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Course Schedule for PUBLIC POLICY & LAW - Spring 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
4357 PBPL-123-01 Fundamentals of American Law 1.00 LEC Weiner, Matthew R: 6:45PM-9:25PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  NOTE: This is the first course recommended for students intending to pursue the Legal Studies minor.
  NOTE: Spaces are reserved by class year; 15 spaces for sophomores, and 15 spaces for first-year students. This course is not open to juniors and seniors.
  NOTE: Students who do not attend the first class will be removed from the roster.
  This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the United States legal system. Core topics covered include: sources of law; the role of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in the creation, implementation, and interpretation of laws ; state and federal judicial systems; civil and criminal cases; trial and appellate process; criminal law and procedure; elements of due process; safeguarding the rights of the accused; current issues confronting the criminal justice system; and an overview of torts, contracts and alternate dispute resolution. The course will also focus on legal ethics and emerging trends in the legal profession. Students will learn to read and analyze case law and statutes and acquire substantive techniques for legal writing and oral presentations.
4633 PBPL-201-01 Intro to Ameri Public Policy 1.00 LEC Moskowitz, Rachel TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 22
  NOTE: Not open to juniors or seniors
  This course introduces students to the formal and informal processes through which American public policy is made. They will study the constitutional institutions of government and the distinct role each branch of the national government plays in the policy-making process, and also examine the ways in which informal institutions-political parties, the media, and political lobbyists-contribute to and shape the policy process.
4175 PBPL-202-01 Law, Argument and Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Falk, Glenn MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or Economics 247,or Public Policy and Law majors, or permission of instructor.
  In this course, students will study legal reasoning and the myriad ways in which legal arguments influence the making of American public policy. They will learn how to structure a legal argument and identify key facts and issues, analyze the formal process through which legal cases unfold (including jurisdiction, standing, and the rules of evidence), and examine how rules of law, which define policy choices and outcomes, develop out of a series of cases.
4333 PBPL-202-02 Law, Argument and Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Falk, Glenn MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or Economics 247,or Public Policy and Law majors, or permission of instructor.
  In this course, students will study legal reasoning and the myriad ways in which legal arguments influence the making of American public policy. They will learn how to structure a legal argument and identify key facts and issues, analyze the formal process through which legal cases unfold (including jurisdiction, standing, and the rules of evidence), and examine how rules of law, which define policy choices and outcomes, develop out of a series of cases.
4431 PBPL-220-01 Research and Evaluation 1.00 SEM Williamson, Abigail TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Students taking this course should not enroll in POLS 242.
  Which policy interventions actually work and which fail to meet their goals? Answering this question is essential to improving public and non-profit services and securing further funding for worthwhile projects. This course aims to give students the ability to comprehend policy research and evaluation, as well as the tools to design and conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them to design evaluations or analyze data to assess the effectiveness of policies. Topics will include data analysis using statistical software, but no previous programming experience is necessary.
5702 PBPL-302-01 Law & Environmental Policy 1.00 SEM Chambers, Joseph R: 6:45PM-9:25PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 16
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  This course examines the development of environmental policy and regulation in the U.S. through analysis of case studies of national environmental policy debates and landmark environmental legislation. The policy challenges presented by global climate change are a special focus. Students gain an understanding of the framework and policy approaches underlying local, state and federal laws regulating air, water, toxic waste, and use of natural resources. In addition, students identify and research a current local, state, national or global environmental issue and then draft a policy memorandum which summarizes the issue, describes available policy choices, and proposes a course of action.
5121 PBPL-304-01 Capital Punishment in America 1.00 SEM Dunn, Timothy T: 6:45PM-9:25PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 123, 201, 202 or permission of instructor.
  The course will examine the legal and moral controversies surrounding the application of capital punishment (i.e., the death penalty) as a punishment for homicide. We will consider whether capital punishment is state sanctioned homicide or good public policy. Topics include: capital punishment through history, U.S. Supreme Court decisions and contemporary problems with the application of the death penalty. We will analyze the nature, extent, and distribution of criminal homicide and critically review current innocence project work.
