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Course Schedule for INTERNATIONAL STUDIES - Spring 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2039 INTS-207-01 Global South 1.00 LEC Prashad,Vijay TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  In 1985, the South Commission reported that two-thirds of the world's people lived in distress. To rectify this, the Commission proposed a laundry list of reforms. At the same time, political and social movements in what had been the Third World grew apace. These movements and this report inaugurate the creation of the "Global South", which is both a place and a project. This course will investigate the contours of the Global South, the conferences held to alleviate its many problems (Beijing/Women, Johannesburg/Environment, Durban/Race), and the people who live in the "South".
1963 INTS-213-01 Worldly Islam 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 5 seats are reserved fpr Sophomores.
  This course explores the diverse domestic, regional, and international politics of the Islamic world. A rich historical perspective illuminates contemporary political struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human rights and needs. (Also offered under Political Science and Middle Eastern Studies.)
2109 INTS-220-01 Writing the Body in Arabic Lit 1.00 LEC Hanna,Kifah T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course offers detailed analyses of gendered perceptions of sexuality in contemporary Arabic literature. It examines literary and cinematic trends of portraying sexuality in the Arab Middle East. Through close readings of several prominent Arab authors, students will investigate topics related to writing the body, sexuality and love, the ethics and aesthetics of morality, homosocial relations, sexual performances, and homoerotic practices. These themes will be explored against the background of major historical, political, and social events in the modern Middle East and supported by a number of theoretical readings, films, and documentaries. No knowledge of Arabic language is required.
1964 INTS-235-01 Youth Culture in the Muslim Wo 1.00 SEM Bauer,Janet L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Increasingly much of the Muslim world is young and with the expansion of media and cyberspace technologies, the circulation of globalized youth culture increasingly challenges taken-for-granted notions in local societies. This course examines the impact of youth and youth culture on personal, social, and political expression in a variety of Muslim communities around the world. We will examine intergenerational struggles over marriage, gender, and sexuality, the renegotiation of religion and morality, and the often 'revolutionary' disputes over conventional politics as conveyed through music, texts, fashion, personal memoirs, and cyberspace blogging.
1895 INTS-236-01 Japanese Crime Lit & Film 1.00 LEC Shen,Yipeng MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course examines major works of Japanese crime literature and film from the works of Edogawa Rampo, known as the father of crime fiction in Japan, to those of contemporary writers to explore social and moral issues reflected in them. While Japanese writers and filmmakers of this genre readily acknowledge Western influences, the literary and cinematic explorations of crime in Japan have also developed ona trajectory of their own, producing works that are easily distinguishable from those of other cultures. The course will also consider the mixing of the crime genre with others, such as ghost and science fiction genres. Works studied in this course include those of Edogawa Rampo, Akira Kurosawa, Miyuki Miyabe, Seicho Matsumoto, and Kobo Abe, as well as yakuza movies. Readings and discussion in English.
1802 INTS-240-01 Race & Modernity in Latin Amer 1.00 LEC Lambright,Anne TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Taking as a point of departure Enrique Dusell’s assertion that European modernity depended (and depends) on the invention of an American otherness, this course will look at the intersection of race and discourses on/projects of modernity in the Americas and Europe. Specifically, we will examine how 20th - and 21st- century Latin American intellectuals have theorized race and its relationship to nation-building and modernizing efforts from 19th century to the present. Rather than tracing the historical development of the concept of race, we will read deeply major texts that theorize the relationship between race and modernity. The course, thus, will look to understand not only the theories, but how these Latin American intellectuals think through problems, develop arguments, converse with peers, and articulate ideas.
1966 INTS-311-01 Global Feminism 1.00 LEC Bauer,Janet L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines how the struggles of diverse gender based movements (religious and secular, urban and rural, black and white), from the Americas to the Middle East and Asia, shed light on vexing social problems like the lack of sexual and reproductive rights, political and social representation, and equal opportunities. Using historical and contemporary examples of women’s organizing and theorizing, course materials interrogate the meaning of ‘feminism’, the relationship between the gendered self and society, the impact of race, class, and cultural differences on women’s solidarity, the challenge of women’s (and gender based) activism to state and social order, the impact of women's networking, and the possibilities for achieving a transnational, cross-cultural or global ‘feminism.’
