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Course Schedule for POLITICAL SCIENCE - Fall 2014
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2270 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Chambers,Stefanie TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - N130 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This section of POLS 102 is methodologically focused.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-years.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
2271 POLS-102-02 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Chambers,Stefanie TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - N130 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This section of POLS 102 is methodologically focused.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-years.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
2541 POLS-102-03 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Williamson,Abigail Fisher TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM CT - 308 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
2061 POLS-103-01 Intro Compar Politics 1.00 LEC Messina,Anthony M. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM MECC - 246 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This section of POLS 103 is methodologically focused.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students
  This lecture course examines major themes and approaches within comparative politics. Its purpose is twofold: First, it provides the necessary theoretical and conceptual foundation for upper-level classes within this subfield. To this end, a broad array of key classics and recent works within comparative politics will be examined. Second, students will learn about the political and economic institutions that undergird foreign countries within a comparative framework. Readings will draw from various regions of the world, including Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Questions that will be discussed include, but are not limited to, the following: What role, if any, can the government play in promoting economic growth? Why do civil wars occur and what is the role of ethnicity in perpetuating conflict?
3118 POLS-103-02 Intro Compar Politics 1.00 LEC Bourbeau,James R. MW: 6:30PM-7:45PM SH - N130 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students
  This lecture course examines major themes and approaches within comparative politics. Its purpose is twofold: First, it provides the necessary theoretical and conceptual foundation for upper-level classes within this subfield. To this end, a broad array of key classics and recent works within comparative politics will be examined. Second, students will learn about the political and economic institutions that undergird foreign countries within a comparative framework. Readings will draw from various regions of the world, including Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Questions that will be discussed include, but are not limited to, the following: What role, if any, can the government play in promoting economic growth? Why do civil wars occur and what is the role of ethnicity in perpetuating conflict?
3138 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Carbonetti,Benjamin C. MW: 6:30PM-7:45PM MC - 106 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
3328 POLS-104-02 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 106 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
2883 POLS-105-01 Intro Pol Philosophy 1.00 LEC Maxwell,Lida E. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM SH - N130 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This section of POLS 105 is methodologically focused.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  An introduction to the philosophical study of political and moral life through a consideration of various topics of both current and historical interest. Topics include environmentalism, ancients and moderns, male and female, nature and nurture, race and ethnicity, reason and history, and reason and revelation.
2277 POLS-241-01 Emp Pol Mthd & Data Anal 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena M: 2:40PM-3:55PM
W: 2:40PM-3:55PM
CT - 210 NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An introduction to the design and execution of empirical political research involving computer analysis. The course covers the normative and empirical arguments at the foundation of the science of politics and the methods evolving from these arguments, and it trains students in the use of computers and statistical software. Course work includes reading, discussion, and completion of a research project in which the theory learned in class is put into practice. No programming experience required.
2423 POLS-301-01 American Political Parties 1.00 LEC Evans,Diana TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - S201 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  An analysis of American political parties, including a study of voting behavior, party organization and leadership, and recent and proposed reforms and proposals for reorganization of existing party structures.
3439 POLS-305-01 Intl Organizations 1.00 LEC Molles,Elitsa V. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 307 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 104.
  This course explores the dynamics of international organizations, examining a broad range of institutions in world politics. In particular, we draw on a variety of perspectives—from mainstream International Relations theory to organizational analysis—to understand questions of institutional emergence, design, and effectiveness. Using case studies and simulations, students are encouraged to think concretely about the challenges facing international organizations.
3141 POLS-312-01 Politics: Mid East & N. Africa 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM LSC - 132 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course offers an introduction to the comparative analysis of politics in the Middle East and North Africa. Organized thematically and conceptually, we examine topics ranging from state formation, nationalism, and civil-military relations, to oil and economic development, democratization efforts, political Islam, and regional concerns.
3329 POLS-316-01 Con Law II:Civ Lib & Civ Ri 1.00 SEM McMahon,Kevin J. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - N128 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Seats are reserved for sophomore/junior Political Science majors.
  An analysis and evaluation of decisions of courts (and related materials) dealing principally with freedom of expression and equal protection of the laws.
2965 POLS-348-01 Social Inequal United States 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM CT - 210 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102 or permission of instructor.
  This course considers the implications of social inequalities for American politics. Income and wealth disparities in the United States have grown rapidly since the 1970s, overlapping with social exclusions based on race, gender, and sexual orientation. The course explores the causes, consequences, and solutions to rising economic inequality at the national and local levels, examining particular instances from Connecticut and contextualizing them within a broader global context. We will pay particular attention to the role of public policies in creating or potentially mitigating inequalities among citizens. Throughout the course we will consider the implications of social inequality for American politics and discuss how the persistence of different forms of inequality squares with enduring ideals of equality and equal opportunity in the American political system.
