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Course Schedule for LANGUAGE AND CULTURE STUDIES - Spring 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
5204 LACS-224-01 Intro to Arab & ME Cinemas 1.00 LEC Hanna, Kifah W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course offers an overview of the social and artistic role of cinema in the Arab world. It presents a historical outlook on the rise and development of cinema in the broader Middle East and North Africa through an investigation of this genre and the use of critical and cultural theory. It examines the artistic and cultural relationship of cinema to the societies it represents by utilizing a variety of structured thematic viewpoints such as the configuration of society and community, children in times of war, feminist discourse, and homosexuality, in order to explore cinema as an integral part of Arabic popular culture. The lectures will be organized around weekly screening of films in addition to related critical readings. No previous knowledge of Arabic language is required. This course is also listed under the African studies concentration and Middle Eastern studies concentration of the International Studies program and under the Women, Gender, and Sexuality program.
5234 LACS-233-01 Fairytales in German Tradition 1.00 SEM Assaiante, Julia TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  For centuries fairytales have served as powerful cultural currency, transmitting ideas about morality, gender, identity, nationalism, and childhood. Running the risk that it will ruin fairytales by vivisection, this course will approach the genre of German-language fairytales from a critical perspective, taking into account their historical context, psychological and philosophical interpretations, and how certain fairytales have changed over time into their contemporary iterations. Special attention will be paid to the fairytales collected by the Brothers Grimm, while also exploring their intersections with fairytales in other cultural and historical contexts. The goal of this course is for students to explore texts with whose content they may be familiar, in order to then gain a deeper understanding of their cultural, historical, and psychological dimensions.
5096 LACS-236-02 Modern Italy 1.00 LEC Alcorn, John TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An introduction to modern Italy, through discussion of outstanding works of history, social science, film, and literature. Topics include the unification of Italy, the sharp changes in relations between church and state, the Great Emigration, Fascism, modernization, the Sicilian mafia, and the persistence of regional divisions. All work is done in English. Students who wish to count this course toward a major in Italian should request permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Italian and will meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. (Listed as both LACS 236 and ITAL 236-01; and under the History Department.)
5237 LACS-239-01 Gender in Japanese Lit/Film 1.00 LEC Wu, Guanda MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  Drawing upon canonical literary sources as well as internationally celebrated films and anime, this course explores how Japanese society defines and portrays heroes and heroines, beginning in the Heian era and continuing through the modern period. Under the umbrella theme of the heroic, we will analyze how Japanese society defines and promotes cultural values and mores, and how gender roles have been constructed in different historical moments and represented in different media. We will move through themes, such as, war and samurai, love and double-suicide, onnagata and gender ambiguity, and feminism and modern heroines. Our discussion will be conducted with close reference to important theoretical issues in gender and sexuality studies. Readings and discussion in English.
5129 LACS-243-01 The 18th C in Lit/Film/Music 1.00 LEC Kehres, Jean-Marc MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  The French 18th century has never been so popular with film-makers. In this course, we will study a selection of films whose subject is the history and cultural life of 18th-century France and examine the relevance of 18th-century issues for the contemporary world. Attention will be paid to literary texts and other documents upon which the films are based and to questions of historical interpretation and film technique. The films studied include Que la fête commence by Bertrand Tavernier, La Religieuse by Jacques Rivette, Les Amants by Louis Malle, Dangerous Liaisons by Stephen Frears, The Affair of the Necklace by Charles Shyer, Ridicule by Patrice Leconte, and L’Anglaise et le duc by Éric Rohmer.
5241 LACS-247-01 Otherness in Italian Cinema 1.00 SEM di Florio Gula, Martina MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  From its beginnings in the early 20th C to the present, Italian Cinema has represented the social and cultural identity of the 'other' and 'otherness', that is, racial, ethnic, and sexual diversity. This course will study the representation of the different kinds of diversity in Italian film, from Neorealism to recent Italian cinema. We will examine films that deal with immigration and the current refugee crisis in the Mediterranean, but also with LGBT culture and other human rights, as well as with Italians' attitudes toward diverse groups and cultures. How does Italian film historically reflect the 'other' in Italian culture and how is film being shaped by diversity? Films include: "Paisà" (Rossellini, 1946), "Una giornata particolare" (Scola, 1977), "Mine vaganti" (Ozpetek, 2010), "Terraferma" (Crialese, 2011).
5116 LACS-259-01 The Postwar German Film 1.00 SEM Doerre, Jason MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  This course will explore the social and political landscape of postwar Germany from 1945 to the present by looking at a broad range of films from East and West Germany, and Austria, that encompass a wide variety of genres, filmmakers, and movements. The themes examined will include, but not be limited to, the creation of a new cinema after World War II, filmmaking during the Cold War, avant-garde cinema, German history through film, socially critical cinema, and Germany today. Directors will include Wolfgang Staudte, Volker Schlöndorff, R.W. Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, Margarethe von Trotta, Fatih Akin, and Christian Petzold.
