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Course Schedule for INTERNATIONAL STUDIES - Spring 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
5129 INTS-205-01 War on Terror 1.00 LEC Prashad,Vijay TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM LSC - 134 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  9/11 inaugurated a new epoch not only for the United States, but decidedly for the world. Tentacular wars of and on terror stretched from Afghanistan into Yemen, from Madrid into Bali. This course will offer a social history of the war on terror. We will explore the roots of the war on terror in the histories of Afghanistan and Yemen, and plot the switch from the prehistory of the War on Terror (1993-2001) to the War on Terror Part 1 (2001-2007) to the War on Terror Part 2 (2007 to the present).
5223 INTS-205-02 War on Terror 1.00 LEC Tabar,Linda TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM LSC - 134 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  9/11 inaugurated a new epoch not only for the United States, but decidedly for the world. Tentacular wars of and on terror stretched from Afghanistan into Yemen, from Madrid into Bali. This course will offer a social history of the war on terror. We will explore the roots of the war on terror in the histories of Afghanistan and Yemen, and plot the switch from the prehistory of the War on Terror (1993-2001) to the War on Terror Part 1 (2001-2007) to the War on Terror Part 2 (2007 to the present).
5155 INTS-212-01 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM HL - 123 Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
5156 INTS-212-02 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM HL - 123 Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
5296 INTS-212-03 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM HL - 123 Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
4979 INTS-216-01 Undrstanding Lat Am & Caribbn 1.00 LEC Euraque,Dario A. MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM SH - N130 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This interdisciplinary course explores major historical themes and contemporary cultural and political topics related to Latin American and Caribbean societies and cultures. The goal is for the students to acquire a panoramic view of the Latin America and the Caribbean worlds while acquiring a deeper understanding of various issues that are explored more deeply in other upper-division courses at Trinity. We will engage issues of demography, geography, basis historical periods processes, particular anthropological and cultural debates, fundamental political and gender, sociological approaches to daily life, aesthetic and literary movements, and the regions’ positions within the historic and contemporary world economy. Open to all students, this course is required of INTS majors with a Caribbean and Latin American Studies focus.
5224 INTS-218-01 Wmn, Gndr & Fam in Middle East 1.00 LEC Tabar,Linda TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - S201 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  As an introduction to the lives of women in the ‘men’s world’ of the Middle East, this course examines the impact of global sociopolitical and economic transformations on gender relations, sexuality, adolescence, family structure, local culture, and feminist movements across the Middle East and North Africa. Case studies survey male and female perspectives in a variety of ethnic/religious communities (Muslim, Jewish, Christian) and types of societies (Bedouin, agricultural, urban).
5154 INTS-225-01 Hip Hop in Southeast Asia 1.00 SEM Ali,Anida Y. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM LSC - 138-9 GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  From Myanmar to Malaysia, this course takes a regional look at the emerging visual, counter-, and youth cultures within Southeast Asia. Countries like Cambodia, Vietnam, and Indonesia have experienced an unprecedented rate of urbanization and globalization that affects the growing youth population. How are communities in these countries localizing their urban arts scene and preserving a legacy of resistance emblematic of Hip Hop? How are musical and pop culture trends from nearby Korea, Japan, and China influencing Southeast Asian Hip Hop artists to remix sound and identities?
4644 INTS-236-01 Japanese Crime Lit & Film 1.00 LEC Shen,Yipeng MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM LSC - 136 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course examines major works of Japanese crime literature and film from the works of Edogawa Rampo, known as the father of crime fiction in Japan, to those of contemporary writers to explore social and moral issues reflected in them. While Japanese writers and filmmakers of this genre readily acknowledge Western influences, the literary and cinematic explorations of crime in Japan have also developed ona trajectory of their own, producing works that are easily distinguishable from those of other cultures. The course will also consider the mixing of the crime genre with others, such as ghost and science fiction genres. Works studied in this course include those of Edogawa Rampo, Akira Kurosawa, Miyuki Miyabe, Seicho Matsumoto, and Kobo Abe, as well as yakuza movies. Readings and discussion in English.
5085 INTS-262-01 People/Culture of Caribb 1.00 LEC Desmangles,Leslie G. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MECC - 246 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A review of the attempt to develop generalizations about the structure of Caribbean society. Theoretical materials will focus on the historical role of slavery, the nature of plural societies, race, class, ethnicity, and specific institutions such as the family, the schools, the church, and the political structure.
4931 INTS-302-01 Global Cities 1.00 SEM Myers,Garth A. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM 70VS - SEM Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of 'developed' and 'developing' worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization.
