Course Schedule

Select a level: Select a term:
Only show courses available to first-year students.

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Course Schedule for PHILOSOPHY - Fall 2014
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2276 PHIL-101-01 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Theurer,Kari L. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM HL - 14 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 6 seats reserved for first-years, 6 for sophomores.
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
3324 PHIL-101-02 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Wade,Maurice L. WF: 2:40PM-3:55PM MC - 102 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
2867 PHIL-205-01 Symbolic Logic 1.00 LEC Theurer,Kari L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM HL - 14 NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  An introduction to the use of symbols in reasoning. Prepositional calculus and quantification theory will be studied. This background knowledge will prepare the student to look at the relation of logic to linguistics, computer science, mathematics, and philosophy. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Philosophy 255, Philosophy of Logic.
3269 PHIL-214-01 Philosophy of Art 1.00 LEC Hyland,Drew A. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM LSC - 132 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  “Art,” one writer has said, “is not a copy of the real world. One of the damn things is enough.” But then, what is art, and what is its relation to the world, to our experience, to the symbolic systems with which we create it? By consulting selected aesthetic texts of important philosophers, these and other questions will be posed to help us understand some of the traditional philosophical perplexities about art.
3270 PHIL-221-01 Science, Reality & Rationality 1.00 LEC Theurer,Kari L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM HL - 14 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Much of modern philosophy has focused on efforts to understand the rise of physical science since the 16th century. This course will focus on 20th-century efforts by philosophers to characterize science, explain its effectiveness, and interpret its findings.
3297 PHIL-226-01 Neuroscience, Ethics, & Agency 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  In this course, we will consider whether and how recent findings in neuroscience should inform our answers to traditional questions in metaethics concerning the nature and origins of morality, as well as our concepts of freedom, moral motivation, moral agency, and moral responsibility.
3271 PHIL-240-01 Intro to Feminist Philosophy 1.00 SEM Marcano,Donna MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM MECC - 293 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  In the last several decades, feminist philosophy has developed with new vitality. It has influenced such diverse areas of philosophy as ethics, politics, and epistemology. Its contributors represent both Anglo-American and European philosophical traditions. This course will introduce students both to some of the major contributors and to the ways in which they have influenced various areas of philosophy. (May be counted toward Women, Gender, and Sexuality major and minor.)
3272 PHIL-246-01 Hum Rgts: Phil Foundations 1.00 LEC Marcano,Donna TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 225 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course will survey and critically assess arguments in favor of the existence of human rights, arguments about the legitimate scope of such rights (who has human rights and against whom such rights can legitimately be claimed), and arguments about which rights ought to be included in any complete account of human rights. Specific topics will include (but not necessarily be limited to) the philosophical history of human rights discourse, cultural relativist attacks on the universality of human rights, debates concerning the rights of cultural minorities to self-determination, and controversies concerning whether human rights should include economic and social rights.
3273 PHIL-255-01 Philosophy of Logic 1.00 LEC Ryan,Todd MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM LSC - 136 NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will introduce students to propositional and (first order) predicate logic, while engaging in philosophical reflection on a range of issues related to modern formal logic. In particular students will first study techniques for representing and analyzing arguments using the symbolism of each formal system. We will then consider some of the many philosophical issues surrounding formal logic, such as the nature of truth and inference, semantic paradoxes, and the attempt by Russell and others to use advances in formal logic to resolve traditional problems in metaphysics and epistemology. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and Philosophy 205, Symbolic Logic.
2925 PHIL-281-01 Ancient Greek Philosophy 1.00 LEC Ewegen,Shane M. TR: 6:30PM-7:45PM MECC - 246 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  This course looks at the origins of western philosophy in the Presocratics, Plato, and Aristotle. Students will see how philosophy arose as a comprehensive search for wisdom, then developed into the “areas” of philosophy such as metaphysics, ethics, and political philosophy. This course fulfills part two of the writing intensive (WI) requirement for the Philosophy major.
3341 PHIL-316-01 Hume and the Limits of Reason 1.00 SEM Ryan,Todd MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM MECC - 293 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  David Hume was one of the greatest and most influential of Enlightenment thinkers. Yet he was also one of its most idiosyncratic. Driven by an uncompromising empiricism, Hume raised profound skeptical worries concerning causation, the external world, the existence of an enduring self and even reason itself. Hume was an equally trenchant critic of moral objectivism and the pretensions of both natural and revealed religion. Yet Hume’s philosophy does not end with this negative assessment of human reason. Rather, Hume attempts to construct a more positive vision of human nature and society, developing an ethical system based on benevolence and utility, and a vision of society freed from its dependence on religious belief. In this course we will look at both sides of Hume’s thought.
