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Course Schedule for PUBLIC POLICY & LAW - Fall 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2351 PBPL-123-01 Fundamentals of American Law 1.00 LEC Fulco,Adrienne
Weiner JD,Matthew A.
R: 6:45PM-9:25PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: This is a required course for students intending to pursue the Legal Studies minor. It is the recommended first course for students who are interested in the minor.
  NOTE: Registered students who do not attend the first class will be dropped from the course.
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for juniors, 15 for sophomores. Course is not open to seniors or first semester students without permission of instructor
  This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the United States legal system. Core topics covered include: sources of law; the role of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in the creation, implementation, and interpretation of laws ; state and federal judicial systems; civil and criminal cases; trial and appellate process; criminal law and procedure; elements of due process; safeguarding the rights of the accused; current issues confronting the criminal justice system; and an overview of torts, contracts and alternate dispute resolution. The course will also focus on legal ethics and emerging trends in the legal profession. Students will learn to read and analyze case law and statutes and acquire substantive techniques for legal writing and oral presentations.
2101 PBPL-201-01 Intro to Ameri Public Policy 1.00 LEC Moskowitz,Rachel L MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: Course not open to First Year Students
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for sophomores and 5 seats reserved for juniors.
  This course introduces students to the formal and informal processes through which American public policy is made. They will study the constitutional institutions of government and the distinct role each branch of the national government plays in the policy-making process, and also examine the ways in which informal institutions-political parties, the media, and political lobbyists-contribute to and shape the policy process.
2880 PBPL-220-01 Research and Evaluation 1.00 SEM Moskowitz,Rachel L MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  Which policy interventions actually work and which fail to meet their goals? Answering this question is essential to improving public and non-profit services and securing further funding for worthwhile projects. This course aims to give students the ability to comprehend policy research and evaluation, as well as the tools to design and conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them to design evaluations or analyze data to assess the effectiveness of policies. Topics will include data analysis using statistical software, but no previous programming experience is necessary.
3136 PBPL-245-01 Title IX: Changing Campus Cult 1.00 SEM Fulco,Adrienne TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  C- or better in Public Policy and Law 123 or 201, or permission of instructor
  NOTE: PBPL 245 is a good choice for first year students with a strong high school background in American politics and government. You may email Prof. Fulco if you have questions about the class: adrienne.fulco@trincoll.edu
  This course will explore the legal and policy implications of the new Title IX federal guidelines as they apply to equity in athletics and sexual misconduct on college campuses. During the course of the term we will consider how best to devise and implement effective policies aimed at: increasing equity in college athletics; reducing incidents of sexual misconduct on college campuses; protecting the legal rights of all parties to administrative hearings; ensuring that institutions of higher education are in full compliance with new federal and state mandates. Trinity’s Title IX Coordinator, will periodically join in our class discussions.
3592 PBPL-251-01 Judicial Proc:Courts & Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Fulco,Adrienne TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science102 or Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  This course examines the evolution of the judicial process in America and the role of the courts as policy makers. We will study civil and criminal courts at both the state and federal level as well as the functions of judges, lawyers, litigants, and other actors. We will also consider how the courts make policy in areas such as the war on terrorism, the right to privacy, gay and lesbian rights, and the rights of the accused.
3137 PBPL-264-01 Urban Policy/Politics America 1.00 LEC Moskowitz,Rachel L MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, or permission of instructor
  This course focuses on the development of urban policies and politics and their impact on urban America. Adopting both a historical and contemporary perspective on these issues will help us understand how the historical development of cities and specific policy choices shaped the urban problems and conflicts we see today. We will also study how the distribution of urban power affects urban policy outcomes. In addition, we will explore many contemporary urban policy issues, including public education, criminal justice, public housing, neighborhood decline, preservation, and gentrification, as well as downtown economic redevelopment. Central to these urban challenges are issues of race, ethnicity, equality, and fairness. We will consider how current policies may generate both potential solutions and new unintended problems for urban America.
3193 PBPL-321-01 American Legal History 1.00 LEC Falk JD,Glenn W. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for Public Policy and Law majors.
