Course Descriptions

Course Catalog for DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGE AND CULTURE STUDIES
ARAB 101
Intensive Elementary Arabic I
Designed to develop fundamental skill in both spoken and written Arabic. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic grammatical structures, which it will be the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take both 101 and 102 in sequence. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour per week. (Also listed under the African Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1.50 units, Lecture
CHIN 101
Intensive Elementary Chinese I
Designed to develop fundamental skill in both spoken and written Mandarin. About 300 characters will be learned. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will be the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take both 101 and 102 in sequence. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. Students with previous training and background in Chinese should consult the instructor for proper placement. (Also listed under the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1.50 units, Lecture
FREN 101
Intensive Elementary French I
Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak French. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will be the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take both 101 and 102 in sequence. Meets 4 times a week. Students with three or more years in high school French may not enroll in this course.
1.50 units, Lecture
GRMN 101
Intensive Elementary German I
This is a basic four-skill (understanding, speaking, reading, and writing) course with emphasis on developing facility in reading and speaking German within a cultural and historical context. Students with prior German language study must obtain the permission of the instructor. Students taking this course should plan to take German 102 in order to complete the study of essential vocabulary and grammar and to gain practice in speaking and in reading original texts.
1.50 units, Lecture
HEBR 101
Elementary Modern Hebrew I
A comprehensive introduction to the basic vocabulary and grammatical rules of Modern Hebrew will be systematically presented and reviewed. Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak modern Hebrew, this course will also include exposure to appropriate cultural materials. (Also offered under the Middle Eastern studies and Jewish studies programs.)
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 101
Elementary Spanish I
Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Spanish. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will be the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take both 101 and 102 in sequence. Generally for students with minimal or no previous experience studying Spanish. Students with 3 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
ITAL 101
Intensive Elementary Italian I
Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Italian. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will be the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take both 101 and 102 in sequence. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. Other than beginning students must have the permission of the instructor.
1.50 units, Lecture
JAPN 101
Intensive Elementary Japanese I
Designed to develop fundamental skill in both spoken and written modern Japanese. About 200 characters will be learned. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will be the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take both 101 and 102 in sequence. Four hours of classwork, plus one required drill hour. Students with prior background in Japanese must have the permission of the instructor. (Also offered under the Asian studies program.)
1.50 units, Lecture
LING 101
Introduction to Linguistics
A general introduction to the study of language. First we will study the fundamental components of language (sounds, words, sentences). We will then examine the crucial question of how words and sentences manage to mean anything. The latter part of the course will be devoted to theoretical approaches to the nature of language, to how and why languages change over time, and to the ways language determines and reflects the structures of society.
1.00 units, Lecture
RUSS 101
Elementary Russian I
This course for beginners emphasizes active command of Russian through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. A web component enhances knowledge of the living language and illustrates cultural differences. This class meets three hours a week and carries one credit.
1.00 units, Lecture
ARAB 102
Intensive Elementary Arabic II
Designed to develop basic language skills learned in Arabic 101. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour per week. (Also listed under the African Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 101 or equivalent.
1.50 units, Lecture
CHIN 102
Intensive Elementary Chinese II
Continuation of Chinese 101, with increased emphasis on conversational practice. An additional 300 characters will be learned. Students are expected to master most of the spoken patterns by the end of the semester. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. (Also listed under the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 101 or equivalent.
1.50 units, Lecture
FREN 102
Intensive Elementary French II
Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 101 or equivalent.
1.50 units, Lecture
GRMN 102
Intensive Elementary German II
Continuation of German 101, with completion of the study of essential grammar, further vocabulary building through oral and written practice, practice in reading, and discussions of cultural contexts.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 101 or equivalent.
1.50 units, Lecture
HEBR 102
Elementary Modern Hebrew II
A continuation of Hebrew 101 with emphasis on increasing vocabulary, understanding, writing and speaking skills with widening exposure to appropriate cultural materials. (Also offered under the Middle Eastern studies and Jewish studies programs.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hebrew 101 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 102
Elementary Spanish II
Continuation of Hispanic Studies101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension. Generally for students with 2-3 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. Students with 4 or more years of pre-college Spanish study will not be allowed to enroll in this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic 101 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
ITAL 102
Intensive Elementary Italian II
Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions and reading comprehension. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 101 or equivalent.
1.50 units, Lecture
JAPN 102
Intensive Elementary Japanese II
Continuation of Japanese 101, with increased emphasis on conversational practice. An additional 120 characters will be learned. Students are expected to master most of the spoken patterns by the end of the semester. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. (Also offered under the Asian studies program.)
Prerequisite: Japanese 101 or equivalent.
1.50 units, Lecture
RUSS 102
Elementary Russian II
A continuation of Russian 101. Students increase their speaking, reading and writing ability through vocabulary building and learning further grammar structures. This class meets three hours a week and carries one credit.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Russian 101 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 103
Intensive Beginning Spanish
Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Spanish. Stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, narrating in the present, past, and future, vocabulary acquisition, introduction to the subjunctive. Acquiring familiarity with the geography and culture of the Spanish-speaking world will also be emphasized. Generally for students with minimal or no previous experience studying Spanish. This intensive course combines covers the material from both HISP 101 and 102. Students who have completed HISP 101 or 102, or the equivalent, are not eligible for this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies
2.00 units, Lecture
CHIN 150
Conversational Chinese in Asian Cities
This course is designed to prepare students’ basic language skills for participating in the China Summer Program. It aims to build students’ basic skills in spoken Chinese with emphasis on basic greetings and survival phrases for first-time travellers. Only students in the China Summer Program are allowed to enroll in this course. Students with prior Chinese language study must obtain the permission of the instructor. This course does not count toward the second language requirement.
0.50 units, Lecture
ARAB 201
Intermediate Arabic I
Continuation of Arabic 102, with an introduction to Arabic composition as well as further grammatical study and conversation practice. Required lab work. (Also listed under the African Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 102 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHIN 201
Intensive Intermediate Chinese I
This course emphasizes the continued development of skill in spoken and written Mandarin. Students will read more advanced texts, practice conversation, and be introduced to additional characters. In order to secure maximum proficiency, students should plan to take both 201 and 202 in sequence. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. (Also listed the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 102 or equivalent.
1.50 units, Lecture
FREN 201
Intermediate French I
Review of basic grammatical concepts and development of fundamental language skills, with increasing emphasis on written expression and spoken accuracy. Use is made of video-based presentations. Since significant linguistic progress cannot be achieved in 201 alone, students wishing to acquire proficiency should plan to take both 201 and 202 in sequence.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 102 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 201
Intermediate German I
This course will aim for intermediate-level proficiency in understanding, speaking, and writing contemporary idiomatic German with emphasis on conversation. Essential grammar review, exercises, and oral reports will be based on the reading and discussion of such materials as edited TV broadcasts, letter-writing, and short essays. Since significant linguistic progress cannot be achieved in 201 alone, students wishing to acquire proficiency should plan to take both 201 and 202 in sequence.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 102 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
HEBR 201
Intermediate Modern Hebrew I
This course continues the development of skills in conversation, composition, and reading. Advanced grammar and syntax are introduced, as well as expanded readings from Israeli newspapers and literature. (Also offered under the Middle Eastern studies and Jewish studies programs.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hebrew 102 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
ITAL 201
Intermediate Italian I: Conversation and Composition
A review of basic grammar learned in the first-year intensive Italian courses (101 and 102) is integrated with oral and writing practice on topics intended to introduce students to contemporary Italian culture. There will be readings of short stories, newspaper, and magazine articles, viewings of film and video presentations, and weekly compositions and other writing assignments. In order to achieve competence in Italian, students should plan to take 201 and 202 in sequence.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 102 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
JAPN 201
Intensive Intermediate Japanese I
This course emphasizes the continued development of skill in spoken and written Japanese. Students will read more advanced texts, practice conversation, and be introduced to additional characters. In order to secure maximum proficiency, students should plan to take both 201 and 202 in sequence. Four hours of classwork, plus one required drill hour. (Also offered under the Asian studies program.)
Prerequisite: Japanese 102 or equivalent.
1.50 units, Lecture
RUSS 201
Intermediate Russian I
In this course students will gain intermediate proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Russian. They will learn how to express themselves in Russian through regular conversation practice on topics such as the world of Russian emotions, love and marriage, music and entertainment, and other practical subjects. They will read real Russian literary texts and learn to write about their thoughts and opinions. They will learn about Russian culture by direct experience, including working with the Russian Internet. Students who take this and the next course in the series, Russian 202, will be ready to go on a study abroad program in Russia. Conducted in Russian. (Also listed under the Russian and Eurasian studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Russian 102 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
ARAB 202
Intermediate Arabic II
Continuation of Arabic 201, leading to a completion of essential basic grammatical constructions as well as further conversational practice. (Also listed under the African Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 201 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHIN 202
Intensive Intermediate Chinese II
Continuation of Chinese 201, with further emphasis on written and spoken development of the current idiom. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. (Also listed under the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 201 or equivalent.
1.50 units, Lecture
FREN 202
Intermediate French II
Further reinforcement of written and spoken skills, with continuing practice in the use of complex grammatical structures and greater emphasis on the mastery of contemporary usage through extensive class discussion, reading, and writing.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 201 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 202
Intermediate German II
Continuation of German 201, with the addition of expository material on German life and culture for discussion and writing practice.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 201 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
HEBR 202
Intermediate Modern Hebrew II
A continuation of Hebrew 201 with more advanced grammar and increased emphasis on composition and speaking as well as exposure to appropriate cultural materials. (Also offered under the Middle Eastern studies and Jewish studies programs.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hebrew 201 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 202
Intermediate Spanish II
The review of grammar begun in Hispanic Studies 201 will be completed. In addition, there will be readings and discussion of contemporary Spanish and Spanish American literature, treating varied literary and cultural selections with a view to vocabulary-building and the reinforcement of the principles of grammar and syntax. Emphasis is placed on the development of competence in oral and written expression. Generally for students with 4 years or equivalent of high school Spanish. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 201 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
ITAL 202
Intermediate Italian II: Composition and Literature
The review of grammar begun in Italian 201 will be completed in this course. Students’ oral and writing skills will be enhanced by further exploration of aspects of Italian culture, through a variety of texts and media. While emphasizing students’ communication skills, this course aims to provide them with the basis for linguistic competence in Italian.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 201 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
JAPN 202
Intensive Intermediate Japanese II
Continuation of Japanese 201, with further emphasis on written and spoken development of the current idiom. Four hours of classwork, plus one required drill hour. (Also offered under the Asian studies program.)
Prerequisite: Japanese 201 or equivalent.
1.50 units, Lecture
RUSS 202
Intermediate Russian II
A continuation of Russian 201 in which students will develop a proficiency in Russian that will be adequate for most practical purposes. They will continue to develop their ability to converse on topics such as computers and work, dating, talking about nature, and others. They will start reading and discussing more complex literary and journalistic texts, including works by classic Russian authors. Regular writing assignments will help reinforce what they are learning. Students will continue their examination of the many sides of Russian culture, including Russian etiquette, gesture, music, television, film, etc. Successful completion of this course gives students the Russian they need in order to go to Russia for work or study. Conducted in Russian. (Also listed under the Russian and Eurasian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Russian 201 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
HEBR 219
Israeli Film and Visual Media
Israeli film from the heroic nationalist sentiments of the 1950s to the conflicted alienation of the 21st century, offers a unique window into the history and society of the modern state. This course uses visual media to promote a wide variety of perspectives on Israeli culture and society, and assumes no previous knowledge about Israel. In addition to commercial movies and TV, assigned readings will address Israeli cinema as well as related historical and social issues.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 219
Israeli Film and Visual Media
Israeli film from the heroic nationalist sentiments of the 1950s to the conflicted alienation of the 21st century, offers a unique window into the history and society of the modern state. This course uses visual media to promote a wide variety of perspectives on Israeli culture and society, and assumes no previous knowledge about Israel. In addition to commercial movies and TV, assigned readings will address Israeli cinema as well as related historical and social issues.