5244 PBPL-364-01 Law and Poverty 1.00 SEM Outlaw, Rochelle TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This is a seminar style course with individual and group presentations.
  This course will explore the nature and extent of poverty in the United States and how the law responds to and reinforces poverty. Specifically, this course will review the intersection of race, gender and age with poverty while exploring particular areas of concern such as right to counsel, healthcare, education, and housing. While this course focuses on legal aspects of poverty, it will also incorporate sociological, economic, and policy perspectives.
5100 PBPL-365-01 Crime,Punishment&Public Policy 1.00 LEC Falk, Glenn TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, or permission of instructor.
  This course will introduce students to the public policy dimensions of crime and punishment in America. We will examine theories of punishment, the structure of the criminal justice system, and the role of the courts in defining the constitutional rights of the accused. Course materials will include novels, policy texts, films, and court cases.
5243 PBPL-375-01 Federalism and Public Policy 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, or permission of instructor.
  Federalism, a defining American constitutional principle, is a system in which political power is shared by the national government and state and local entities. This structure of “dual sovereignty,” which has been subject to ongoing interpretation, has informed some of the most divisive controversies in American history. Currently, executives, legislators, and the courts at all levels of government are engaged in robust debates about the degree to which power should be shared and whether governing authority should reside with national or with state and local officials. We will focus on how the American federal structure shapes arguments and choices in three contentious policy areas: immigration, health care, and the reform of marijuana laws.
5287 PBPL-398-01 Public Policy Law Intern & Sem 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne W: 6:45PM-9:15PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The required internship is designed to: (1) To provide students with the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to the work of an organization concerned with the making of public policy; (2) To engage students in academic projects directly linked to the internship experience and their areas of concentration in the major. To enroll in the internship students need the permission of a faculty member, who will supervise the academic work.
4253 PBPL-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Submission fo the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
4415 PBPL-401-01 Curr Iss: Supreme Ct & Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is only open to senior Public Policy and Law majors.
  This seminar will focus on the Supreme Court in transition. We will explore competing theories of constitutional interpretation that have characterized the Rehnquist court and examine specific cases that are representative of the court's work. We will study contending theories of the Supreme Court's role in our constitutional framework, and we will consider how new appointees to the court may shift the balance in important areas of jurisprudence that have become increasingly contentious, especially with respect to issues of personal autonomy, affirmative action, and national security.
5046 PBPL-414-01 Cur Iss:Localism/States Rights 1.00 SEM Moskowitz, Rachel W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar will explore questions about the development and purpose of federalism, states’ rights, and localism. We will consider competing ideological frameworks around support and opposition of local and state power – for example, from the notion of laboratories of democracy to states’ rights resistance in the face of claims of federal overreach. We will study state and local policies in the current political era and pay particular attention to the development of policies as both progressive resistance to and conservative support of the Trump administration. In this context, we will study battles not just between states or localities and the federal government, but also conflicts between states and cities. We will also consider the role of other institutions, like the media and the courts, in these conflicts.
4254 PBPL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
4332 PBPL-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
4255 PBPL-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, availaboe in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis.
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single-semester thesis. (1 course credit to be completed in one semester.)
5208 PBPL-804-01 Capital Punishment in America 1.00 SEM Dunn, Timothy T: 6:45PM-9:25PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  The course will examine the legal and moral controversies surrounding the application of capital punishment (i.e., the death penalty) as a punishment for homicide. We will consider whether capital punishment is state sanctioned homicide or good public policy. Topics include: capital punishment through history, U.S. Supreme Court decisions and contemporary problems with the application of the death penalty. We will analyze the nature, extent, and distribution of criminal homicide and critically review current innocence project work.
4631 PBPL-806-01 Methods of Research 1.00 LEC Ellis, Chad W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is intended to empower students to evaluate common forms of research critically, and to give them some experience in conducting research. Through a series of weekly assignments and class projects, students will be introduced to the shaping of research questions; hypothesis testing, writing a research paper, conducting interviews and surveys, giving a professional presentation, and presenting simple tabular data to prove a point. The course does not require an extensive mathematics background. Regular attendance and access to a computer, e-mail, and the Internet are expected.
