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Course Schedule for PUBLIC POLICY & LAW - Spring 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1251 PBPL-123-01 Fundamentals of American Law 1.00 LEC Fulco,Adrienne T: 6:45PM-9:25PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 45
  NOTE: This is the first course recommended for students intending to pursue the Legal Studies minor.
  NOTE: Spaces are reserved by class year; 5 spaces for juniors, 20 spaces for sophomores, and 20 spaces for first-year students. This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students who do not attend the first class will be removed from the roster.
  NOTE: Students may not earn credit for both PBPL 113 and PBPL 123.
  This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the United States legal system. Core topics covered include: sources of law; the role of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in the creation, implementation, and interpretation of laws ; state and federal judicial systems; civil and criminal cases; trial and appellate process; criminal law and procedure; elements of due process; safeguarding the rights of the accused; current issues confronting the criminal justice system; and an overview of torts, contracts and alternate dispute resolution. The course will also focus on legal ethics and emerging trends in the legal profession. Students will learn to read and analyze case law and statutes and acquire substantive techniques for legal writing and oral presentations.
1385 PBPL-123-02 Fundamentals of American Law 1.00 LEC Fulco,Adrienne R: 6:45PM-9:25PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 45
  NOTE: This is the first course recommended for students intending to pursue the Legal Studies minor.
  NOTE: Spaces are reserved by class year; 5 spaces for juniors, 20 spaces for sophomores, and 20 spaces for first-year students. This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students who do not attend the first class will be removed from the roster.
  NOTE: Students may not earn credit for both PBPL 113 and PBPL 123.
  This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the United States legal system. Core topics covered include: sources of law; the role of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in the creation, implementation, and interpretation of laws ; state and federal judicial systems; civil and criminal cases; trial and appellate process; criminal law and procedure; elements of due process; safeguarding the rights of the accused; current issues confronting the criminal justice system; and an overview of torts, contracts and alternate dispute resolution. The course will also focus on legal ethics and emerging trends in the legal profession. Students will learn to read and analyze case law and statutes and acquire substantive techniques for legal writing and oral presentations.
1158 PBPL-202-01 Law, Argument and Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Cabot,Edward TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 22
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or Economics 247,or Public Policy and Law majors, or permission of instructor.
  In this course, students will study legal reasoning and the myriad ways in which legal arguments influence the making of American public policy. They will learn how to structure a legal argument and identify key facts and issues, analyze the formal process through which legal cases unfold (including jurisdiction, standing, and the rules of evidence), and examine how rules of law, which define policy choices and outcomes, develop out of a series of cases.
1351 PBPL-202-02 Law, Argument and Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Cabot,Edward TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 22
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or Economics 247,or Public Policy and Law majors, or permission of instructor.
  In this course, students will study legal reasoning and the myriad ways in which legal arguments influence the making of American public policy. They will learn how to structure a legal argument and identify key facts and issues, analyze the formal process through which legal cases unfold (including jurisdiction, standing, and the rules of evidence), and examine how rules of law, which define policy choices and outcomes, develop out of a series of cases.
1584 PBPL-220-01 Research and Evaluation 1.00 SEM Williamson,Abigail Fisher MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 22
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Students taking this course should not enroll in POLS 242.
  Which policy interventions actually work and which fail to meet their goals? Answering this question is essential to improving public and non-profit services and securing further funding for worthwhile projects. This course aims to give students the ability to comprehend policy research and evaluation, as well as the tools to design and conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them to design evaluations or analyze data to assess the effectiveness of policies. Topics will include data analysis using statistical software, but no previous programming experience is necessary.
1110 PBPL-302-01 Law & Environmental Policy 1.00 LEC Chambers JD,Joseph T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  The course emphasizes how and why American environmental law has developed over the preceding three decades as a primary tool to achieve environmental goals. Topics include the analysis of policy options, "command-and-control" regulation, modification of liability rules, pollution prevention through non-regulatory means, and the environmental aspects of U.S. energy policies in relation to petroleum, electricity, and transportation. The course concludes by addressing transnational environmental issues such as atmospheric change, burgeoning population growth, depletion of forests and species, sustainable development, and the role of international legal institutions in relation to these pressing problems.
1884 PBPL-303-01 Real World Policy Implement 1.00 SEM Bangser,Michael R. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  Implementation, sometimes called the hidden chapter in public policy, will be explored primarily using case studies describing the practical realities of what happens after a statute is passed, a regulation is issued, a court decision is handed down, or a public or nonprofit agency decides on a course of action. The cases will be drawn primarily from areas such as education, health care, children's issues, housing and economic development, and civil rights. They will include examples from the Hartford area and around the country in which the professor and/or guest speakers have participated. Class discussions and related exercises will emphasize students' ability to frame the salient policy and implementation challenges, identify the strengths and weaknesses of potential solutions, and present and defend their recommendations to decision makers (e.g., legislators, agency officials, and judges). Permission of the instructor is required for enrollment.