1.00 units, Lecture
HEBR 220
Modern Israeli Literature and Jewish Heritage
Artists, and especially writers and poets, are the seismographs and mirrors of society, anticipating and reflecting its many forces and movements. During the past two hundred years Jewish life has been profoundly affected by such forces and movements as emancipation, the Enlightenment, assimilation, Zionism, and the Holocaust. A primary focus of modern Israeli writers is the birth of the State of Israel and its ongoing struggles, internally as well as with its Arab neighbors. One of the main ways Hebrew literature captures these significant changes is through the use of biblical themes, images and archetypes which resonate through the generations. This course will examine the ways in which modern Hebrew literature enriches and brings deeper understanding of collective Jewish experiences and detects and shapes the reality of modern Israel.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 220
Modern Israeli Literature and Jewish Heritage
Artists, and especially writers and poets, are the seismographs and mirrors of society, anticipating and reflecting its many forces and movements. During the past two hundred years Jewish life has been profoundly affected by such forces and movements as emancipation, the Enlightenment, assimilation, Zionism, and the Holocaust. A primary focus of modern Israeli writers is the birth of the State of Israel and its ongoing struggles, internally as well as with its Arab neighbors. One of the main ways Hebrew literature captures these significant changes is through the use of biblical themes, images and archetypes which resonate through the generations. This course will examine the ways in which modern Hebrew literature enriches and brings deeper understanding of collective Jewish experiences and detects and shapes the reality of modern Israel.
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 221
Advanced Grammar and Composition
Emphasis on composition work in conjunction with a review of grammar, especially of the more difficult and subtle aspects, together with a consideration of stylistics. The writings of selected modern Hispanic authors will serve as models. Generally for students with 5+ years or equivalent of high school Spanish. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 222
Portuguese for Spanish Speakers
An introductory language course designed for English/Spanish bilinguals or students with a strong foundation of Spanish. Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Spanish speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 223
Portuguese for Spanish Speakers II
The second part of the introductory language course designed for English/Spanish bilinguals or students with a strong foundation of Spanish. Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Spanish speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 222 or permission of instructor
1.00 units, Seminar
ARAB 224
Introduction to Arab and Middle Eastern Cinemas
This course offers an overview of the social and artistic role of cinema in the Arab world. It presents a historical outlook on the rise and development of cinema in the broader Middle East and North Africa through an investigation of this genre and the use of critical and cultural theory. It examines the artistic and cultural relationship of cinema to the societies it represents by utilizing a variety of structured thematic viewpoints such as the configuration of society and community, children in times of war, feminist discourse, and homosexuality, in order to explore cinema as an integral part of Arabic popular culture. The lectures will be organized around weekly screening of films in addition to related critical readings. No previous knowledge of Arabic language is required. This course is also listed under the African studies concentration and Middle Eastern studies concentration of the International Studies program and under the Women, Gender, and Sexuality program.
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 224
Spanish for Heritage Students
A comprehensive course for bilingual students who demonstrate spoken ability in Spanish but whose formal education has been in English. The course will cover all basic language skills while targeting the particular needs of bilingual students, including accentuation, homonyms, and usage of complex sentence structure. Special emphasis will be placed on reading and writing. Permission of the instructor is required. Prepares students for Hispanic Studies 221 or more advanced Hispanic studies course. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 224
Introduction to Arab and Middle Eastern Cinemas
This course offers an overview of the social and artistic role of cinema in the Arab world. It presents a historical outlook on the rise and development of cinema in the broader Middle East and North Africa through an investigation of this genre and the use of critical and cultural theory. It examines the artistic and cultural relationship of cinema to the societies it represents by utilizing a variety of structured thematic viewpoints such as the configuration of society and community, children in times of war, feminist discourse, and homosexuality, in order to explore cinema as an integral part of Arabic popular culture. The lectures will be organized around weekly screening of films in addition to related critical readings. No previous knowledge of Arabic language is required. This course is also listed under the African studies concentration and Middle Eastern studies concentration of the International Studies program and under the Women, Gender, and Sexuality program.
1.00 units, Lecture
ARAB 225
Contemporary Arabic Novel: Continuity and Change
This course offers a general survey of 20th-century Arabic literature in translation, mainly the novel. It examines a variety of cultural aspects of Egyptian and Levantine societies with reference to gender issues and the status of women in these societies as reflected in the writings of Najib Mahfuz, Ala Aswani, Nawal El-Saadawi, and Ghadah al-Samman. The works of these prominent contemporary writers will be examined against the background of the major historical political and social events in the modern Middle East and supported by a number of films and documentaries.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 225
Contemporary Arabic Novel: Continuity and Change
This course offers a general survey of 20th-century Arabic literature in translation, mainly the novel. It examines a variety of cultural aspects of Egyptian and Levantine societies with reference to gender issues and the status of women in these societies as reflected in the writings of Najib Mahfuz, Ala Aswani, Nawal El-Saadawi, and Ghadah al-Samman. The works of these prominent contemporary writers will be examined against the background of the major historical political and social events in the modern Middle East and supported by a number of films and documentaries.
1.00 units, Lecture
ARAB 226
Writing the Body in Contemporary Arabic Literature
This course offers detailed analyses of gendered perceptions of sexuality in contemporary Arabic literature. It examines literary and cinematic trends of portraying sexuality in the Arab Middle East. Through close readings of several prominent Arab authors, students will investigate topics related to writing the body, sexuality and love, the ethics and aesthetics of morality, homosocial relations, sexual performances, and homoerotic practices. These themes will be explored against the background of major historical, political, and social events in the modern Middle East and supported by a number of theoretical readings, films, and documentaries. No knowledge of Arabic language is required.
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 226
Iberian and Latin American Film and Conversation
In this course students will analyze landmarks of Spanish/Latin American cinema in terms of social, historical, and cultural questions they raise, as well as in terms of ideological, aesthetic, and cinematographic movements to which they belong. The discussion of films will be conducted in Spanish and will provide an academic forum for the exchange of ideas, interpretations, and critique. Heritage speakers, students who have studied in a Spanish speaking country, or students who have taken a course at a higher level (Hispanic Studies 261 or above) are not eligible to enroll.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 226
Writing the Body in Contemporary Arabic Literature
This course offers detailed analyses of gendered perceptions of sexuality in contemporary Arabic literature. It examines literary and cinematic trends of portraying sexuality in the Arab Middle East. Through close readings of several prominent Arab authors, students will investigate topics related to writing the body, sexuality and love, the ethics and aesthetics of morality, homosocial relations, sexual performances, and homoerotic practices. These themes will be explored against the background of major historical, political, and social events in the modern Middle East and supported by a number of theoretical readings, films, and documentaries. No knowledge of Arabic language is required.
1.00 units, Lecture
ITAL 228
Italian Language and Society
This course will examine the relationship between language and society in contemporary Italy and in countries with high levels of Italian migration, while also developing students’ linguistic skills. Topics include: geographical, class, and generational differences in language, the effects of mass media on language, and the Italian of immigrants to the United States. As part of their coursework, students will conduct interviews with Italian Americans in the Hartford area.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
FREN 232
African Novelists: Voices and Images of a Continent
An examination of contemporary representative literary works from West, East, North and South Africa. To shed light on the cultural and literary sources of the African novel, the course will begin with a unit on the African epic and folktales. Then we will examine the contemporary novel. By juxtaposing the perspectives of men and women writers, we will explore the ways in which gender influences how African writers perceive the issues of culture, political identity and the self. Through the means of a few selected African films or African television shows we will illustrate how some of these important issues are translated into images and if any discrepancies exist, and if so why, between the word and the image. Some of the writers to be considered include Achebe, Camara Laye, Buchi Emecheta,Ousmane Sembene, André Brink, Bessie Head, Mariama Bâ, Nuruddin Farah, Tahar Ben Jelloun. Students wishing to apply this course to a major in French must secure the permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in French and will meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 233
The Godfather: The Art of Hard Choices
The Godfather films (I and II) are narrative masterpieces that provide many insights into the interplay of character and culture in decision-making in high-stakes situations outside the law. We will interpret the films as illustrations of strategic interaction in stylized mafia settings. Specific topics are the relationship between narrative fiction and reality; motivations and behavior; the mafia’s code of honor; private protection and extortion; vice markets; corruption; and the prisoner’s dilemma. The course has an experimental hybrid format: 8 seminar classes (50 minutes each) and 12 online class units. Assessment is based on three assignments: 1) a paper (1,500 words) on a topic to be chosen in consultation with the instructor; 2) a seminar report; and 3) seminar participation. The paper and the report require analysis of film clips in the spirit of the syllabus.
0.50 units, Lecture
ITAL 236
Modern Italy
An introduction to modern Italy, through discussion of outstanding works of history, social science, film, and literature. Topics include the unification of Italy, the sharp changes in relations between church and state, the Great Emigration, Fascism, modernization, the Sicilian mafia, and the persistence of regional divisions. All work is done in English. Students who wish to count this course toward a major in Italian should request permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Italian and will meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. (Listed as both LACS 236 and ITAL 236-01; and under the History Department.)
1.00 units, Lecture
JAPN 236
Japanese Crime Literature and Film
This course examines major works of Japanese crime literature and film from the works of Edogawa Rampo, known as the father of crime fiction in Japan, to those of contemporary writers to explore social and moral issues reflected in them. While Japanese writers and filmmakers of this genre readily acknowledge Western influences, the literary and cinematic explorations of crime in Japan have also developed ona trajectory of their own, producing works that are easily distinguishable from those of other cultures. The course will also consider the mixing of the crime genre with others, such as ghost and science fiction genres. Works studied in this course include those of Edogawa Rampo, Akira Kurosawa, Miyuki Miyabe, Seicho Matsumoto, and Kobo Abe, as well as yakuza movies. Readings and discussion in English.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 236
Japanese Crime Literature and Film
This course examines major works of Japanese crime literature and film from the works of Edogawa Rampo, known as the father of crime fiction in Japan, to those of contemporary writers to explore social and moral issues reflected in them. While Japanese writers and filmmakers of this genre readily acknowledge Western influences, the literary and cinematic explorations of crime in Japan have also developed ona trajectory of their own, producing works that are easily distinguishable from those of other cultures. The course will also consider the mixing of the crime genre with others, such as ghost and science fiction genres. Works studied in this course include those of Edogawa Rampo, Akira Kurosawa, Miyuki Miyabe, Seicho Matsumoto, and Kobo Abe, as well as yakuza movies. Readings and discussion in English.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 236
Modern Italy
An introduction to modern Italy, through discussion of outstanding works of history, social science, film, and literature. Topics include the unification of Italy, the sharp changes in relations between church and state, the Great Emigration, Fascism, modernization, the Sicilian mafia, and the persistence of regional divisions. All work is done in English. Students who wish to count this course toward a major in Italian should request permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Italian and will meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. (Listed as both LACS 236 and ITAL 236-01; and under the History Department.)
1.00 units, Lecture
CHIN 237
20th-Century Chinese Literature
A survey of modern Chinese literature, 1918-2000. We will study three major periods of the 20th century: 1918-1949, 1949-1976, and 1976 to the present. The course will concentrate on the work of writers such as Lu Xun, Yu Dafu, Eileen Chang (Zhang Ailing), Xu Zhimo, Mao Dun, Shen Congwen, Bei Dao, Yu Hua, Su Tong, and Wang Anyi. Students will be introduced to the basic developmental trajectory of 20th-century Chinese literature, and will explore interactions between social-historical conditions and the production of modern Chinese literary works. Readings and discussion in English.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 237
20th-Century Chinese Literature
A survey of modern Chinese literature, 1918-2000. We will study three major periods of the 20th century: 1918-1949, 1949-1976, and 1976 to the present. The course will concentrate on the work of writers such as Lu Xun, Yu Dafu, Eileen Chang (Zhang Ailing), Xu Zhimo, Mao Dun, Shen Congwen, Bei Dao, Yu Hua, Su Tong, and Wang Anyi. Students will be introduced to the basic developmental trajectory of 20th-century Chinese literature, and will explore interactions between social-historical conditions and the production of modern Chinese literary works. Readings and discussion in English.
