Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for PHILOSOPHY - Spring 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2071 PHIL-101-01 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Brown,W. Miller MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
2110 PHIL-101-02 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Vogt,Erik MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
2073 PHIL-205-01 Symbolic Logic 1.00 LEC Ryan,Todd MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  An introduction to the use of symbols in reasoning. Prepositional calculus and quantification theory will be studied. This background knowledge will prepare the student to look at the relation of logic to linguistics, computer science, mathematics, and philosophy. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Philosophy 255, Philosophy of Logic.
2074 PHIL-212-01 Philosophy of Religion 1.00 LEC Ryan,Todd MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  A discussion of some of the philosophical problems that arise out of reflection on religion; the nature of religion and its relation to science, art, and morality; the nature of religious and theological language, the concept of God; the problem of evil; and the justification of religious belief.
1364 PHIL-215-01 Medical Ethics 1.00 LEC Brown,W. Miller MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course will take up ethical, political, and legal issues relevant to the medical profession and patient population. Topics will include: death with dignity, treatment with dignity, abortion, mercy-killing, patient consent, the nature of physical versus mental illness, medical experimentation, and the socially conscious distribution of medical resources.
2075 PHIL-223-01 African Philosophy 1.00 LEC Wade,Maurice L. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  What is African philosophy? Currently, among the scholars addressing this question, no single answer prevails. Some hold that philosophy, by its nature, transcends race, ethnicity, and region and hence that terms such as “African philosophy,” “European philosophy,”and “Asian philosophy,” are all rooted in misunderstanding what philosophy fundamentally is. Some argue that prior to the very recent work of African scholars trained in formal (often European) departments of philosophy, African philosophy did not (and could not) exist. Others argue that while (many of) the peoples of Africa have little or no tradition of formal (written) philosophizing, the differing worldviews embodied in the myths, religions, rituals, and other cultural practices of ethnic Africans constitute genuine African philosophy. Yet others find African philosophy in the critical musings of indigenous African (so-called) wise men or sages. In this course we will critically examine the variety of possibilities, forms, and practices in Africa and elsewhere that might be referred to appropriately as “African philosophy” and attempt to understand why the notion of “African philosophy” is so especially contentious. (May be counted toward African Studies.)
2160 PHIL-226-01 Neuroscience, Ethics, & Agency 1.00 LEC Theurer,Kari L. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  In this course, we will consider whether and how recent findings in neuroscience should inform our answers to traditional questions in metaethics concerning the nature and origins of morality, as well as our concepts of freedom, moral motivation, moral agency, and moral responsibility.
2076 PHIL-228-01 Animal Rights, Human Respons 1.00 LEC Ewegen,Shane M. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Who is the animal? In an effort to explore this and related questions this course will serve as a philosophical investigation into the essence of non-human animals. Major philosophical and political theories regarding the status, value, and autonomy of non-human animals will be explored. Additional efforts will be made to address the discourse of animal rights, animal husbandry, and animal suffering, as well as broader issues of human rights insofar as they relate to and affect the non-human animal. Through a philosophical inquiry into the nature of animality, we will see that our understanding of animals bears immediately upon our understanding of the human being and of human rights. Thus, the question ‘who is the animal’ will lead us directly into the most pressing of philosophical questions – who is the human being?
2214 PHIL-239-01 African-American Feminism 1.00 SEM Marcano,Donna TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  This course is a historical survey of the writings of African-American women as they have historically attempted to negotiate fundamental philosophical questions of the "race problem" and the "woman problem." To this extent, we will be inserting black women's voices into the philosophical canon of both race and feminism. Along with exploring and contextualizing the responses and dialogues of women writers, like Anna Julia Cooper with their more famous male contemporaries such as Du Bois, up to more contemporary articulations of black women's voices in what is known as hip-hop feminism, we will ask the question of whether there is a particular black feminist thought, epistemology, and thus philosophy.
2201 PHIL-254-01 Shakespeare as Philosopher 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Was Shakespeare a philosopher? The practice of philosophy entails sustained argument surrounding propositions of universal importance. We will examine selected plays and poetry of Shakespeare in search of coherent philosophical discourse, considering specifically Shakespearean treatments of themes in metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, and ethics. This seminar is open to students in all disciplines, with no prerequisites. Background knowledge about Shakespeare or Elizabethan literature is not presupposed, however students should be capable of close reading of the original texts.
1702 PHIL-283-01 Early Modern Philosophy 1.00 LEC Ryan,Todd WF: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  The history of Western philosophy from approximately 1600 to 1750, with major attention given to Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley and Hume. This course fulfills part two of the writing intensive (WI) requirement for the Philosophy major.