2104 PBPL-351-01 Managing Diversity in the City 1.00 SEM Williamson,Abigail Fisher MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Political Science 102 or Public Policy and Law 201, or consent of instructor.
  Drawing on literature related to federalism, urban politics, and state and local policy, this course will examine how cities have responded to diverse newcomers, from the early twentieth century's machine politics, through the Great Migration of African-Americans to northern cities, to the dispersion of new immigrant populations since the late 1980s. Using this historical perspective, we will consider how local policies shape processes of social and political incorporation, as well as how the presence of newcomers shapes the on-going development of local policies. The course will incorporate case studies of policy decision-making, devoting particular attention to the city of Hartford.
2025 PBPL-377-01 Law, Gender & Supreme Court 1.00 LEC Fulco,Adrienne TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course introduces students to contemporary gender issues as they have been treated both in the law and in the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. We will explore some of the historical antecedents to contemporary legal gender questions and then examine in detail the following areas of controversy: sex discrimination, marriage equality, reproductive rights, and Title IX.
1508 PBPL-398-01 Public Policy & Law Internship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  The required internship is designed to: (1) To provide students with the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to the work of an organization concerned with the making of public policy; (2) To engage students in academic projects directly linked to the internship experience and their areas of concentration in the major. To enroll in the internship students need the permission of a faculty member, who will supervise the academic work.
1253 PBPL-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  NOTE: Submission fo the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1555 PBPL-401-01 Curr Iss: Supreme Ct & Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Fulco,Adrienne W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is only open to senior Public Policy and Law majors.
  This seminar will focus on the Supreme Court in transition. We will explore competing theories of constitutional interpretation that have characterized the Rehnquist court and examine specific cases that are representative of the court's work. We will study contending theories of the Supreme Court's role in our constitutional framework, and we will consider how new appointees to the court may shift the balance in important areas of jurisprudence that have become increasingly contentious, especially with respect to issues of personal autonomy, affirmative action, and national security.
1581 PBPL-407-01 Power, Values, Making Am PBPL 1.00 SEM Cabot,Edward M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to Public Policy and Law majors.
  Politicians often speak in sweeping and contradictory generalities, but once elected or appointed to public office, they must govern. Using case studies developed at the Kennedy School of Government, this course will explore how officials make tough choices in specific cases. Students will refine their own views of complex ethical/public policy issues and learn how advocates achieve results through the American political process. Controversial issues will include: what obligations government owes to ‘the least among us,’ the line between a candidate’s personal privacy and the duty of full disclosure, and the use of lies and distortions in campaigns, the media and in the confirmation of a justice of the Supreme Court. Special attention will be devoted to the question of how public opinion is formed and the role of mass media in that process.
1254 PBPL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1350 PBPL-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
1255 PBPL-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, availaboe in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.)
1886 PBPL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2208 PBPL-806-01 Methods of Research 1.00 LEC Schack,Ronald W. TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is intended to empower students to evaluate common forms of research critically, and to give them some experience in conducting research. Through a series of weekly assignments and class projects, students will be introduced to the shaping of research questions; hypothesis testing, writing a research paper, conducting interviews and surveys, giving a professional presentation, and presenting simple tabular data to prove a point. The course does not require an extensive mathematics background. Regular attendance and access to a computer, e-mail, and the Internet are expected.
1593 PBPL-808-01 Constutional Foundatns Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Horowitz,Amy R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will examine the history, methods, and types of successful, formal, written argumentation in policy advocacy. Among the arenas explored will be courts of law, legislative bodies, and the broader field of public opinion. Most course material will be drawn from case studies.
2170 PBPL-822-01 Economic History and Policy 1.00 LEC Jacobs,Cindy M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: Economics 801 or permission of the instructor.
  This course attempts to provide the student with a basic yet thorough understanding of the growth and development of the American economy. At the outset of the course, we will discuss the role and importance of economic history and the methodology of economic historians. We will then study the colonial economy, the early national and antebellum years, the reunification era, the emergence of a modern U.S. economy, and the development of the post-WWII economy up to the present. The analysis will focus on key economic sectors - agriculture, commerce, money and banking, labor, government - and their growth and development.
2026 PBPL-825-01 Policy Implementation 1.00 SEM Feldman,Barry M. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Implementation is the action step in the public policy process that arguably is the most challenging and complex to do. It is the key to making something happen and is often the gauge the public uses to determine the overall effectiveness of government, in its broadest terms. This course is devoted exclusively to the study of policy implementation from the relevant literature, theoretical constructs, and the practical issues of attempting to implement public policy that often has vague and conflicting policy goals and inadequate resources. Students will examine a current public policy that was adopted by a town/city government in the Greater Hartford area, will ascertain whether the policy was implemented, analyze the challenges involved in the implementation, and meet and question government leaders involved in the policy implementation effort. The class will be conducted as a seminar, with fieldwork as necessary. A major research paper that reviews and analyzes the success of the town/city government in implementing the adopted policy studied during the semester comprises an important end product of the course.
