Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for PHILOSOPHY - Fall 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3474 PHIL-101-01 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Lloyd,Dan TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 18 seats reserved for first-year students
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
3475 PHIL-101-02 Intro to Phil 1.00 LEC Lloyd,Dan TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 18 seats reserved for first-year students
  An introduction to fundamental topics and concepts in the history of philosophy, e.g., rationality, wisdom, knowledge, the good life, the just society, and the nature of language. This course is especially appropriate for first-year students or students beginning the college-level study of philosophy. Students contemplating majoring in philosophy are strongly urged to make this their first philosophy course.
3476 PHIL-205-01 Symbolic Logic 1.00 LEC Ryan,Todd MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  An introduction to the use of symbols in reasoning. Prepositional calculus and quantification theory will be studied. This background knowledge will prepare the student to look at the relation of logic to linguistics, computer science, mathematics, and philosophy. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Philosophy 255, Philosophy of Logic.
3477 PHIL-222-01 Existentialism 1.00 LEC Marcano,Donna MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A study of the philosophical background of existentialism and of a number of principal existentialistic texts by such writers as Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Camus, and Sartre.
3478 PHIL-226-01 Neuroscience, Ethics, & Agency 1.00 LEC Theurer,Kari L. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  In this course, we will consider whether and how recent findings in neuroscience should inform our answers to traditional questions in metaethics concerning the nature and origins of morality, as well as our concepts of freedom, moral motivation, moral agency, and moral responsibility.
3479 PHIL-239-01 African-American Feminism 1.00 SEM Marcano,Donna TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course is a historical survey of the writings of African-American women as they have historically attempted to negotiate fundamental philosophical questions of the "race problem" and the "woman problem." To this extent, we will be inserting black women's voices into the philosophical canon of both race and feminism. Along with exploring and contextualizing the responses and dialogues of women writers, like Anna Julia Cooper with their more famous male contemporaries such as Du Bois, up to more contemporary articulations of black women's voices in what is known as hip-hop feminism, we will ask the question of whether there is a particular black feminist thought, epistemology, and thus philosophy.
3480 PHIL-281-01 Ancient Greek Philosophy 1.00 LEC Ewegen,Shane M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course looks at the origins of western philosophy in the Presocratics, Plato, and Aristotle. Students will see how philosophy arose as a comprehensive search for wisdom, then developed into the “areas” of philosophy such as metaphysics, ethics, and political philosophy. This course fulfills part two of the writing intensive (WI) requirement for the Philosophy major.
3629 PHIL-307-01 Plato 1.00 SEM Ewegen,Shane M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  A study of one or more important dialogues of Plato. Careful attention will be paid to the dramatic form which Plato employs and its connection to the philosophic ideas that develop.
3469 PHIL-339-01 The Birth of Modern Ethics 1.00 SEM Ryan,Todd MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  The seventeenth- and eighteenth-centuries were an extraordinarily fruitful period in the development of modern ethics. As philosophy began to free itself from traditional religious belief, thinkers were led to pose such fundamental questions as what motivates human behavior? Are all of our actions ultimately selfish or do we have a natural concern for the well-being of others? Are there objective moral truths knowable by reason or do we judge human behavior based on feeling? What reason do we have to be moral even when doing so appears not to be in our own self-interest? Among the authors to be discussed are Hobbes, Mandeville, Hutcheson, Butler and Hume.
2849 PHIL-355-01 Moral Theory and Pub Pol 1.00 SEM Wade,Maurice L. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The purpose of this course is to assist students in acquiring the skill in ethical reasoning and analysis needed for mature participation in society’s continuing debates over moral issues of public concern. The course will begin by examining some types of ethical theories and will proceed to consider a number of controversial social issues. Abortion, euthanasia, racial and sexual discrimination, world hunger, treatment of animals, and capital punishment are among the topics to be considered.
3481 PHIL-378-01 Philosophy of Mind 1.00 LEC Theurer,Kari L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  In this course we will investigate classical and contemporary theories of mind, such as dualism, logical behaviorism, materialism, and functionalism. Among the issues we will consider are what is the nature of the mental? Is the mind identical with or distinct from the body? What is the nature of consciousness? Is the mind a genuine cause? What, if anything, do contemporary investigations in cognitive science and artificial intelligence have to teach us about the nature of the mind?
2292 PHIL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Independent, intensive study in a field of special interest requiring a wide range of reading and resulting in an extended paper. Normally there will be only a few meetings with the supervisor during the course of the semester. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2199 PHIL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Work conducted in close consultation with the instructor of a single course and participation in teaching that course. Duties for a teaching assistant may include, for example, holding review sessions, reading papers, or assisting in class work. In addition, a paper may be required from the teaching assistant. This course may count as one of the 11 total required for the major, but will not count as one of the six required “upper-level” (300 and above) courses. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2266 PHIL-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A two-credit course culminating in an extended paper to be read by two or more members of the department. It may be organized like a tutorial or independent study. This is a required course for all students who wish to graduate with honors in philosophy. To be eligible for this course a student must have an A- average in the major or must successfully petition the department for an exemption. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending the first semester, and two course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
2356 PHIL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A two-credit course culminating in an extended paper to be read by two or more members of the department. It may be organized like a tutorial or independent study. This is a required course for all students who wish to graduate with honors in philosophy. In order to be eligible for this course a student must have an A- average in the major or must successfully petition the department for an exemption. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this yearlong thesis.