5225 INTS-311-01 Global Feminism 1.00 LEC Tabar,Linda W: 1:15PM-3:55PM CT - 210 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines how the struggles of diverse gender based movements (religious and secular, urban and rural, black and white), from the Americas to the Middle East and Asia, shed light on vexing social problems like the lack of sexual and reproductive rights, political and social representation, and equal opportunities. Using historical and contemporary examples of women’s organizing and theorizing, course materials interrogate the meaning of ‘feminism’, the relationship between the gendered self and society, the impact of race, class, and cultural differences on women’s solidarity, the challenge of women’s (and gender based) activism to state and social order, the impact of women's networking, and the possibilities for achieving a transnational, cross-cultural or global ‘feminism.’
4762 INTS-344-01 Global Hip Hop Cultures 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 309 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Hip-Hop is both music and culture with a global imprint that dates back to the 1980s. This course is a reading and writing intensive course that critically examines hip-hop cultural and political formations in Africa and the African Diaspora. We begin with canonical texts that contributed to the growth of an emergent interdisciplinary field called, 'Hip-Hop Studies' in order to familiarize ourselves with a set of core concepts, discourses and frameworks that will help us assess hip-hop's global emergence. What does the globalization of African-American music and culture tell us about the power and impact of neoliberalism on post-colonial identities, culture and nation-states in the non-Western world? It is a question that will shape our discussions on race, youth, masculinity, and nationalism in contemporary urban societies.
5226 INTS-350-01 Contemporary Muslim Artists 1.00 SEM Ali,Anida Y. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM 70VS - SEM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  How have war, violence, and crisis marked much of the current Islamic world and how are performance artists reflecting this world? This course is intended to stimulate and complicate the dialogue on Islam and contemporary “Islamic” art. We will consider the role of performance among artists who, whether Muslim by faith or not, are classified under the Islamic umbrella as a result of their political, social, or aesthetic choices. We will study the ways in which these “Muslim” artists have applied multiple lenses to their performance practices and how they invoke crisis in their works. Some artists featured in this course include Wafaa Bilal, Arahmaiani, Lida Abdul, Mos Def, Lalla Essaydi and more.
4648 INTS-395-01 Senior Seminar: Iss Cont China 1.00 SEM Shen,Yipeng MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM LSC - 136 WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  The primary goal of this course is to become familiar with, discuss, and debate some cultural, political and economical situations of the contemporary Chinese speaking world through the modern media of newspapers, television and film. The course will also further improve advanced students' ability to use Chinese in their daily and professional lives.
4359 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
4588 INTS-401-01 Senior Sem Internationl Stdies 1.00 SEM Prashad,Vijay M: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 313 Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to seniors majoring in International Studies; other students may enroll only with permission of instructor.
  This writing intensive course functions as the capstone experience for all INTS majors. The instructor will guide INTS seniors through the process of completing a substantial research paper that engages critically with dominant disciplinary approaches to and public discourses about the “global” or “international” sphere. The instruction of this course will rotate among INTS faculty, each of whom will organize the course around a particular theme.
4612 INTS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
5328 INTS-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4587 INTS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single semester thesis.
4192 AHIS-294-01 The Arts of Africa 1.00 LEC Gilbert,Michelle V. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM HHN - 105 GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An examination of the art and architecture of sub-Saharan Africa as modes of symbolic communication: the ritual context of art, the concept of the artist, the notion of popular art, and the decorated body.
4295 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Trostle,James A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MECC - 246 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
4861 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MECC - 246 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
5172 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Hussain,Shafqat TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MECC - 246 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
4425 CHIN-415-01 Advanced Chinese IV 1.00 LEC Wang,Jui-Chien MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM MC - 225 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 413 or equivalent.
  Students will improve skills in written and spoken Mandarin for formal occasions and conversations. Focuses will be given to students' ability to use the language formally and idiomatically.
4118 ECON-101-01 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Skouloudis,Alexander MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM MC - 213 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4119 ECON-101-02 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Helming,Troy TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MC - 307 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4120 ECON-101-03 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Stoica,Teodora A. TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM LSC - AUD SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4121 ECON-101-04 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Schneider,Arthur M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 106 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4313 ECON-101-05 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Schneider,Arthur M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 106 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
5206 ECON-101-06 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Stoica,Teodora A. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM LSC - AUD SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4465 ECON-316-01 International Finance 1.00 LEC Ramirez,Miguel D. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM SH - N130 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302.
  This course examines the major theoretical and policy issues faced by business firms, the government, and individual investors in their international financial transactions. Topics include the following: basic theories of the balance of payments, exchange rates, and the balance of trade; interest rates and interest parity; alternative exchange rate systems; and recent developments in the international money markets.