5119 LACS-264-01 Literature and the Law 1.00 SEM Assaiante, Julia MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  In literature and in law, language shapes rhetorical worlds that seek to represent, constitute and interpret the actions of human beings and their world. Therefore, examining how the law is represented in literature gives insight both into how this representation shifts to accommodate historical and cultural differences, and how central the role of narrative is to legal institutions. This course will focus on representations of the law in German-language literature from the late 18th century onward, to examine how literature relates the human condition to law, to other central cultural values (love, honor and justice), and how literature can put the law itself into question. The course will emphasize literary interrogations of National Socialist law, which take up these questions in their most urgent form. Taught in English.
4798 LACS-272-01 Mafia 1.00 LEC Alcorn, John TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  In contemporary societies there is an intimate contest between two kinds of social order: The rule of law and criminal organization. A remarkable instance may be found in the workings and metamorphoses of the Mafia. From its origins in Sicily, an agrarian society on the periphery of Europe, the Mafia has acquired intercontinental dimensions and a grip on high politics and finance capital. This shadowy phenomenon has been approached and explained in very different ways by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, economists, and political scientists. It has also been the subject of literature and film. We shall discuss outstanding examples of each approach and treatment. The purposes of the course are to make sense of the Mafia, to explore a basic problem of social order and to compare the different styles of reasoning and representation that characterize the various disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. Course requirements: seminar reports, several short papers, and full attendance and participation. (Listed as both LACS 272 and ITAL 272.)
5098 LACS-285-01 Love, Sex & War in Tolstoy 1.00 LEC Any, Carol WF: 1:15PM-2:40PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course offers a detailed and varied exploration of Tolstoy's greatest fiction. Writer and prophet, aristocrat and socialist, moralist and hedonist, Tolstoy contained a bundle of contradictions in a mind of artistic genius. As we seek to uncover the aesthetic workings of his stories and novels, we will have ample opportunity to discuss the subjects of these works—romantic love, sexual expression, family life, war as military theory and as human experience, and the individual's search for meaning in relation to the works themselves and to our own lives. Tolstoy's youth, military service, marriage, religious conversion, and contentious relations with those around him will be discussed in connection with his literary art. (Listed as both LACS 285 and RUSS 285; under the Russian and Eurasian studies concentration of the International Studies Program; and under the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Program.)
5161 LACS-288-01 Who Am I & Where Am I Going 1.00 LEC Any, Carol MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  How many personal identities do you have? Lover, friend, brother or sister, gambler, worshipper, skeptic, liar, outsider, psychotic—we may play all of these parts simultaneously or at different times in our lives. Through discussion of short literary texts, with some forays into religion and psychology, we will consider the ways in which our multiple identities shape our self-image as well as how others see us. Readings will be chosen from, among others, Tennessee Williams, Dostoevsky, Freud, and the Bible.
4572 LACS-299-01 Foundations of LACS 1.00 SEM Harrington, Thomas TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course (taught in English) starts from the premise that all language acts are culturally based. The main topics of the course fall into three categories: what is language; critical approaches to culture studies with an emphasis on literary texts; translation. We will also explore what happens when a literary text is translated from one language into another. Students will have a chance to do individualized work that bears upon their own language of study. The course features regular guest lectures by faculty from a range of languages and fields.
4305 LACS-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4651 LACS-401-01 Senior Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  The capstone project for the World Literature and Culture Studies major. To enroll, students must submit a completed special registration form available from the Registrar's Office.
4307 LACS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4301 ARAB-102-01 Intensive Elementary Arabic II 1.50 LEC Mabrouk, Karim MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM
R: 9:25AM-10:40AM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 101 or equivalent.
  Designed to develop basic language skills learned in Arabic 101. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour per week. (Also listed under the African Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4055 ARAB-202-01 Intermediate Arabic II 1.00 LEC Hanna, Kifah TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 201 or equivalent.
  Continuation of Arabic 201, leading to a completion of essential basic grammatical constructions as well as further conversational practice. (Also listed under the African Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4056 ARAB-302-01 Intermediate Arabic IV 1.00 LEC Hanna, Kifah TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 301 or equivalent.
  Continuation of Arabic 301, presenting alternative stylistic tools for oral and written communication, with a vigorous expansion of vocabulary. Lab work required. (Also listed under the African Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4057 ARAB-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4385 ARAB-402-01 Adv Arabic II: Comp & Style 1.00 LEC Hanna, Kifah TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 401 or equivalent.
  This course is a continuation of Arabic 401. We will closely read and analyze complex authentic texts in order to develop a high level of proficiency and grammatical accuracy in Modern Standard Arabic and colloquial Levantine. We will continue to vigorously focus on the root and pattern system. Students will study new grammatical aspects such as the imperative, the prohibitive, hollow and weak verbs, assimilation in and basic meanings of certain awzan, and the different types of grammatical objects (to name a few). Students will learn different styles of narration and significantly expand their vocabulary repertoire.