1967 INTS-315-01 Global Ideologies 1.00 SEM Prashad,Vijay TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  From the 1920s to the 1980s, the countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America forged a "Third World project." This project came undone in the 1980s, as debt, war and corruption overwhelmed the three continents. Along came neo-liberalism and globalization, which emerged as the dominant ideologies of the time. With the rise of Bolivarianism in Latin America, and with the financial crisis, neo-liberalism has lost its shine. This course will trace the "Third World project," neo-liberalism, and the emergent ideology of the Global South.
2040 INTS-344-01 Global Hip Hop Cultures 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. R: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Hip-Hop is both music and culture with a global imprint that dates back to the 1980s. This course is a reading and writing intensive course that critically examines hip-hop cultural and political formations in Africa and the African Diaspora. We begin with canonical texts that contributed to the growth of an emergent interdisciplinary field called, 'Hip-Hop Studies' in order to familiarize ourselves with a set of core concepts, discourses and frameworks that will help us assess hip-hop's global emergence. What does the globalization of African-American music and culture tell us about the power and impact of neoliberalism on post-colonial identities, culture and nation-states in the non-Western world? It is a question that will shape our discussions on race, youth, masculinity, and nationalism in contemporary urban societies.
1902 INTS-395-01 Senior Seminar: Iss Cont China 1.00 SEM Shen,Yipeng MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  The primary goal of this course is to become familiar with, discuss, and debate some cultural, political and economical situations of the contemporary Chinese speaking world through the modern media of newspapers, television and film. The course will also further improve advanced students' ability to use Chinese in their daily and professional lives.
1399 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1750 INTS-401-01 Senior Sem Internationl Stdies 1.00 SEM Bauer,Janet L. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to seniors majoring in International Studies; other students may enroll only with permission of instructor.
  This writing intensive course functions as the capstone experience for all INTS majors. The instructor will guide INTS seniors through the process of completing a substantial research paper that engages critically with dominant disciplinary approaches to and public discourses about the “global” or “international” sphere. The instruction of this course will rotate among INTS faculty, each of whom will organize the course around a particular theme.
1826 INTS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1749 INTS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single semester thesis.
1212 AHIS-294-01 The Arts of Africa 1.00 LEC Gilbert,Michelle V. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An examination of the art and architecture of sub-Saharan Africa as modes of symbolic communication: the ritual context of art, the concept of the artist, the notion of popular art, and the decorated body.
1323 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Trostle,James A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 45
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
1398 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TBA TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 45
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2154 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan MW: 6:30PM-7:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 45
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
1477 CHIN-415-01 Advanced Chinese IV 1.00 LEC Wang,Jui-Chien TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 413 or equivalent.
  Students will improve skills in written and spoken Mandarin for formal occasions and conversations. Focuses will be given to students' ability to use the language formally and idiomatically.
1130 ECON-101-01 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Ramirez,Miguel D. MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
1131 ECON-101-02 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Butos,William N. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
1132 ECON-101-03 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Schneider,Arthur M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
1133 ECON-101-04 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Schneider,Arthur M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
1342 ECON-101-05 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Grossberg,Adam J. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
1520 ECON-101-06 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Skouloudis,Alexander WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
1539 ECON-316-01 International Finance 1.00 LEC Ramirez,Miguel D. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 and Economics 302.
  This course examines the major theoretical and policy issues faced by business firms, the government, and individual investors in their international financial transactions. Topics include the following: basic theories of the balance of payments, exchange rates, and the balance of trade; interest rates and interest parity; alternative exchange rate systems; and recent developments in the international money markets.
2145 EDUC-320-01 Anthropology & Education 1.00 SEM Dyrness,Andrea TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or Anthropology 101 (formerly 201), or permission of instructor.