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 240
Latin American Literature and Film in Translation
This course is aimed at a broad and general audience. No knowledge of Spanish is required. Taught in English this survey course introduces students to a set of key Latin American literary works of the 19th and 20th century, from various areas (the Caribbean, Mexico, Latinos in the U.S./the border, Central America, South America, the Southern Cone), of various kinds (novels, short novels, short stories, essays, testimonies, collages, etc.) and reflecting on a variety of social and cultural issues (depicting/ordering/making sense of reality, storytelling, mythmaking, constructing the nation, neo-colonialism, fascism, revolution, human rights, exile, border-culture, race, ethnicity, gender). Students wishing to count this course toward a major in Spanish should secure permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Spanish and will meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. (Listed as both Language and Cultural Studies 233-11 and Hispanic Studies 233-01; and under the Latin American and Caribbean Studies program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 240
Latin American Literature and Film in Translation
This course is aimed at a broad and general audience. No knowledge of Spanish is required. Taught in English this survey course introduces students to a set of key Latin American literary works of the 19th and 20th century, from various areas (the Caribbean, Mexico, Latinos in the U.S./the border, Central America, South America, the Southern Cone), of various kinds (novels, short novels, short stories, essays, testimonies, collages, etc.) and reflecting on a variety of social and cultural issues (depicting/ordering/making sense of reality, storytelling, mythmaking, constructing the nation, neo-colonialism, fascism, revolution, human rights, exile, border-culture, race, ethnicity, gender). Students wishing to count this course toward a major in Spanish should secure permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Spanish and will meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. (Listed as both Language and Cultural Studies 233-11 and Hispanic Studies 233-01; and under the Latin American and Caribbean Studies program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
FREN 241
Advanced Composition and Style
Development of a high level of proficiency through the reading and analysis of texts and films in contemporary idiomatic French, with considerable emphasis on attainment of grammatical accuracy.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 202 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 241
Prisms of Modernity: Inquiry, Discovery, Possession
A study of the birth of the modern age (14th-18th centuries) focused on the emergence of five distinct forms of inquiry, discovery, and possession: juridical interrogation, geographical exploration, military conquest, mystical speculation, and scientific experimentation. Through careful analyses of the figure of the holy inquisitor, the explorer, the conquistador, the mystic, and the scientist, we will investigate the rise of modern technologies of knowledge and domination. What was their combined effect on efforts to uphold the authority of divine revelation and how do they relate to the cultural shifts that gave rise to our world? Texts by or about Joan of Arc, Torquemada, Columbus, Hernan Cortes, Luther, Saint Teresa of Avila, Galileo, Francis Bacon, Boyle, Lowith, Heidegger, and Blumenberg.
1.00 units, Seminar
LACS 241
Prisms of Modernity: Inquiry, Discovery, Possession
A study of the birth of the modern age (14th-18th centuries) focused on the emergence of five distinct forms of inquiry, discovery, and possession: juridical interrogation, geographical exploration, military conquest, mystical speculation, and scientific experimentation. Through careful analyses of the figure of the holy inquisitor, the explorer, the conquistador, the mystic, and the scientist, we will investigate the rise of modern technologies of knowledge and domination. What was their combined effect on efforts to uphold the authority of divine revelation and how do they relate to the cultural shifts that gave rise to our world? Texts by or about Joan of Arc, Torquemada, Columbus, Hernan Cortes, Luther, Saint Teresa of Avila, Galileo, Francis Bacon, Boyle, Lowith, Heidegger, and Blumenberg.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 242
Self, Society and Writing in Contemporary Latin American 'Autoficcion'
The goal of this course is to examine contemporary Spanish American short stories and novels, mainy from the second half of the twentieth century to the present, where the figure of an/the author—real or fictional—is present within the fiction. As Beatriz Trastoy observes, what is of interest about the concept of ‘autoficción’ is its persistent ambiguity as it asks to be and not to be believed, as it presents itself as simultaneously false and serious, refusing to offer the necessary signs to differentiate between reality and fiction. This will lead us to examine the discourse of real and fictional autobiography as writers explore their own identity inside and outside fiction. Authors to be discussed include: Borges, García Márquez, Vargas Llosa, Poniatowska, Glanz, Bolaño.
1.00 units, Seminar
LACS 242
Self, Society and Writing in Contemporary Latin American 'Autoficcion'
The goal of this course is to examine contemporary Spanish American short stories and novels, mainy from the second half of the twentieth century to the present, where the figure of an/the author—real or fictional—is present within the fiction. As Beatriz Trastoy observes, what is of interest about the concept of ‘autoficción’ is its persistent ambiguity as it asks to be and not to be believed, as it presents itself as simultaneously false and serious, refusing to offer the necessary signs to differentiate between reality and fiction. This will lead us to examine the discourse of real and fictional autobiography as writers explore their own identity inside and outside fiction. Authors to be discussed include: Borges, García Márquez, Vargas Llosa, Poniatowska, Glanz, Bolaño.
1.00 units, Seminar
FREN 245
French and Belgian Whodunnits
Students will explore three major francophone detective novels: Georges Simenon's L'Affaire Saint Fiacre, Didier Daeninck's Le Geant Inacheve, and Patrick Manchette's Que d'Os! Emphasis will be placed upon narratological, social and political analysis. The study of film adaptations will complement the readings. The class will be conducted in French and will count toward the French major or minor.
0.50 units, Seminar
HISP 245
Latin American Film and Human Rights
This course has the dual purpose of examining important human rights issues in Latin America and questioning the role of film in making visible, critiquing, or even sustaining the structures that lead to human rights violations. We will study specific human rights issues tackled by filmmakers in Latin America, such as cultural rights, gender and sexuality rights, economic rights, environmental issues, and war and state terror. Furthermore, we will discuss specific film schools and movements that developed to address human rights issues in diverse Latin American contexts. Finally, we will look at how Latin American films work the international human rights film festival circuit, and the ethical and practical implications of filming local human rights issues for international audiences.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 245
Latin American Film and Human Rights
This course has the dual purpose of examining important human rights issues in Latin America and questioning the role of film in making visible, critiquing, or even sustaining the structures that lead to human rights violations. We will study specific human rights issues tackled by filmmakers in Latin America, such as cultural rights, gender and sexuality rights, economic rights, environmental issues, and war and state terror. Furthermore, we will discuss specific film schools and movements that developed to address human rights issues in diverse Latin American contexts. Finally, we will look at how Latin American films work the international human rights film festival circuit, and the ethical and practical implications of filming local human rights issues for international audiences.
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 246
Latino Literature in the United States
This course will study the literary production of the Hispanic Diaspora, concentrating on those four groups historically understood to constitute "Latinos" in the United States: the immigrants of Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. Through the literature and cinema of these groups we will not only study the socio-cultural situation and history of this heterogeneous Diaspora but will also explore and come to question central themes traditionally used to discuss Latinos in the US: identity, language, culture, community, exile, and memory. In examining a literary and cultural production that spans three centuries, we will read texts in translation from the original Spanish, bilingual texts, and texts written in originally English. A reading knowledge of Spanish helpful but not essential.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 246
Latino Literature in the United States
This course will study the literary production of the Hispanic Diaspora, concentrating on those four groups historically understood to constitute "Latinos" in the United States: the immigrants of Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. Through the literature and cinema of these groups we will not only study the socio-cultural situation and history of this heterogeneous Diaspora but will also explore and come to question central themes traditionally used to discuss Latinos in the US: identity, language, culture, community, exile, and memory. In examining a literary and cultural production that spans three centuries, we will read texts in translation from the original Spanish, bilingual texts, and texts written in originally English. A reading knowledge of Spanish helpful but not essential.
1.00 units, Lecture
FREN 247
Introduction to Francophone Studies
This course provides an introduction to the history, literature and culture of the Francophone world. Through a range of texts and films hailing from French-speaking countries in Africa, the Caribbean, and the Americas, we explore the legacy of colonialism and post-colonialism, and pay particular attention to issues of race, identity, language, and nationhood. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 248
Alchemy of Identity Culture Planning & Civil Society in Barcelona, 1855-2008
This course provides an in-depth analysis of the cultural history of Barcelona over the past century and a half, a time in which the city has emerged as one of the world’s prime laboratories of urban innovation. Students will study the foundations of this innovation and just what the “Barcelona Model” can bring to analyses of urban problems through¬out the world. The program combines standard course¬work based at the Trinity program space with on-site teaching throughout the city of Barcelona. Over the course of the program, students will gain a first-hand understanding of the politics of public space as well as the adjunct issues of bilingualism and multiculturality. The program is appropriate for students from all majors who have an interest in Spain and Barcelona.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 248
Alchemy of Identity Culture Planning & Civil Society in Barcelona, 1855-2008
This course provides an in-depth analysis of the cultural history of Barcelona over the past century and a half, a time in which the city has emerged as one of the world’s prime laboratories of urban innovation. Students will study the foundations of this innovation and just what the “Barcelona Model” can bring to analyses of urban problems through¬out the world. The program combines standard course¬work based at the Trinity program space with on-site teaching throughout the city of Barcelona. Over the course of the program, students will gain a first-hand understanding of the politics of public space as well as the adjunct issues of bilingualism and multiculturality. The program is appropriate for students from all majors who have an interest in Spain and Barcelona.
1.00 units, Lecture
FREN 250
Advanced Language Study
This course is designed to strengthen and develop students’ reading, writing, and translating skills, to facilitate the transition between lower-level language courses and the upper-level study of literature and culture. Readings will focus on the short story as a genre in order to build vocabulary and increase students’ ability to read with ease, as well as to appreciate the literary value of a text. Weekly writing will be assigned on a variety of topics taken from the readings, as well as the students’ own creative writing (essays or short fiction). The translation component of the course will entail passages from the texts read in class, but students will also translate their own creative work. Texts by contemporary writers such as Le Clézio, Assia Djebar, Véronique Tadjo, Philippe Delerm, and others will be used.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 250
Divided Germany and the Cold War
In this course students explore life in divided Germany as portrayed in literature and film from both sides of the border. Against the backdrop of Nazi Germany's defeat, the daunting task of rebuilding the country—free market or soviet style—and the ebb and flow of Cold War tension, students become familiar with major writers and filmmakers taking the pulse of the German people. Featured prominently are the city of Berlin as the epicenter of the Cold War, the nuclear arms' race and peace efforts, coming to terms with Germany's Nazi past, the dream of "normalcy", and the fall of the Berlin Wall.—Taught in English
1.00 units, Seminar
LACS 250
Divided Germany and the Cold War
In this course students explore life in divided Germany as portrayed in literature and film from both sides of the border. Against the backdrop of Nazi Germany's defeat, the daunting task of rebuilding the country—free market or soviet style—and the ebb and flow of Cold War tension, students become familiar with major writers and filmmakers taking the pulse of the German people. Featured prominently are the city of Berlin as the epicenter of the Cold War, the nuclear arms' race and peace efforts, coming to terms with Germany's Nazi past, the dream of "normalcy", and the fall of the Berlin Wall.—Taught in English
1.00 units, Seminar
FREN 251
French Literature I: From the Middle Ages to Romanticism
This course is designed to introduce the student to the major authors of French literature from the Middle Ages to the 19th century. Representative works will be read in chronological order to foster a sense of literary history. Special emphasis will be placed on techniques of literary appreciation. Class conducted entirely in French.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
FREN 252
Modern French Literature
This course will be a survey of the major texts of the 19th and 20th century France. Principles of literary history and literary appreciation will be emphasized. Prerequisite: French 241 or equivalent
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 255
Exile from Nazi Germany
In the 1930s, thousands of writers, scientists, filmmakers, philosophers, historians, musicians, architects, and artists were driven into exile by the Nazi regime. The majority of émigrés, many of whom were Jewish, settled in the United States and went on to make significant contributions to the country's intellectual and cultural life. The purpose of this course is threefold: to introduce the concept of exile; to study the particular circumstances and stories of exile from Nazi Germany and Nazi-occupied Europe; to become familiar with the accomplishments of exiles in the fields of literature, film, music, and culture studies. Special emphasis will be placed on the impact of German and Austrian filmmakers in Hollywood and on the stamp of exiles on the U.S. academic world.
1.00 units, Seminar
LACS 255
Exile from Nazi Germany
In the 1930s, thousands of writers, scientists, filmmakers, philosophers, historians, musicians, architects, and artists were driven into exile by the Nazi regime. The majority of émigrés, many of whom were Jewish, settled in the United States and went on to make significant contributions to the country's intellectual and cultural life. The purpose of this course is threefold: to introduce the concept of exile; to study the particular circumstances and stories of exile from Nazi Germany and Nazi-occupied Europe; to become familiar with the accomplishments of exiles in the fields of literature, film, music, and culture studies. Special emphasis will be placed on the impact of German and Austrian filmmakers in Hollywood and on the stamp of exiles on the U.S. academic world.
1.00 units, Seminar
GRMN 256
Berlin, Vienna, Prague
In this course we will peek into the urban souls of Berlin, Vienna, and Prague as we become familiar with some of the many writers, artists, musicians, and filmmakers who have called these cities home. Berlin comes alive in expressionist films and cityscapes, the Berlin literary avant-garde, and the many artistic responses to the Cold War and its most visible reminder: the Berlin Wall. We'll approach Vienna through Sigmund Freud and Arthur Schnitzler, study Secessionist art by Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele, and accompany modern writers on their wanderings through the city. In Prague we will study Art Nouveau and Art Deco and become acquainted with the city's most famous writers, Franz Kafka and Milan Kundera. This course is taught in English and is listed as GRMN 233 and LACS 233. It meets the Writing Part II requirement for German Studies majors.
