Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for PHILOSOPHY - Fall 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3060 PHIL-101-01 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Lloyd, Dan TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students, 8 seats reserved for sophomores
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
3061 PHIL-101-02 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Lloyd, Dan TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students, 8 seats reserved for sophomores
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
3534 PHIL-103-01 Ethics 1.00 LEC Theurer, Kari TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An introductory study of values, virtues, and right action. Major concepts of ethical theory (goodness, responsibility, freedom, respect for persons, and morals) will be examined through a study of Aristotle, Kant, and Mill. The course is not primarily a historical survey, but rather attempts to clarify in systematic fashion both moral concepts and moral action.
3062 PHIL-205-01 Symbolic Logic 1.00 LEC Theurer, Kari TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  An introduction to the use of symbols in reasoning. Prepositional calculus and quantification theory will be studied. This background knowledge will prepare the student to look at the relation of logic to linguistics, computer science, mathematics, and philosophy. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Philosophy 255, Philosophy of Logic.
3535 PHIL-217-01 Philosophy and Literature 1.00 LEC Vogt, Erik T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  We shall study a number of philosophic works with literary significance and a number of literary works with philosophic content in order to raise the question of what the difference is between the two. This course may be used to fulfill the Literature and Psychology minor requirements.
3536 PHIL-221-01 Science, Reality & Rationality 1.00 LEC Theurer, Kari TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Much of modern philosophy has focused on efforts to understand the rise of physical science since the 16th century. This course will focus on 20th-century efforts by philosophers to characterize science, explain its effectiveness, and interpret its findings.
3537 PHIL-223-01 African Philosophy 1.00 LEC Wade, Maurice WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  What is African philosophy? Currently, among the scholars addressing this question, no single answer prevails. Some hold that philosophy, by its nature, transcends race, ethnicity, and region and hence that terms such as “African philosophy,” “European philosophy,”and “Asian philosophy,” are all rooted in misunderstanding what philosophy fundamentally is. Some argue that prior to the very recent work of African scholars trained in formal (often European) departments of philosophy, African philosophy did not (and could not) exist. Others argue that while (many of) the peoples of Africa have little or no tradition of formal (written) philosophizing, the differing worldviews embodied in the myths, religions, rituals, and other cultural practices of ethnic Africans constitute genuine African philosophy. Yet others find African philosophy in the critical musings of indigenous African (so-called) wise men or sages. In this course we will critically examine the variety of possibilities, forms, and practices in Africa and elsewhere that might be referred to appropriately as “African philosophy” and attempt to understand why the notion of “African philosophy” is so especially contentious. (May be counted toward African Studies.)
3538 PHIL-246-01 Hum Rgts: Phil Foundations 1.00 LEC Marcano, Donna-Dale MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course will survey and critically assess arguments in favor of the existence of human rights, arguments about the legitimate scope of such rights (who has human rights and against whom such rights can legitimately be claimed), and arguments about which rights ought to be included in any complete account of human rights. Specific topics will include (but not necessarily be limited to) the philosophical history of human rights discourse, cultural relativist attacks on the universality of human rights, debates concerning the rights of cultural minorities to self-determination, and controversies concerning whether human rights should include economic and social rights.
3539 PHIL-255-01 Philosophy of Logic 1.00 LEC Ryan, Todd TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will introduce students to propositional and (first order) predicate logic, while engaging in philosophical reflection on a range of issues related to modern formal logic. In particular students will first study techniques for representing and analyzing arguments using the symbolism of each formal system. We will then consider some of the many philosophical issues surrounding formal logic, such as the nature of truth and inference, semantic paradoxes, and the attempt by Russell and others to use advances in formal logic to resolve traditional problems in metaphysics and epistemology. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and Philosophy 205, Symbolic Logic.
3540 PHIL-281-01 Ancient Greek Philosophy 1.00 LEC Ewegen, Shane M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course looks at the origins of western philosophy in the Presocratics, Plato, and Aristotle. Students will see how philosophy arose as a comprehensive search for wisdom, then developed into the “areas” of philosophy such as metaphysics, ethics, and political philosophy. This course fulfills part two of the writing intensive (WI) requirement for the Philosophy major.
3541 PHIL-282-01 Medieval Philosophy 1.00 LEC Ryan, Todd TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  A study of representative thinkers of the medieval period. Discussion will focus on such major issues as the existence of God, the problem of evil, the nature of universals, the relation between philosophical reason and religious faith. Attention will also be paid to the cultural, historical and religious climates which helped influence the unique scholastic doctrines under discussion. (Students enrolling in Philosophy 282 must also enroll in Philosophy 290-01L.) Enrollment limited.
3542 PHIL-306-01 20th C Cont Phil 1.00 SEM Ewegen, Shane W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  What are poets for in a destitute time?” asks Heidegger’s favorite poet, Holderlin. We add, “and what are philosophers for?” The tradition of 20th-century continental philosophy has responded, “certainly not just to analyze language!” We shall follow some of the leading figures and themes of this rich tradition from its roots in Nietzsche through the transformations of phenomenology, to existentialism and beyond. Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, and Derrida will be studied among others.
3543 PHIL-351-01 Aesthetics 1.00 SEM Vogt, Erik M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will provide both a survey and close readings of some of the most significant thinkers in the tradition of philosophical aesthetics. Its scope will include 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century positions in aesthetics; moreover, texts interrogated in the course will engage different artistic fields such as literature, painting, music, cinema, and new media.
2689 PHIL-355-01 Moral Theory and Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Wade, Maurice M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The purpose of this course is to assist students in acquiring the skill in ethical reasoning and analysis needed for mature participation in society’s continuing debates over moral issues of public concern. The course will begin by examining some types of ethical theories and will proceed to consider a number of controversial social issues. Abortion, euthanasia, racial and sexual discrimination, world hunger, treatment of animals, and capital punishment are among the topics to be considered.
2220 PHIL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Independent, intensive study in a field of special interest requiring a wide range of reading and resulting in an extended paper. Normally there will be only a few meetings with the supervisor during the course of the semester. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2135 PHIL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Work conducted in close consultation with the instructor of a single course and participation in teaching that course. Duties for a teaching assistant may include, for example, holding review sessions, reading papers, or assisting in class work. In addition, a paper may be required from the teaching assistant. This course may count as one of the 11 total required for the major, but will not count as one of the six required “upper-level” (300 and above) courses. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2194 PHIL-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A two-credit course culminating in an extended paper to be read by two or more members of the department. It may be organized like a tutorial or independent study. This is a required course for all students who wish to graduate with honors in philosophy. To be eligible for this course a student must have an A- average in the major or must successfully petition the department for an exemption. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending the first semester, and two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
2278 PHIL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A two-credit course culminating in an extended paper to be read by two or more members of the department. It may be organized like a tutorial or independent study. This is a required course for all students who wish to graduate with honors in philosophy. In order to be eligible for this course a student must have an A- average in the major or must successfully petition the department for an exemption. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis.
3446 POLS-105-01 Intro Pol Philosophy 1.00 LEC Dudas, Mary MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  An introduction to the philosophical study of political and moral life through a consideration of various topics of both current and historical interest. Topics include environmentalism, ancients and moderns, male and female, nature and nurture, race and ethnicity, reason and history, and reason and revelation.