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Course Schedule for INTERNATIONAL STUDIES - Spring 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
5196 INTS-233-01 Political Geography 1.00 LEC Mitchell-Eaton, Emily MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Despite our common-sense notions about geography and nature, the spatial arrangement of our world is not the result of natural processes but the outcome of human struggles about the position of borders, the extent of territory, and authority over territories. In this course, we will investigate these struggles and their impact on today's global relations. Special attention will be given to the spatial nature of the state, the role geography has played in the power politics of major states, and future scenarios in a world in which the territorial aspirations of political communities clash with the globalizing flows of economic and cultural activities.
5103 INTS-237-01 20th Cent Chinese Literature 1.00 LEC Wu, Guanda MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A survey of modern Chinese literature, 1918-2000. We will study three major periods of the 20th century: 1918-1949, 1949-1976, and 1976 to the present. The course will concentrate on the work of writers such as Lu Xun, Yu Dafu, Eileen Chang (Zhang Ailing), Xu Zhimo, Mao Dun, Shen Congwen, Bei Dao, Yu Hua, Su Tong, and Wang Anyi. Students will be introduced to the basic developmental trajectory of 20th-century Chinese literature, and will explore interactions between social-historical conditions and the production of modern Chinese literary works. Readings and discussion in English.
5235 INTS-239-01 Gender in Japanese Lit/Film 1.00 LEC Wu, Guanda MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  Drawing upon canonical literary sources as well as internationally celebrated films and anime, this course explores how Japanese society defines and portrays heroes and heroines, beginning in the Heian era and continuing through the modern period. Under the umbrella theme of the heroic, we will analyze how Japanese society defines and promotes cultural values and mores, and how gender roles have been constructed in different historical moments and represented in different media. We will move through themes, such as, war and samurai, love and double-suicide, onnagata and gender ambiguity, and feminism and modern heroines. Our discussion will be conducted with close reference to important theoretical issues in gender and sexuality studies. Readings and discussion in English.
5219 INTS-256-01 Human Rights in Lat Amer&Carib 1.00 LEC Davis, Teresa TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  In the 1970s and 1980s, thousands of people were “disappeared,” tortured and murdered in Latin America and the Caribbean, mostly by military regimes and by para-military death-squads. The period is often characterized as perhaps the lowest point in the modern abuse of “Human Rights” in the region. This course explores how these central notions, the human and rights, have evolved in theory and in practice in the history of the Americas. The course begins with the 16th-century debates among the Spaniards over the “humanity” of Indians and enslaved Africans; it then covers distinguishing elements of the human and rights within the legal structures of the nations created after independence from Spain in the 1820s and before the more contemporary conceptions of human rights in the aftermath of the Holocaust and the crimes against humanity during WWII. Finally, the modern conception and practice of human rights defense and legal monitoring are explored in case studies in the region from the late 1940s to the 1980s.
4886 INTS-258-01 The Islamic City 1.00 LEC Antrim, Zayde TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course explores the cities founded, claimed, and inhabited by Muslims over the centuries, with a particular focus on the Middle East. Scholars have long debated whether there is such a thing as a prototypical "Islamic city" shaped by religious and cultural norms. Through a combination of lectures and discussions, we will grapple with this question by situating cities in their historical contexts, examining their built environments, and considering the ways in which gender, economic and social life, political movements, and war shape urban space.
4778 INTS-262-01 People/Culture of Caribb 1.00 LEC Desmangles, Leslie TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A review of the attempt to develop generalizations about the structure of Caribbean society. Theoretical materials will focus on the historical role of slavery, the nature of plural societies, race, class, ethnicity, and specific institutions such as the family, the schools, the church, and the political structure.
5150 INTS-271-01 New Age of Revolution 1.00 LEC Mabrouk, Karim MF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  The “Age of Revolution” usually refers to the period from mid-18th century to mid-19th century, which witnessed some of the most influential revolutions in world history. This course will use the “Age of Revolution” as the starting point for exploring a new global era of protest, rebellion, and revolt. From the “Occupy Movement” to the “Arab Spring”, the course will examine the common causes, tools, ideals, and outcomes that may exist between these various social movements. Questions addressed in the course will include: is it possible that, despite their vast diversity, modern social movements are all inspired by one another? Which movements failed and which movements succeeded, and why? The course will emphasize in-class discussion and paper writing.
