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Course Schedule for POLITICAL SCIENCE - Spring 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
4983 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Dudas,Mary J. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM CT - 105 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
4984 POLS-102-02 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Dudas,Mary J. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM LSC - AUD SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
4985 POLS-103-01 Intro Compar Politics 1.00 LEC Molles,Elitsa V. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MECC - 220 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  This lecture course examines major themes and approaches within comparative politics. Its purpose is twofold: First, it provides the necessary theoretical and conceptual foundation for upper-level classes within this subfield. To this end, a broad array of key classics and recent works within comparative politics will be examined. Second, students will learn about the political and economic institutions that undergird foreign countries within a comparative framework. Readings will draw from various regions of the world, including Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Questions that will be discussed include, but are not limited to, the following: What role, if any, can the government play in promoting economic growth? Why do civil wars occur and what is the role of ethnicity in perpetuating conflict?
4109 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MC - 102 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
4328 POLS-104-02 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 102 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
4986 POLS-105-01 Intro Pol Philosophy 1.00 LEC Maxwell,Lida E. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - N130 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  An introduction to the philosophical study of political and moral life through a consideration of various topics of both current and historical interest. Topics include environmentalism, ancients and moderns, male and female, nature and nurture, race and ethnicity, reason and history, and reason and revelation.
4677 POLS-220-01 Histry of Pol Thought II 1.00 LEC Smith,Gregory TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - AUD SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 70
  This course focuses on the development of modern political philosophy. All readings will be from primary sources that include, among others, Machiavelli, Descartes, Bacon, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, and Marcuse. Enrollment limited.
4987 POLS-237-01 Building the European Union 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 303 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  As an intergovernmental and supranational union of 27 democratic member countries, the contemporary European Union is arguably the boldest experiment in inter-state economic and political integration since the formation of the contemporary nation-state system during the mid-17th century. Against this backdrop, this course considers the project for greater economic, political, and security integration within its appropriate historical context, its current economic and political setting, and its projected future ambitions. As such, it will very much be concerned with recent events and important events-in-the-making, including the continuing conflict over the Lisbon Treaty and the EU's projected enlargement by several new members.
4471 POLS-242-01 Pol Sci Research Methods 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM LIB - 02 NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: This class is methodologically focused.
  NOTE: 18 seats are reserved for Political Science majors.
  Why do people participate in politics? Which government policies best serve the public good? What prevents wars between nations? Political scientists employ a toolbox of research methods to investigate these and other fundamental questions. By learning the strengths and weaknesses of various qualitative and quantitative methods, students in this course will identify how best to answer the political questions about which they feel most passionate. They will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them observe, analyze, and report on political phenomena. Research skills will include field observation, interviewing, comparative case studies, and data analysis using statistical software. No previous statistical or programming experience is necessary.
4988 POLS-309-01 Congress and Public Policy 1.00 LEC Evans,Diana TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM LSC - 136 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102.
  A study of the structure and politics of the American Congress. This course examines the relationship between Congress members and their constituents; the organization and operation of Congress; the relationship between legislative behavior and the electoral incentive; and the place of Congress in national policy networks.
4989 POLS-313-01 Nationl & Europ Forgn Policies 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 307 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will investigate the relationship between European Union member states and EU foreign policy. It will question how EU member states reconcile their independent foreign policies with their membership in the European Union as well as their relationship with NATO. Students will have the opportunity to assess to what extent EU member states have Europeanized their foreign affairs policies in order to build a more coherent Common Security and Defense Policy (CDSP).
4937 POLS-344-01 Politics of Africa 1.00 LEC Kamola,Isaac A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM LSC - 133  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Political Scientists often study Africa as a distinct place, defined by a unique set of crises, which set the continent apart from the rest of the world. This class, in contrast, starts from the assertion that Africa is not a discrete location to be studied in isolation but instead a site of active and dynamic human practices that intersect and define the political and economic lives of all people across the world. "Africa" is, in the words of James Ferguson, a "category through which a 'world' is structured." We first examine the colonial and Cold War histories shaping the modern world, and how they played out in Africa specifically. We then study contemporary issues that tie Africa to the rest of the world, including: civil conflict and the "responsibility to protect"; debt, structural adjustment, aid, and development; Chinese/Africa economic cooperation; "the land question"; and the Arab Spring.
