Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for PHILOSOPHY - Fall 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3326 PHIL-101-01 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Theurer,Kari L. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
3327 PHIL-101-02 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Lloyd,Dan MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
3330 PHIL-205-01 Symbolic Logic 1.00 LEC Theurer,Kari L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  An introduction to the use of symbols in reasoning. Prepositional calculus and quantification theory will be studied. This background knowledge will prepare the student to look at the relation of logic to linguistics, computer science, mathematics, and philosophy. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Philosophy 255, Philosophy of Logic.
3331 PHIL-238-01 Media Philosophy 1.00 LEC Vogt,Erik M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  In the wake of the increasing significance of media technologies in all realms of society, media theory has moved to the center of discussion within the humanities. This course will introduce philosophical theories and texts that take a broad approach to the new media and communication technologies.
3332 PHIL-241-01 Race Racism & Phil 1.00 LEC Marcano,Donna MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An intensive examination of some philosophical discussions of race and racism. Topics include the origins of European racism, the distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic racism, the conceptual connections between racist thinking and certain canonized philosophical positions (e.g., Locke’s nominalism), the relationship between racism and our notions of personal identity, the use of traditional philosophical thought (e.g., the history of philosophy) to characterize and explain differences between European and black African cultures, the possible connections between racism and Pan-Africanism, the nature of anti-Semitism, and recent attempts to conceptualize race and racism as social constructions.
3333 PHIL-246-01 Hum Rgts: Phil Foundations 1.00 LEC Marcano,Donna TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course will survey and critically assess arguments in favor of the existence of human rights, arguments about the legitimate scope of such rights (who has human rights and against whom such rights can legitimately be claimed), and arguments about which rights ought to be included in any complete account of human rights. Specific topics will include (but not necessarily be limited to) the philosophical history of human rights discourse, cultural relativist attacks on the universality of human rights, debates concerning the rights of cultural minorities to self-determination, and controversies concerning whether human rights should include economic and social rights.
3334 PHIL-247-01 Latin Amer Soc & Polit Thought 1.00 LEC Wade,Maurice L. WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An historical survey of important Latin American social and political thinkers. Thinkers covered may include las Casas, Sepulveda, Bolivar, Sarmiento, Marti, Mariategui, Vasconcelos, Jose Gracia, Enrique Dussel, Linda Alcoff, and Ofelia Schutte among others. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is required. All texts are available translated into English.
3335 PHIL-254-01 Shakespeare as Philosopher 1.00 LEC Lloyd,Dan MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Was Shakespeare a philosopher? The practice of philosophy entails sustained argument surrounding propositions of universal importance. We will examine selected plays and poetry of Shakespeare in search of coherent philosophical discourse, considering specifically Shakespearean treatments of themes in metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, and ethics. This seminar is open to students in all disciplines, with no prerequisites. Background knowledge about Shakespeare or Elizabethan literature is not presupposed, however students should be capable of close reading of the original texts.
3336 PHIL-281-01 Ancient Greek Philosophy 1.00 LEC Ewegen,Shane M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course looks at the origins of western philosophy in the Presocratics, Plato, and Aristotle. Students will see how philosophy arose as a comprehensive search for wisdom, then developed into the “areas” of philosophy such as metaphysics, ethics, and political philosophy. This course fulfills part two of the writing intensive (WI) requirement for the Philosophy major.
3337 PHIL-306-01 20th C Cont Phil 1.00 SEM Ewegen,Shane M. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  What are poets for in a destitute time?” asks Heidegger’s favorite poet, Holderlin. We add, “and what are philosophers for?” The tradition of 20th-century continental philosophy has responded, “certainly not just to analyze language!” We shall follow some of the leading figures and themes of this rich tradition from its roots in Nietzsche through the transformations of phenomenology, to existentialism and beyond. Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, and Derrida will be studied among others.
3338 PHIL-351-01 Aesthetics 1.00 SEM Vogt,Erik T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will provide both a survey and close readings of some of the most significant thinkers in the tradition of philosophical aesthetics. Its scope will include 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century positions in aesthetics; moreover, texts interrogated in the course will engage different artistic fields such as literature, painting, music, cinema, and new media.