  This course focuses on key themes in law and American history from the colonial era to the early twentieth century. Topics include the English origins of American legal institutions; land, law and Native Americans; the framing of the Constitution; the emergence of the Supreme Court; slavery, westward expansion and constitutional conflict in the new republic; the rise of corporations, railroads and modern tort law; civil rights in Reconstruction; the treatment of immigrants and labor under the law. The course analyzes landmark Supreme Court decisions but also considers legal history from the bottom up, e.g., the participation of slaves, free people of color and women in the legal system of the antebellum South. Previous courses in American history and an introduction to law are strongly suggested.
2085 PBPL-323-01 The Legal History of Race Rela 1.00 SEM Stevens,Barry K.
Fulco,Adrienne
T: 6:45PM-9:25PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 123, 201, 202 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Contact Prof. Fulco for permission.
  This course will examine the interaction between the American social and legal systems in the treatment of race relations. The seminar will analyze major Supreme Court cases on equal rights and race relations with an emphasis on the historical and social contexts in which the decisions were rendered. The Socratic method will be used for many of the classes, placing importance on classroom discussion among the students and the lecturer. The goals of the course are to expose the students to the basis of the legal system and the development of civil rights legislations sharpen legal and critical analysis, improve oral expression, and develop a concise and persuasive writing style.
3648 PBPL-332-01 Social Advocacy & Ethical Life 1.00 SEM Outlaw,Rochelle D. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: The course counts for the moral theory requirement in the PBPL major.
  NOTE: Please contact Prof. Fulco about permission to enroll.
  This course addresses the relationship between ethics and oral forms of expression in a variety of socio-political contexts. Students in the course will have an opportunity to investigate theories of ethics and principles of rhetoric, and to apply their inquiry in a cumulative series of exercises. Both critical and practical, the work undertaken in this course offers a chance for students to: 1) question the meaning and importance of contemporary calls for civility and engaged citizenship; 2) investigate the roots and limits of ethical discourse relevant to social and political decision-making; and 3) develop an understanding of the principles of social advocacy and the ways in which rhetoric remakes the grounds of ethical interaction.
3675 PBPL-334-01 Journalism&Public Good in Amer 1.00 SEM Silk,Mark R. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  Alexis de Tocqueville considered newspapers essential to democracy in America, but from the days of Cotton Mather and John Peter Zenger to those of Fox News and WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange, the news media have been a source of controversy and contention. This seminar will explore the place of journalism in American civic life by examining both the history of the law governing journalistic enterprise and the evolution of the news media as social and political actors. Topics to be discussed will include the nature of news, libel law, national security as a basis for censorship, public reason, the economics of journalism, and the new media environment.
3593 PBPL-352-01 Art and the Public Good 1.00 SEM Power,Katharine G. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Is art a public good? Is government good for art? Students will explore these questions by examining what happens when U.S. taxpayer dollars are used to fund the arts. Course topics will include: the depression era federal arts projects and the dream of a "cultural democracy" that inspired them; the State Department's export of art across the globe during the Cold War era; the legal and congressional battles over offensive art that threatened to shut down the National Endowment for the Arts during the 1990s; and former Mayor Giuliani's attempt to withdraw funding from the Brooklyn Museum of Art following public outcry over a provocative depiction of the Virgin Mary.
2936 PBPL-398-01 Public Policy Law Intern & Sem 1.00 SEM Fulco,Adrienne
Bangser,Michael R.
M: 6:45PM-9:25PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The required internship is designed to: (1) To provide students with the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to the work of an organization concerned with the making of public policy; (2) To engage students in academic projects directly linked to the internship experience and their areas of concentration in the major. To enroll in the internship students need the permission of a faculty member, who will supervise the academic work.
2293 PBPL-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2153 PBPL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2265 PBPL-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
2154 PBPL-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, availaboe in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.)
2684 PBPL-498-01 Thesis and Colloquium 2.00 SEM Fulco,Adrienne F: 12:00PM-2:00PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is designed to teach senior Public Policy and Law majors how to write a year long honors thesis. The course is designed to provide support and structure to the process of writing a thesis. Students will formulate a research question, undertake a review of the literature, develop strategies to organize their work, and familiarize themselves with the appropriate Library and Internet sources. Students will also make oral presentations of their work. This course is required of all senior Public Policy and Law majors who are writing an honors thesis.
