Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for PHILOSOPHY - Spring 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
4988 PHIL-101-01 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Theurer, Kari TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
4989 PHIL-101-02 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Theurer, Kari TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
4990 PHIL-103-01 Ethics 1.00 LEC Wade, Maurice WF: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An introductory study of values, virtues, and right action. Major concepts of ethical theory (goodness, responsibility, freedom, respect for persons, and morals) will be examined through a study of Aristotle, Kant, and Mill. The course is not primarily a historical survey, but rather attempts to clarify in systematic fashion both moral concepts and moral action.
4991 PHIL-205-01 Symbolic Logic 1.00 LEC Theurer, Kari TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  An introduction to the use of symbols in reasoning. Prepositional calculus and quantification theory will be studied. This background knowledge will prepare the student to look at the relation of logic to linguistics, computer science, mathematics, and philosophy. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Philosophy 255, Philosophy of Logic.
4992 PHIL-212-01 Philosophy of Religion 1.00 LEC Ryan, Todd MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  A discussion of some of the philosophical problems that arise out of reflection on religion; the nature of religion and its relation to science, art, and morality; the nature of religious and theological language, the concept of God; the problem of evil; and the justification of religious belief.
4993 PHIL-228-01 Animal Rights, Human Respons 1.00 LEC Ewegen, Shane TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Who is the animal? In an effort to explore this and related questions this course will serve as a philosophical investigation into the essence of non-human animals. Major philosophical and political theories regarding the status, value, and autonomy of non-human animals will be explored. Additional efforts will be made to address the discourse of animal rights, animal husbandry, and animal suffering, as well as broader issues of human rights insofar as they relate to and affect the non-human animal. Through a philosophical inquiry into the nature of animality, we will see that our understanding of animals bears immediately upon our understanding of the human being and of human rights. Thus, the question ‘who is the animal’ will lead us directly into the most pressing of philosophical questions – who is the human being?
5229 PHIL-239-01 African-American Feminism 1.00 SEM Marcano, Donna-Dale TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course is a historical survey of the writings of African-American women as they have historically attempted to negotiate fundamental philosophical questions of the "race problem" and the "woman problem." To this extent, we will be inserting black women's voices into the philosophical canon of both race and feminism. Along with exploring and contextualizing the responses and dialogues of women writers, like Anna Julia Cooper with their more famous male contemporaries such as Du Bois, up to more contemporary articulations of black women's voices in what is known as hip-hop feminism, we will ask the question of whether there is a particular black feminist thought, epistemology, and thus philosophy.
4994 PHIL-244-01 The Music of Thought 1.00 SEM Lloyd, Dan TR: 2:45PM-4:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  What is music? What is thought? Could these concepts be usefully combined? In philosophy and cognitive science, language and thinking are perennially linked. But language is not the only deeply human cognitive capacity; music is equally universal across cultures. This course will examine the philosophical concept of music along with some ideas from cognitive musicology, exploring whether these ideas can apply to consciousness in general and whether a form of “mind music” can be empirically discovered in the dynamics of the brain. The course is offered without prerequisites, nor is prior training in musicianship required.
4848 PHIL-246-01 Hum Rgts: Phil Foundations 1.00 LEC Marcano, Donna-Dale MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course will survey and critically assess arguments in favor of the existence of human rights, arguments about the legitimate scope of such rights (who has human rights and against whom such rights can legitimately be claimed), and arguments about which rights ought to be included in any complete account of human rights. Specific topics will include (but not necessarily be limited to) the philosophical history of human rights discourse, cultural relativist attacks on the universality of human rights, debates concerning the rights of cultural minorities to self-determination, and controversies concerning whether human rights should include economic and social rights.
4995 PHIL-247-01 Latin Amer Soc & Polit Thought 1.00 LEC Wade, Maurice WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An historical survey of important Latin American social and political thinkers. Thinkers covered may include las Casas, Sepulveda, Bolivar, Sarmiento, Marti, Mariategui, Vasconcelos, Jose Gracia, Enrique Dussel, Linda Alcoff, and Ofelia Schutte among others. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is required. All texts are available translated into English.
4996 PHIL-255-01 Philosophy of Logic 1.00 LEC Ryan, Todd MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will introduce students to propositional and (first order) predicate logic, while engaging in philosophical reflection on a range of issues related to modern formal logic. In particular students will first study techniques for representing and analyzing arguments using the symbolism of each formal system. We will then consider some of the many philosophical issues surrounding formal logic, such as the nature of truth and inference, semantic paradoxes, and the attempt by Russell and others to use advances in formal logic to resolve traditional problems in metaphysics and epistemology. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and Philosophy 205, Symbolic Logic.
