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Course Schedule for POLITICAL SCIENCE - Spring 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
5020 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Laws, Serena MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, and 5 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
5021 POLS-102-02 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Laws, Serena MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, and 5 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
4147 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert, Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, and 5 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
4339 POLS-104-02 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert, Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, and 5 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
5022 POLS-105-01 Intro Pol Philosophy 1.00 LEC Terwiel, Anna TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, and 5 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  An introduction to the philosophical study of political and moral life through a consideration of various topics of both current and historical interest. Topics include environmentalism, ancients and moderns, male and female, nature and nurture, race and ethnicity, reason and history, and reason and revelation.
5023 POLS-220-01 Histry of Pol Thought II 1.00 LEC Smith, Gregory TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 70
  This course focuses on the development of modern political philosophy. All readings will be from primary sources that include, among others, Machiavelli, Descartes, Bacon, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, and Marcuse. Enrollment limited.
5025 POLS-238-01 Prisons and Justice in America 1.00 LEC Terwiel, Anna TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, and 5 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This political theory course examines prisons and justice in the US. We will pursue two large questions: How did the prison come to exemplify criminal justice? And how does mass incarceration affect our understanding of the US as a liberal democracy? We will examine the theoretical underpinnings of the prison in rights discourse; the prison’s productive role in shaping conceptions of freedom and citizenship; and its relation to racism, biopower, and neoliberalism. We will also consider alternative visions of criminal justice: abolition democracy and restorative and transformative justice. Readings will include work by John Locke, Alexis de Tocqueville, Michel Foucault, Angela Davis, Michelle Alexander, Philip Pettit, and Andrew Dilts.
5026 POLS-242-01 Pol Sci Research Methods 1.00 LEC Williamson, Abigail TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused
  Why do people participate in politics? Which government policies best serve the public good? What prevents wars between nations? Political scientists employ a toolbox of research methods to investigate these and other fundamental questions. By learning the strengths and weaknesses of various qualitative and quantitative methods, students in this course will identify how best to answer the political questions about which they feel most passionate. They will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them observe, analyze, and report on political phenomena. Research skills will include field observation, interviewing, comparative case studies, and data analysis using statistical software. No previous statistical or programming experience is necessary.
5015 POLS-256-01 State & Society in Comp Persp 1.00 LEC Matsuzaki, Reo MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  NOTE: 15 seats for First Year Students, 15 seats for sophomores, 5 seats for juniors with a POLS major. No Seniors allowed without instructor permission
  NOTE: Students who have taken POLS 103 with Professor Matsuzaki may not enroll in this course
  This methodologically focused course examines the various ways government officials and social forces interact as both collaborators and competitors in the exercise of political power and authority across the globe. First, we will examine the role of society in the maintenance of governance within democratic and authoritarian regimes. Second, students will investigate why some countries are able to achieve social cohesion and unity, while others fragment along ethnic and racial lines. The final portion of the course will focus on societies in conflict: We will explore how individuals may successfully challenge the authority of the state and force change in government policy through collective action, as well as the causes of civil wars and the factors that determine the timing and nature of their resolution.
5040 POLS-265-01 Understand Conflict in Africa 1.00 LEC Kamola, Isaac MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, and 5 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  Many Americans claim to know certain truths about Africa when, in reality, such understandings rely heavily upon ahistorical representations of the continent. In recent decades, the portrayal of Africa as conflict-prone and violent has become the predominant way of "knowing" Africa . This course disarms such limited understandings by engaging, historicizing, and contextualizing political violence in Africa. The course starts with recent conflicts, including wars in Somalia, Rwanda, Congo, Sudan, and Libya. We then situate these conflicts within the legacy of colonialism, the Cold War, and the contemporary reorganization of the world economy. The class concludes by debating possible solutions, including foreign intervention (peacekeeping, AFRICOM, the International Criminal Court) as well as responses crafted by African-led organizations and movements (ECOWAS, African Union, and Arab Spring).
5027 POLS-305-01 Intl Organizations 1.00 LEC Lefebvre, Thomas MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course explores the dynamics of international organizations, examining a broad range of institutions in world politics. In particular, we draw on a variety of perspectives—from mainstream International Relations theory to organizational analysis—to understand questions of institutional emergence, design, and effectiveness. Using case studies and simulations, students are encouraged to think concretely about the challenges facing international organizations.
5028 POLS-316-01 Civil Liberties 1.00 SEM McMahon, Kevin TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement. Closed to seniors.
  An analysis and evaluation of US Supreme Court decisions (and related materials) dealing principally with freedom of expression; the right to privacy; freedom of religion; and, liberty and security.