4076 CHIN-102-01 Intens Elem Chinese II 1.50 LEC Wang, Jui-Chien MW: 11:00AM-11:50AM
T: 1:30PM-2:20PM
R: 1:30PM-2:45PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of Chinese 101, with increased emphasis on conversational practice. An additional 300 characters will be learned. Students are expected to master most of the spoken patterns by the end of the semester. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. (Also listed under the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4074 CHIN-202-01 Intens Interm Chinese II 1.50 LEC Wang, Jui-Chien MW: 12:00PM-12:50PM
T: 2:55PM-4:10PM
R: 2:55PM-3:45PM
TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 201 or equivalent.
  Continuation of Chinese 201, with further emphasis on written and spoken development of the current idiom. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. (Also listed under the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
5102 CHIN-237-01 20th Cent Chinese Literature 1.00 LEC Wu, Guanda MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A survey of modern Chinese literature, 1918-2000. We will study three major periods of the 20th century: 1918-1949, 1949-1976, and 1976 to the present. The course will concentrate on the work of writers such as Lu Xun, Yu Dafu, Eileen Chang (Zhang Ailing), Xu Zhimo, Mao Dun, Shen Congwen, Bei Dao, Yu Hua, Su Tong, and Wang Anyi. Students will be introduced to the basic developmental trajectory of 20th-century Chinese literature, and will explore interactions between social-historical conditions and the production of modern Chinese literary works. Readings and discussion in English.
4077 CHIN-302-01 Advanced Chinese II 1.00 LEC Wu, Guanda MW: 6:30PM-7:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Concentration on advanced writing and speaking skills, further acquisition of compound characters, and further extensive practice in complex reading. (Also listed under the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4336 CHIN-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
5091 CHIN-415-01 Advanced Chinese IV 1.00 LEC Wu, Guanda MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 413 or equivalent.
  Students will improve skills in written and spoken Mandarin for formal occasions and conversations. Focuses will be given to students' ability to use the language formally and idiomatically.
4075 CHIN-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE:
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4043 COLL-151-01 French Film Festival 0.50 LEC Kehres, Jean-Marc
Kippur, Sara
TBA TBA Q2
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: Course meets April 7 - April 13. Contact Prof. Humphries for additional information.
  A half-credit course offered in conjunction with the annual spring French Film Festival. Class meetings and film screenings will take place in the second week of April. Two mandatory workshops will take place prior to and following the festival at a time to be announced. Students are required to attend all film showings. One absence will be allowed. Students taking the course for credit in French will be required to do all written work in French and to attend French language versions of the two supplemental workshops. Course may not be taken on a pass/fail basis.
5092 FREN-101-01 Intensive Elementary French I 1.50 LEC Solomon, Julie MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM
T: 10:50AM-12:05PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak French. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will be the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take both 101 and 102 in sequence. Meets 4 times a week. Students with three or more years in high school French may not enroll in this course.
4105 FREN-102-01 Intensive Elementary French II 1.50 LEC Mabrouk, Karim MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM
R: 10:50AM-12:05PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour.
4502 FREN-102-02 Intensive Elementary French II 1.50 LEC Evelein, Isabel MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM
T: 9:25AM-10:40AM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour.
4302 FREN-201-01 Intermediate French I 1.00 LEC Evelein, Isabel MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 102 or equivalent.
  Review of basic grammatical concepts and development of fundamental language skills, with increasing emphasis on written expression and spoken accuracy. Use is made of video-based presentations. Since significant linguistic progress cannot be achieved in 201 alone, students wishing to acquire proficiency should plan to take both 201 and 202 in sequence.
4107 FREN-202-01 Intermediate French II 1.00 LEC Solomon, Julie MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 201 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
  Further reinforcement of written and spoken skills, with continuing practice in the use of complex grammatical structures and greater emphasis on the mastery of contemporary usage through extensive class discussion, reading, and writing.
4106 FREN-241-01 Adv Composition & Style 1.00 LEC Solomon, Julie MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 202 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
  Development of a high level of proficiency through the reading and analysis of texts and films in contemporary idiomatic French, with considerable emphasis on attainment of grammatical accuracy.
5128 FREN-243-01 The 18th C in Lit/Film/Music 1.00 LEC Kehres, Jean-Marc MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  The French 18th century has never been so popular with film-makers. In this course, we will study a selection of films whose subject is the history and cultural life of 18th-century France and examine the relevance of 18th-century issues for the contemporary world. Attention will be paid to literary texts and other documents upon which the films are based and to questions of historical interpretation and film technique. The films studied include Que la fête commence by Bertrand Tavernier, La Religieuse by Jacques Rivette, Les Amants by Louis Malle, Dangerous Liaisons by Stephen Frears, The Affair of the Necklace by Charles Shyer, Ridicule by Patrice Leconte, and L’Anglaise et le duc by Éric Rohmer.