4941 POLS-346-01 World Economy of Higher Educ 1.00 LEC Kamola,Isaac A. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM SH - N129  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Colleges and universities are commonly understood as "ivory towers" removed from the economic pressures of "the real world." However, higher education has always been an important dimension of the world economy. Universities and colleges train employees, develop human capital, design marketable goods, and sometimes sell education for profit. This class examines theorists of higher education, the rise of the American-style university, the Cold War politics of higher education, the World Bank's reconceptualization of higher education as key to economic development, the reframing of education as an exportable service, and branch campuses in the Middle East. In short, this course helps students better understand various pressures and dynamics of the contemporary world economy through an examination of the particular institution of which we are a part.
4990 POLS-347-01 Immigration in Contemp Europe 1.00 LEC Molles,Elitsa V. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 102 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Why do people migrate? How do host states and societies react to an increasingly multicultural and diverse foreign population? What impacts the political, economic and socio-cultural incorporation of Europe’s immigrants? How has migration changed the meaning of membership in the Western European nation-state? This course explores the central debates in immigration studies through a survey of contemporary Europe, with cases comprising immigrant populations in both traditional immigrant receivers (e.g., Algerians in France or Turks in Germany) and “new” immigration countries (e.g. Ecuadorians in Spain or Poles and Nigerians in Ireland). Particular interest is placed on how the relationship between the immigrant and the receiving state transforms both.
5115 POLS-356-01 Philosophy and Religion 1.00 LEC Smith,Gregory TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM CT - 210  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  The course will study the interpenetration of Early Christianity and the Philosophical Tradition in the period especially from Tertullian, through Ambrose and Jerome to Augustine. Readings from the Gospels and the Letters of Paul will be supplemented by historical works by Downing, Johnson, Copleston, Jonas and others, finishing with significant selections from Cicero and Augustine. Walking tours will include trips to St. Peters and the Vatican, plus the Vatican library, the Arch of Constantine, San Clemente, San Pietro in Vincoli, Domine Quo Vadas, Castel Sant' Angelo, various catacombs and other possibilities to be announced.
4938 POLS-357-01 Hannah Arendt 1.00 SEM Maxwell,Lida E. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM LSC - 136 WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is open to Juniors and Sophomores only.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement.
  This seminar focuses on the work of the 20th century Jewish German émigré thinker, Hannah Arendt. Arendt’s work begins from the premise that the rise of totalitarianism reveals the breakdown of traditional western categories of moral and political thought – categories that were unable to generate challenges or resistance to the rise of Nazism. Arendt’s work fills the gap left by the “explosion” of our old categories of thought by pressing us to understand our contemporary predicament and to ask how we might guide ourselves anew. Among the questions raised is: what kinds of “guideposts,” historical examples, and practices of political action might serve as new forms of guidance for citizens interested in generating and sustaining freedom, equality, diversity, human rights, and the rule of law?
4991 POLS-359-01 Feminist Political Theory 1.00 LEC Maxwell,Lida E. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM LSC - 131 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course examines debates in feminist political theory. Topics will include liberal and socialist feminist theory, as well as radical, postcolonial, and postmodern feminist theory. We will also consider feminist perspectives on issues of race and sex, pornography, law and rights, and “hot button” issues like veiling. We will pay particular attention to the question of what feminism means and should mean in increasingly multicultural, global societies. Readings will include work by Mary Wollstonecraft, Carol Gilligan, Catherine MacKinnon, Chandra Mohanty, Wendy Brown, Audre Lorde, Patricia Williams, & Judith Butler.
