Major Requirements

Neuroscience

REQUIREMENTS

The major requires 14 course credits, including nine core courses and five courses from the list of electives. Electives must be selected from at least three different departments (biology, chemistry, engineering, neuroscience, philosophy, or psychology).

Lab Requirement: Students must take eight courses with a laboratory component, which can include NESC 301. Introduction to Neuroscience Methodology. The lab course options also include those listed in the core course requirements, core electives, or cognate electives. However, two must be designated NESC.

No course grade of less than C- may be counted toward the major.

  • Core courses:
    • BIOL 182L. Evolution of Life

    • BIOL 183L. The Cellular Basis of Life

    • CHEM 111L. Introductory Chemistry I

    • CHEM 112L. Introductory Chemistry II

    • MATH 107. Elements of Statistics or MATH 131. Calculus I or MATH 207. Statistical Data Analysis
      - or PSYC 221L. Research Design and Analysis

    • NESC 201L. Principles of Neuroscience

    • NESC 388. Current Issues in Neuroscience (senior year only)
    • PSYC 261L. Brain and Behavior
  • Electives—Must take a total of five electives, at least four must be core electives:
    • Core electives—Must take a minimum of four of these:
    • BIOL 456L. The Biology of Communication

    • BIOL 473. Sensory Biology

    • ENGR 311. Electrophysiology of the Central Nervous System

    • ENGR 316. Neural Engineering

    • NESC 210L. Neuroendocrinology

    • NESC 301L. Introduction to Neuroscience Methodology

    • NESC 320. Developmental Neuroscience

    • NESC 325. Hormones and Social Behavior

    • NESC 362. Neuroethology

    • NESC 401. Neurochemistry

    • NESC 402. Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology

    • NESC 432. Nutrition and Brain Health

    • PHIL 374. Minds and Brains

    • PSYC 293L. Perception

    • PSYC 302. Behavioral Neuroscience

    • PSYC 334. Current Issues in Cognition

    • PSYC 348. Focusing the Mind: The Psychology of Attention

    • PSYC 364. Neuropsychopharmacology

    • PSYC 365. Cognitive and Social Neuroscience

    • PSYC 391. Psychology of Language

    • PSYC 392. Human Neuropsychology

  • Cognate electives—Must take one additional elective (this can be either from the core electives above or from the following):
    • BIOL 120. Genes, Clones and Biotechnology

    • BIOL 140. Biological Systems

    • BIOL 211L. Electron Microscopy

    • BIOL 224. Genetics

    • BIOL 227L. Cell Biology

    • BIOL 317. Biochemistry

    • BIOL 319L. Animal Physiology

    • CHEM 211L. Elementary Organic Chemistry I

    • NESC 101. The Brain

    • NESC 120. Nervous Connections

    • NESC 425. Research in Neuroscience(1.0 credit)*
    • PHIL 226. Neuroscience, Ethics, and Agency

    • PHIL 244. The Music of Thought

    • PHIL 378. Philosophy of Mind

    • PSYC 255L. Cognitive Psychology

    • PSYC 265. Drugs and Behavior

    • PSYC 339. Developmental Psychopathology

*HFPR 202. Health Care Research may substitute for NESC 425 provided the research is done in a neurological, neurosurgical, neuropsychiatric, or basic neuroscience laboratory setting. This substitution must be approved by the program director.

  • The Writing Intensive Part II requirement is fulfilled by one of the following courses:
    • NECS 325. Hormones and Social Behavior

    • NESC 362. Neuroethology

    • NESC 401. Neurochemistry

    • NESC 402. Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology

    • NESC 432. Nutrition and Brain Health

    • PHIL 374. Minds and Brains

    • PSYC 302. Behavioral Neuroscience

    • PSYC 334. Current Issues in Cognition

    • PSYC 339. Developmental Psychopathology

    • PSYC 348. Focusing the Mind: The Psychology of Attention

    • PSYC 365. Cognitive and Social Neuroscience

    • PSYC 392. Human Neuropsychology

Breadth requirement—Electives must cover three departments (NESC, PSYC, BIOL, CHEM, ENGR, PHIL)

Capstone/Senior Project: NESC 388. Current Issues in Neuroscience

Concentrations/Tracks:

Depth option: In order to be designated as fulfilling a concentration in one area of neuroscience, students who choose to do so (in addition to fulfilling the breadth requirements above) must complete four electives as listed below. This will be indicated on their transcript (e.g., Neuroscience: Cellular/Molecular Concentration).

Four electives fulfill depth in one area:

  • Cellular/Molecular
    • BIOL 224. Genetics

    • BIOL 317L. Biochemistry

    • ENGR 311. Electrophysiology of the Central Nervous System

    • ENGR 316. Neural Engineering

    • NESC 320. Developmental Neuroscience

    • NESC 401. Neurochemistry

    • NESC 402. Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology

    • NESC 432. Nutrition and Brain Health
  • Systems/Behavioral
    • BIOL 319L. Animal Physiology

    • BIOL 456L. The Biology of Communication

    • BIOL 473. Sensory Biology

    • NESC 210L. Neuroendocrinology

    • NECS 325. Hormones and Social Behavior

    • NESC 362. Neuroethology

    • PSYC 302. Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Clinical/Cognitive
    • PHIL 226. Neuroscience, Ethics, and Agency

    • PHIL 244. The Music of Thought

    • PHIL 374. Minds and Brains

    • PHIL 378. Philosophy of Mind

    • PSYC 293L. Perception

    • PSYC 334. Current Issues in Cognition

    • PSYC 339. Developmental Psychopathology

    • PSYC 348. Focusing the Mind: The Psychology of Attention

    • PSYC 364. Neuropsychopharmacology

    • PSYC 365. Cognitive and Social Neuroscience

    • PSYC 391. Psychology of Language

    • PSYC 392. Human Neuropsychology

To double major in neuroscience and another major, a maximum of three courses with a designation of 200 or above can be double-counted in both majors.

ADDITIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

Independent Studies: Neuroscience students are encouraged to perform independent research in one of the many active labs on campus. In addition, opportunities exist to perform research or get clinical experience at the University of Connecticut Health Center, Hartford Hospital, the Institute of Living and Connecticut Children's Medical Center. A special research program is available through the Ayers Neuroscience Institute. See the program director to learn how to apply for these opportunities.

Study away: Neuroscience students who wish to study abroad should meet with their adviser and the program director in advance of the semester they intend to go abroad. Professor Raskin is currently the study-abroad adviser for the Neuroscience Program and can advise students regarding specific study-abroad options. There are many study-abroad locations that allow for course work in neuroscience as well as internship experiences. Students who wish to take a course for major credit while abroad must have this approved by the program director before going abroad.

Courses at other institutions: Students who wish to earn major credit for course work at other institutions should submit to the director the name of the institution and the number, title, and catalog description of the course. This information must be submitted in writing before the work is initiated and formal permission must be granted before the courses can be credited toward the major at Trinity, following the usual procedures established by the Office of Study Away.

Honors: Honors in the major will be awarded to students who attain a B+ average in courses in the major at the 200 level and above (not including the research project) and who also demonstrate superior performance in a research project, culminating in a two-semester thesis, an oral proposal and final presentation, and a poster at the spring science symposium.