3339 PHIL-355-01 Moral Theory and Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Wade,Maurice L. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The purpose of this course is to assist students in acquiring the skill in ethical reasoning and analysis needed for mature participation in society’s continuing debates over moral issues of public concern. The course will begin by examining some types of ethical theories and will proceed to consider a number of controversial social issues. Abortion, euthanasia, racial and sexual discrimination, world hunger, treatment of animals, and capital punishment are among the topics to be considered.
3341 PHIL-378-01 Philosophy of Mind 1.00 LEC Theurer,Kari L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  In this course we will investigate classical and contemporary theories of mind, such as dualism, logical behaviorism, materialism, and functionalism. Among the issues we will consider are what is the nature of the mental? Is the mind identical with or distinct from the body? What is the nature of consciousness? Is the mind a genuine cause? What, if anything, do contemporary investigations in cognitive science and artificial intelligence have to teach us about the nature of the mind?
2300 PHIL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Independent, intensive study in a field of special interest requiring a wide range of reading and resulting in an extended paper. Normally there will be only a few meetings with the supervisor during the course of the semester. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2193 PHIL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Work conducted in close consultation with the instructor of a single course and participation in teaching that course. Duties for a teaching assistant may include, for example, holding review sessions, reading papers, or assisting in class work. In addition, a paper may be required from the teaching assistant. This course may count as one of the 11 total required for the major, but will not count as one of the six required “upper-level” (300 and above) courses. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2272 PHIL-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A two-credit course culminating in an extended paper to be read by two or more members of the department. It may be organized like a tutorial or independent study. This is a required course for all students who wish to graduate with honors in philosophy. To be eligible for this course a student must have an A- average in the major or must successfully petition the department for an exemption. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending the first semester, and two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
2405 PHIL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A two-credit course culminating in an extended paper to be read by two or more members of the department. It may be organized like a tutorial or independent study. This is a required course for all students who wish to graduate with honors in philosophy. In order to be eligible for this course a student must have an A- average in the major or must successfully petition the department for an exemption. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis.
2361 PBPL-344-01 Seeking JUSTICE in Amer Life 1.00 SEM Cancelled Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  This course will examine basic theories of ethics (common morality), found in moral and political philosophy in order to consider the extent to which traditional ethical and moral principles govern legal, political, and private decision-making. We will begin by identifying ethical and moral principles in our founding documents before proceeding with the main work of the course, which is to examine the ethical and moral reasoning behind legal and policy decisions, business decisions, and personal decisions. Among the diverse subjects that will be discussed are physician-assisted suicide, the death penalty, buying and selling of body parts, human cloning, legalizing drugs, affirmative action, national service in war, hate speech and political dissent, wealth and income distribution including disbursing public money to private business, individual rights versus the needs of the community, torture, truth and lying in private and public, equality and inequality, drug-enhancement in sports, immoral behavior on the part of public figures.
3317 POLS-105-01 Intro Pol Philosophy 1.00 LEC Dudas,Mary J. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  An introduction to the philosophical study of political and moral life through a consideration of various topics of both current and historical interest. Topics include environmentalism, ancients and moderns, male and female, nature and nurture, race and ethnicity, reason and history, and reason and revelation.
3323 POLS-329-01 Political Philosophy & Ethics 1.00 LEC Smith,Gregory TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 105, 219, or 220.
  This course will engage the literature of ethical theory and ethical debate. The course attempts to enlighten the place ethical reasoning plays in political science, political life and the tradition of political philosophy. Readings in the course will differ from year to year but may include such authors as Aristotle, Cicero, Aquinas, Kant, Mill, Rawls, Nietzsche. In different years the course may focus on various themes which could include topics such as feminism, gentlemanliness, Eudaimonism, utilitarianism and deontology, ethics and theology, legal and business ethics, or the place of ethics in the discipline of Political Science.
3458 RELG-307-01 Jewish Philosophy 1.00 SEM Kiener,Ronald M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Religion 109.
  This course provides an introduction to the major themes and thinkers of medieval and modern Jewish philosophy. We will study how Plato, Aristotle, and other non-Jewish philosophers found their Jewish voice in the likes of Philo, Saadia Gaon, Judah Halevi, Maimonides, and Mendelssohn. Issues to be considered are the relationship between reason and revelation, the concept of monotheism, the nature of prophecy and the Jewish tradition, and the problem of evil. Extensive use of original sources in translation will be complemented by interpretive studies. (May be counted toward Philosophy.)