3327 POLS-353-01 Authoritarianism in Eurasia 1.00 LEC Matsuzaki,Reo TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM LSC - 133 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  More than half of the countries in the world are authoritarian or mixed regimes. Yet the study of authoritarianism—specifically, how authoritarian regimes function, and sources of their resilience and collapse—has long been neglected in political science. Authoritarian regimes in Tunisia, Egypt, and Syria, all widely regarded as models of resilience right up until their demise, turned out to be strikingly and unexpectedly fragile. Conversely, analysts have predicted the collapse of North Korea for decades, only to witness its survival through war, famine, economic collapse, and potentially destabilizing leadership transitions. In this course, we will examine the nascent scholarship on authoritarianism, especially as it pertains to Eurasia—namely, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and East and Southeast Asia.
3142 POLS-355-01 Urban Politics 1.00 LEC Chambers,Stefanie M: 1:15PM-3:55PM LSC - 136 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: 20 seats are reserved for Political Science majors
  This course will use the issues, institutions, and personalities of the metropolitan area of Hartford to study political power, who has it, and who wants it. Particular attention will be given to the forms of local government, types of communities, and the policies of urban institutions. Guest speakers will be used to assist each student in preparing a monograph on a local political system.
3143 POLS-369-01 Intl Human Rights Law 1.00 LEC Carbonetti,Benjamin C. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM LSC - 133 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course offers a comprehensive survey of the evolution of international human rights law, focusing on the major actors and processes at work. Which rights do individual human beings have vis-a-vis the modern state? What is the relationship between domestic and international legal processes? Are regional human rights mechanisms like the European system more influential than international ones? More generally, how effective is contemporary international human rights in securing accountability and justice? We use specific cases and contemporary debates to study a range of treaties and emerging institutions, including ad hoc war crimes tribunals and the International Criminal Court.
3144 POLS-379-01 American Foreign Policy 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM LSC - 132 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  This course offers an examination of postwar American foreign policy. After reviewing the major theoretical and interpretive perspectives, we examine the policymaking process, focused on the principal players in the executive and legislative branches, as well as interest groups and the media. We then turn to contemporary issues: the "war on terror," the Iraq war, humanitarian intervention, U.S. relations with other major powers, and America's future prospects as the dominant global power.
2229 POLS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2540 POLS-402-01 Sr Sem:Amer Govt Dem Rep 1.00 SEM Evans,Diana W: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 309A Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This seminar consists of an investigation of the nature and processes of representation of individuals and groups at the level of American national government, especially within the U.S. Congress. Topics dealt with include the concept of representation, the goals of representatives and represented, means by which government is influenced from the outside, and the implications for representation of recent campaign finance and congressional reforms. Enrollment limited.
3145 POLS-412-01 Sr Sem: Pol of Judicial Policy 1.00 SEM McMahon,Kevin J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - T121 Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores a constant tension in the work of courts. While courts are not “supposed” to make policy, they often do. In examining this tension, the course will focus on the origins of judicial intervention, the nature of specific court decisions on policy questions, and the effectiveness of those decisions in producing social change.
2964 POLS-418-01 Sr.Sem:State Form & State-Bld 1.00 SEM Matsuzaki,Reo TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM HL - 123 Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This seminar is organized around two themes. First, it will examine the origins of the modern state in China and Western Europe, as well as the cause of diversity in state institutions across the globe. In particular, the consequences of Western imperialism on the development of African and Asian states will be explored. Second, we will discuss historic and contemporary attempts at transferring Western institutions to the global periphery—a phenomenon commonly known as state-building. Students will debate the strategic, developmental, and humanitarian merits and shortcomings of this policy. Questions that will be discussed include the following: What explains variation in the structure of political authority across different states? What is the legacy of colonialism? Can stable democracies be built through foreign occupation?
2230 POLS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2231 POLS-490-01 Research Assistant 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3146 POLS-496-01 Senior Thesis Colloquium 1.00 SEM Maxwell,Lida E. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 309A WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  This is a required colloquium for senior political science majors writing theses. The class will proceed in part through course readings about research methods and aims, and in part through offering students the opportunity to present and discuss their thesis projects. All students will be required to write a (non-introductory draft) chapter by semester's end.
3085 POLS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  For honors candidates (see description of Honors in Political Science following the “Areas of Concentration” section). Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment in honors.
2308 INTS-212-01 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM HL - 123 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 5 seats are reserved for sophomores.
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
3150 INTS-212-02 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM HL - 123 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 5 seats are reserved for sophomores
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
2984 PBPL-331-01 Immigration/Integration Policy 1.00 SEM Williamson,Abigail Fisher TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM LSC - 131 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in either Political Science 102 or Public Policy and Law 201, or permission of instructor.
  Critics of immigration argue that a growing foreign-born population endangers economic health, threatens democratic traditions, and undermines cultural unity. Proponents respond that immigration is central to America’s national identity and crucial for prosperity. This course examines popular and scholarly debates over immigration and immigrant adaptation and analyzes the efficacy of U.S. policies aimed at managing this process. Topics include U.S. border security, the increased state and local regulation of immigration, and the DREAM Act, a proposal that would offer certain undocumented youth a path toward legal status. Course assignments will emphasize persuasive writing and communication for a policymaking audience, including memos and briefings.