5024 POLS-325-01 American Presidency 1.00 LEC McMahon, Kevin TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An explanation of the institutional and political evolution of the presidency with an emphasis on the nature of presidential power in domestic and foreign affairs. Attention is also given to institutional conflicts with Congress and the courts. The nature of presidential leadership and personality is also explored.
5029 POLS-329-01 Political Philosophy & Ethics 1.00 LEC Smith, Gregory TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will engage the literature of ethical theory and ethical debate. The course attempts to enlighten the place ethical reasoning plays in political science, political life and the tradition of political philosophy. Readings in the course will differ from year to year but may include such authors as Aristotle, Cicero, Aquinas, Kant, Mill, Rawls, Nietzsche. In different years the course may focus on various themes which could include topics such as feminism, gentlemanliness, Eudaimonism, utilitarianism and deontology, ethics and theology, legal and business ethics, or the place of ethics in the discipline of Political Science.
4683 POLS-331-01 Comparative Politics East Asia 1.00 SEM Matsuzaki, Reo MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: Course is only open to Sophomores and Juniors. Closed to seniors.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement.
  This seminar examines East Asian countries through the lens of major themes found within the comparative politics subfield of political science. With an empirical emphasis on Japan, South Korea, North Korea, Taiwan, and China, topics covered in this course include the following: evolution of political power and authority in modern East Asia; Japanese colonialism and its legacies on postcolonial economic development and contemporary international relations; dynamics of regime change and democratization in South Korea and Taiwan; and the nature and durability of authoritarian governance within North Korea and China.
5030 POLS-332-01 Understanding Civil Conflict 1.00 SEM Carbonetti, Benjamin TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused
  This course surveys the many causes and consequences of civil conflict and civil war. Major themes of the course include ethnic fractionalization, natural resources, climate change, colonial legacies, institutional design, globalization, intervention, international efforts in state building, gendered violence, and human rights. The course also examines the different theoretical and methodological approaches to studying civil conflict.
5146 POLS-333-01 Global Food Politics 1.00 LEC Lefebvre, Thomas MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA FYR5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course investigates the fast-paced environment of global food politics, from the impact of states and international organizations on global food production and distribution, to international trade negotiations such as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T-TIP). It also considers the roles of corporations and NGOs, and the dispute resolution mechanisms such as the World Trade Organization (WTO) and arbitration of Investor-State Dispute Settlements (ISDS).
4887 POLS-337-01 Building the European Union 1.00 LEC Messina, Anthony MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  As an intergovernmental and supranational union of 27 democratic member countries, the contemporary European Union is arguably the boldest experiment in inter-state economic and political integration since the formation of the contemporary nation-state system during the mid-17th century. Against this backdrop, this course considers the project for greater economic, political, and security integration within its appropriate historical context, its current economic and political setting, and its projected future ambitions. As such, it will very much be concerned with recent events and important events-in-the-making, including the continuing conflict over the Lisbon Treaty and the EU's projected enlargement by several new members. Not open to students who completed POLS 237.
5031 POLS-344-01 Politics of Africa 1.00 LEC Kamola, Isaac MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused
  Political Scientists often study Africa as a distinct place, defined by a unique set of crises, which set the continent apart from the rest of the world. This class, in contrast, starts from the assertion that Africa is not a discrete location to be studied in isolation but instead a site of active and dynamic human practices that intersect and define the political and economic lives of all people across the world. "Africa" is, in the words of James Ferguson, a "category through which a 'world' is structured." We first examine the colonial and Cold War histories shaping the modern world, and how they played out in Africa specifically. We then study contemporary issues that tie Africa to the rest of the world, including: civil conflict and the "responsibility to protect"; debt, structural adjustment, aid, and development; Chinese/Africa economic cooperation; "the land question"; and the Arab Spring.
5033 POLS-369-01 Intl Human Rights Law 1.00 LEC Carbonetti, Benjamin TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course offers a comprehensive survey of the evolution of international human rights law, focusing on the major actors and processes at work. Which rights do individual human beings have vis-a-vis the modern state? What is the relationship between domestic and international legal processes? Are regional human rights mechanisms like the European system more influential than international ones? More generally, how effective is contemporary international human rights in securing accountability and justice? We use specific cases and contemporary debates to study a range of treaties and emerging institutions, including ad hoc war crimes tribunals and the International Criminal Court.
5034 POLS-380-01 War & Peace in the Middle East 1.00 SEM Flibbert, Andrew W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 104.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement. Closed to seniors.
  This course addresses the causes and consequences of nationalist, regional, and international conflict in the Middle East. We use theoretical perspectives from political science to shed light on the dynamics of conflict, the successes and failures of attempts to resolve it, and the roles played by the United States and other major international actors. The course is organized on a modified chronological basis, starting with the early phases of the Arab-Israeli conflict and ending with current developments in Iraq.