5093 FREN-252-01 Modern French Literature 1.00 LEC Kippur, Sara TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course will be a survey of the major texts of the 19th and 20th century France. Principles of literary history and literary appreciation will be emphasized. Prerequisite: French 241 or equivalent
4550 FREN-305-01 Mod Cult & Civilization 1.00 LEC Kehres, Jean-Marc MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent.
  A study of modern France through its history, arts, politics, and social structures. This course is designed to help students understand why the French think the way they do and why their societal concepts are often very different from those of the Americans. To do so we will see that for the French the presence of the past deeply informs the present and how this historical phenomenon has shaped, at least in part, the concept of the family, the government, the educational system, and the position of women in France. We will also examine the important issue of immigration, which is one of France’s major social issues today. Finally, we will look at the role that France is playing in the shaping of European unity.
5232 FREN-355-01 Crime Stories 1.00 SEM Kehres, Jean-Marc MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent.
  Students will explore the evolution of the francophone detective novel through the works of major authors such as Gaston Leroux, Georges Simenon, Didier Daeninckx, Jean-Patrick Manchette and Achille F. Ngoye. Emphasis will be placed upon narratological, social and political analysis. The study of film adaptations will complement the readings. The class will be conducted in French.
4325 FREN-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4412 FREN-401-01 Senior Seminar 1.00 SEM Kippur, Sara TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one 300-level course in French literature or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.
  This seminar is required of all seniors majoring or minoring in French. Over the term, students will work collaboratively on the various papers they are writing by way of integrating exercises in their major or minor, and the whole class will undertake a number of readings in common in order to provide informed criticism of one another’s papers. Depending on enrollment, the class may also spend part of the semester considering a special topic, author, or genre in French studies.
4324 FREN-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4110 GRMN-102-01 Intens Elemtry German II 1.50 LEC Doerre, Jason MWF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in German 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of German 101, with completion of the study of essential grammar, further vocabulary building through oral and written practice, practice in reading, and discussions of cultural contexts.
5090 GRMN-102-02 Intens Elemtry German II 1.50 LEC Evelein, Johannes MWF: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in German 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of German 101, with completion of the study of essential grammar, further vocabulary building through oral and written practice, practice in reading, and discussions of cultural contexts.
4160 GRMN-202-01 Intermediate German II 1.00 LEC Assaiante, Julia MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in German 201 or equivalent.
  Continuation of German 201, with the addition of expository material on German life and culture for discussion and writing practice.
5233 GRMN-233-01 Fairytales in German Tradition 1.00 SEM Assaiante, Julia TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  For centuries fairytales have served as powerful cultural currency, transmitting ideas about morality, gender, identity, nationalism, and childhood. Running the risk that it will ruin fairytales by vivisection, this course will approach the genre of German-language fairytales from a critical perspective, taking into account their historical context, psychological and philosophical interpretations, and how certain fairytales have changed over time into their contemporary iterations. Special attention will be paid to the fairytales collected by the Brothers Grimm, while also exploring their intersections with fairytales in other cultural and historical contexts. The goal of this course is for students to explore texts with whose content they may be familiar, in order to then gain a deeper understanding of their cultural, historical, and psychological dimensions.
5117 GRMN-259-01 The Postwar German Film 1.00 SEM Doerre, Jason MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  This course will explore the social and political landscape of postwar Germany from 1945 to the present by looking at a broad range of films from East and West Germany, and Austria, that encompass a wide variety of genres, filmmakers, and movements. The themes examined will include, but not be limited to, the creation of a new cinema after World War II, filmmaking during the Cold War, avant-garde cinema, German history through film, socially critical cinema, and Germany today. Directors will include Wolfgang Staudte, Volker Schlöndorff, R.W. Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, Margarethe von Trotta, Fatih Akin, and Christian Petzold.
5118 GRMN-264-01 Literature and the Law 1.00 SEM Assaiante, Julia MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  In literature and in law, language shapes rhetorical worlds that seek to represent, constitute and interpret the actions of human beings and their world. Therefore, examining how the law is represented in literature gives insight both into how this representation shifts to accommodate historical and cultural differences, and how central the role of narrative is to legal institutions. This course will focus on representations of the law in German-language literature from the late 18th century onward, to examine how literature relates the human condition to law, to other central cultural values (love, honor and justice), and how literature can put the law itself into question. The course will emphasize literary interrogations of National Socialist law, which take up these questions in their most urgent form. Taught in English.
5115 GRMN-302-01 Small Masterpiecs Mod Grmn Lit 1.00 LEC Doerre, Jason TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202 or equivalent.
  Through close readings and comparative discussions of novellas and short prose fictions of major German authors, students will improve German comprehension and speaking skills. Frequent writing assignments will be required. Some grammar review will be offered. All work will be done in German.
4210 GRMN-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4256 HEBR-102-01 Elem Modern Hebrew II 1.00 LEC Ayalon, Michal MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hebrew 101 or equivalent.