2869 PHIL-325-01 Nietzsche 1.00 SEM Hyland,Drew A. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 307 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Nietzsche is one of those thinkers whose influence on our culture has been far wider than the number of people who have actually read him. Through a careful study of this 19th-century thinker’s major works we shall examine his own claim of thinking the most challenging thoughts of the next century.
3295 PHIL-328-01 Freud 1.00 SEM Vogt,Erik R: 6:30PM-9:10PM MC - 305 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  This seminar will concentrate on the works of Sigmund Freud. We will begin with Freud’s psychological writings, then move on to his more anthropological writings. Our aim will be to see how Freud’s psychological theories inform is arguments about religion and culture.
3275 PHIL-336-01 Foucault 1.00 SEM Vogt,Erik M: 6:30PM-9:10PM MC - 305 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Michel Foucault was one of the most influential European thinkers of the 20th century. Using a selection of his writings, we shall examine some of his main contributions, seeking to understand both the philosophical and cultural influences that led Foucault to his positions, as well as the wide-spread influence he has had on subsequent philosophy and political, historical and cultural theory.
2544 PHIL-355-01 Moral Theory and Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Wade,Maurice L. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 225 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  The purpose of this course is to assist students in acquiring the skill in ethical reasoning and analysis needed for mature participation in society’s continuing debates over moral issues of public concern. The course will begin by examining some types of ethical theories and will proceed to consider a number of controversial social issues. Abortion, euthanasia, racial and sexual discrimination, world hunger, treatment of animals, and capital punishment are among the topics to be considered.
2349 PHIL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Independent, intensive study in a field of special interest requiring a wide range of reading and resulting in an extended paper. Normally there will be only a few meetings with the supervisor during the course of the semester. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2228 PHIL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Work conducted in close consultation with the instructor of a single course and participation in teaching that course. Duties for a teaching assistant may include, for example, holding review sessions, reading papers, or assisting in class work. In addition, a paper may be required from the teaching assistant. This course may count as one of the 11 total required for the major, but will not count as one of the six required “upper-level” (300 and above) courses. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2320 PHIL-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  A two-credit course culminating in an extended paper to be read by two or more members of the department. It may be organized like a tutorial or independent study. This is a required course for all students who wish to graduate with honors in philosophy. To be eligible for this course a student must have an A- average in the major or must successfully petition the department for an exemption. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending the first semester, and two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
2493 PHIL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  A two-credit course culminating in an extended paper to be read by two or more members of the department. It may be organized like a tutorial or independent study. This is a required course for all students who wish to graduate with honors in philosophy. In order to be eligible for this course a student must have an A- average in the major or must successfully petition the department for an exemption. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis.
2437 PBPL-344-01 Seeking JUSTICE in Amer Life 1.00 SEM Fulco,Adrienne
Schaller,Barry R.
M: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 305 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  This course will examine basic theories of ethics (common morality), found in moral and political philosophy in order to consider the extent to which traditional ethical and moral principles govern legal, political, and private decision-making. We will begin by identifying ethical and moral principles in our founding documents before proceeding with the main work of the course, which is to examine the ethical and moral reasoning behind legal and policy decisions, business decisions, and personal decisions. Among the diverse subjects that will be discussed are physician-assisted suicide, the death penalty, buying and selling of body parts, human cloning, legalizing drugs, affirmative action, national service in war, hate speech and political dissent, wealth and income distribution including disbursing public money to private business, individual rights versus the needs of the community, torture, truth and lying in private and public, equality and inequality, drug-enhancement in sports, immoral behavior on the part of public figures.
2883 POLS-105-01 Intro Pol Philosophy 1.00 LEC Maxwell,Lida E. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM SH - N130 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This section of POLS 105 is methodologically focused.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  An introduction to the philosophical study of political and moral life through a consideration of various topics of both current and historical interest. Topics include environmentalism, ancients and moderns, male and female, nature and nurture, race and ethnicity, reason and history, and reason and revelation.