5035 POLS-385-01 Crossing Borders 1.00 LEC Messina, Anthony M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course investigates the primary economic, humanitarian, and political forces that are driving and sustaining the complex phenomenon of contemporary transnational migration. Within this context, several key questions are addressed: Have the forces of globalization and the entanglements of international commitments and treaty obligations significantly compromised the policy-making prerogatives of the traditional nation state? What are the benefits and costs of migration for the immigration receiving countries? Is a liberal immigration regime desirable and, if so, can it be politically sustained?
5036 POLS-390-01 Theor Internat Political Econ 1.00 SEM Kamola, Isaac MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement. Closed to Seniors.
  This course asks a number of core questions concerning international political economy: What explains inequality between nations? How do countries develop? What can states, international institutions, and other political actors do to advance economic prosperity? How one answers these questions, however, depends upon where one stands regarding various fundamental principles of political economy. We start the class with the work of Adam Smith and Karl Marx. We then examine how this debate plays out in the work of early twentieth century thinkers debating the cause of the Great Depression and the two world wars (including Polanyi, Schumpeter, Keynes, Hayek, and Friedman). We conclude by examining various contemporary economic issues.
5037 POLS-392-01 Legislative Internship 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The Trinity College Legislative Internship is a special program designed for those students who want to observe politics and government firsthand. Student interns work full time for individual legislators and are eligible for up to four course credits, three for a letter grade and one pass/fail. One of the graded credits is a political science credit. In addition to working approximately 35 to 40 hours per week for a legislator, each intern participates in a seminar in which interns present papers and discuss issues related to the legislative process. Although there are no prerequisite courses for enrollment in this program, preference will be given to juniors and seniors. Students majoring in areas other than political science are encouraged to apply. Candidates for this program, which is limited to 14 students, should contact the Political Science Department in April or September. The program will accommodate some students who wish to work part time (20 hours per week) for two graded course credits.
5201 POLS-394-01 Legislative Internship 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
5202 POLS-396-01 Legislative Internship 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
5203 POLS-398-01 Legislative Internship 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4289 POLS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
5038 POLS-406-01 Sr Sem: Why Political Phil? 1.00 SEM Smith, Gregory M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior Political Science majors.
  This seminar will be devoted to a close reading of a major political philosopher in the Western tradition.
5039 POLS-416-01 Senior Seminar: Biopolitics 1.00 SEM Terwiel, Anna W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: This course is only open to Senior Political Science Majors
  In the 1970s, Michel Foucault developed the concept of “biopower” to describe a distinctly modern form of power that governs the biological life of individuals and populations. This seminar takes Foucault’s work as its point of departure to ask how and why bodily existence – health and illness, life and death – matters for politics. Are we political beings insofar as we are “more than” animals? Conversely, what might it mean to assert that our bodies are political? We will examine these questions through influential theoretical texts (by Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, Nikolas Rose, Judith Butler, Achille Mbembe, and others) as well as case-studies involving hunger strikes, access to medicine, and struggles around new reproductive technologies.
4290 POLS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4520 POLS-490-01 Research Assistant 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4521 POLS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  For honors candidates (see description of Honors in Political Science following the “Areas of Concentration” section). Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment in honors.
4431 PBPL-220-01 Research and Evaluation 1.00 SEM Williamson, Abigail TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Students taking this course should not enroll in POLS 242.
  Which policy interventions actually work and which fail to meet their goals? Answering this question is essential to improving public and non-profit services and securing further funding for worthwhile projects. This course aims to give students the ability to comprehend policy research and evaluation, as well as the tools to design and conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them to design evaluations or analyze data to assess the effectiveness of policies. Topics will include data analysis using statistical software, but no previous programming experience is necessary.
5243 PBPL-375-01 Federalism and Public Policy 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 16
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, or permission of instructor.
  Federalism, a defining American constitutional principle, is a system in which political power is shared by the national government and state and local entities. This structure of “dual sovereignty,” which has been subject to ongoing interpretation, has informed some of the most divisive controversies in American history. Currently, executives, legislators, and the courts at all levels of government are engaged in robust debates about the degree to which power should be shared and whether governing authority should reside with national or with state and local officials. We will focus on how the American federal structure shapes arguments and choices in three contentious policy areas: immigration, health care, and the reform of marijuana laws.
5741 PBPL-875-01 Federalism and Public Policy 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 3
  Federalism, a defining American constitutional principle, is a system in which political power is shared by the national government and state and local entities. This structure of “dual sovereignty,” which has been subject to ongoing interpretation, has informed some of the most divisive controversies in American history. Currently, executives, legislators, and the courts at all levels of government are engaged in robust debates about the degree to which power should be shared and whether governing authority should reside with national or with state and local officials. We will focus on how the American federal structure shapes arguments and choices in three contentious policy areas: immigration, health care, and the reform of marijuana laws.