5136 PBPL-808-01 Constutional Foundatns Pub Pol 1.00 LEC Horowitz, Amy M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will examine the history, methods, and types of successful, formal, written argumentation in policy advocacy. Among the arenas explored will be courts of law, legislative bodies, and the broader field of public opinion. Most course material will be drawn from case studies.
5142 PBPL-820-01 Policy and Health Equity 1.00 SEM McGuire, Maryann R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The course will study the intersection of contemporary public health topics with societal factors and policies that influence the health of populations. A review of current U.S. policy approaches that address health care and social determinants of health will be covered. The key social determinants of health include: economic stability, neighborhoods and physical environment, education, food, race/ethnicity, social engagement and the health care system Through case studies, collaborative learning projects and class seminars, students will understand how these social determinants affect the health outcomes of populations and policy as well as program mechanisms that can improve outcomes. An overarching focus of this course will be on policy changes that can eliminate health inequalities.
4632 PBPL-828-01 Institutions and Public Policy 1.00 SEM Fotos, Michael T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The course applies social choice theory to the study of four components of democratic policy making; voting, political strategy, theories of governance, and bureaucracy. The course emphasizes weekly readings and in-class discussion of central themes in the literature. Examination of the formal properties of voting rules leads to a deeper understanding of representation and political outcomes. The analysis of institutions offers lessons on the problems of delegation, policy design, implementation, and democratic administration.
5137 PBPL-840-01 Budget Mgt & Public Policy 1.00 SEM Jacobs, Cindy R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will focus on the practical aspects of pubic budgeting, finance, and financial management in the policy making process. It will begin with the "how to's" of budget development, from estimating and projecting revenues to deconstructing expenditures in order to develop the best estimates. Where appropriate, elements of public finance theory will be introduced and discussed as it relates to practical budget and financial management Both the bonding process and the complications related to third party service provision will be addressed. We will utilize practical tools for budget and financial management, such as results-based accountability, performance contracting, and reviewing budget to actual data together with projected to actual service data on a regular basis.
4240 PBPL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4246 PBPL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A research project on a special topic approved by the instructor and with the written approval of the director of public policy studies. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4244 PBPL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Two credit thesis: start time-approval of idea, initial bibliography, and sketch of the project by pre-registration time for graduate students in the term prior to registration for the credit; first draft by reading week of the second semester, "final" first draft by end of spring vacation week; final copy due one week before the last day of classes.
4245 PBPL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4243 PBPL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4375 EDUC-300-01 Education Reform: Past&Present 1.00 LEC Dougherty, Jack M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  Prerequisite: C- or better in EDUC200, or American Studies major or Public Policy and Law major.
  How do we explain the rise and decline of education reform movements? How do we evaluate their level of “success” from different sources of evidence? Drawing upon primary source materials and historical interpretations, this course examines a broad array of elementary, secondary, and higher education reform movements from the mid-19th century to the present, analyzing social, material, and ideological contexts. This intermediate-level seminar explores a topic common to all branches of educational studies from both theoretical and comparative perspectives.
5139 EDUC-309-01 Race Class & Educ Policy 1.00 SEM Wong, Jia-Hui Stefanie TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or permission of instructor.
  How do competing theories explain educational inequality? How do different policies attempt to address it? This class will consider the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the examination of educational inequality. Possible topics include economic and cultural capital, racial/gender/sexual identity formation, desegregation, multiculturalism, detracking, school choice, school-family relationships, and affirmative action. Student groups will expand upon the readings by proposing, implementing, and presenting their research analysis from a community learning project.
4100 ENVS-149-01 Intro to Environmental Science 1.25 LEC Ehlert, Krista TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 26
  NOTE: Enrollment is limited to 4 seniors, 4 juniors, 8 sophomores, and 10 first-year students, there will be 6 additional seats assigned by the instructor.