  A continuation of Hebrew 101 with emphasis on increasing vocabulary, understanding, writing and speaking skills with widening exposure to appropriate cultural materials. (Also offered under the Middle Eastern studies and Jewish studies programs.)
4551 HEBR-202-01 Intmdt Modern Hebrew II 1.00 LEC Ayalon, Michal MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hebrew 201 or equivalent.
  A continuation of Hebrew 201 with more advanced grammar and increased emphasis on composition and speaking as well as exposure to appropriate cultural materials. (Also offered under the Middle Eastern studies and Jewish studies programs.)
4552 HISP-102-01 Elementary Spanish II 1.00 LEC Flores, Laura
Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic 101 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students, 5 for sophomores, 5 for juniors
  Continuation of Hispanic Studies101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension. Generally for students with 2-3 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 4 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4553 HISP-102-02 Elementary Spanish II 1.00 LEC Flores, Laura
Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic 101 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students, 5 for sophomores, 5 for juniors
  Continuation of Hispanic Studies101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension. Generally for students with 2-3 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 4 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
5260 HISP-102-03 Elementary Spanish II 1.00 LEC Flores, Laura
Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of Hispanic Studies101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension. Generally for students with 2-3 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 4 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4721 HISP-201-01 Inter Span I 1.00 LEC Morales, Angela
Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 102 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students, 5 for sophomores, 5 for juniors
  An intermediate course for those who have had at least three years of secondary school Spanish or one year of college Spanish. A thorough review of grammar combined with oral practice. In addition, there is a strong cultural component and an introduction to reading literary texts. Generally for students with 3-4 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 5 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4162 HISP-201-02 Inter Span I 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
Chmielewska, Ewa
MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 102 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students, 5 for sophomores, 5 for juniors
  An intermediate course for those who have had at least three years of secondary school Spanish or one year of college Spanish. A thorough review of grammar combined with oral practice. In addition, there is a strong cultural component and an introduction to reading literary texts. Generally for students with 3-4 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 5 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4323 HISP-201-03 Inter Span I 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
Chmielewska, Ewa
MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 102 or equivalent.
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students, 5 for sophomores, 5 for juniors
  An intermediate course for those who have had at least three years of secondary school Spanish or one year of college Spanish. A thorough review of grammar combined with oral practice. In addition, there is a strong cultural component and an introduction to reading literary texts. Generally for students with 3-4 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 5 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4163 HISP-202-01 Interm Span II 1.00 LEC Morales, Angela
Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 201 or equivalent.
  The review of grammar begun in Hispanic Studies 201 will be completed. In addition, there will be readings and discussion of contemporary Spanish and Spanish American literature, treating varied literary and cultural selections with a view to vocabulary-building and the reinforcement of the principles of grammar and syntax. Emphasis is placed on the development of competence in oral and written expression. Generally for students with 4 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4164 HISP-202-02 Interm Span II 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali
Souto Alcalde, David
TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 201 or equivalent.
  The review of grammar begun in Hispanic Studies 201 will be completed. In addition, there will be readings and discussion of contemporary Spanish and Spanish American literature, treating varied literary and cultural selections with a view to vocabulary-building and the reinforcement of the principles of grammar and syntax. Emphasis is placed on the development of competence in oral and written expression. Generally for students with 4 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4171 HISP-221-01 Advanced Grammar & Composition 1.00 LEC Aldrete, Diana TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 202 or equivalent.
  Emphasis on composition work in conjunction with a review of grammar, especially of the more difficult and subtle aspects, together with a consideration of stylistics. The writings of selected modern Hispanic authors will serve as models. Generally for students with 5+ years or equivalent of high school Spanish. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4604 HISP-223-01 Portuguese for Spanish Spkr II 1.00 SEM Patruno, Luigi MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: the equivalent of two semesters of study of any Romance Language (Spanish, French, Italian, Catalan)
  A continuation of Hispanic Studies/Portuguese 222, designed for students with any prior knowledge of a Romance Language (Spanish, Italian, French, Catalan). Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Romance Languages speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
5127 HISP-224-01 Spanish for Heritage Students 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  A comprehensive course for bilingual students who demonstrate spoken ability in Spanish but whose formal education has been in English. The course will cover all basic language skills while targeting the particular needs of bilingual students, including accentuation, homonyms, and usage of complex sentence structure. Special emphasis will be placed on reading and writing. Permission of the instructor is required. Prepares students for Hispanic Studies 221 or more advanced Hispanic studies course. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4378 HISP-226-01 Iberian & LatAmer Film&Convers 1.00 LEC Aldrete, Diana TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 202 or equivalent.
  In this course students will analyze landmarks of Spanish/Latin American cinema in terms of social, historical, and cultural questions they raise, as well as in terms of ideological, aesthetic, and cinematographic movements to which they belong. The discussion of films will be conducted in Spanish and will provide an academic forum for the exchange of ideas, interpretations, and critique. Heritage speakers, students who have studied in a Spanish speaking country, or students who have taken a course at a higher level (Hispanic Studies 261 or above) are not eligible to enroll.