2634 PBPL-800-01 Principles and Practice 1.00 SEM Ellis,Chad D. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will focus on both micro- and macro-level elements of the public policy process, from problem identification through post-implementation evaluation. In addition to core theoretical text-based discussion, students will be exposed to models of research and reporting used in the various fields of public policy. Students will apply their learning through case-study analysis. They will be required to complete an independent research project through which they will examine a particular area of policy (e.g., healthcare, education, housing, etc.) and to analyze a specific program through one or more of the lenses discussed in class.
2850 PBPL-836-01 Moral Theory and Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Wade,Maurice L. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The purpose of this course is to assist students in acquiring the skill in ethical reasoning and analysis needed for mature participation in society’s continuing debates over moral issues of public concern. The course will begin by examining some types of ethical theories and will proceed to consider a number of controversial social issues. Abortion, euthanasia, racial and sexual discrimination, world hunger, treatment of animals, and capital punishment are among the topics to be considered.
2881 PBPL-846-01 Policy Analysis 1.00 SEM Fotos III,Michael T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  In policy analysis, we focus on the problems of empirical policy analysis: defining the problem, framing the questions to be answered, picking the location and scope of the study, selecting the metrics of analysis, aligning metrics with public values, collecting evidence, and transforming the evidence into data. The readings and weekly discussions are avenues for students to query themselves on the problems they must solve to advance their own research agendas. Students will complete a major project in empirical policy analysis. Enrollment limited.
3191 PBPL-849-01 Health Care Regulation&Policy 1.00 SEM Gaul,Tanya K. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will offer an overview of the basic concepts and principles of health care regulation and policy that are necessary to understand the health care sector in the United States. This course will focus on the purposes of health care regulation, the key components of regulation and the processes by which regulation is developed and implemented. Various spheres of health care regulation will be analyzed, including both governmental and private parties involved int he regulatory process. Emphasis will be on policy issues and conflicts that underlie health care regulation.
2183 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2184 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2185 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
2203 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2186 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2919 ECON-217-01 Econ of Health & Health Care 1.00 LEC Helming,Troy TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  Analysis of the structure of health care markets using economic principles Evaluation of current health care policies and their effects on cost, access and quality. Topics covered include the production of and demand for health and medical care; information asymmetries between patients, doctors, and payers; health insurance coverage; the effects of managed care (including HMOs) on competition, efficiency, and quality; training and practice of physicians; hospitals; prescription drug pricing; government regulations; Medicare and Medicaid; health care reform.
2920 ECON-334-01 Law and Economics 1.00 LEC Helming,Troy TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 301.
  Legal rules of property, contract and tort law create implicit prices that incentivize individuals behavior and motivate the economic approach to the study of law. This course brings together the two disciplines of economics and law to examine fundamental rules governing an exchange economy. Topics to be covered include property law, tort law (non-criminal harm or injuries), contract law and crime. Please note, this is not a course in law but in economic analysis of the law.
3426 EDUC-309-01 Race Class & Educ Policy 1.00 SEM Cancelled SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or permission of instructor.
  How do competing theories explain educational inequality? How do different policies attempt to address it? This class will consider the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the examination of educational inequality. Possible topics include economic and cultural capital, racial/gender/sexual identity formation, desegregation, multiculturalism, detracking, school choice, school-family relationships, and affirmative action. Student groups will expand upon the readings by proposing, implementing, and presenting their research analysis from a community learning project.
2334 POLS-301-01 American Political Parties 1.00 LEC Evans,Diana TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  An analysis of American political parties, including a study of voting behavior, party organization and leadership, and recent and proposed reforms and proposals for reorganization of existing party structures.
3422 WMGS-301-01 Western Feminist Thought 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in one other course in Women Gender and Sexuality.
  An exploration of the main currents in American feminism, with occasional excursions into European thought. The course readings assume (rather than demonstrate) women’s historical subordination to man and put forward various explanations and strategies for change. Readings in J.S. Mill, C. P. Gilman, Emma Goldman, Simone de Beauvoir, Adrienne Rich, bell hooks, Mary Daly, Audre Lorde, and others. This course is not open to First-Year students.