  The anthropology of education has a rich history of investigating the links between culture, learning, and schooling. Anthropologists studying education have sought to illuminate learning and educational achievement as social processes and cultural products that cannot be understood apart from the socio-cultural contexts in which they occur. In this upper-level seminar, we will explore selected works in the anthropology of education, both classic and contemporary, in order to understand the unique contributions anthropology makes to the study of education, and in particular, the experience of minority groups in education. We will explore topics such as race, gender, and language in education and how they have been addressed by anthropologists. Students will have an opportunity to read critically a variety of detailed ethnographic and qualitative studies focusing on formal schooling and informal education in the United States and in other countries. Reviewing these studies, we will explore the central questions: What is a cultural analysis of schooling? What unique insights does ethnography (anthropology's signature method) offer into key educational problems? And finally, how can a cultural analysis of schooling inform efforts to create a more socially just educational system?
2181 HIST-103-01 Latin Am & Carib through Film 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TBA TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 50
  This course introduces students to the history and current cultures of Latin America and the Caribbean through film and film movements. It covers their history from 1492 to the present. Themes include: conquest and colonization of Native peoples; African slavery in Brazil and the Caribbean; the interplay of gender, race, class, and sexuality, from the politics of love and solidarity to the politics of subordination and oppression; the contrast between rural and urban society, with an emphasis on urban-centered films; the cultural creativity of the region’s artists in music, film, visual arts, literature and architecture; the role of religion in daily life and politics; and the confrontations of oligarchies and military regimes with movements for reform, democracy and revolution.
2063 HIST-222-01 Japan from Dawn of Human Hist 1.00 LEC Bayliss,Jeffrey MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course provides a broad overview of the events and themes encountered in Japan’s early history, from the earliest archeological evidence of human habitation to the establishment of a stable political and social order under the Tokugawa bakufu (shogunate). The course will explore the role of diverse religious and cultural influences in shaping Japanese society and culture during the pre-modern era. Themes and topics of particular interest are the impact of Chinese civilization and the “indigenization” of imported traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, early political organization and the rise of the imperial clan, and civil war and the ascendance of the warrior class to political and cultural hegemony.
2182 HIST-224-01 Gender in Brazilian History 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Since colonization, Brazilian society stabilized specific roles for men and women in its national discourse. We will debate how gender roles marked the experiences of Brazilian indigenous, European and afro-descent populations before and after colonialism. Gender categories also affected the lives of enslaved and freed people, since they created specific experiences for black men and women, and peculiar ways of social uplift that depended on the gender of individuals. In the 20th Century, government propaganda produced a discourse of national identity that influenced the way in which Brazilian men and especially women were seemed national and internationally. The debates and demands carried by LGBT, feminists and other social movements in Brazil who are dedicated to equalizing the rights of people will also be discussed.
2175 HIST-229-01 Middle East Since 1517 1.00 LEC Antrim,Zayde TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for first year students
  This course surveys Middle Eastern history from the foundations of the Ottoman and Safavid Empires through the 20th century. Major topics include modernity, imperialism, nationalism, and the role of Islam. Textbook readings are supplemented with primary sources and biographical sketches to situate the complexities of gender and culture in the context of political and economic change.
2064 HIST-235-01 Colonialism in the Americas 1.00 LEC Euraque,Dario A. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Columbus’s voyage began a new period in the history of colonialism. This course examines the complex world that the Spanish Conquest destroyed, and it explores the “New World” created in its aftermath. It opens with a journey into the worlds of the Aztecs, the Mayas, and Incas, but it also considers indigenous peoples less well known to contemporary students, especially the Tainos, the Lencas, and the Guarani. The plight of millions of enslaved West Africans in the Americas is also a central topic. Spanish colonialism here extends between 1492 and 1898 in the Caribbean, and up to the 1820s in the U.S.
2065 HIST-242-01 History of China, Qing to Pres 1.00 LEC Lestz,Michael E. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  A survey of modern Chinese history in the period covering the last traditional dynastic state (1644-1911) and 20th-century China. Emphasis on the collapse of the Confucian state, China’s “Enlightenment,” and the Chinese Revolution.
