Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for PHILOSOPHY - Fall 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2989 PHIL-101-01 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Vogt,Erik WF: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: 2 seats reserved for HMTCA students
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
2990 PHIL-101-02 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Theurer,Kari L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
3369 PHIL-101-03 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Lloyd,Dan MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students.
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
2991 PHIL-205-01 Symbolic Logic 1.00 LEC Ryan,Todd MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  An introduction to the use of symbols in reasoning. Prepositional calculus and quantification theory will be studied. This background knowledge will prepare the student to look at the relation of logic to linguistics, computer science, mathematics, and philosophy. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Philosophy 255, Philosophy of Logic.
3370 PHIL-221-01 Science, Reality & Rationality 1.00 LEC Theurer,Kari L. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Much of modern philosophy has focused on efforts to understand the rise of physical science since the 16th century. This course will focus on 20th-century efforts by philosophers to characterize science, explain its effectiveness, and interpret its findings.
2993 PHIL-241-01 Race Racism & Phil 1.00 LEC Wade,Maurice L. WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An intensive examination of some philosophical discussions of race and racism. Topics include the origins of European racism, the distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic racism, the conceptual connections between racist thinking and certain canonized philosophical positions (e.g., Locke’s nominalism), the relationship between racism and our notions of personal identity, the use of traditional philosophical thought (e.g., the history of philosophy) to characterize and explain differences between European and black African cultures, the possible connections between racism and Pan-Africanism, the nature of anti-Semitism, and recent attempts to conceptualize race and racism as social constructions.
3371 PHIL-254-01 Shakespeare as Philosopher 1.00 LEC Lloyd,Dan MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Was Shakespeare a philosopher? The practice of philosophy entails sustained argument surrounding propositions of universal importance. We will examine selected plays and poetry of Shakespeare in search of coherent philosophical discourse, considering specifically Shakespearean treatments of themes in metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, and ethics. This seminar is open to students in all disciplines, with no prerequisites. Background knowledge about Shakespeare or Elizabethan literature is not presupposed, however students should be capable of close reading of the original texts.
2997 PHIL-281-01 Ancient Greek Philosophy 1.00 LEC Ewegen,Shane M. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course looks at the origins of western philosophy in the Presocratics, Plato, and Aristotle. Students will see how philosophy arose as a comprehensive search for wisdom, then developed into the “areas” of philosophy such as metaphysics, ethics, and political philosophy. This course fulfills part two of the writing intensive (WI) requirement for the Philosophy major.
3372 PHIL-282-01 Medieval Philosophy 1.00 LEC Ryan,Todd MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A study of representative thinkers of the medieval period. Discussion will focus on such major issues as the existence of God, the problem of evil, the nature of universals, the relation between philosophical reason and religious faith. Attention will also be paid to the cultural, historical and religious climates which helped influence the unique scholastic doctrines under discussion. (Students enrolling in Philosophy 282 must also enroll in Philosophy 290-01L.) Enrollment limited.
2998 PHIL-306-01 20th C Cont Phil 1.00 SEM Vogt,Erik W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  What are poets for in a destitute time?” asks Heidegger’s favorite poet, Holderlin. We add, “and what are philosophers for?” The tradition of 20th-century continental philosophy has responded, “certainly not just to analyze language!” We shall follow some of the leading figures and themes of this rich tradition from its roots in Nietzsche through the transformations of phenomenology, to existentialism and beyond. Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, and Derrida will be studied among others.
3373 PHIL-316-01 Hume and the Limits of Reason 1.00 SEM Ryan,Todd R: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  David Hume was one of the greatest and most influential of Enlightenment thinkers. Yet he was also one of its most idiosyncratic. Driven by an uncompromising empiricism, Hume raised profound skeptical worries concerning causation, the external world, the existence of an enduring self and even reason itself. Hume was an equally trenchant critic of moral objectivism and the pretensions of both natural and revealed religion. Yet Hume’s philosophy does not end with this negative assessment of human reason. Rather, Hume attempts to construct a more positive vision of human nature and society, developing an ethical system based on benevolence and utility, and a vision of society freed from its dependence on religious belief. In this course we will look at both sides of Hume’s thought.
3374 PHIL-324-01 Sartre's Political Thought 1.00 SEM Vogt,Erik F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will explore the political thought and essays of Jean-Paul Sartre. We will look at Sartre’s writings on Communism, colonialism, race, and racism, Sartre’s turn to materialism and his debate with fellow existentialist, Merleau-Ponty. The aim of this class is to examine the theoretical continuity, if there is any, between Sartre’s existential texts and his political thought as well as his activism.
3000 PHIL-355-01 Moral Theory and Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Wade,Maurice L. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The purpose of this course is to assist students in acquiring the skill in ethical reasoning and analysis needed for mature participation in society’s continuing debates over moral issues of public concern. The course will begin by examining some types of ethical theories and will proceed to consider a number of controversial social issues. Abortion, euthanasia, racial and sexual discrimination, world hunger, treatment of animals, and capital punishment are among the topics to be considered.
2313 PHIL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Independent, intensive study in a field of special interest requiring a wide range of reading and resulting in an extended paper. Normally there will be only a few meetings with the supervisor during the course of the semester. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2213 PHIL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Work conducted in close consultation with the instructor of a single course and participation in teaching that course. Duties for a teaching assistant may include, for example, holding review sessions, reading papers, or assisting in class work. In addition, a paper may be required from the teaching assistant. This course may count as one of the 11 total required for the major, but will not count as one of the six required “upper-level” (300 and above) courses. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2285 PHIL-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A two-credit course culminating in an extended paper to be read by two or more members of the department. It may be organized like a tutorial or independent study. This is a required course for all students who wish to graduate with honors in philosophy. To be eligible for this course a student must have an A- average in the major or must successfully petition the department for an exemption. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending the first semester, and two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
2384 PHIL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A two-credit course culminating in an extended paper to be read by two or more members of the department. It may be organized like a tutorial or independent study. This is a required course for all students who wish to graduate with honors in philosophy. In order to be eligible for this course a student must have an A- average in the major or must successfully petition the department for an exemption. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis.
3596 CLCV-234-01 Greek Comedy: Aristophanes 1.00 LEC Ewegen,Shane M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course will explore the literary, political, and philosophical elements of ancient Athens' greatest comic playwright, Aristophanes. By carefully reading several of his plays we will gain an appreciation for Greek comedy as a form of political satire, as a highly successful criticism of philosophy and sophistry, and as a method of philosophical inquiry in its own right. In order to better understand the humor and references of Aristophanes' plays, we will read a variety of other texts, including works of Greek history, tragedy, and philosophy. Finally, we will study some contemporary works in which the spirit (if not the structure) of Greek comedy is echoed.
3408 POLS-339-01 Contemp&Postmod Thought 1.00 LEC Smith,Gregory W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 105, 219 or 220.
  This course will deal with philosophical developments of moral and political significance in the 20th century. Using the writings of selected authors, such as Heidegger, Sartre, Gadamer, Marcuse, Strauss, Foucault, and Habermas, it will focus on various modern movements of thought: existentialism, critical theory, neo-Marxism, hermeneutics, feminism, deconstructionism, and postmodernism. Readings will be from primary sources.