2078 PHIL-285-01 20th Cent Analytic Philosophy 1.00 LEC Theurer,Kari L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Philosophy, said Wittgenstein, is the "bewitchment of the intelligence by means of language," and in his later work he sought to counter the thralldom of language by investigating its many uses. So have other writers from Russell, Ayer, and Ryle to the American philosophers Quine and Goodman. Their approach to philosophy, influenced by spectacular developments in logic and science, was largely "analytic," but their aims were traditional: to limn the prospect of human knowledge and release human intelligence from confusion and superstition. We will study their writings to understand their approach and to assess what it is to do philosophy in the 20th century.
2079 PHIL-310-01 Question of Justice 1.00 SEM Marcano,Donna TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course will be centered on the question: “What is justice?” The majority of the semester will be devoted to a historical survey of the different philosophical conceptions of justice from Plato to 20th-century political theorists like Rawls, Nozick, and Kelsen. In the final weeks of the course, we will turn our attention to the “crime against humanity,” which is arguably the greatest challenge to contemporary formulations of justice. Specifically, we will analyze the morality and political viability of recent truth commissions (like those in South Africa, Chile, Uganda, Haiti, and Argentina) and international criminal tribunals (like those set up by the United Nations for Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia). We will also consider the theoretical and practical value of the discourses surrounding “restorative justice” and “transitional justice” over and against more traditional frameworks.
2095 PHIL-320-01 Marx 1.00 LEC Wade,Maurice L.
Vogt,Erik
M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A great deal of philosophical study has been devoted to the views of Karl Marx, yet much disagreement remains concerning what Marx actually thought. This course will examine some contemporary interpretations of Marx’s work against the background of some of his more important writings. Though we cannot realistically hope to arrive at the “correct” interpretation of Marx’s views, we can at least assess the merits of some of the contending accounts.
2111 PHIL-345-01 Colonialism and Neocolonialism 1.00 SEM Wade,Maurice L.
Vogt,Erik
W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This seminar will examine major theories of colonialism and neocolonialism. A historical-chronological approach will explore both Marxist, liberal, existentialist, and culturalist accounts. Authors to be discussed will include Karl Marx, Rosa Luxemburg, Hannah Arendt, Jean-Paul Sartre, Frantz Fanon, and Edward Said.
2197 PHIL-374-01 Minds and Brains 1.00 SEM Staff,Trinity MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  The neurosciences have made striking progress in recent years toward understanding the brains of animals and human beings. Through readings in philosophy and science we will consider what contribution this explosion of neuroscientific data can make to our understanding of the mind.
2198 PHIL-383-01 Time 1.00 SEM Staff,Trinity MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  If the past no longer exists, and the future is not yet, then what is time? This seminar will consider time and temporality as issues in philosophy of science, phenomenology, and cognitive science. Authors include Augustine, James, Husserl, and Einstein, with the thought-experimental contributions of Proust, Borges, and others.
1358 PHIL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Work conducted in close consultation with the instructor of a single course and participation in teaching that course. Duties for a teaching assistant may include, for example, holding review sessions, reading papers, or assisting in class work. In addition, a paper may be required from the teaching assistant. This course may count as one of the 11 total required for the major, but will not count as one of the six required “upper-level” (300 and above) courses. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2116 CLCV-325-01 Philosophy of Tragedy 1.00 SEM Ewegen,Shane M. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Throughout the history of Western philosophy, ancient Greek tragedy has continued to be a source of great fascination. This course shall focus on a number of philosophical analyses of ancient tragedy, including those offered by Plato, Aristotle, Nietzsche, Hegel, and Heidegger. Additionally, several ancient Greek tragedies will be read in order to test the validity of these philosophical analyses. We will see that philosophy itself, owing to this preoccupation with tragedy, takes on a tragic character through the guise of some of these thinkers.
1934 POLS-105-01 Intro Pol Philosophy 1.00 LEC Archer,Crina B. WF: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  An introduction to the philosophical study of political and moral life through a consideration of various topics of both current and historical interest. Topics include environmentalism, ancients and moderns, male and female, nature and nurture, race and ethnicity, reason and history, and reason and revelation.
1937 POLS-339-01 Contemp&Postmod Thought 1.00 LEC Smith,Gregory TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 105, 219 or 220.
  This course will deal with philosophical developments of moral and political significance in the 20th century. Using the writings of selected authors, such as Heidegger, Sartre, Gadamer, Marcuse, Strauss, Foucault, and Habermas, it will focus on various modern movements of thought: existentialism, critical theory, neo-Marxism, hermeneutics, feminism, deconstructionism, and postmodernism. Readings will be from primary sources.