5136 POLS-369-01 Intl Human Rights Law 1.00 LEC Carbonetti,Benjamin C. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - AUD GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course offers a comprehensive survey of the evolution of international human rights law, focusing on the major actors and processes at work. Which rights do individual human beings have vis-a-vis the modern state? What is the relationship between domestic and international legal processes? Are regional human rights mechanisms like the European system more influential than international ones? More generally, how effective is contemporary international human rights in securing accountability and justice? We use specific cases and contemporary debates to study a range of treaties and emerging institutions, including ad hoc war crimes tribunals and the International Criminal Court.
4992 POLS-372-01 The American Welfare State 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM LSC - 137 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  The American government provides a social safety net to its citizens through a number of direct social programs, including Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, unemployment insurance, public assistance, and a variety of other social provisions. However, the role that federal and state governments should play in providing a robust social safety net remains a highly contested issue in American politics. This course contextualizes the contemporary debate by examining the historical development of the peculiar American welfare state from the earliest social programs in the nineteenth century to the New Deal and Great Society programs to the scaling back of direct social programs during the 1980s and 1990s.
5028 POLS-380-01 War & Peace in the Middle East 1.00 SEM Flibbert,Andrew MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM MC - 313 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  All seats are reserved for juniors and sophomores.
  NOTE: This course is only open to Juniors and Sophomores.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement.
  This course addresses the causes and consequences of nationalist, regional, and international conflict in the Middle East. We use theoretical perspectives from political science to shed light on the dynamics of conflict, the successes and failures of attempts to resolve it, and the roles played by the United States and other major international actors. The course is organized on a modified chronological basis, starting with the early phases of the Arab-Israeli conflict and ending with current developments in Iraq.
4994 POLS-390-01 Theor Internat Political Econ 1.00 SEM Kamola,Isaac A. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM LSC - 135 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  This course is only open to sophomores and juniors.
  This course asks a number of core questions concerning international political economy: What explains inequality between nations? How do countries develop? What can states, international institutions, and other political actors do to advance economic prosperity? How one answers these questions, however, depends upon where one stands regarding various fundamental principles of political economy. We start the class with the work of Adam Smith and Karl Marx. We then examine how this debate plays out in the work of early twentieth century thinkers debating the cause of the Great Depression and the two world wars (including Polanyi, Schumpeter, Keynes, Hayek, and Friedman). We conclude by examining various contemporary economic issues.
4148 POLS-392-01 Legislative Internship 1.00 LEC Evans,Diana M: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 305 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 14
  The Trinity College Legislative Internship is a special program designed for those students who want to observe politics and government firsthand. Student interns work full time for individual legislators and are eligible for up to four course credits, three for a letter grade and one pass/fail. One of the graded credits is a political science credit. In addition to working approximately 35 to 40 hours per week for a legislator, each intern participates in a seminar in which interns present papers and discuss issues related to the legislative process. Although there are no prerequisite courses for enrollment in this program, preference will be given to juniors and seniors. Students majoring in areas other than political science are encouraged to apply. Candidates for this program, which is limited to 14 students, should contact the Political Science Department in April or September. The program will accommodate some students who wish to work part time (20 hours per week) for two graded course credits.
4147 POLS-394-01 Legislative Internship 1.00 LEC Evans,Diana TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 14
4146 POLS-396-01 Legislative Internship 1.00 LEC Evans,Diana TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 14
4145 POLS-398-01 Legislative Internship 1.00 LEC Evans,Diana TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 14
4269 POLS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4995 POLS-408-01 Sr Sem: Racial & Ethnic Pol 1.00 SEM Chambers,Stefanie M: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - N215 Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This course examines the role of African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans in all areas of the American political system. We study each group and their roles as voters, party activists, candidates and public officials. By exploring the socio-historical context within which each group acts, we will also consider the non-traditional forms of political participation embraced by some of these groups and the reasons that minority groups have resorted to such strategies. The process of political socialization will also be considered, as will the political behavior, attitudes, and public policy opinions of these groups. Finally, we will also explore theories of racial and ethnic political coalitions and conflict.
