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Course Schedule for PUBLIC POLICY & LAW - Spring 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
4231 PBPL-123-01 Fundamentals of American Law 1.00 LEC Weiner JD,Matthew A. T: 6:45PM-9:25PM SH - N130  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: This is the first course recommended for students intending to pursue the Legal Studies minor.
  NOTE: Spaces are reserved by class year; 15 spaces for sophomores, and 15 spaces for first-year students. This course is not open to juniors and seniors.
  NOTE: Students who do not attend the first class will be removed from the roster.
  NOTE: Students may not earn credit for both PBPL 113 and PBPL 123.
  This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the United States legal system. Core topics covered include: sources of law; the role of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in the creation, implementation, and interpretation of laws ; state and federal judicial systems; civil and criminal cases; trial and appellate process; criminal law and procedure; elements of due process; safeguarding the rights of the accused; current issues confronting the criminal justice system; and an overview of torts, contracts and alternate dispute resolution. The course will also focus on legal ethics and emerging trends in the legal profession. Students will learn to read and analyze case law and statutes and acquire substantive techniques for legal writing and oral presentations.
5119 PBPL-201-01 Intro to Ameri Public Policy 1.00 LEC Moskowitz,Rachel L MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM MC - 303 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 13 seats are reserved for first year students, 13 for sophomores, and 4 for juniors.
  This course introduces students to the formal and informal processes through which American public policy is made. They will study the constitutional institutions of government and the distinct role each branch of the national government plays in the policy-making process, and also examine the ways in which informal institutions-political parties, the media, and political lobbyists-contribute to and shape the policy process.
4142 PBPL-202-01 Law, Argument and Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Falk JD,Glenn W. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MC - 213 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or Economics 247,or Public Policy and Law majors, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Please contact Prof. Fulco for a PIN to enroll.
  In this course, students will study legal reasoning and the myriad ways in which legal arguments influence the making of American public policy. They will learn how to structure a legal argument and identify key facts and issues, analyze the formal process through which legal cases unfold (including jurisdiction, standing, and the rules of evidence), and examine how rules of law, which define policy choices and outcomes, develop out of a series of cases.
4321 PBPL-202-02 Law, Argument and Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Falk JD,Glenn W. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MECC - 260 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or Economics 247,or Public Policy and Law majors, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Please contact Prof. Fulco for a PIN.
  In this course, students will study legal reasoning and the myriad ways in which legal arguments influence the making of American public policy. They will learn how to structure a legal argument and identify key facts and issues, analyze the formal process through which legal cases unfold (including jurisdiction, standing, and the rules of evidence), and examine how rules of law, which define policy choices and outcomes, develop out of a series of cases.
4492 PBPL-220-01 Research and Evaluation 1.00 SEM Moskowitz,Rachel L MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM LIB - 02 Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 22
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, and permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Students taking this course should not enroll in POLS 242.
  Which policy interventions actually work and which fail to meet their goals? Answering this question is essential to improving public and non-profit services and securing further funding for worthwhile projects. This course aims to give students the ability to comprehend policy research and evaluation, as well as the tools to design and conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them to design evaluations or analyze data to assess the effectiveness of policies. Topics will include data analysis using statistical software, but no previous programming experience is necessary.
5268 PBPL-302-01 Law & Environmental Policy 1.00 LEC Fulco,Adrienne
Chambers JD,Joseph
R: 6:45PM-9:25PM SH - S201 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Please contact Prof. Fulco for a PIN to enroll in this course.
  The course emphasizes how and why American environmental law has developed over the preceding three decades as a primary tool to achieve environmental goals. Topics include the analysis of policy options, "command-and-control" regulation, modification of liability rules, pollution prevention through non-regulatory means, and the environmental aspects of U.S. energy policies in relation to petroleum, electricity, and transportation. The course concludes by addressing transnational environmental issues such as atmospheric change, burgeoning population growth, depletion of forests and species, sustainable development, and the role of international legal institutions in relation to these pressing problems.
4635 PBPL-303-01 Real World Policy Implement 1.00 SEM Bangser,Michael R. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM MC - 205 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  Implementation, sometimes called the hidden chapter in public policy, will be explored primarily using case studies describing the practical realities of what happens after a statute is passed, a regulation is issued, a court decision is handed down, or a public or nonprofit agency decides on a course of action. The cases will be drawn primarily from areas such as education, health care, children's issues, housing and economic development, and civil rights. They will include examples from the Hartford area and around the country in which the professor and/or guest speakers have participated. Class discussions and related exercises will emphasize students' ability to frame the salient policy and implementation challenges, identify the strengths and weaknesses of potential solutions, and present and defend their recommendations to decision makers (e.g., legislators, agency officials, and judges). Permission of the instructor is required for enrollment.