4165 HISP-262-01 Iberian Culture II 1.00 LEC Harrington, Thomas TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221, or permission of instructor.
  This course introduces students to the set of cultural problems that have shaped Spain’s contemporary development. It will do so through the study of novels, films, and historical narrative. Special emphasis given to the cultural history of the Franco years (1939-1975) and the country’s more recent transition to democracy (1975-1992).
4166 HISP-264-01 Latin American Culture II 1.00 LEC Chmielewska, Ewa MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221, or permission of instructor.
  This course focuses on the social, political, economic, and cultural development of the Latin American nations. Emphasis will be on to the construction of national identities during the 19th century as well as main historic-political events of the 20th century. Discussions will be based on readings, documentaries, and feature films. Latin American newspapers on the Internet are used to inform our debates of current events. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4173 HISP-270-01 Intro to Cultural Analysis 1.00 LEC Melendez, Priscilla TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221 or 224, or permission of instructor.
  This course serves as a transition to advanced courses in Spanish language, culture, and literature. Students will develop analytical skills through an intense exploration of cultural production in the Hispanic world and through an examination of diverse literary genres, film, and current events. The focus will be on improving the necessary linguistic and critical thinking skills that are the fundamental foundation for literary and cultural analysis in advanced Spanish study.
4191 HISP-280-01 Hispanic Hartford 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221 or 224, or permission of instructor.
  This course seeks to place Trinity students in active and informed dialogue with the Hartford region’s large and diverse set of Spanish-speaking communities. The course will help student recognize and analyze the distinct national histories (e.g. Peruvian, Puerto Rican, Chilean, Honduran, Cuban, Colombian, and Mexican) which have contributed to the Hispanic diaspora in the city and the entire northeastern region of the United States. Students will undertake field projects designed to look at the effects of transnational migration on urban culture, institution-building, and identity formation. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4394 HISP-290-01 Studying in HISP World Colloq 0.50 SEM Aldrete, Diana TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course is designed to provide students returning from study abroad in Barcelona, Buenos Aires, and other Spanish-speaking venues (summer, semester, or year-long programs) with a forum within which they can share, compare, and process analytically and historically the difficulties, conflicts, absences, and discoveries that they experienced in their time abroad. They will then be asked to investigate how these experiences have affected their view of the social and cultural norms of U.S. culture. (Prerequisite: Study abroad in an approved program in a Spanish-speaking country.)
4646 HISP-345-01 Special Topic 1.00 LEC Patruno, Luigi MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 and one of the following: Hispanic Studies 261, 262, 263, or 264, or permission of instructor.
  To be offered occasionally on a special topic of consideration in Spanish American or Iberian literatures and cultures.
5157 HISP-356-01 (Counter)Imperial Subjects 1.00 SEM Souto Alcalde, David TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 16
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221, or permission of instructor.
  During the 16th and 17th centuries Spain was a Global Empire, which following an imperial logic of endless expansion, implemented policies that put human beings and nature under siege, causing an ecological and political crisis. In this course, we will scrutinize the strategies of resistance employed by imperial subjects through the exploration of a number of topics such as the emergence of an early-modern ecological consciousness, the early-modern boom of debates on equality (debates on the right to self-preservation, on the ways to fight poverty, monetary inflation, etc.) and the revolutionary side of early modern counter-heroes (the rogue, the mystic, the bandit, the pirate.) Materials include literature works, fragments of religious and political treatises, New World Chronicles, Inquisitorial records and visual and musical works.
4335 HISP-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4193 HISP-401-01 Senior Seminar 1.00 SEM Melendez, Priscilla TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 11
  This course is open to seniors only.
  Required for graduation with a major in Spanish (Plan A) or Plan B with Spanish as primary language. In this final exercise, students will engage theoretical and critical readings around a common theme related to the Spanish-speaking world and will write a 25-page analytical research paper on a specific topic related to the common theme.
4334 HISP-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4118 ITAL-101-01 Intens Elem Italian I 1.50 LEC Palma, Giuliana MW: 9:00AM-9:50AM
T: 8:25AM-9:15AM
R: 8:00AM-9:15AM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: Students who studied Italian for three or more years in high school may not enroll in ITAL 101.
  Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Italian. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will be the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take both 101 and 102 in sequence. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. Other than beginning students must have the permission of the instructor.
4161 ITAL-101-02 Intens Elem Italian I 1.50 LEC Palma, Giuliana
King, Joshua
MW: 11:00AM-11:50AM
T: 10:50AM-11:40AM
R: 10:50AM-12:05PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: Students who studied Italian for three or more years in high school may not enroll in ITAL 101.
  Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Italian. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will be the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take both 101 and 102 in sequence. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. Other than beginning students must have the permission of the instructor.