1.00 units, Seminar
LACS 256
Berlin, Vienna, Prague
In this course we will peek into the urban souls of Berlin, Vienna, and Prague as we become familiar with some of the many writers, artists, musicians, and filmmakers who have called these cities home. Berlin comes alive in expressionist films and cityscapes, the Berlin literary avant-garde, and the many artistic responses to the Cold War and its most visible reminder: the Berlin Wall. We'll approach Vienna through Sigmund Freud and Arthur Schnitzler, study Secessionist art by Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele, and accompany modern writers on their wanderings through the city. In Prague we will study Art Nouveau and Art Deco and become acquainted with the city's most famous writers, Franz Kafka and Milan Kundera. This course is taught in English and is listed as GRMN 233 and LACS 233. It meets the Writing Part II requirement for German Studies majors.
1.00 units, Seminar
GRMN 257
New German Cinema
This course will examine the rich and varied cinema produced in the Federal Republic of Germany between 1960 and the mid-1980s, otherwise known as New German Cinema. Concurrent with screenings of films by directors such as Wim Wenders, Rainer Werner Fassbinder and Doris Dörrie, we will consider the political and historical events that influenced the film industry and aesthetic at this time in Germany. We will also trace the history of film financing, distribution and exhibition in post-WWII West Germany. The themes examined will include, but are not limited to, the relationship between public and private, past and present, the relationship between history and gender, the "German" and the other, the search for a national identity. On completion of this course, students will be able to understand (1) the diverse aesthetic of New German Cinema films, (2) the institutional influences in the development of New German Cinema, (3) the history of West German after 1949, and (4) the different conceptualizations of German identity in different historical and political moments. Directors include R. W. Fassbinder, W. Herzog, W. Wenders, H. Sanders-Brahms, and M. v. Trotta.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 257
New German Cinema
This course will examine the rich and varied cinema produced in the Federal Republic of Germany between 1960 and the mid-1980s, otherwise known as New German Cinema. Concurrent with screenings of films by directors such as Wim Wenders, Rainer Werner Fassbinder and Doris Dörrie, we will consider the political and historical events that influenced the film industry and aesthetic at this time in Germany. We will also trace the history of film financing, distribution and exhibition in post-WWII West Germany. The themes examined will include, but are not limited to, the relationship between public and private, past and present, the relationship between history and gender, the "German" and the other, the search for a national identity. On completion of this course, students will be able to understand (1) the diverse aesthetic of New German Cinema films, (2) the institutional influences in the development of New German Cinema, (3) the history of West German after 1949, and (4) the different conceptualizations of German identity in different historical and political moments. Directors include R. W. Fassbinder, W. Herzog, W. Wenders, H. Sanders-Brahms, and M. v. Trotta.
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 258
Burnt Books: Literature and Nazi Germany
In an effort to cleanse the nation’s soul of un-German influences, the National Socialists ceremoniously burnt works by hundreds of so called “degenerate” writers, among them such celebrated authors as Heinrich Heine, Erich Maria Remarque, Heinrich Mann, and Bertolt Brecht. This course explores major works of German literature forbidden during the Third Reich and examines the rationale for their exclusion from the Nazi canon. The course furthermore studies Nazi-endorsed writings, as well as literary responses to the Third Reich by anti-Nazi writers such as Anna Seghers, Klaus Mann, and Stefan Zweig. (Listed as both LACS 233-92 and GRMN 233-18.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 258
Burnt Books: Literature and Nazi Germany
In an effort to cleanse the nation’s soul of un-German influences, the National Socialists ceremoniously burnt works by hundreds of so called “degenerate” writers, among them such celebrated authors as Heinrich Heine, Erich Maria Remarque, Heinrich Mann, and Bertolt Brecht. This course explores major works of German literature forbidden during the Third Reich and examines the rationale for their exclusion from the Nazi canon. The course furthermore studies Nazi-endorsed writings, as well as literary responses to the Third Reich by anti-Nazi writers such as Anna Seghers, Klaus Mann, and Stefan Zweig. (Listed as both LACS 233-92 and GRMN 233-18.)
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 259
The Postwar German Film
This course will explore the social and political landscape of postwar Germany from 1945 to the present by looking at a broad range of films from East and West Germany, and Austria, that encompass a wide variety of genres, filmmakers, and movements. The themes examined will include, but not be limited to, the creation of a new cinema after World War II, filmmaking during the Cold War, avant-garde cinema, German history through film, socially critical cinema, and Germany today. Directors will include Wolfgang Staudte, Volker Schlöndorff, R.W. Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, Margarethe von Trotta, Fatih Akin, and Christian Petzold.
1.00 units, Seminar
LACS 259
The Postwar German Film
This course will explore the social and political landscape of postwar Germany from 1945 to the present by looking at a broad range of films from East and West Germany, and Austria, that encompass a wide variety of genres, filmmakers, and movements. The themes examined will include, but not be limited to, the creation of a new cinema after World War II, filmmaking during the Cold War, avant-garde cinema, German history through film, socially critical cinema, and Germany today. Directors will include Wolfgang Staudte, Volker Schlöndorff, R.W. Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, Margarethe von Trotta, Fatih Akin, and Christian Petzold.
1.00 units, Seminar
GRMN 261
Berlin to Hollywood
Through close examination of films and readings, this course will explore the influence that filmmaking during the Weimar Republic period of German history had on Hollywood and American popular culture. By looking closely at films and filmmakers, we will examine the continuities and breaks between German film and classic Hollywood film. Starting with the expressionism and new objectivity styles in Germany during the 1920s, we will move on to emigration of filmmakers from the Third Reich and their work in Hollywood. Among others, we will examine genres such as the anti-Nazi film, film noir, and comedies, as well as explore questions regarding race, gender, and ideology.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 261
Iberian Culture I (Middle Ages to the 19th Century)
The course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the primary cultural dynamics of the Iberian Peninsula from the Middle Ages to the 19th century. We will pay special attention to the more important cultural developments during this crucial era of Spanish history.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 261
Berlin to Hollywood
Through close examination of films and readings, this course will explore the influence that filmmaking during the Weimar Republic period of German history had on Hollywood and American popular culture. By looking closely at films and filmmakers, we will examine the continuities and breaks between German film and classic Hollywood film. Starting with the expressionism and new objectivity styles in Germany during the 1920s, we will move on to emigration of filmmakers from the Third Reich and their work in Hollywood. Among others, we will examine genres such as the anti-Nazi film, film noir, and comedies, as well as explore questions regarding race, gender, and ideology.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 262
Iberian Culture II (The 20th Century)
This course introduces students to the set of cultural problems that have shaped Spain’s contemporary development. It will do so through the study of novels, films, and historical narrative. Special emphasis given to the cultural history of the Franco years (1939-1975) and the country’s more recent transition to democracy (1975-1992).
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 263
Latin American Culture I (Pre-Columbian Era to Enlightenment)
This course examines the history, societies, and cultures of the various regions that today are known as Latin America. The course moves from the major pre-Columbian civilizations, through the first encounter between Europe and these peoples, the subsequent conquest and colonization, and the first manifestations of the desire for independence. The course will concentrate specifically on how the peoples of these various regions and periods explored their social and political concerns through art, literature, and music. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 264
Literature and the Law
In literature and in law, language shapes rhetorical worlds that seek to represent, constitute and interpret the actions of human beings and their world. Therefore, examining how the law is represented in literature gives insight both into how this representation shifts to accommodate historical and cultural differences, and how central the role of narrative is to legal institutions. This course will focus on representations of the law in German-language literature from the late 18th century onward, to examine how literature relates the human condition to law, to other central cultural values (love, honor and justice), and how literature can put the law itself into question. The course will emphasize literary interrogations of National Socialist law, which take up these questions in their most urgent form. Taught in English.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 264
Latin American Culture II (Independence to Present Day)
This course focuses on the social, political, economic, and cultural development of the Latin American nations. Emphasis will be on to the construction of national identities during the 19th century as well as main historic-political events of the 20th century. Discussions will be based on readings, documentaries, and feature films. Latin American newspapers on the Internet are used to inform our debates of current events. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 264
Literature and the Law
In literature and in law, language shapes rhetorical worlds that seek to represent, constitute and interpret the actions of human beings and their world. Therefore, examining how the law is represented in literature gives insight both into how this representation shifts to accommodate historical and cultural differences, and how central the role of narrative is to legal institutions. This course will focus on representations of the law in German-language literature from the late 18th century onward, to examine how literature relates the human condition to law, to other central cultural values (love, honor and justice), and how literature can put the law itself into question. The course will emphasize literary interrogations of National Socialist law, which take up these questions in their most urgent form. Taught in English.
1.00 units, Seminar
GRMN 265
German History Through Literature and Film
This course examines German history from 1871 to the present through major works of German literature and film. Special emphasis will be placed on the historical context within which each work was written: the Wilhelmine Empire, World War I, the Weimar Republic, Nazi Germany, East/West Germany and the Cold War, and Reunification. The objective of the course is twofold: to become familiar with some of the most powerful narratives of modern German literature and film; and to analyze literature and film as windows on social, cultural, and historical processes.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 265
German History Through Literature and Film
This course examines German history from 1871 to the present through major works of German literature and film. Special emphasis will be placed on the historical context within which each work was written: the Wilhelmine Empire, World War I, the Weimar Republic, Nazi Germany, East/West Germany and the Cold War, and Reunification. The objective of the course is twofold: to become familiar with some of the most powerful narratives of modern German literature and film; and to analyze literature and film as windows on social, cultural, and historical processes.
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 266
Marx, Nietzsche, Freud
This survey of German intellectual history from 1848 to the present will acquaint students with writings of Marx, Freud, Nietzsche, and the many others who shaped subsequent western culture and thought. Drawing upon close readings of excerpts from pivotal works, we will examine the relevance of such works in the matrix of artistic trends and historical circumstances from which they emerge. Short literary pieces (Franz Kafka, Thomas Mann) will be included.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 266
Marx, Nietzsche, Freud
This survey of German intellectual history from 1848 to the present will acquaint students with writings of Marx, Freud, Nietzsche, and the many others who shaped subsequent western culture and thought. Drawing upon close readings of excerpts from pivotal works, we will examine the relevance of such works in the matrix of artistic trends and historical circumstances from which they emerge. Short literary pieces (Franz Kafka, Thomas Mann) will be included.
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 267
The Modern German Novel
An introduction to the major German novels of the 19th and 20th centuries in their historical and cultural context. Topics include: the Industrial Revolution, existentialism and the "Death of God," modernism and the cult of Nietzsche, the Great War, the Weimar Republic, Nazi Germany and World War II, exile, and postwar life in divided Germany. Among the authors are: Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, Hermann Hesse, Christa Wolf, and Günter Grass. (Listed as both LACS 233-91 and GRMN 233-17.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 267
The Modern German Novel
An introduction to the major German novels of the 19th and 20th centuries in their historical and cultural context. Topics include: the Industrial Revolution, existentialism and the "Death of God," modernism and the cult of Nietzsche, the Great War, the Weimar Republic, Nazi Germany and World War II, exile, and postwar life in divided Germany. Among the authors are: Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, Hermann Hesse, Christa Wolf, and Günter Grass. (Listed as both LACS 233-91 and GRMN 233-17.)
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 268
Inside the Third Reich: Culture, Politics, and the Everyday in Nazi Germany
What was the Third Reich? Through the examination of various primary and secondary texts, this course takes an in-depth look at life inside Nazi Germany. Themes include the role of propaganda in the media and entertainment industries, Volk, anti-Semitism, race, narratives of the persecuted, the aesthetics of fascism, gender, youth organizations, resistance, and collapse.