5236 PBPL-365-01 Crime,Punishment&Public Policy 1.00 LEC Fulco,Adrienne TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 225  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, and permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Seats are reserved for Public Policy and Law majors. Other students need instructor permission to enroll.
  This course will introduce students to the public policy dimensions of crime and punishment in America. We will examine theories of punishment, the structure of the criminal justice system, and the role of the courts in defining the constitutional rights of the accused. Course materials will include novels, policy texts, films, and court cases.
5298 PBPL-398-01 Public Policy Law Intern & Sem 1.00 SEM Fulco,Adrienne T: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 205 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The required internship is designed to: (1) To provide students with the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to the work of an organization concerned with the making of public policy; (2) To engage students in academic projects directly linked to the internship experience and their areas of concentration in the major. To enroll in the internship students need the permission of a faculty member, who will supervise the academic work.
4232 PBPL-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Submission fo the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
4470 PBPL-401-01 Curr Iss: Supreme Ct & Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Fulco,Adrienne W: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 313 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is only open to senior Public Policy and Law majors.
  This seminar will focus on the Supreme Court in transition. We will explore competing theories of constitutional interpretation that have characterized the Rehnquist court and examine specific cases that are representative of the court's work. We will study contending theories of the Supreme Court's role in our constitutional framework, and we will consider how new appointees to the court may shift the balance in important areas of jurisprudence that have become increasingly contentious, especially with respect to issues of personal autonomy, affirmative action, and national security.
4233 PBPL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
4320 PBPL-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
4234 PBPL-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, availaboe in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.)
5281 PBPL-498-01 Thesis and Colloquium 2.00 SEM Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is designed to teach senior Public Policy and Law majors how to write a year long honors thesis. The course is designed to provide support and structure to the process of writing a thesis. Students will formulate a research question, undertake a review of the literature, develop strategies to organize their work, and familiarize themselves with the appropriate Library and Internet sources. Students will also make oral presentations of their work. This course is required of all senior Public Policy and Law majors who are writing an honors thesis.
5282 PBPL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
5256 PBPL-802-01 Global Cities 1.00 SEM Myers,Garth A. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM 70VS - SEM GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of 'developed' and 'developing' worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization.
5117 PBPL-806-01 Methods of Research 1.00 LEC Schack,Ronald W. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM LIB - 02  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is intended to empower students to evaluate common forms of research critically, and to give them some experience in conducting research. Through a series of weekly assignments and class projects, students will be introduced to the shaping of research questions; hypothesis testing, writing a research paper, conducting interviews and surveys, giving a professional presentation, and presenting simple tabular data to prove a point. The course does not require an extensive mathematics background. Regular attendance and access to a computer, e-mail, and the Internet are expected.
4499 PBPL-808-01 Constutional Foundatns Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Horowitz,Amy R: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 205 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will examine the history, methods, and types of successful, formal, written argumentation in policy advocacy. Among the arenas explored will be courts of law, legislative bodies, and the broader field of public opinion. Most course material will be drawn from case studies.
5252 PBPL-815-01 The Policy & Pol of Educ Fin 1.00 SEM Ellis,Chad D. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM HHN - 105  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  One of the most important and contentious elements of education policy involves finance. Funding battles at the federal, state, and local levels have a direct impact on students, teachers, and schools. The sources of revenue, funding formulas, and budget priorities have implications not only for the operation of schools but for equity and social justice. This course will examine the legal, practical, and moral/ethical elements of education finance and efforts to reform the system. It will blend traditional seat time with online components and field work.
5257 PBPL-822-01 Economic History and Policy 1.00 LEC Jacobs,Cindy M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 311  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course attempts to provide the student with a basic yet thorough understanding of the growth and development of the American economy. At the outset of the course, we will discuss the role and importance of economic history and the methodology of economic historians. We will then study the colonial economy, the early national and antebellum years, the reunification era, the emergence of a modern U.S. economy, and the development of the post-WWII economy up to the present. The analysis will focus on key economic sectors - agriculture, commerce, money and banking, labor, government - and their growth and development.
4752 PBPL-825-01 Policy Implementation 1.00 SEM Feldman,Barry M. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 311  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Implementation is the action step in the public policy process that arguably is the most challenging and complex to do. It is the key to making something happen and is often the gauge the public uses to determine the overall effectiveness of government, in its broadest terms. This course is devoted exclusively to the study of policy implementation from the relevant literature, theoretical constructs, and the practical issues of attempting to implement public policy that often has vague and conflicting policy goals and inadequate resources. Students will examine a current public policy that was adopted by a town/city government in the Greater Hartford area, will ascertain whether the policy was implemented, analyze the challenges involved in the implementation, and meet and question government leaders involved in the policy implementation effort. The class will be conducted as a seminar, with fieldwork as necessary. A major research paper that reviews and analyzes the success of the town/city government in implementing the adopted policy studied during the semester comprises an important end product of the course.
