dispute Settlements (ISDS).
3458 POLS-340-01 Republicanism Ancient & Modern 1.00 LEC Smith, Gregory TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  The Republican Tradition is traced by most scholars back to Greece and the different regimes in Sparta and Athens. All of the pre-Modern Republics had in common that they were small, warlike, and homogeneous. But after the fall of Rome, the Republican Tradition went into eclipse for almost 1,500 years. The conscious search for a distinctively Modern Republican alternative, which was to be large, prosperous, less warlike and less homogeneous began with Machiavelli and traces itself through a variety of thinkers down to Montesquieu, Locke and the American Founding. There is another distinctively Modern permutation of the Republican Tradition that we will consider as exemplified by Rousseau and the French Revolution. The course will explore the nature of pre-Modern Republicanism but will focus on the distinctive nature of the rise and perfection of the Modern Liberal variant of Republicanism.
3099 POLS-353-01 Authoritarianism in Eurasia 1.00 LEC Matsuzaki, Reo MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 5 seats are reserved for sophomore students.
  More than half of the countries in the world are authoritarian or mixed regimes. Yet the study of authoritarianism—specifically, how authoritarian regimes function, and sources of their resilience and collapse—has long been neglected in political science. Authoritarian regimes in Tunisia, Egypt, and Syria, all widely regarded as models of resilience right up until their demise, turned out to be strikingly and unexpectedly fragile. Conversely, analysts have predicted the collapse of North Korea for decades, only to witness its survival through war, famine, economic collapse, and potentially destabilizing leadership transitions. In this course, we will examine the nascent scholarship on authoritarianism, especially as it pertains to Eurasia—namely, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and East and Southeast Asia.
3440 POLS-355-01 Urban Politics 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie T: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102 or permission of instructor.
  This course will use the issues, institutions, and personalities of the metropolitan area of Hartford to study political power, who has it, and who wants it. Particular attention will be given to the forms of local government, types of communities, and the policies of urban institutions. Guest speakers will be used to assist each student in preparing a monograph on a local political system.
3459 POLS-369-01 Intl Human Rights Law 1.00 LEC Carbonetti, Benjamin TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course offers a comprehensive survey of the evolution of international human rights law, focusing on the major actors and processes at work. Which rights do individual human beings have vis-a-vis the modern state? What is the relationship between domestic and international legal processes? Are regional human rights mechanisms like the European system more influential than international ones? More generally, how effective is contemporary international human rights in securing accountability and justice? We use specific cases and contemporary debates to study a range of treaties and emerging institutions, including ad hoc war crimes tribunals and the International Criminal Court.
3460 POLS-379-01 American Foreign Policy 1.00 LEC Flibbert, Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  This course offers an examination of postwar American foreign policy. After reviewing the major theoretical and interpretive perspectives, we examine the policymaking process, focused on the principal players in the executive and legislative branches, as well as interest groups and the media. We then turn to contemporary issues: the "war on terror," the Iraq war, humanitarian intervention, U.S. relations with other major powers, and America's future prospects as the dominant global power.
3671 POLS-385-01 Crossing Borders 1.00 LEC Messina, Anthony M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course investigates the primary economic, humanitarian, and political forces that are driving and sustaining the complex phenomenon of contemporary transnational migration. Within this context, several key questions are addressed: Have the forces of globalization and the entanglements of international commitments and treaty obligations significantly compromised the policy-making prerogatives of the traditional nation state? What are the benefits and costs of migration for the immigration receiving countries? Is a liberal immigration regime desirable and, if so, can it be politically sustained?
2136 POLS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2310 POLS-402-01 Sr Sem:Amer Govt Dem Rep 1.00 SEM Evans, Diana W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This seminar consists of an investigation of the nature and processes of representation of individuals and groups at the level of American national government, especially within the U.S. Congress. Topics dealt with include the concept of representation, the goals of representatives and represented, means by which government is influenced from the outside, and the implications for representation of recent campaign finance and congressional reforms. Enrollment limited.
3461 POLS-406-01 Sr Sem: Why Political Phil? 1.00 SEM Smith, Gregory W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This seminar will be devoted to a close reading of a major political philosopher in the Western tradition.
3462 POLS-418-01 Sr.Sem:State Form & State-Bld 1.00 SEM Matsuzaki, Reo MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This seminar is organized around two themes. First, it will examine the origins of the modern state in China and Western Europe, as well as the cause of diversity in state institutions across the globe. In particular, the consequences of Western imperialism on the development of African and Asian states will be explored. Second, we will discuss historic and contemporary attempts at transferring Western institutions to the global periphery—a phenomenon commonly known as state-building. Students will debate the strategic, developmental, and humanitarian merits and shortcomings of this policy. Questions that will be discussed include the following: What explains variation in the structure of political authority across different states? What is the legacy of colonialism? Can stable democracies be built through foreign occupation?
3335 POLS-425-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 20
2137 POLS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2138 POLS-490-01 Research Assistant 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3463 POLS-496-01 Senior Thesis Colloquium 1.00 SEM Kamola, Isaac MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This is a required colloquium for senior political science majors writing theses. The class will proceed in part through course readings about research methods and aims, and in part through offering students the opportunity to present and discuss their thesis projects. All students will be required to write a (non-introductory draft) chapter by semester's end.
2550 POLS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  For honors candidates (see description of Honors in Political Science following the “Areas of Concentration” section). Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment in honors.
3006 INTS-212-01 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker, Raymond TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for sophomores.
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
3007 INTS-212-02 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker, Raymond TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for sophomores.
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
3008 INTS-212-03 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker, Raymond TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for sophomores.
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.