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Course Schedule for JEWISH STUDIES - Spring 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1588 JWST-206-01 Arab/Israeli Conflict 1.00 LEC Kiener,Ronald TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  An examination of the dynamics of the Arab/Israeli conflict, especially since the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. The course will focus on the changing interests and positions of the parties involved: Israel, the Palestinians, the Arab states, and the important international players. It will also highlight contradictions within the major camps.
1587 JWST-220-01 Mod Israeli Lit & Jew Heritage 1.00 LEC Ayalon,Michal MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Artists, and especially writers and poets, are the seismographs and mirrors of society, anticipating and reflecting its many forces and movements. During the past two hundred years Jewish life has been profoundly affected by such forces and movements as emancipation, the Enlightenment, assimilation, Zionism, and the Holocaust. A primary focus of modern Israeli writers is the birth of the State of Israel and its ongoing struggles, internally as well as with its Arab neighbors. One of the main ways Hebrew literature captures these significant changes is through the use of biblical themes, images and archetypes which resonate through the generations. This course will examine the ways in which modern Hebrew literature enriches and brings deeper understanding of collective Jewish experiences and detects and shapes the reality of modern Israel.
1861 JWST-223-01 American Jewish Lit Since 1865 1.00 LEC Pozorski,Aimee L. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course begins with a question: How would one characterize or define the tradition of American Jewish literature since 1865 – the period following the Civil War that also necessarily accounts for the first and second world wars, the polio and AIDS crises in America, U.S. responses to the Holocaust, and ongoing questions about how to balance assimilation with maintaining one’s ethnic identity in U.S. cities large and small. Through close reading of the works of eight canonical American Jewish writers (two poets, two short story writers, two dramatist, and two novelists), we will consider such questions as: What makes these works Jewish? What makes these works American? What makes these works literary?
1256 HEBR-102-01 Elem Modern Hebrew II 1.00 LEC Ayalon,Michal MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hebrew 101 or equivalent.
  A continuation of Hebrew 101 with emphasis on increasing vocabulary, understanding, writing and speaking skills with widening exposure to appropriate cultural materials. (Also offered under the Middle Eastern studies and Jewish studies programs.)
2049 HEBR-202-01 Intmdt Modern Hebrew II 1.00 LEC Ayalon,Michal MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hebrew 201 or equivalent.
  A continuation of Hebrew 201 with more advanced grammar and increased emphasis on composition and speaking as well as exposure to appropriate cultural materials. (Also offered under the Middle Eastern studies and Jewish studies programs.)
2168 HIST-213-01 Modern Jewish History 1.00 LEC Kassow,Samuel D. TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students
  This course will examine major trends in Jewish history since 1789. There will be particular emphasis on Jewish society in Eastern Europe and the breakdown of orthodox hegemony. Topics will include the Haskalah, the Bund, the development of Zionism, the interwar period in Eastern Europe, the Holocaust, and the State of Israel. The approach will be primarily that of intellectual history with emphasis on the secular aspect of Jewish history.
2029 RELG-214-01 Jews in America 1.00 LEC Kiener,Ronald TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  A social and religious history of American Judaism from pre-revolutionary to contemporary times. After examining the era of immigration and “Americanization,” the course will focus on the ethnic, religious, and social structures of American Judaism: the community center, the synagogue, and the federation. (May be counted toward American studies and Jewish studies.)