4963 ENGL-288-01 World Cinema 1.00 LEC Younger,James Prakash MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM
M: 6:30PM-9:30PM
AAC - 320 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course provides an introduction to the study of world cinema, with a focus on cinematic cultures other than those of the USA or Europe. We will begin by considering some of the theoretical questions involved in intercultural spectatorship and introducing/reviewing critical categories we can use to discuss the films. We will then proceed through a series of units based around specific cinematic cultures, focusing on movement, genres and auteurs and on the historical, cultural, and geopolitical issues that the films illuminate. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the film studies minor.
5029 HISP-223-01 Portuguese for Spanish Spkr II 1.00 SEM Hubert,Maria Del Rosario TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM LSC - 136  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 222 or permission of instructor
  The second part of the introductory language course designed for English/Spanish bilinguals or students with a strong foundation of Spanish. Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Spanish speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
5245 HIST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM LSC - AUD GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Course examines the historical evolution and current dynamics of Latin American cities, from the pre-colonial (pre-1492), to the colonial (1492–1825) and post-colonial (since the 1800's) periods. A variety of sources allow us to explore specific examples from several cities, including: Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Havana, Mexico City, Lima, Rio de Janeiro, and São Paulo, for example. Topics include colonialism, nationalism and transnationalism; urban slavery and race; rural-urban and ethnic migrations; industrialization and the urban working-class; urbanism, urban spaces and architecture; authoritarianism, populism and democratization; and consumer cultures, sports and leisure, among others.
5144 HIST-224-01 Gender in Brazilian History 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Since colonization, Brazilian society stabilized specific roles for men and women in its national discourse. We will debate how gender roles marked the experiences of Brazilian indigenous, European and afro-descent populations before and after colonialism. Gender categories also affected the lives of enslaved and freed people, since they created specific experiences for black men and women, and peculiar ways of social uplift that depended on the gender of individuals. In the 20th Century, government propaganda produced a discourse of national identity that influenced the way in which Brazilian men and especially women were seemed national and internationally. The debates and demands carried by LGBT, feminists and other social movements in Brazil who are dedicated to equalizing the rights of people will also be discussed.
5145 HIST-231-01 Abraham's Children 1.00 SEM Elukin,Jonathan TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM HIL - DININGROOM HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Jews, Christians and Muslims all claimed Abraham as the founder of their particular form of monotheism. In the Middle Ages, men and women from all three groups had to negotiate relationships in war and peace. Jews lived among Christians and Muslims. Christians and Muslims fought in the Crusades, and all three groups traded with each other in the cosmopolitan cities of the Mediterranean. What kinds of worlds did these people live in? Were they worlds of prejudice and hatred or a pragmatic tolerance? How were the identities of Jews, Christians and Muslims shaped by their interactions during the Middle Ages? Are we still living with the results of those interactions?
4783 HIST-242-01 History of China, Qing to Pres 1.00 LEC Lestz,Michael E. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM SH - N130 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  A survey of modern Chinese history in the period covering the last traditional dynastic state (1644-1911) and 20th-century China. Emphasis on the collapse of the Confucian state, China’s “Enlightenment,” and the Chinese Revolution.
4786 HIST-332-01 African Nationalism&Decoloniz. 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM LIB - 103 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines both the theoretical and empirical aspects of anticolonial nationalist movements in Africa from the end of World War II to the dismantling of the apartheid regime in South Africa in the early 1990s. Topics such as nonviolent civil disobedience, armed guerilla struggle, nationalist thought, and postcolonial state formation will inform the ways in which we seek to understand the end of European colonial rule and its social, economic, cultural, and political implications for Africa. A series of case studies will acquaint students to such themes as well as highlight the utility of an interdisciplinary approach for examining a broad array of historical developments. The second half of the course will focus on southern Africa, using the Aluka digital archive, "The Struggles for Freedom in South Africa Collection."
4494 JWST-220-01 Mod Israeli Lit & Jew Heritage 1.00 LEC Ayalon,Michal TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM CT - 210 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Artists, and especially writers and poets, are the seismographs and mirrors of society, anticipating and reflecting its many forces and movements. During the past two hundred years Jewish life has been profoundly affected by such forces and movements as emancipation, the Enlightenment, assimilation, Zionism, and the Holocaust. A primary focus of modern Israeli writers is the birth of the State of Israel and its ongoing struggles, internally as well as with its Arab neighbors. One of the main ways Hebrew literature captures these significant changes is through the use of biblical themes, images and archetypes which resonate through the generations. This course will examine the ways in which modern Hebrew literature enriches and brings deeper understanding of collective Jewish experiences and detects and shapes the reality of modern Israel.