5118 PBPL-828-01 Theory of Democratic Institut 1.00 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The course applies social choice theory to the study of four components of democratic policy making; voting, political strategy, theories of governance, and bureaucracy. The course emphasizes weekly readings and in-class discussion of central themes in the literature. Examination of the formal properties of voting rules leads to a deeper understanding of representation and political outcomes. The analysis of institutions offers lessons on the problems of delegation, policy design, implementation, and democratic administration.
4218 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4224 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4222 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
4223 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4221 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
5207 ECON-217-01 Econ of Health & Health Care 1.00 LEC Helming,Troy TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM CT - 210 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  Analysis of the structure of health care markets using economic principles Evaluation of current health care policies and their effects on cost, access and quality. Topics covered include the production of and demand for health and medical care; information asymmetries between patients, doctors, and payers; health insurance coverage; the effects of managed care (including HMOs) on competition, efficiency, and quality; training and practice of physicians; hospitals; prescription drug pricing; government regulations; Medicare and Medicaid; health care reform.
4368 EDUC-300-01 Education Reform: Past&Present 1.00 LEC Dougherty,John A. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM SH - S205 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  Prerequisite: C- or better in EDUC200, or American Studies major or Public Policy and Law major.
  How do we explain the rise and decline of education reform movements? How do we evaluate their level of “success” from different sources of evidence? Drawing upon primary source materials and historical interpretations, this course examines a broad array of elementary, secondary, and higher education reform movements from the mid-19th century to the present, analyzing social, material, and ideological contexts. This intermediate-level seminar explores a topic common to all branches of educational studies from both theoretical and comparative perspectives.
4057 ENVS-149-01 Intro to Environmental Science 1.25 LEC Geiss,Christoph TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 106 GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 26
  NOTE: Enrollment is limited to 4 seniors, 4 juniors, 8 sophomores, and 10 first-year students, there will be 6 additional seats assigned by the instructor.
  An introduction to interrelationships among the natural environment, humans, and the human environment, including the biological, social, economic, technological, and political aspects of current environmental challenges. This course focuses on building the scientific framework necessary to understand environmental issues. It explores the structure, function, and dynamics of ecosystems, interactions between living and physical systems, and how human enterprise affects natural systems. It also examines current issues regarding human impacts on environmental quality, including global warming, air and water pollution, agriculture, overpopulation, energy, and urbanization. The laboratory section, which complements lecture material, incorporates laboratory and field exercises that include a focus on Hartford and a nearby rural area.
5184 HIST-270-01 Parliamentary Debate 1.00 SEM Regan-Lefebvre,Jennifer M. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - AUD HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 32
  This course introduces the history of debate in the British parliamentary tradition and the practice of debate as a collegiate extra-curricular activity. The course is a dynamic mix of lecture, seminar-style discussion and experiential learning. The course has three components: historical background to and analysis of the British parliamentary system, drawing on the emerging field of the history of rhetoric; primary source analysis of historical speeches and debates; applied sessions when students will draft and practice their own debates in teams. Written exercises include developing a ‘time-space case’ based in British history. Students will complete the course with a broader understanding of British political history, a deeper sensitivity to political rhetoric, and stronger oral and written argumentation and communication skills. No debate experience is necessary.
5004 PHIL-246-01 Hum Rgts: Phil Foundations 1.00 LEC Marcano,Donna TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM AAC - 320 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course will survey and critically assess arguments in favor of the existence of human rights, arguments about the legitimate scope of such rights (who has human rights and against whom such rights can legitimately be claimed), and arguments about which rights ought to be included in any complete account of human rights. Specific topics will include (but not necessarily be limited to) the philosophical history of human rights discourse, cultural relativist attacks on the universality of human rights, debates concerning the rights of cultural minorities to self-determination, and controversies concerning whether human rights should include economic and social rights.
4937 POLS-344-01 Politics of Africa 1.00 LEC Kamola,Isaac A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM LSC - 133  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Political Scientists often study Africa as a distinct place, defined by a unique set of crises, which set the continent apart from the rest of the world. This class, in contrast, starts from the assertion that Africa is not a discrete location to be studied in isolation but instead a site of active and dynamic human practices that intersect and define the political and economic lives of all people across the world. "Africa" is, in the words of James Ferguson, a "category through which a 'world' is structured." We first examine the colonial and Cold War histories shaping the modern world, and how they played out in Africa specifically. We then study contemporary issues that tie Africa to the rest of the world, including: civil conflict and the "responsibility to protect"; debt, structural adjustment, aid, and development; Chinese/Africa economic cooperation; "the land question"; and the Arab Spring.