1329 PBPL-846-01 Policy Analysis 1.00 SEM Fotos III,Michael T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  In policy analysis, we focus on the problems of empirical policy analysis: defining the problem, framing the questions to be answered, picking the location and scope of the study, selecting the metrics of analysis, aligning metrics with public values, collecting evidence, and transforming the evidence into data. The readings and weekly discussions are avenues for students to query themselves on the problems they must solve to advance their own research agendas. Students will complete a major project in empirical policy analysis. Enrollment limited.
1238 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1244 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1242 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
1243 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
1241 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 20
2220 CLCV-242-01 Kings, Tyrants, Emperors 1.00 LEC Regan,Amanda R. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  From the Homeric lords to the pharaoh-kings of Hellenistic Egypt to the emperors of Rome, one-person rule played an essential part in both political discourse and political reality in the ancient Mediterranean world. What differentiated a good autocrat from a bad one—a “king” from a “tyrant”, in the developing political rhetoric of classical antiquity, which we have inherited? Investigations in this course may include the terminology for such autocrats, primarily “king”, “tyrant”, and “emperor”; theoretical treatments of autocratic rule by Plato, Aristotle, and Polybius; and the representation of autocrats in literary and visual art, historical sources, and archaeological remains.
1521 ECON-247-01 Intro to Policy Analysis 1.00 LEC Ahmed,Rasha M. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  This course will introduce students to the basic ingredients of policy analysis rooted in the microeconomics of externalities (social, economic, and political), public goods, common property, information failure, absence of competition, and distributional concern. This course is not open to students who have previously earned credit for Economics 306 or Economics 311.
1412 EDUC-300-01 Education Reform: Past&Present 1.00 LEC Moore,Heather C. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  Prerequisite: C- or better in EDUC200, or American Studies major or Public Policy and Law major.
  How do we explain the rise and decline of education reform movements? How do we evaluate their level of “success” from different sources of evidence? Drawing upon primary source materials and historical interpretations, this course examines a broad array of elementary, secondary, and higher education reform movements from the mid-19th century to the present, analyzing social, material, and ideological contexts. This intermediate-level seminar explores a topic common to all branches of educational studies from both theoretical and comparative perspectives.
2144 EDUC-309-01 Race Class & Educ Policy 1.00 SEM Leventhal-Weiner,Rachel G. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200, or juniors / seniors with permission of instructor.
  How do competing theories explain educational inequality? How do different policies attempt to address it? This class will consider the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the examination of educational inequality. Possible topics include economic and cultural capital, racial/gender/sexual identity formation, desegregation, multiculturalism, detracking, school choice, school-family relationships, and affirmative action. Student groups will expand upon the readings by proposing, implementing, and presenting their research analysis from a community learning project.
1062 ENVS-149-01 Intro to Environmental Science 1.25 LEC Douglass,Cameron H. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 26
  NOTE: Enrollment is limited to 4 seniors, 4 juniors, 8 sophomores, and 10 first-year students, there will be 6 additional seats assigned by the instructor.
  An introduction to interrelationships among the natural environment, humans, and the human environment, including the biological, social, economic, technological, and political aspects of current environmental challenges. This course focuses on building the scientific framework necessary to understand environmental issues. It explores the structure, function, and dynamics of ecosystems, interactions between living and physical systems, and how human enterprise affects natural systems. It also examines current issues regarding human impacts on environmental quality, including global warming, air and water pollution, agriculture, overpopulation, energy, and urbanization. The laboratory section, which complements lecture material, incorporates laboratory and field exercises that include a focus on Hartford and a nearby rural area.
1364 PHIL-215-01 Medical Ethics 1.00 LEC Brown,W. Miller MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course will take up ethical, political, and legal issues relevant to the medical profession and patient population. Topics will include: death with dignity, treatment with dignity, abortion, mercy-killing, patient consent, the nature of physical versus mental illness, medical experimentation, and the socially conscious distribution of medical resources.
2100 THDN-247-01 Post War American Theater 1.00 SEM Power,Katharine G. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  This course offers a survey of prominent plays and choreographies authored by American theater artists during the post-war period (1945-1965). Playwrights such as Arthur Miller, Lorraine Hansberry, and Tennessee Williams, along with selected choreographers, including Martha Graham and Alvin Ailey will be discussed with reference to the House Committee on Unamerican Activities; the popularity of Freudian and Jungian psychoanalysis; the emergence of a civil rights movement; and the social and political forces of "containment" that defined the early years of the Cold War era.
2150 WMGS-301-01 Western Feminist Thought 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in one other course in Women Gender and Sexuality.
  An exploration of the main currents in American feminism, with occasional excursions into European thought. The course readings assume (rather than demonstrate) women’s historical subordination to man and put forward various explanations and strategies for change. Readings in J.S. Mill, C. P. Gilman, Emma Goldman, Simone de Beauvoir, Adrienne Rich, bell hooks, Mary Daly, Audre Lorde, and others. This course is not open to First-Year students.