4119 ITAL-102-01 Intens Elem Italian II 1.50 LEC King, Joshua MW: 9:00AM-9:50AM
T: 8:25AM-9:15AM
R: 8:00AM-9:15AM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour.
4311 ITAL-102-02 Intens Elem Italian II 1.50 LEC King, Joshua MW: 11:00AM-11:50AM
T: 10:50AM-11:40AM
R: 10:50AM-12:05PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour.
4734 ITAL-202-01 Inter Ital II:Comp & Lit 1.00 LEC di Florio Gula, Martina MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 201 or equivalent.
  The review of grammar begun in Italian 201 will be completed in this course. Students’ oral and writing skills will be enhanced by further exploration of aspects of Italian culture, through a variety of texts and media. While emphasizing students’ communication skills, this course aims to provide them with the basis for linguistic competence in Italian.
5097 ITAL-236-01 Modern Italy 1.00 LEC Alcorn, John TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An introduction to modern Italy, through discussion of outstanding works of history, social science, film, and literature. Topics include the unification of Italy, the sharp changes in relations between church and state, the Great Emigration, Fascism, modernization, the Sicilian mafia, and the persistence of regional divisions. All work is done in English. Students who wish to count this course toward a major in Italian should request permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Italian and will meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. (Listed as both LACS 236 and ITAL 236-01; and under the History Department.)
5240 ITAL-247-01 Otherness in Italian Cinema 1.00 SEM di Florio Gula, Martina MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  From its beginnings in the early 20th C to the present, Italian Cinema has represented the social and cultural identity of the 'other' and 'otherness', that is, racial, ethnic, and sexual diversity. This course will study the representation of the different kinds of diversity in Italian film, from Neorealism to recent Italian cinema. We will examine films that deal with immigration and the current refugee crisis in the Mediterranean, but also with LGBT culture and other human rights, as well as with Italians' attitudes toward diverse groups and cultures. How does Italian film historically reflect the 'other' in Italian culture and how is film being shaped by diversity? Films include: "Paisà" (Rossellini, 1946), "Una giornata particolare" (Scola, 1977), "Mine vaganti" (Ozpetek, 2010), "Terraferma" (Crialese, 2011).
4799 ITAL-272-01 Mafia 1.00 LEC Alcorn, John TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  In contemporary societies there is an intimate contest between two kinds of social order: The rule of law and criminal organization. A remarkable instance may be found in the workings and metamorphoses of the Mafia. From its origins in Sicily, an agrarian society on the periphery of Europe, the Mafia has acquired intercontinental dimensions and a grip on high politics and finance capital. This shadowy phenomenon has been approached and explained in very different ways by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, economists, and political scientists. It has also been the subject of literature and film. We shall discuss outstanding examples of each approach and treatment. The purposes of the course are to make sense of the Mafia, to explore a basic problem of social order and to compare the different styles of reasoning and representation that characterize the various disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. Course requirements: seminar reports, several short papers, and full attendance and participation. (Listed as both LACS 272 and ITAL 272.)
4597 ITAL-314-01 Contemporary Italian Lit 1.00 LEC di Florio Gula, Martina MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A critical reading of selected novels, short stories, poetry, and plays from the turn of the 20th century to the present. Authors include: Pirandello, Svevo, Aleramo, Montale, Ungaretti, Morante, Calvino, Petrignani, Fo, and other contemporary authors. Emphasis is on the historical and cultural context of the works and on recent trends in Italian literature. Topics include: literature during both world wars and under Fascism, modernism and postmodernism in literature, contemporary women writers, and the role of Italian intellectuals in society. All work is done in Italian.
4331 ITAL-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4598 ITAL-401-01 Sr Sem: Topics in Ital Studies 1.00 SEM di Florio Gula, Martina MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 228 or equivalent.
  This seminar is required of all seniors majoring in Italian: Plan A, Plan B (Italian as primary language.) An interdisciplinary seminar devoted to guided, individual research. Each student may work on any aspect of the history, society, or culture of Italy or of Italians in other lands. Coursework is conducted in Italian. The grade is based on seminar participation and a research project. Prerequisites: At least one 300-level course in Italian literature or equivalent and permission of the instructor.
4328 ITAL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4121 JAPN-102-01 Intens Elem Japanese II 1.50 LEC Wagoner, Rieko MWF: 9:00AM-9:45AM
TR: 8:25AM-9:10AM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: Japanese 101 or equivalent.
  Continuation of Japanese 101, with increased emphasis on conversational practice. An additional 120 characters will be learned. Students are expected to master most of the spoken patterns by the end of the semester. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. (Also offered under the Asian studies program.)
4122 JAPN-202-01 Intens Intrm Japanese II 1.50 LEC Miyazaki, Atsuko MWF: 10:00AM-10:45AM
TR: 9:25AM-10:10AM
TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: Japanese 201 or equivalent.
  Continuation of Japanese 201, with further emphasis on written and spoken development of the current idiom. Four hours of classwork, plus one required drill hour. (Also offered under the Asian studies program.)