2066 HIST-253-01 African Hist: 1850 to Contemp 1.00 LEC Markle,Seth M. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is the second part of a two-part introductory survey of African history. With a focus on "Black Africa" south of the Sahara, we will begin by exploring the impact of the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade on Africa and move to the establishment of - and resistance to - European colonial rule. We will then look at the impact of the two World Wars on Africa as well as the rise in nationalism and movements for independence. In the postcolonial period, we will explore Cold War policies in Africa, and address issues including the end of apartheid in South Africa, the politics of foreign aid and military interventions, global health and resource wars.
2103 HIST-315-01 The Pacific War: 1931-1945 1.00 SEM Lestz,Michael E. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the consequences of Japan's occupation of Manchuria, Tokyo's rejection of membership in the League of Nations, and the birth of the Japanese puppet state of Manchukuo. Subsequently, Japanese expansionism in north and south China and the formation of an increasingly close relationship with Italy and Germany paved the way for the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Key topics to be examined will include the Japan's response to Chinese nationalism, Japanese perceptions of Versaille order as it impinged upon East Asia, Japan's theory and practice of "total war," war in Burma and the Pacific, and the effect of the Pacific War on European colonial empires.
2112 HIST-320-01 Gender & Masculinity Latn Amer 1.00 SEM Euraque,Dario A. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course addresses discourses of sexuality and gender in men in Latin America and the Caribbean between the 1870s and the 1970s. It will examine sexual practices and their cultural and social meanings in this region. Students will read social history, biographies, memoirs, poetry and see films to study sexual practices and behaviors, as well as expressions of love, in the daily life of men in relations with men and women in the Americas. The century will be divided two sub-periods, 1870s -1930s, and the 1940s to the late 1970s. The former registered new concepts, "homosexual" in 1867" and "heterosexual" at the beginning of the 20th century; by the 1960s and 1970s gay rights movements in the U.S. influenced Latin America and the Caribbean masculinities.
1549 HIST-326-01 Disaster Archipelago: Japan 1.00 SEM Bayliss,Jeffrey F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Japan is one of the most seismically active countries in the world. Throughout history, people have dealt with devastation from volcanic eruptions, frequent earthquakes, and killer tsunamis. This course explores the history of these catastrophes and their aftermaths from a variety of perspectives: economic, political, social, and cultural. How have the Japanese people coped with these disasters and attempted to prepare for them, in light of shifting political contexts and evolving knowledge of the geologic mechanisms involved? Students will explore and discuss a wide variety of primary and secondary sources on Japanese ways of appreciating and dealing with disasters past and present, including memoirs, novels, and films. The course will culminate with an in-depth examination of the march 2011 tsunami and its aftermath.
2067 HIST-328-01 Transnational Urbanism 1.00 SEM Figueroa,Luis A. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores urban history and the history of urbanism by focusing on a selected group of cities in Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia. It traces the global routes that urbanism has taken since Paris was transformed in the 19th century into the ideal city of modernity. Topics examined include not only urban space, planning, and architecture, but also politics and social movements, capitalism, and mass consumption, as well as sports, literature, and film. Throughout we will pay close attention to how each city's national and international context produced particular urban forms and urban cultures that nonetheless shared certain global patterns.
2068 HIST-332-01 African Nationalism&Decoloniz. 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines both the theoretical and empirical aspects of anticolonial nationalist movements in Africa from the end of World War II to the dismantling of the apartheid regime in South Africa in the early 1990s. Topics such as nonviolent civil disobedience, armed guerilla struggle, nationalist thought, and postcolonial state formation will inform the ways in which we seek to understand the end of European colonial rule and its social, economic, cultural, and political implications for Africa. A series of case studies will acquaint students to such themes as well as highlight the utility of an interdisciplinary approach for examining a broad array of historical developments. The second half of the course will focus on southern Africa, using the Aluka digital archive, "The Struggles for Freedom in South Africa Collection."
1588 JWST-206-01 Arab/Israeli Conflict 1.00 LEC Kiener,Ronald TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  An examination of the dynamics of the Arab/Israeli conflict, especially since the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. The course will focus on the changing interests and positions of the parties involved: Israel, the Palestinians, the Arab states, and the important international players. It will also highlight contradictions within the major camps.