5176 POLS-414-01 Sr Sem: Global Environmen Pol 1.00 SEM Carbonetti,Benjamin C. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM LSC - 135 Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  Environmental issues have attracted the increasing attention of scholars of international relations. As globalization continues to accelerate, it is clear that environmental problems do not adhere to national borders and require international efforts to remedy them. This introduces student to the international dimensions of environmental politics through an in-depth analysis of both the theory and practice of international attempts to tackle growing environmental challenges. The course also includes discussion of, among other subjects, the relationship between global environmental issues and international law, international organizations, international political economy, war, and human rights.
4996 POLS-426-01 Sr Sem: Who Are We? 1.00 SEM Messina,Anthony M. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM HL - 123 Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  Citizenship historically has been defined as a set of rights and obligations that are exclusive to formal members, or "citizens," of territorially bounded nation states. Transnational migration challenges this assumption by creating citizens outside of and foreign residents or "denizens" inside of traditional nation state territories. Some scholars have suggested that globalization generally -- and migration specifically -- undermines the salience of citizenship and fosters conflict and confusion about who "we" are. This senior seminar will explore the major political and social challenges posed by transnational migration for notions of who "belongs" and who doesn't within the major immigration-receiving countries, including the United States.
5227 POLS-427-01 SrSem:Eth/Imm/Relg in W.Eur 1.00 SEM Messina,Anthony M. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM HL - 123 Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This seminar surveys the politics of ethnicity, religion, and immigration in contemporary Western Europe. It thus includes both traditional ethnic or ethnoterritorial conflict (e.g., Spanish Basque separatism) and more recent manifestations of ethnic/religious tensions arising from the migration after 1950 of millions of Third World immigrants and asylum seekers to the major immigration-receiving countries (e.g., Turks in Germany, Algerians in France). Equal attention will be paid in the course to the effects of politics on the political and social incorporation of ethnic minorities as well as how their presence and demands are transforming the domestic politics of Western Europe.
4270 POLS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4629 POLS-490-01 Research Assistant 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4630 POLS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  For honors candidates (see description of Honors in Political Science following the “Areas of Concentration” section). Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment in honors.
5129 INTS-205-01 War on Terror 1.00 LEC Prashad,Vijay TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM LSC - 134 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  9/11 inaugurated a new epoch not only for the United States, but decidedly for the world. Tentacular wars of and on terror stretched from Afghanistan into Yemen, from Madrid into Bali. This course will offer a social history of the war on terror. We will explore the roots of the war on terror in the histories of Afghanistan and Yemen, and plot the switch from the prehistory of the War on Terror (1993-2001) to the War on Terror Part 1 (2001-2007) to the War on Terror Part 2 (2007 to the present).
5223 INTS-205-02 War on Terror 1.00 LEC Tabar,Linda TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM LSC - 134 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  9/11 inaugurated a new epoch not only for the United States, but decidedly for the world. Tentacular wars of and on terror stretched from Afghanistan into Yemen, from Madrid into Bali. This course will offer a social history of the war on terror. We will explore the roots of the war on terror in the histories of Afghanistan and Yemen, and plot the switch from the prehistory of the War on Terror (1993-2001) to the War on Terror Part 1 (2001-2007) to the War on Terror Part 2 (2007 to the present).
5155 INTS-212-01 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM HL - 123 Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
5156 INTS-212-02 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM HL - 123 Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
5296 INTS-212-03 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM HL - 123 Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
4931 INTS-302-01 Global Cities 1.00 SEM Myers,Garth A. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM 70VS - SEM Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of 'developed' and 'developing' worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization.
4492 PBPL-220-01 Research and Evaluation 1.00 SEM Moskowitz,Rachel L MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM LIB - 02 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 22
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, and permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Students taking this course should not enroll in POLS 242.
  Which policy interventions actually work and which fail to meet their goals? Answering this question is essential to improving public and non-profit services and securing further funding for worthwhile projects. This course aims to give students the ability to comprehend policy research and evaluation, as well as the tools to design and conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them to design evaluations or analyze data to assess the effectiveness of policies. Topics will include data analysis using statistical software, but no previous programming experience is necessary.