5236 JAPN-239-01 Gender in Japanese Lit/Film 1.00 LEC Wu, Guanda MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  Drawing upon canonical literary sources as well as internationally celebrated films and anime, this course explores how Japanese society defines and portrays heroes and heroines, beginning in the Heian era and continuing through the modern period. Under the umbrella theme of the heroic, we will analyze how Japanese society defines and promotes cultural values and mores, and how gender roles have been constructed in different historical moments and represented in different media. We will move through themes, such as, war and samurai, love and double-suicide, onnagata and gender ambiguity, and feminism and modern heroines. Our discussion will be conducted with close reference to important theoretical issues in gender and sexuality studies. Readings and discussion in English.
4599 JAPN-312-01 Advanced Spoken Japanese I 1.00 LEC Wagoner, Rieko TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: Japanese 202 or equivalent.
  This course aims to develop students’ listening and speaking skills in Japanese. The first half of the course focuses on basic tasks and social situations covered in Japanese 101 through Japanese 202, bringing students’ performance to a more natural and practical level. The latter half will introduce new conversational strategies and diverse topics and situations mostly drawn from current and culture-specific topics. (Since the content of this course varies from year to year to focus on the most contemporary materials, students may enroll for credit more than once.)
4329 JAPN-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4600 JAPN-412-01 Advanced Spoken Japanese II 1.00 LEC Wagoner, Rieko TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Japanese 312.
  This course is also listed under Asian Studies in the International Studies Program. The aim of this course is to further students' acquisition of listening and speaking skills in Japanese through study and discussion of films, TV shows, and other audio-visual sources. It aims to enhance students' ability to express their personal responses and opinions, while exposing them to more culturally specific concepts and topics.
4340 JAPN-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
5172 PORT-223-01 Portuguese for Spanish Spkr II 1.00 SEM Patruno, Luigi MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A continuation of Hispanic Studies/Portuguese 222, designed for students with any prior knowledge of a Romance Language (Spanish, Italian, French, Catalan). Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Romance Languages speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
4218 RUSS-102-01 Elementary Russian II 1.00 LEC Lahti, Katherine MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Russian 101 or equivalent.
  A continuation of Russian 101. Students increase their speaking, reading and writing ability through vocabulary building and learning further grammar structures. This class meets three hours a week and carries one credit.
4408 RUSS-202-01 Intermediate Russian II 1.00 LEC Any, Carol MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Russian 201 or equivalent.
  A continuation of Russian 201 in which students will develop a proficiency in Russian that will be adequate for most practical purposes. They will continue to develop their ability to converse on topics such as computers and work, dating, talking about nature, and others. They will start reading and discussing more complex literary and journalistic texts, including works by classic Russian authors. Regular writing assignments will help reinforce what they are learning. Students will continue their examination of the many sides of Russian culture, including Russian etiquette, gesture, music, television, film, etc. Successful completion of this course gives students the Russian they need in order to go to Russia for work or study. Conducted in Russian. (Also listed under the Russian and Eurasian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
5101 RUSS-270-01 Russian Poetry 1.00 LEC Lahti, Katherine TBA TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Russian 201 or equivalent.
  Readings in Russian poetry, including verse of the Golden and Silver Ages (the nineteenth century through 1920). Texts will be discussed from the viewpoint of their aesthetic and historical significance. Students will become familiar with the classics of Russian poetry while also developing the critical skills of being able to analyze poetry linguistically and write about it. Stylistic analysis will refine students’ knowledge of grammar; extensive discussion of texts will enhance oral proficiency. All readings and discussion in Russian.
5099 RUSS-285-01 Love, Sex & War in Tolstoy 1.00 LEC Any, Carol WF: 1:15PM-2:40PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course offers a detailed and varied exploration of Tolstoy's greatest fiction. Writer and prophet, aristocrat and socialist, moralist and hedonist, Tolstoy contained a bundle of contradictions in a mind of artistic genius. As we seek to uncover the aesthetic workings of his stories and novels, we will have ample opportunity to discuss the subjects of these works—romantic love, sexual expression, family life, war as military theory and as human experience, and the individual's search for meaning in relation to the works themselves and to our own lives. Tolstoy's youth, military service, marriage, religious conversion, and contentious relations with those around him will be discussed in connection with his literary art. (Listed as both LACS 285 and RUSS 285; under the Russian and Eurasian studies concentration of the International Studies Program; and under the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Program.)
5160 RUSS-288-01 Who Am I & Where Am I Going 1.00 LEC Any, Carol MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  How many personal identities do you have? Lover, friend, brother or sister, gambler, worshipper, skeptic, liar, outsider, psychotic—we may play all of these parts simultaneously or at different times in our lives. Through discussion of short literary texts, with some forays into religion and psychology, we will consider the ways in which our multiple identities shape our self-image as well as how others see us. Readings will be chosen from, among others, Tennessee Williams, Dostoevsky, Freud, and the Bible.