  An introduction to interrelationships among the natural environment, humans, and the human environment, including the biological, social, economic, technological, and political aspects of current environmental challenges. This course focuses on building the scientific framework necessary to understand environmental issues. It explores the structure, function, and dynamics of ecosystems, interactions between living and physical systems, and how human enterprise affects natural systems. It also examines current issues regarding human impacts on environmental quality, including global warming, air and water pollution, agriculture, overpopulation, energy, and urbanization. The laboratory section, which complements lecture material, incorporates laboratory and field exercises that include a focus on Hartford and a nearby rural area.
5654 HIST-270-01 Parliamentary Debate 1.00 LEC Regan-Lefebvre, Jennifer T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 32
  This course introduces the history of debate in the British parliamentary tradition and the practice of debate as a collegiate extra-curricular activity. The course is a dynamic mix of lecture, seminar-style discussion and experiential learning. The course has three components: historical background to and analysis of the British parliamentary system, drawing on the emerging field of the history of rhetoric; primary source analysis of historical speeches and debates; applied sessions when students will draft and practice their own debates in teams. Written exercises include developing a ‘time-space case’ based in British history. Students will complete the course with a broader understanding of British political history, a deeper sensitivity to political rhetoric, and stronger oral and written argumentation and communication skills. No debate experience is necessary.
5238 JWST-217-01 Law & Arab/Israeli Conflict 1.00 SEM Feinstein, Barry TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Focusing on the vital role international law plays in the ongoing Arab-Israeli conflict, this course will consider opposing views of key controversial historical and legal issues in this dispute, such as: international recognition, the legality of the use of force and self-defense, strategic aspects in the conflict, international humanitarian law / the law of armed conflict and belligerent occupation, international waterways,. Key diplomatic and legal documents pertaining to the conflict will be analyzed.
4848 PHIL-246-01 Hum Rgts: Phil Foundations 1.00 LEC Marcano, Donna-Dale MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course will survey and critically assess arguments in favor of the existence of human rights, arguments about the legitimate scope of such rights (who has human rights and against whom such rights can legitimately be claimed), and arguments about which rights ought to be included in any complete account of human rights. Specific topics will include (but not necessarily be limited to) the philosophical history of human rights discourse, cultural relativist attacks on the universality of human rights, debates concerning the rights of cultural minorities to self-determination, and controversies concerning whether human rights should include economic and social rights.
5028 POLS-316-01 Civil Liberties 1.00 SEM McMahon, Kevin TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement. Closed to seniors.
  An analysis and evaluation of US Supreme Court decisions (and related materials) dealing principally with freedom of expression; the right to privacy; freedom of religion; and, liberty and security.
5024 POLS-325-01 American Presidency 1.00 LEC McMahon, Kevin TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An explanation of the institutional and political evolution of the presidency with an emphasis on the nature of presidential power in domestic and foreign affairs. Attention is also given to institutional conflicts with Congress and the courts. The nature of presidential leadership and personality is also explored.
5031 POLS-344-01 Politics of Africa 1.00 LEC Kamola, Isaac MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused
  Political Scientists often study Africa as a distinct place, defined by a unique set of crises, which set the continent apart from the rest of the world. This class, in contrast, starts from the assertion that Africa is not a discrete location to be studied in isolation but instead a site of active and dynamic human practices that intersect and define the political and economic lives of all people across the world. "Africa" is, in the words of James Ferguson, a "category through which a 'world' is structured." We first examine the colonial and Cold War histories shaping the modern world, and how they played out in Africa specifically. We then study contemporary issues that tie Africa to the rest of the world, including: civil conflict and the "responsibility to protect"; debt, structural adjustment, aid, and development; Chinese/Africa economic cooperation; "the land question"; and the Arab Spring.
4560 THDN-247-01 Post War American Theater 1.00 SEM Power, Katharine TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  This course offers a survey of prominent plays and choreographies authored by American theater artists during the post-war period (1945-1965). Playwrights such as Arthur Miller, Lorraine Hansberry, and Tennessee Williams, along with selected choreographers, including Martha Graham and Alvin Ailey will be discussed with reference to the House Committee on Unamerican Activities; the popularity of Freudian and Jungian psychoanalysis; the emergence of a civil rights movement; and the social and political forces of "containment" that defined the early years of the Cold War era.