1.00 units, Seminar
LACS 268
Inside the Third Reich: Culture, Politics, and the Everyday in Nazi Germany
What was the Third Reich? Through the examination of various primary and secondary texts, this course takes an in-depth look at life inside Nazi Germany. Themes include the role of propaganda in the media and entertainment industries, Volk, anti-Semitism, race, narratives of the persecuted, the aesthetics of fascism, gender, youth organizations, resistance, and collapse.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 270
Introduction to Cultural Analysis
This course serves as a transition to advanced courses in Spanish language, culture, and literature. Students will develop analytical skills through an intense exploration of cultural production in the Hispanic world and through an examination of diverse literary genres, film, and current events. The focus will be on improving the necessary linguistic and critical thinking skills that are the fundamental foundation for literary and cultural analysis in advanced Spanish study.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221 or 224, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
RUSS 270
Russian Poetry
Readings in Russian poetry, including verse of the Golden and Silver Ages (the nineteenth century through 1920). Texts will be discussed from the viewpoint of their aesthetic and historical significance. Students will become familiar with the classics of Russian poetry while also developing the critical skills of being able to analyze poetry linguistically and write about it. Stylistic analysis will refine students’ knowledge of grammar; extensive discussion of texts will enhance oral proficiency. All readings and discussion in Russian.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Russian 201 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
ITAL 272
Mafia
In contemporary societies there is an intimate contest between two kinds of social order: The rule of law and criminal organization. A remarkable instance may be found in the workings and metamorphoses of the Mafia. From its origins in Sicily, an agrarian society on the periphery of Europe, the Mafia has acquired intercontinental dimensions and a grip on high politics and finance capital. This shadowy phenomenon has been approached and explained in very different ways by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, economists, and political scientists. It has also been the subject of literature and film. We shall discuss outstanding examples of each approach and treatment. The purposes of the course are to make sense of the Mafia, to explore a basic problem of social order and to compare the different styles of reasoning and representation that characterize the various disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. Course requirements: seminar reports, several short papers, and full attendance and participation. (Listed as both LACS 272 and ITAL 272.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 272
Mafia
In contemporary societies there is an intimate contest between two kinds of social order: The rule of law and criminal organization. A remarkable instance may be found in the workings and metamorphoses of the Mafia. From its origins in Sicily, an agrarian society on the periphery of Europe, the Mafia has acquired intercontinental dimensions and a grip on high politics and finance capital. This shadowy phenomenon has been approached and explained in very different ways by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, economists, and political scientists. It has also been the subject of literature and film. We shall discuss outstanding examples of each approach and treatment. The purposes of the course are to make sense of the Mafia, to explore a basic problem of social order and to compare the different styles of reasoning and representation that characterize the various disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. Course requirements: seminar reports, several short papers, and full attendance and participation. (Listed as both LACS 272 and ITAL 272.)
1.00 units, Lecture
ITAL 274
Food in Italian History, Society, and Art
The saying, “A tavola non s’invecchia” (“One does not age at the supper table”), expresses the importance of food and eating for Italians. In this course, we will examine the relationship between food and culture in Italy, from the Romans to the present, through a variety of readings and tasting experiences. Topics include: the importing and exporting of different foods in antiquity as an instance of cultural and economic exchange; medieval beliefs about intellectual and physical aptitudes associated with diet; the representation of food in art, literature, and cinema; regional cuisines and cultural identities; and the language of food. We will also discuss Italian and Italian-American cuisine as the reflection of related, yet very different, cultures. Students may opt to undertake a Community Learning Initiative in consultation with the course instructor. (Listed as both LACS 274 and ITAL 274.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 274
Food in Italian History, Society, and Art
The saying, “A tavola non s’invecchia” (“One does not age at the supper table”), expresses the importance of food and eating for Italians. In this course, we will examine the relationship between food and culture in Italy, from the Romans to the present, through a variety of readings and tasting experiences. Topics include: the importing and exporting of different foods in antiquity as an instance of cultural and economic exchange; medieval beliefs about intellectual and physical aptitudes associated with diet; the representation of food in art, literature, and cinema; regional cuisines and cultural identities; and the language of food. We will also discuss Italian and Italian-American cuisine as the reflection of related, yet very different, cultures. Students may opt to undertake a Community Learning Initiative in consultation with the course instructor. (Listed as both LACS 274 and ITAL 274.)
1.00 units, Lecture
ITAL 276
Enlightenment and Romanticism in Italy
An introduction to modern ideas of nature, human nature, and history expressed in great literature, art, and music. Topics include individuality and community, the passions and the interests, the intimate contest of bourgeois and aristocratic cultures, revolution and reaction, and secularism. Among authors, artists, and composers who will be studied are: Leopardi, Manzoni, Tiepolo, Longhi, Canaletto, Canova, Fattori, Donizetti, Rossini, and Verdi. (Listed as both LACS 233-98 AND ITAL 233-08.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 276
Enlightenment and Romanticism in Italy
An introduction to modern ideas of nature, human nature, and history expressed in great literature, art, and music. Topics include individuality and community, the passions and the interests, the intimate contest of bourgeois and aristocratic cultures, revolution and reaction, and secularism. Among authors, artists, and composers who will be studied are: Leopardi, Manzoni, Tiepolo, Longhi, Canaletto, Canova, Fattori, Donizetti, Rossini, and Verdi. (Listed as both LACS 233-98 AND ITAL 233-08.)
1.00 units, Lecture
ITAL 278
Italy and America
An interdisciplinary introduction to the history of relations between these two nations, with an emphasis on the experience of Italians in America, through discussion of works of history, sociology, literature, and film. Topics include explorers and colonists; the Great Emigration; the ethnic neighborhood; the trial of Sacco & Vanzetti; mafia; the war against fascism; unions; religion; and assimilation. There will be course-related trips to Little Italys in cities of the Eastern Seaboard. Students wishing to count this course toward a major in Italian should receive permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Italian and will meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. (Listed both as LACS 233-24 and ITAL 233-04; and under the American Studies program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 278
Italy and America
An interdisciplinary introduction to the history of relations between these two nations, with an emphasis on the experience of Italians in America, through discussion of works of history, sociology, literature, and film. Topics include explorers and colonists; the Great Emigration; the ethnic neighborhood; the trial of Sacco & Vanzetti; mafia; the war against fascism; unions; religion; and assimilation. There will be course-related trips to Little Italys in cities of the Eastern Seaboard. Students wishing to count this course toward a major in Italian should receive permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Italian and will meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. (Listed both as LACS 233-24 and ITAL 233-04; and under the American Studies program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 280
Hispanic Hartford
This course seeks to place Trinity students in active and informed dialogue with the Hartford region’s large and diverse set of Spanish-speaking communities. The course will help student recognize and analyze the distinct national histories (e.g. Peruvian, Puerto Rican, Chilean, Honduran, Cuban, Colombian, and Mexican) which have contributed to the Hispanic diaspora in the city and the entire northeastern region of the United States. Students will undertake field projects designed to look at the effects of transnational migration on urban culture, institution-building, and identity formation. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221 or 224, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
FREN 281
Conversational French: Current Events
This course is designed for students who want to acquire greater proficiency in their oral expression and are interested in current events. We will examine current political, social, historical and educational issues as they appear in French newspapers and magazines such as L’Express, Le Monde, Le Nouvel Observateur and other online resources. Students will participate in class discussions, prepare oral reports and conduct presentations on the issues under study.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 282
Dostoevsky
(Conducted in English.) Reading and discussing Dostoevsky’s literary works, we will try to answer the social, psychological, philosophical, and religious questions that tortured him. We will examine Dostoevsky’s reaction to social problems he saw in 19th-century Russia: family breakdown, alienation and powerlessness in the workplace, the daily humiliations of living in a system that ranks people according to their salary; and we will try to answer the underlying question: how can people connect with each other in the modern age? Modernity’s preference for science and social science also troubled Dostoevsky. If human actions are scientifically predictable, can people ever be free? We will examine the unsavory solutions Dostoevsky offered: spite, game-playing, crime, radical nihilism, and others. Do religions, with all their glaring contradictions, offer a viable answer? The search for answers to these and other questions will open up new vistas and will educate students about one of the most influential world writers, the author of such classics as Notes from Underground, Crime and Punishment, and The Brothers Karamazov. (Listed as LACS 333-10 and under the Russian and Eurasian studies concentration of the International Studies program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 284
Fantasy and Realism in Russian Literature
All readings and discussion will be in English. Through the enduring traditions of fantasy and realism, Russian literature has probed human dilemmas and invited self-examination. We shall read these works as art and entertainment, and also for what they help us learn about ourselves. A disturbing world of the uncanny, populated by murderous doubles, human snakes, talking dogs, ghosts, and other diabolical creatures will open up to us and haunt our imaginations. As we consider the realist and fantastic streams, we shall ultimately ask the question: can we really define the difference between them? Authors to be read include Gogol, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, and others. This course will introduce the students to some of the greatest works in the Russian literary canon. (Listed as both LACS 233-36 and RUSS 233-01; and under the Russian and Eurasian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
RUSS 284
Fantasy and Realism in Russian Literature
All readings and discussion will be in English. Through the enduring traditions of fantasy and realism, Russian literature has probed human dilemmas and invited self-examination. We shall read these works as art and entertainment, and also for what they help us learn about ourselves. A disturbing world of the uncanny, populated by murderous doubles, human snakes, talking dogs, ghosts, and other diabolical creatures will open up to us and haunt our imaginations. As we consider the realist and fantastic streams, we shall ultimately ask the question: can we really define the difference between them? Authors to be read include Gogol, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, and others. This course will introduce the students to some of the greatest works in the Russian literary canon. (Listed as both LACS 233-36 and RUSS 233-01; and under the Russian and Eurasian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 285
Love, Sex, and War in Tolstoy
This course offers a detailed and varied exploration of Tolstoy's greatest fiction. Writer and prophet, aristocrat and socialist, moralist and hedonist, Tolstoy contained a bundle of contradictions in a mind of artistic genius. As we seek to uncover the aesthetic workings of his stories and novels, we will have ample opportunity to discuss the subjects of these works—romantic love, sexual expression, family life, war as military theory and as human experience, and the individual's search for meaning in relation to the works themselves and to our own lives. Tolstoy's youth, military service, marriage, religious conversion, and contentious relations with those around him will be discussed in connection with his literary art. (Listed as both LACS 233-82 and RUSS 233-07; under the Russian and Eurasian studies concentration of the International Studies Program; and under the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
RUSS 285
Love, Sex, and War in Tolstoy
This course offers a detailed and varied exploration of Tolstoy's greatest fiction. Writer and prophet, aristocrat and socialist, moralist and hedonist, Tolstoy contained a bundle of contradictions in a mind of artistic genius. As we seek to uncover the aesthetic workings of his stories and novels, we will have ample opportunity to discuss the subjects of these works—romantic love, sexual expression, family life, war as military theory and as human experience, and the individual's search for meaning in relation to the works themselves and to our own lives. Tolstoy's youth, military service, marriage, religious conversion, and contentious relations with those around him will be discussed in connection with his literary art. (Listed as both LACS 233-82 and RUSS 233-07; under the Russian and Eurasian studies concentration of the International Studies Program; and under the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 286
Soul, Flesh, and the Russian Mystique
"A riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma" is Winston Churchill's famous description of Russia. Renowned for its passionate unrestraint, the legendary Russian soul encompasses opposing extremes of human thought and impulse. Selfish pleasure, gratuitous cruelty, and humiliation of others coexist with forgiveness, compassion, and embrace of suffering. As our window on the multifaceted Russian soul—as well as its physical manifestation, the rebellious body—we will take salient works from one thousand years of music, art, and literature. Among the genres we will explore: icon painting and the later, socially-themed paintings that hastened the revolution; the majestic muse of the Orthodox church and contemporary youth pop; the wise woman and holy fools of the folktale; and the comic literature of scandal. Taught in English; no prerequisites.
1.00 units, Lecture
RUSS 286
Soul, Flesh, and the Russian Mystique
"A riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma" is Winston Churchill's famous description of Russia. Renowned for its passionate unrestraint, the legendary Russian soul encompasses opposing extremes of human thought and impulse. Selfish pleasure, gratuitous cruelty, and humiliation of others coexist with forgiveness, compassion, and embrace of suffering. As our window on the multifaceted Russian soul—as well as its physical manifestation, the rebellious body—we will take salient works from one thousand years of music, art, and literature. Among the genres we will explore: icon painting and the later, socially-themed paintings that hastened the revolution; the majestic muse of the Orthodox church and contemporary youth pop; the wise woman and holy fools of the folktale; and the comic literature of scandal. Taught in English; no prerequisites.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 288
Who Am I and Where Am I Going?
How many personal identities do you have? Lover, friend, brother or sister, gambler, worshipper, skeptic, liar, outsider, psychotic—we may play all of these parts simultaneously or at different times in our lives. Through discussion of short literary texts, with some forays into religion and psychology, we will consider the ways in which our multiple identities shape our self-image as well as how others see us. Readings will be chosen from, among others, Tennessee Williams, Dostoevsky, Freud, and the Bible.