4997 PHIL-283-01 Early Modern Philosophy 1.00 LEC Ryan, Todd MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  The history of Western philosophy from approximately 1600 to 1750, with major attention given to Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley and Hume. This course fulfills part two of the writing intensive (WI) requirement for the Philosophy major.
4998 PHIL-288-01 Modern Philosophy 1.00 LEC Ewegen, Shane TR: 9:30AM-10:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will provide a survey of 18th century European philosophy; to be more precise, we will examine texts by representatives of both French and German Enlightenment thought. The first section of the course will focus on Rousseau's and Diderot's contributions to political and aesthetic thought; the second section will be concerned with Kant's epistemology and with some of his shorter texts on political and aesthetic thought. The goal of this course consists in both defining Enlightenment thought and unearthing the fateful dialectic at its very heart. Methodologically, this course will employ an approach owed to the tradition of Critical Theory. This course fulfills part two of the writing intensive (WI) requirement for the Philosophy major.
4999 PHIL-335-01 Heidegger 1.00 SEM Ewegen, Shane W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Martin Heidegger is arguably the most important philosopher of the 20th century. Yet because of the myopia of the Anglo-American philosophic tradition, he has only recently begun to receive the attention he deserves in the English-speaking world. This seminar will make a careful study of Heidegger’s magnum opus, Being and Time. In addition to our reflection on the intrinsic meaning and merit of this book, we shall consider some of its important roots in the tradition and some of the ways in which it prepares the way both for Heidegger’s own radically transformed later thought and for the most recent trends in contemporary continental philosophy.
4594 PHIL-374-01 Minds and Brains 1.00 SEM Lloyd, Dan TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  The neurosciences have made striking progress in recent years toward understanding the brains of animals and human beings. Through readings in philosophy and science we will consider what contribution this explosion of neuroscientific data can make to our understanding of the mind.
4338 PHIL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Work conducted in close consultation with the instructor of a single course and participation in teaching that course. Duties for a teaching assistant may include, for example, holding review sessions, reading papers, or assisting in class work. In addition, a paper may be required from the teaching assistant. This course may count as one of the 11 total required for the major, but will not count as one of the six required “upper-level” (300 and above) courses. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
5242 MUSC-249-01 Music Therapy Intro 1.00 SEM Johnson, Douglas MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  An introduction to the principles and current practices of music therapy, with emphasis on the broadly interdisciplinary nature of the field. Topics explored include music itself, and music interwoven with studies in movement, psychology, neuroscience, philosophy, ethics, human development, ability, and disability. Seminar format emphasizes student engagement and responsibility. Reading, writing, discussion, and evaluation of research, and an experiential component each week offer a variety of modes of engaging with key topics in the field.
5022 POLS-105-01 Intro Pol Philosophy 1.00 LEC Terwiel, Anna TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, and 5 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  An introduction to the philosophical study of political and moral life through a consideration of various topics of both current and historical interest. Topics include environmentalism, ancients and moderns, male and female, nature and nurture, race and ethnicity, reason and history, and reason and revelation.
5029 POLS-329-01 Political Philosophy & Ethics 1.00 LEC Smith, Gregory TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will engage the literature of ethical theory and ethical debate. The course attempts to enlighten the place ethical reasoning plays in political science, political life and the tradition of political philosophy. Readings in the course will differ from year to year but may include such authors as Aristotle, Cicero, Aquinas, Kant, Mill, Rawls, Nietzsche. In different years the course may focus on various themes which could include topics such as feminism, gentlemanliness, Eudaimonism, utilitarianism and deontology, ethics and theology, legal and business ethics, or the place of ethics in the discipline of Political Science.
4975 RELG-307-01 Jewish Philosophy 1.00 SEM Kiener, Ronald TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Religion 109.
  This course provides an introduction to the major themes and thinkers of medieval and modern Jewish philosophy. We will study how Plato, Aristotle, and other non-Jewish philosophers found their Jewish voice in the likes of Philo, Saadia Gaon, Judah Halevi, Maimonides, and Mendelssohn. Issues to be considered are the relationship between reason and revelation, the concept of monotheism, the nature of prophecy and the Jewish tradition, and the problem of evil. Extensive use of original sources in translation will be complemented by interpretive studies. (May be counted toward Philosophy.)