1587 JWST-220-01 Mod Israeli Lit & Jew Heritage 1.00 LEC Ayalon,Michal MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Artists, and especially writers and poets, are the seismographs and mirrors of society, anticipating and reflecting its many forces and movements. During the past two hundred years Jewish life has been profoundly affected by such forces and movements as emancipation, the Enlightenment, assimilation, Zionism, and the Holocaust. A primary focus of modern Israeli writers is the birth of the State of Israel and its ongoing struggles, internally as well as with its Arab neighbors. One of the main ways Hebrew literature captures these significant changes is through the use of biblical themes, images and archetypes which resonate through the generations. This course will examine the ways in which modern Hebrew literature enriches and brings deeper understanding of collective Jewish experiences and detects and shapes the reality of modern Israel.
2075 PHIL-223-01 African Philosophy 1.00 LEC Wade,Maurice L. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  What is African philosophy? Currently, among the scholars addressing this question, no single answer prevails. Some hold that philosophy, by its nature, transcends race, ethnicity, and region and hence that terms such as “African philosophy,” “European philosophy,”and “Asian philosophy,” are all rooted in misunderstanding what philosophy fundamentally is. Some argue that prior to the very recent work of African scholars trained in formal (often European) departments of philosophy, African philosophy did not (and could not) exist. Others argue that while (many of) the peoples of Africa have little or no tradition of formal (written) philosophizing, the differing worldviews embodied in the myths, religions, rituals, and other cultural practices of ethnic Africans constitute genuine African philosophy. Yet others find African philosophy in the critical musings of indigenous African (so-called) wise men or sages. In this course we will critically examine the variety of possibilities, forms, and practices in Africa and elsewhere that might be referred to appropriately as “African philosophy” and attempt to understand why the notion of “African philosophy” is so especially contentious. (May be counted toward African Studies.)
1908 POLS-103-01 Intro Compar Politics 1.00 LEC Matsuzaki,Reo TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  This lecture course examines major themes and approaches within comparative politics. Its purpose is twofold: First, it provides the necessary theoretical and conceptual foundation for upper-level classes within this subfield. To this end, a broad array of key classics and recent works within comparative politics will be examined. Second, students will learn about the political and economic institutions that undergird foreign countries within a comparative framework. Readings will draw from various regions of the world, including Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Questions that will be discussed include, but are not limited to, the following: What role, if any, can the government play in promoting economic growth? Why do civil wars occur and what is the role of ethnicity in perpetuating conflict?
1116 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
1359 POLS-104-02 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
1936 POLS-322-01 Intl Political Economy 1.00 LEC Kamola,Isaac A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 104.
  This course examines the interplay of politics and economics in the current world system since the European expansion in the 16th century. Focus will be on the penetration and colonization of Latin America, Asia, and Africa; economic relations in the industrialized world and between the north and the south; the role of international institutions such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund; the role of international trade and transnational corporations; the changing division of labor in the world economy; and current problems of the world economy.
2114 RELG-291-01 Religion & Humor: Islam 1.00 SEM Staff,Trinity TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  This course will explore the tradition of humor in Islamic literature (Qur’an, Prophetic traditions, religious law, ethics, spirituality and works of pure entertainment), and norms of humor in ritual contexts. We will analyze humor as a virtue; as entertainment and play; as a means of approaching God; as a pedagogical technique; and as upending conventions through the figure of the trickster and holy fool. We will also consider the boundaries and power-relations of humor, first in the case of contemporary Muslim-American comedians, who view comedy as dissent, and then in the European discourse of the “humorless Muslim” that portrays Muslim immigrants as unfit to live in Western secular liberal democracies. The class is grounded in psychological, sociological, and philosophical studies on the relationship of religion and humor.
2042 RELG-386-01 Islam in America 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  This course explores Muslim social and spiritual expression in the United States. We'll look at the teachings of representative groups and their founders, asking how each group presents Islam and why, how they discourse on Muslims in America, how they discourse on America, and how they position themselves as Americans. Topics include religious movements among African-American and immigrant groups, educational, cultural and youth initiatives, Sufism and new-age movements, civil rights groups, progressive Muslims, women's and feminist movements, and Islam in the media. The course requires that students participate in a community learning project to gain first-hand experience with the diverse Muslim community in Hartford.