1.00 units, Lecture
RUSS 288
Who Am I and Where Am I Going?
How many personal identities do you have? Lover, friend, brother or sister, gambler, worshipper, skeptic, liar, outsider, psychotic—we may play all of these parts simultaneously or at different times in our lives. Through discussion of short literary texts, with some forays into religion and psychology, we will consider the ways in which our multiple identities shape our self-image as well as how others see us. Readings will be chosen from, among others, Tennessee Williams, Dostoevsky, Freud, and the Bible.
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 290
Studying in the Hispanic World Colloquium
This course is designed to provide students returning from study abroad in Barcelona, Santiago, Cordoba, and other Spanish-speaking venues (summer, semester, or year-long programs) with a forum within which they can share, compare, and process analytically and historically the difficulties, conflicts, absences, and discoveries that they experienced in their time abroad. They will then be asked to investigate how these experiences have affected their view of the social and cultural norms of U.S. culture. (Prerequisite: Study abroad in an approved program in a Spanish-speaking country.)
0.50 units, Seminar
ITAL 290
Italian Cinema: Fiction and Film
A study and discussion of Italian cinema from neorealism to the present. The course will cover both formal and thematic trends in the films of the noted postwar Italian directors Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica, and Luchino Visconti. The course will also consider the trend away from reliance on literary texts toward the development of personal expressions by such author/directors as Federico Fellini, Michelangelo Antonioni, Lina Wertmüller, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, Maurizio Nichetti, and others. Film screenings will be in Italian with English subtitles. Lectures and coursework will be in English. Students wishing to apply this course toward the major in Italian must secure permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Italian and meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. Faithful attendance is required. (Listed as both LACS 290 and ITAL 290.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 290
Italian Cinema: Fiction and Film
A study and discussion of Italian cinema from neorealism to the present. The course will cover both formal and thematic trends in the films of the noted postwar Italian directors Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica, and Luchino Visconti. The course will also consider the trend away from reliance on literary texts toward the development of personal expressions by such author/directors as Federico Fellini, Michelangelo Antonioni, Lina Wertmüller, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, Maurizio Nichetti, and others. Film screenings will be in Italian with English subtitles. Lectures and coursework will be in English. Students wishing to apply this course toward the major in Italian must secure permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Italian and meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. Faithful attendance is required. (Listed as both LACS 290 and ITAL 290.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 299
Foundations of Language and Culture Studies
This course (taught in English) starts from the premise that all language acts are culturally based. The main topics of the course fall into three categories: what is language; critical approaches to culture studies with an emphasis on literary texts; translation. We will also explore what happens when a literary text is translated from one language into another. Students will have a chance to do individualized work that bears upon their own language of study. The course features regular guest lectures by faculty from a range of languages and fields.
1.00 units, Seminar
ARAB 301
Intermediate Arabic III
Continuation of Arabic 202, introducing increasingly complex grammatical structures through culturally based materials and literary texts, with a programmed expansion of vocabulary to 1,500 words. Lab work required. (Also listed under the African Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHIN 301
Advanced Chinese I
Further development of skill in written and spoken Mandarin, with increasing emphasis on longer texts, additional characters, and extensive discussion. In order to secure maximum proficiency, students should plan to take both 301 and 302 in sequence. (Also listed under the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 301
Imagining America
America has long served as a projection screen for European cultural fantasies and anxieties. German writers have consistently evoked images of America that hover between utopian dreams and dystopian nightmares. Particularly after 9/11 and the recent expansion of the European Union, German writers have begun to view the United States with a greater detachment than before. In this course we will examine the history of interaction between the United States and post-1945 Germany with a focus on literature written in East, West, and reunified Germany. Our readings of short stories, novels (excerpts), and essays will look at literature as a mapping of changing perceptions of America within specific political and socio-cultural contexts. In addition to the study of literature, we will also continue with the oral history project with German immigrants in the Hartford area that was started by German students in 2007. This course develops students’ basic skills of literary interpretation, interviewing skills, various readings techniques (e.g. close readings, reading for the plot etc.), and writing. Authors include Christa Wolf, Günter Kunert, Peter Handke, Uwe Johnson, and Heiner Müller.
1.00 units, Lecture
HEBR 301
Advanced Modern Hebrew I
Emphasis on written essays as well as on comprehension through readings and class discussion of short stories, articles, and poetry. (Also offered under the Middle Eastern studies and Jewish studies programs.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hebrew 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
ARAB 302
Intermediate Arabic IV
Continuation of Arabic 301, presenting alternative stylistic tools for oral and written communication, with a vigorous expansion of vocabulary. Lab work required. (Also listed under the African Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 301 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHIN 302
Advanced Chinese II
Concentration on advanced writing and speaking skills, further acquisition of compound characters, and further extensive practice in complex reading. (Also listed under the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 302
Small Masterpieces of Modern German Literature
Through close readings and comparative discussions of novellas and short prose fictions of major German authors, students will improve German comprehension and speaking skills. Frequent writing assignments will be required. Some grammar review will be offered. All work will be done in German.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 303
German Literature and Film Since 1945
Through close readings and comparative discussions of short prose, poetry, and film from 1945 until the present, students will improve their German comprehension (listening as well as reading), speaking, and writing skills. There will be texts from Austria, Switzerland, the Federal Republic of Germany, and the former German Democtatic Republic, by authors such as Günter Grass, Heinrich Böll, Max Frisch, Friedrich Dürrenmatt, and Christa Wolf, as well as many well-known poets and film directors. Some grammar review will be offered. All work will be done in German.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 304
The Wild 18th Century: Goethe on Love, Death and the Devil
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is perhaps the most influential author in German literature, and his works defined some of the most important genres of his lifetime and beyond (1749-1832). This course will explore some of Goethe's greatest masterpieces, as well as selected works by other authors of the era, in order to examine some of the fundamental philosophical and aesthetic questions of the eighteenth century. Readings will include Goethe's "Die Leiden des jungen Werther," "Faust I" and selected poems; Schiller's "Die Räuber" and selected poems; and Kleist's "Das Erdbeben in Chile." We will also focus on the life and times of Goethe in order to understand his influence and role in German and European culture.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
RUSS 304
Current Russian Media
A survey of current Russian newspaper and magazine articles, radio and television broadcasts, and the Internet. Subjects covered will include popular culture, home and family life, environmental issues, economics, and politics. Students will strive to master the special type of Russian used in the media as well as describe how these media reflect or distort the state of Russian society. Prerequisite: Russian 222 or permission of the instructor. (This course is also offered under the Russian and Eurasian Studies program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
FREN 305
Modern Culture and Civilization
A study of modern France through its history, arts, politics, and social structures. This course is designed to help students understand why the French think the way they do and why their societal concepts are often very different from those of the Americans. To do so we will see that for the French the presence of the past deeply informs the present and how this historical phenomenon has shaped, at least in part, the concept of the family, the government, the educational system, and the position of women in France. We will also examine the important issue of immigration, which is one of France’s major social issues today. Finally, we will look at the role that France is playing in the shaping of European unity.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 241 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 305
German-Jewish Writers
This course will examine the contribution of Jewish writers to German literature, philosophy and culture. Of central concern will be how these writers negotiate and theorize their dual identity as Jew and German through the form and content of their writings. Issues of national, cultural and linguistic identification, acculturation, and self-criticism will be traced out through texts dating from the Enlightenment to the modern era. Readings to include: Mendelssohn, Varnhagen, Schlegel, Heine, Schnitzler, Freud, Kafka, Lasker-Schüler, Arendt, Celan.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Seminar
RUSS 305
Russian Culture and Civilization
An exploration of recurring themes in Russian culture through the examination of prose fiction, poetry, theater, film and the visual arts. Emphasis will be placed on canonical works to give students a foundation in the Russian tradition. Since cultural continuity needs to be studied in the context of cultural change, we will simultaneously do an overview of important moments in Russian history from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. Students will write a paper every week about an aspect of Russian culture as it appears in the works we are examining. All reading, writing and discussion will be in Russian. Prerequisite: Russian 222 or permission of the instructor. (This course is also offered under the Russian and Eurasian Studies program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 306
German Fairytales
Through close readings and comparative discussions of theoretical texts and primary source materials, this course will explore the genre of German language fairytales, with a particular emphasis on the Grimm collection. Readings on the historical context of the fairytale genre, the intersections of fairytales and feminism, and psychoanalytical readings will inform the study of the Brothers Grimm, Andersen, Bechstein, Wolf, and Ende.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Seminar
GRMN 307
The Weimar Republic
This course develops students' skills of literary interpretation, speaking, reading, and writing in the target German language, while concentrating on one of the great eras of cultural production in German history wedged between the two great catastrophes of the twentieth century. In examining an array of texts across disciplines, genres, mediums, and movements, students will gain an in-depth look at the German-speaking world's own "roaring twenties," from the moments of economic and political crisis to the time of stabilization and collapse. Course materials will include films, literary texts, music, art, and essays from figures of this era such as Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weil, Hermann Hesse, Joseph Goebbels, Rosa Luxemburg, Albert Einstein, Fritz Lang and more.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Seminar
GRMN 308
German Literature from 1700-1900
This course explores German history and culture through the lens of literature and focuses on the historical period encompassing the aesthetic movements of the Storm and Stress, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Classicism and Realism. While the focus is on the interpretation of literary texts, secondary readings on history and aesthetic/cultural theory will also be included. Readings include works by Goethe, Schiller, Heine, Stifter, Hauptmann, Rilke and Mann.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202, German 301, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
GRMN 309
Moments in Modern German Culture
This course will introduce students to four major issues in German culture beginning with the early twentieth century and ending with very contemporary cultural concerns. Divided into four segments, the course will begin with a focus on the Weimar Republic, anti-Semitism and National Socialism, before moving on to the concepts of the Stunde Null, multiculturalism, and finishing up with a look at Die Berliner Republik and Germany’s political standing in Europe. Each topic will be explored through a combination of readings and other media (film, music), with the goal of improving students’ reading, speaking, listening and writing skills in German. Readings: Brecht, Döblin, Kolmar, Borchert, Tawada, Schulze.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Seminar
GRMN 310
Voices of the Century
Through the discussion and interpretation of the memoirs, letters, diaries, and eyewitness testimonials of famous and eclectic German poets, artists, composers, architects, film directors, politicians, and critics, the class will examine the themes and conflicts that comprise the German Zeitgeist. We shall also experience and analyze selections from a major film, art work, or musical composition that played a role in the phenomenal transitions from the Kaiserreich through the fall of the Berlin Wall. Students will be asked to draw conclusions from the art forms and the texts in short essays and an online journal. Some grammar review will be offered. All work will be done in German.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 311
Autobiographies
Further development and practice of advanced oral and written skills, based on a variety of German literary readings. This course will explore differing responses to such fundamental questions as "Who am I?" through an examination of various canonical and lesser known autobiographical texts. The genre of autobiography pushes the boundaries of self-reflection, self-analysis, and representation, leading to differing modes of identity construction along cultural, historical, religious, and gender lines. We will explore the limits and possibilities of this genre by reading a broad range of German language texts from the late 18th to the late 20th centuries, focusing on such questions as what role do memoirs play in relating history? Is a subjective account more truthful? Is there an ethics attached to the memoir? And what is the connection between the artistic production and lived experience of these authors? Reading to include Goethe, Varnhagen, and Nietzsche.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
JAPN 311
Advanced Readings in Japanese I
This course aims at building students’ skills and speed in reading Japanese. It will draw materials from primary sources in various genres such as novels, poems, newspapers, essays, and instructional materials. Students will develop sentence analysis strategies as well as expand their knowledge of advanced vocabulary and kanji. An appropriate level of oral communication skill is required. (Since the content of this course varies from year to year to focus on the most contemporary materials, students may enroll for credit more than once.)(Also offered under the Asian studies program.)
Prerequisite: Japanese 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 312
German Crime Stories
The crime story, or the Krimi, has long held an esteemed place in the literature of the German-speaking countries. While working on improving students’ speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills in German, this course will introduce students to the world of crime fiction. The materials will include both literary and filmic examples of the Krimi that span a broad period of time. In addition to some works from classic German authors, we will also look at more contemporary examples that include films, television series, and short stories.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Seminar
JAPN 312
Advanced Spoken Japanese I
This course aims to develop students’ listening and speaking skills in Japanese. The first half of the course focuses on basic tasks and social situations covered in Japanese 101 through Japanese 202, bringing students’ performance to a more natural and practical level. The latter half will introduce new conversational strategies and diverse topics and situations mostly drawn from current and culture-specific topics. (Since the content of this course varies from year to year to focus on the most contemporary materials, students may enroll for credit more than once.)