5255 JWST-261-01 Abraham's Children 1.00 SEM Elukin,Jonathan TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM HIL - DININGROOM HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Jews, Christians and Muslims all claimed Abraham as the founder of their particular form of monotheism. In the Middle Ages, men and women from all three groups had to negotiate relationships in war and peace. Jews lived among Christians and Muslims. Christians and Muslims fought in the Crusades, and all three groups traded with each other in the cosmopolitan cities of the Mediterranean. What kinds of worlds did these people live in? Were they worlds of prejudice and hatred or a pragmatic tolerance? How were the identities of Jews, Christians and Muslims shaped by their interactions during the Middle Ages? Are we still living with the results of those interactions?
4109 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MC - 102 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
4328 POLS-104-02 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 102 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
4937 POLS-344-01 Politics of Africa 1.00 LEC Kamola,Isaac A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM LSC - 133  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Political Scientists often study Africa as a distinct place, defined by a unique set of crises, which set the continent apart from the rest of the world. This class, in contrast, starts from the assertion that Africa is not a discrete location to be studied in isolation but instead a site of active and dynamic human practices that intersect and define the political and economic lives of all people across the world. "Africa" is, in the words of James Ferguson, a "category through which a 'world' is structured." We first examine the colonial and Cold War histories shaping the modern world, and how they played out in Africa specifically. We then study contemporary issues that tie Africa to the rest of the world, including: civil conflict and the "responsibility to protect"; debt, structural adjustment, aid, and development; Chinese/Africa economic cooperation; "the land question"; and the Arab Spring.
5028 POLS-380-01 War & Peace in the Middle East 1.00 SEM Flibbert,Andrew MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM MC - 313 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  All seats are reserved for juniors and sophomores.
  NOTE: This course is only open to Juniors and Sophomores.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement.
  This course addresses the causes and consequences of nationalist, regional, and international conflict in the Middle East. We use theoretical perspectives from political science to shed light on the dynamics of conflict, the successes and failures of attempts to resolve it, and the roles played by the United States and other major international actors. The course is organized on a modified chronological basis, starting with the early phases of the Arab-Israeli conflict and ending with current developments in Iraq.
5093 RELG-282-01 Modern Islamic Movements 1.00 LEC Koertner,Mareike MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM HIL - DININGROOM HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course examines the rise and ideological foundation of modern Islamic movements, including the Muslim Brotherhood, Hizbollah, Hamas, al-Qa’ida, and ISIS. We will study the emergence of Islamic fundamentalism in its historical and political context as well as major intellectual figures of these movements, and take a close look at the notion of jihad in classical and modern legal contexts.
5247 RELG-285-01 Religions of Africa 1.00 SEM Landry,Timothy R. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM MC - 205 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is an exploration of the ways in which Africans make sense of their worlds through religion. By reading a wide range of ethnographic and historical texts, students will consider the challenges that post-colonial politics present to understanding religion in Africa and in the diaspora Students will examine a variety of African religious traditions ranging from indigenous practices to the ways in which Christianity and Islam have developed uniquely African beliefs. In so doing, students will frame African religions as global phenomena while considering the historical and contemporary salience of the many canonical themes found in African religion such as spirit possession, divination, healing, magic, witchcraft, sorcery, and animal sacrifice.
5095 RELG-286-01 Islam in America 1.00 LEC Koertner,Mareike TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 313 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Islam has become the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse religious group in the United States. This course is divided into two parts: the first provides an historical survey of Islam in America, from its discovery to the present; the second part examines contemporary issues of Muslim American communities and their interactions with American society at large. Topics include religious movements among African-American and immigrant groups, educational, cultural and youth initiatives, Sufism, civil rights groups, progressive Muslims, women's and feminist movements, and Islam in popular culture and in the media.
4980 URST-210-01 Sustainable Urban Development 1.00 LEC Huang,Zhengli TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 303 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  With the era in which city dwellers comprise a majority of the world's population has come a new urgency for understanding the balance between urban development and the environment. This course introduces students to the sub-field of urban studies which deals with sustainable development, including exploration of the debates on the meanings of sustainability and development in cities. Taking a comparative approach and a global perspective, topics to be examined may include the ecological footprint of cities, urban programs for sustainable urban planning, urban transportation and service delivery, energy issues, and the critical geopolitics of urban sustainability around the world. May be counted toward INTS major requirements.
5326 URST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM LSC - AUD GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Course examines the historical evolution and current dynamics of Latin American cities, from the pre-colonial (pre-1492), to the colonial (1492–1825) and post-colonial (since the 1800's) periods. A variety of sources allow us to explore specific examples from several cities, including: Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Havana, Mexico City, Lima, Rio de Janeiro, and São Paulo, for example. Topics include colonialism, nationalism and transnationalism; urban slavery and race; rural-urban and ethnic migrations; industrialization and the urban working-class; urbanism, urban spaces and architecture; authoritarianism, populism and democratization; and consumer cultures, sports and leisure, among others.