Prerequisite: Japanese 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
ITAL 314
Contemporary Italian Literature
A critical reading of selected novels, short stories, poetry, and plays from the turn of the 20th century to the present. Authors include: Pirandello, Svevo, Aleramo, Montale, Ungaretti, Morante, Calvino, Petrignani, Fo, and other contemporary authors. Emphasis is on the historical and cultural context of the works and on recent trends in Italian literature. Topics include: literature during both world wars and under Fascism, modernism and postmodernism in literature, contemporary women writers, and the role of Italian intellectuals in society. All work is done in Italian.
1.00 units, Lecture
GRMN 315
Becoming Animal/Becoming Human
The notion that there is a fundamental difference between humans and animals is well enshrined in Western culture Yet in certain literary forms-e.g. fables, fairy tales and poetry-this distinction is regularly transgressed: Animals are depicted with "human" traits like speech or reason while humans assume attributes of particular animals. In this course, we will discuss such zoological boundary crossings in German literature and film from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. The course will also serve as an introduction to German literary history and allow students to practice reading and communicating in German. Literature and film by Lessing, the Grimms, Heine, Rilke, Kafka, Brecht, Herzog and others. Taught in German.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 315
21st Century Mexican Literature and Popular Culture
This course examines readings by Mexican authors of the 21st century. Readings will include (but are not limited to) short stories, poetry, critical essays, blogs, film, and novel. Some focus will be given to issues of violence, human rights, globalization, and neoliberalism, and their contribution to the current sociopolitical fabric of Mexico. Some references to important historical characters and cultural motifs will be explored; however, emphasis will be on the examination of modern Mexico. There will also be particular attention to the social and the political use of technologies such as Twitter and Facebook, which have served as a tool for social movements as well as a literary tool – as seen with the “twitteratura” trend (the fusion of Twitter and literature). Taught in Spanish.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
FREN 320
French Cinema
This course is designed to familiarize students with the development and art of the French cinema as seen through its important phases and movements, and in its relationship to modern France. Relevant literary and critical texts will accompany each film. Lectures and coursework will be in English. (Listed as both LACS 320-01 and FREN 320-01.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 320
French Cinema
This course is designed to familiarize students with the development and art of the French cinema as seen through its important phases and movements, and in its relationship to modern France. Relevant literary and critical texts will accompany each film. Lectures and coursework will be in English. (Listed as both LACS 320-01 and FREN 320-01.)
1.00 units, Lecture
RUSS 320
Gogol
We will begin with Gogol's Ukranian stories ("Ivan Shponka and his Aunt," "The Tale of How Ivan Ivanovich Argued with Ivan Nikiforovich"). The Petersburg tales ("Diary of a Madman," "Nevsky Prospect," "The Overcoat") will be particularly exciting. We will also read Gogol's plays "The Inspector General" and "Marriage" as well as his great novel "Dead Souls." Attention will be paid to Gogol's biography, especially given that he wrote a number of these Russian classics in Rome.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Russian 202 or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
GRMN 324
German Literature and Film Today
Through close readings and discussions of literature, film, and essays from the contemporary German-speaking world, this course seeks to develop students’ reading, writing and speaking skills. Beginning with the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, this course will examine German, Austrian, and Swiss culture in the last decades right up to the present. We will examine some of the most impactful contemporary works of literature and film, from authors and filmmakers such as Daniel Kehlmann, Zafer Senocak, Herta Müller, Fatih Akin, and Christian Petzold, as well as current topics such as Germany’s image in the world, immigration, Europe and more. All work will be done in German.
Prerequisite: C- or better in German 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Seminar
FREN 325
Americans in Paris/Parisians in America
Americans visiting Paris today flock to the literary cafés of the Latin Quarter and the Impressionist paintings at the Musée d’Orsay, but how was it that Paris came to represent a cultural mecca for Americans? To what extent do American cities generally—and New York in particular—occupy a similar place in the cultural imaginary of Parisians? This course draws from an eclectic mix of materials—historical and literary texts, transatlantic correspondence, pop culture and comedy, music, films, political treatises, cultural theory—to examine some of the assumptions, prejudices, and cross-cultural influences that characterize Franco-American relations historically and today. Sample reading list includes works by James Baldwin, Simone de Beauvoir, Adam Gopnik, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Miller, David Sedaris, and Alexis de Tocqueville. Coursework and discussions will be in English. Listed as both LACS 325-01 and FREN 325-01.
1.00 units, Seminar
LACS 325
Americans in Paris/Parisians in America
Americans visiting Paris today flock to the literary cafés of the Latin Quarter and the Impressionist paintings at the Musée d’Orsay, but how was it that Paris came to represent a cultural mecca for Americans? To what extent do American cities generally—and New York in particular—occupy a similar place in the cultural imaginary of Parisians? This course draws from an eclectic mix of materials—historical and literary texts, transatlantic correspondence, pop culture and comedy, music, films, political treatises, cultural theory—to examine some of the assumptions, prejudices, and cross-cultural influences that characterize Franco-American relations historically and today. Sample reading list includes works by James Baldwin, Simone de Beauvoir, Adam Gopnik, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Miller, David Sedaris, and Alexis de Tocqueville. Coursework and discussions will be in English. Listed as both LACS 325-01 and FREN 325-01.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 328
Iberian Film
In this course we will examine the relationship between history and film in Spain, one of the world's most important film-producing countries. Until quite recently, cinematic production there was marked by a general tendency to promote the primacy of Castilian culture and Church-derived social mores through the production of historicist narratives. Since the country's transition to democracy, a much more plural and heterodix cinematic tradition has taken root in the country. While still very much engaged with history, this new tradition promotes a broader view of the country's religious, sexual and linguistic heritage.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 and one of the following: Hispanic Studies 261, 262, 263, or 264, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
ITAL 333
Modern Italian Literature
A survey of major works of Italian literature from the 18th through the 19th centuries, from the neoclassical period, through Romanticism, to Verismo and Decadentismo. Authors to be read include: Goldoni, Alfieri, Foscolo, Leopardi, Manzoni, Verga, D’Annunzio, and Serrao. Special attention is paid to the historical and cultural significance of the works to be read. Topics include: the development of a national language and identity, women writers and intellectuals, and literary representations of the North/South question. All work is done in Italian. (Listed both as LACS 333-26 and ITAL 333-02.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 228 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 333
Modern Existentialist Drama
No Course Description Available.
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 335
Misplaced/Displaced Narratives in Latin America
What makes a novel "Latin American"? In this course we will study novels produced in Latin America in the last three decades that deal with topics, characters and settings that have little relation to the immediate reality of the continent. By questioning the imperative for national allegory assigned to the novel from the periphery of the West, we will explore notions of referentiality, language and representation and we will try to work out the geopolitics of the genre in the context of globalization, translation and world literature. Among others, we will read works by César Aira, Mario Bellatin, Bernardo Carvalho, Chico Buarque and Santiago Gamboa.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 and one of the following: Hispanic Studies 261, 262, 263, or 264, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
ITAL 335
Dante: The Divine Comedy
An intensive study of the Divine Comedy (in translation) with particular emphasis on the historical and aesthetic significance of this 'summa.' Students wishing to count this course toward a major in Italian should receive permission of the instructor. (Listed as both LACS 335 and ITAL 335.)
1.00 units, Lecture
LACS 335
Dante: The Divine Comedy
An intensive study of the Divine Comedy (in translation) with particular emphasis on the historical and aesthetic significance of this 'summa.' Students wishing to count this course toward a major in Italian should receive permission of the instructor. (Listed as both LACS 335 and ITAL 335.)
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 337
21st Century Latin American Film
This course examines the most current trends, movements, and themes in Latin American film from 2000 to the present. We contemplate how contemporary film produced in Latin America or abroad, by Latin American directors, explores such topics as transitional justice and human rights, violence, urbanism, identity issues, and globalization, through films produced in traditional film hotbeds (Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico), as well as emerging film industries. We will also look closely at key filmmakers whose significant body of work is garnering worldwide attention (Cuarón, González Iñárritu, Laraín, Llosa, Reygadas). In an era of intense global interaction and international intervention in filmmaking , we ponder what it means to be a “Latin American” filmmaker and to make a “Latin American” film. Course taught in Spanish.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 342
Migration and Exile in Contemporary Latin American Theatre
This course explores the development of twentieth and twenty first-century Latin American theater as it becomes more experimental, independent, and self-reflexive in dialogue with social, political, performative, and aesthetic issues. This frequently transgressive conversation deals with non-Aristotelian theatrical forms in both Europe and Latin America, such as Brechtian Theater, the theater of cruelty, "teatro campesino," "teatro colectivo," and Theater of the Oppressed. Latin American theater often features issues of class, race, exile, repression and oppression, violence, marginality, and also ironic and devastating humor as it searches not necessarily for solutions but for the unmasking of multiple and contradictory realities. Discussion topics can include: Politics, Violence, and Memory; Theater of Exile; Historical Theater; Sex and Politics; Torture and Performance; Humor and Politics.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 and one of the following: Hispanic Studies 261, 262, 263, or 264, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 345
Special Topic
To be offered occasionally on a special topic of consideration in Spanish American or Iberian literatures and cultures.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 and one of the following: Hispanic Studies 261, 262, 263, or 264, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
HISP 345
Special Topics: Cervantes, Goya, Buñuel
An in-depth study of the works of three Spanish iconoclasts, focused on their explorations of the critical potential of art and of the role of the artist in the society of the spectacle. Special emphasis will be placed on the ways in which fiction, painting, and cinema each give expression to skepticism about the premises of modern, enlightened, and capitalist ideology.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 and one of the following: Hispanic Studies 261, 262, 263, or 264, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 345
Special Topic: Politicizing Aesthetics, Aestheticizing Politics - Lit. & Politics-Spain & Latin Amer
This class studies the sociopolitical place of poetry in Transatlantic Hispanic culture. We will read works tackling different crises of the public realm with a special emphasis on works produced after the rise of totalitarian regimes. We will study the transformations of literature and the idea of literature in relation to the loss of a public space accessible to all citizens (war, dictatorship, exile, concentration camps). Does the poetic preserve a space of autonomy through language? Does it become a disruptive presence? Does it betray a politically disempowering melancholia? We will emphasize a transnational paradigm in which the idiom and the figure of the poet are sites where social relations meet literature and where their confrontation reveals conflicts of identity, class, gender, and race.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 345
Special Topics: Fictions of China in Latin America
China and Latin America have for long exchanged peoples, and together with that, political ideologies, artistic sensibilities, and cultural imaginaries. By scrutinizing a variety of sources (fiction, travel writing, poetry, journalism, cinema, painting, documentary film and comics) from Hispanic America and Brazil, this course proposes an interdisciplinary approach to representations of China in Latin America. Along with the reading of literary, historical and anthropological texts we will consider how discourses of globalization and the Global South help us frame the discussion of cultural difference and explore constructions of Asian spaces from a Latin American point of view.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 and one of the following: Hispanic Studies 261, 262, 263, or 264, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 352
Politics and Modernity in Hispanic Caribbean Literature and Culture
This course will center on the literary and cultural production of the Hispanic Caribbean—Cuba, Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico— during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in the light of the region’s complex political development and its attempt at modernization. Through literature and film we will examine the social, economic, and political history of the Caribbean—colonialism, plantation economy, mestizaje, sexuality, imperialism, nationalism, revolution—, aspects that will allow us to study the artistic production of this region. The problematics of diversity vs. unity in terms of history, race, language, and culture, as well as within the countries themselves, will be considered. Arriví, Bosch, Carpentier, Benítez Rojo, Ena Lucía Portela, Belaval, Sánchez, Alcántara Almánzar, Santos Febres, Ferré, Ana Lydia Vega, Aurora Arias, Rita Indiana Hernández.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 263, 264 or 270, or permission of instructor
1.00 units, Seminar
FREN 355
Dandyism, Decadence, and the Cult of the Self
This course explores the developments and intersections of style, fashion, and the self in 19th-century French culture. Baudelaire answers his own question in reference to dandyism--“what is this unofficial institution which has formed so haughty and exclusive a sect?”— he claims, it is “the burning need to create for oneself a personal originality.” In the age of industrial revolution and mechanical reproduction, the place of the individual in society—particularly urban society—is wrought with paradoxes. We will examine many of these contradictions in a variety of fictional, poetic, and critical texts as well as through visual media. Authors include but are not limited to Balzac, Baudelaire, Barbey d’Aurevilly, J-K Huysmans, Oscar Wilde, Rachilde, Renée Vivien, Michel Foucault, Pierre Bourdieu, and Roland Barthes.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 251 or 252, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
FREN 355
Reading the Streets of Paris: flâneurs, lionnes, and chiffonniers
This course focuses on representations of Paris through the eyes of a variety of 19th and 20th-century authors. This course integrates the experience of study abroad and with the analysis of texts that evoke different aspects of urban life. We will begin with a brief history of the city of Paris and specific features of its transformation under Haussmann. Urban icons such as Baudelaire's flâneur, working girls, (grisettes) and ragpickers (chiffonniers) hold an important place in visual and textual representations by the following authors: Charles Baudelaire, Honoré Balzac, Delphine Girardin, George Sand, Jules Verne, Walter Benjamin, André Breton and Colette.We begin with texts by Baudelaire to understand the concept of the flâneur. This becomes an important and uniquely urban phenomenon in 19th-century French culture. The flâneur implies either bohemian or bourgeois social status; however we also analyze texts about women navigating the city, and ragpickers (chiffonniers) who are immortalized in the poetry of Baudelaire and photographs of Atget. Authors include: Charles Baudelaire, Honoré Balzac, Céleste Mogador, George Sand, Jules Verne, Walter Benjamin, Louis Aragon, and Colette.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 251 or 252, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
FREN 355
The World of Marcel Proust
Marcel Proust is arguably the most iconic and influential French author of the twentieth century. The proustian gaze reaches into every aspect of social, intellectual and artistic life of the period from 1870 to 1920. In this course, a close reading of Du côté de chez Swann, provides an intiation to the world of Proust and A la recherche du temps perdu. Substantial extracts from other parts of the epic seven volume novel will allow a more in-depth understanding of the author’s ideas and of the narrative arch of his work. We will also study a number of adaptations of Proust’s novel in film and other media.
1.00 units, Seminar
FREN 355
18th-Century Enlightenment
The Enlightenment can be defined as a movement of political, social, and philosophical contestation advocating the reign of reason and progress. This course will examine the manifestations of this questioning through the study of the dominant genres of the periods: plays, philosophical tales, dialogues, novels. We will also study a selection of films whose subject is the history and cultural life of 18th-century France and examine the relevance of 18th-century issues to the contemporary world. Sample reading list, L'île des esclaves, Marivaux, Le Neveu de Rameau, Diderot Candide, Voltaire, Le Mariage de Figaro, Beaumarchais, Les Infortunes de la vertu, Sade. Films: Que la fête commence, Bertrand Tavernier, Ridicule, Patrice Leconte, L'Anglaise et le duc, Éric Roemer.
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 251 or 252, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
FREN 355
Special Topics in French Literature: Writing Life Stories in the 20th Century
Why write stories about our lives? How do authors put into writing the personal, traumatic, and often unbelievable experiences they've had in life? This course considers how authors construct fictional and autobiographical selves in French and Francophone literature of the 20th century. By looking at first-person narratives as presented in novels, memoirs, war testimonies, and journals, we will examine the often tenuous boundary between truth and fiction, probe the assumptions we bring to reading autobiographical texts, and pay close attention to the representation of national identity, trauma, and loss. Among the authors to be considered are Proust, Leiris, Beckett, Sartre, Duras, Sarraute, Camus, Chraibi, Conde, Berr, and Federman
Prerequisite: C- or better in French 251 or 252, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
LACS 355
Language Across the Curriculum
Students who have completed the intermediate level of a foreign language (fourth semester or equivalent) and who are enrolled in any course across the college, may do an additional half-credit work in the language for that course. This half-credit course will be done with one of the faculty of the Language and Culture Studies Department. The language faculty member will meet with the student regularly and go over the texts in the foreign language that pertain to the course being taken. The language faculty member will grade the student on this additional half-credit and it will count as an LACS course (independent study).
0.50 units, Independent Study
RUSS 357
Dostoevsky
(Conducted in English.) Reading and discussing Dostoevsky’s literary works, we will try to answer the social, psychological, philosophical, and religious questions that tortured him. We will examine Dostoevsky’s reaction to social problems he saw in 19th-century Russia: family breakdown, alienation and powerlessness in the workplace, the daily humiliations of living in a system that ranks people according to their salary; and we will try to answer the underlying question: how can people connect with each other in the modern age? Modernity’s preference for science and social science also troubled Dostoevsky. If human actions are scientifically predictable, can people ever be free? We will examine the unsavory solutions Dostoevsky offered: spite, game-playing, crime, radical nihilism, and others. Do religions, with all their glaring contradictions, offer a viable answer? The search for answers to these and other questions will open up new vistas and will educate students about one of the most influential world writers, the author of such classics as Notes from Underground, Crime and Punishment, and The Brothers Karamazov. (Listed as LACS 333-10 and under the Russian and Eurasian studies concentration of the International Studies program.)
1.00 units, Lecture
ARAB 399
Independent Study
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
CHIN 399
Independent Study
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
FREN 399
Independent Study
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units min / 2.00 units max, Independent Study
GRMN 399
Independent Study
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units min / 2.00 units max, Independent Study
HEBR 399
Independent Study
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units min / 2.00 units max, Independent Study
HISP 399
Independent Study
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units min / 2.00 units max, Independent Study
ITAL 399
Independent Study
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units min / 2.00 units max, Independent Study
JAPN 399
Independent Study
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 2.00 units max, Independent Study
LACS 399
Independent Study
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
RUSS 399
Independent Study
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units min / 2.00 units max, Independent Study
ARAB 401
Advanced Arabic I: Conversation and Composition
This course builds on grammatical concepts acquired in elementary and intermediate courses (101-302). It introduces alternative stylistic tools for oral, aural, and writing skills with a vigorous expansion of vocabulary related to contemporary Arab culture and daily events in the Middle East. We will focus on two key areas of Arabic grammar: the root and pattern system, and complex sentence structure. Students will gain knowledge of grammatical aspects such as active and passive participles, geminate verbs, passive voice, circumstantial clauses, and nouns of place and time (to name a few) and learn more on idafas, broken plurals and superlatives and comparative forms. We will read and discuss authentic texts (short stories, newspapers, and magazine articles) and view films and various news clips in Arabic.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 302 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHIN 401
Senior Seminar: Issues in Contemporary China
The primary goal of this course is to become familiar with, discuss, and debate some cultural, political and economical situations of the contemporary Chinese speaking world through the modern media of newspapers, television and film. The course will also further improve advanced students' ability to use Chinese in their daily and professional lives.
1.00 units, Seminar
FREN 401
Senior Seminar: Special Topics
This seminar is required of all seniors majoring or minoring in French. Over the term, students will work collaboratively on the various papers they are writing by way of integrating exercises in their major or minor, and the whole class will undertake a number of readings in common in order to provide informed criticism of one another’s papers. Depending on enrollment, the class may also spend part of the semester considering a special topic, author, or genre in French studies.
Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one 300-level course in French literature or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
GRMN 401
Senior Seminar: Special Topics in German Studies
This interdisciplinary seminar, devoted to guided, individual research, is required of all seniors majoring in German Studies Plan A or Plan B (German as primary language). Each student may work on any aspect of the history, society, or culture of the German-speaking world. Coursework is conducted in German. The grade is based on seminar participation and a research project.
Prerequisite: One 300 level German course and permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
HISP 401
Senior Seminar
Required for graduation with a major in Spanish (Plan A) or Plan B with Spanish as primary language. In this final exercise, students will engage theoretical and critical readings around a common theme related to the Spanish-speaking world and will write a 25-page analytical research paper on a specific topic related to the common theme.
This course is open to seniors only.
1.00 units, Seminar
ITAL 401
Senior Seminar: Topics in Italian Studies
This seminar is required of all seniors majoring in Italian: Plan A, Plan B (Italian as primary language.) An interdisciplinary seminar devoted to guided, individual research. Each student may work on any aspect of the history, society, or culture of Italy or of Italians in other lands. Coursework is conducted in Italian. The grade is based on seminar participation and a research project. Prerequisites: At least one 300-level course in Italian literature or equivalent and permission of the instructor.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Italian 228 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Seminar
JAPN 401
Senior Seminar: Special Topics
This seminar is required of all seniors majoring in Japanese: Plan B (Japanese as primary language). Over the term, students will work collaboratively on the various papers they are writing by way of integrating exercises in their major, and the whole class will undertake a number of readings in common in order to provide informed criticism of one another’s papers. Depending on enrollment, the class may also spend part of the semester considering a special topic, author, or genre in Japanese studies.
1.00 units, Seminar
LACS 401
Senior Project
The capstone project for the World Literature and Culture Studies major. To enroll, students must submit a completed special registration form available from the Registrar's Office.
1.00 units, Independent Study
ARAB 402
Advanced Arabic II: Composition and Style
This course is a continuation of Arabic 401. We will closely read and analyze complex authentic texts in order to develop a high level of proficiency and grammatical accuracy in Modern Standard Arabic and colloquial Levantine. We will continue to vigorously focus on the root and pattern system. Students will study new grammatical aspects such as the imperative, the prohibitive, hollow and weak verbs, assimilation in and basic meanings of certain awzan, and the different types of grammatical objects (to name a few). Students will learn different styles of narration and significantly expand their vocabulary repertoire.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Arabic 401 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
MDLG 402
Sr Sem:Trnsltn-Thry&Prac
No Course Description Available.
1.00 units, Seminar
JAPN 411
Advanced Reading in Japanese II
The course aims at further training in reading Japanese above JAPN 311. Students will read a variety of materials taken mostly from primary sources, such as novels, news articles, instructions, etc., at an accelerated rate. The goal is to develop speed, accuracy, and efficiency in students' reading skills in Japanese. Class activities focus on analyzing the given texts and translation them into English. A total accumulation of kanji is expected to be 1,100-1,200.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Japanese 311.
1.00 units, Lecture
JAPN 412
Advanced Spoken Japanese II
This course is also listed under Asian Studies in the International Studies Program. The aim of this course is to further students' acquisition of listening and speaking skills in Japanese through study and discussion of films, TV shows, and other audio-visual sources. It aims to enhance students' ability to express their personal responses and opinions, while exposing them to more culturally specific concepts and topics.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Japanese 312.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHIN 413
Advanced Chinese III
Students will further develop skills in written and spoken Mandarin, with increasing emphasis on longer texts, additional characters, and extensive discussion. In order to secure maximum proficiency, students should plan to take both 413 and 415 in sequence.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 302 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHIN 415
Advanced Chinese IV
Students will improve skills in written and spoken Mandarin for formal occasions and conversations. Focuses will be given to students' ability to use the language formally and idiomatically.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 413 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHIN 420
Chinese Writing
The course introduces Chinese writing skills for graduate level use. The targeted students will be those who major or minor in Chinese, and/or have received significant amount of Chinese language training, and/or have great interest in pursuing a Chinese-related graduate study.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHIN 430
Chinese Speaking and Writing I
The course introduces Chinese speaking and writing skills for graduate school-level use. The targeted students will be those who major or minor in Chinese, and/or have received significant amount of Chinese language training, and/or have great interest in pursuing a Chinese-related career. In order to secure maximum proficiency, students should plan to take both 430 and 440 in sequence. (Also listed under the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHIN 440
Chinese Speaking and Writing II
The course introduces Chinese speaking and writing skills for graduate school-level use. The targeted students will be those who major or minor in Chinese, and/or have received significant amount of Chinese language training, and/or have great interest in pursuing a Chinese-related career. In order to secure maximum proficiency, students should plan to take both 430 and 440 in sequence. (Also listed under the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture
FREN 460
Tutorial
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units, Independent Study
GRMN 460
Tutorial
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units, Independent Study
LACS 460
Tutorial
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units, Independent Study
RUSS 460
Tutorial
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units, Independent Study
ARAB 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
CHIN 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
FREN 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
GRMN 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
HEBR 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
HISP 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
ITAL 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
JAPN 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
LACS 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
LING 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
RUSS 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
GRMN 497
Senior Thesis
Submission of special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the director are required for enrollment.
1.00 units, Independent Study
RUSS 497
Senior Thesis
No Course Description Available.
1.00 units, Independent Study