4915 INTS-309-01 Development in Africa 1.00 LEC Myers, Garth MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course examines the history of development ideas and practices in Africa. Beginning with the early colonial era, when Europeans spoke of their “civilizing mission,” and ending with present-day critiques of World Bank policies, it traces continuity and change in state and grassroots efforts to bring about development in Africa. It explores the theories behind development policies. including the ways in which experts have conceptualized African farming systems and Africa’s place in the world economy, and it asks to what extent these theories match reality. It also examines how development policies have been put into practice, how African communities have responded to and reshaped development, whether communities have a “right to development” and who should define what that development should be. Finally, it considers why so many development efforts have failed and whether past failures have led to improved practice. (Also offered under History.)
5192 INTS-311-01 Global Feminism 1.00 LEC Mitchell-Eaton, Emily MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines how the struggles of diverse gender based movements (religious and secular, urban and rural, black and white), from the Americas to the Middle East and Asia, shed light on vexing social problems like the lack of sexual and reproductive rights, political and social representation, and equal opportunities. Using historical and contemporary examples of women’s organizing and theorizing, course materials interrogate the meaning of ‘feminism’, the relationship between the gendered self and society, the impact of race, class, and cultural differences on women’s solidarity, the challenge of women’s (and gender based) activism to state and social order, the impact of women's networking, and the possibilities for achieving a transnational, cross-cultural or global ‘feminism.’
5256 INTS-323-01 Classics and Colonialism 1.00 SEM Ramgopal, Sailakshmi MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course explores the reception of classical literature and history in colonial contexts. Through texts like Sophocles' Antigone; Nehru's "India and Greece"; and Fugard's The Island, we will examine how colonized peoples used the classical tradition to develop strategies of collaboration and resistance to oust European colonizers from environments like India, South Africa, and the Caribbean. By studying the reception of classics through the perspectives of colonized communities, the course considers the relationship between classics and colonialism and performs the crucial function of decentering classical reception studies.
5643 INTS-346-01 Special Topic: The Global City 1.00 SEM Patruno, Luigi MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  What sentiments, desires, and ideas arise from the modern space of Buenos Aires? How do intellectuals experience processes of social and urban transformation? What can we draw from their aesthetic practices to interrogate our own identities, communities, and city landscapes? This seminar sets out to explore urban culture and intellectual history in Latin America. By scrutinizing a variety of literary texts, films, and artistic materials, we will engage with notions of modernism and avant-garde, discourses of globalization and neoliberalism. Among others, we will analyze works by Jorge Luis Borges, César Aira, Victoria Ocampo, María Negroni, Carlos Correas, Witold Gombrowicz, Fernando Solana, Wong Kar-Wai, and Matías Piñeiro. Recommended for students who want to study abroad in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Course taught in Spanish.
5223 INTS-355-01 Human Rights and Empire 1.00 SEM Davis, Teresa TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  In the nineteenth century, the expansion of empires marched in lockstep with the spread of international law in general and human rights in particular. In the twentieth-century, even as formal empires disappeared, the idea of rights continues to be intimately intertwined with international power, and has been mobilized to justify an array of interventions across the Global South. In this course we examine the past and present of human rights as they intersected with international power, from the fight over Belgian atrocities in the Congo Free State to the post 9/11 proliferation of human rights language in the War on Terror. Along the way, we will study the array of projects that have sought to reclaim the idea of universal rights for popular, democratic, anti-racist and anti-colonial ends.
5224 INTS-385-01 Global Capitalism 1.00 SEM Davis, Teresa MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  In this course, we will explore the competing theories and ideologies at the heart of debates over the international economy since the mid-nineteenth century. We will study how markets, development and the economic role of the state are understood by intellectuals and experts across the globe, and we will investigate the models through which policymakers, intellectuals and economists have envisioned the economic ties between Global "North" and Global "South." Finally, we will focus on the ways in which capitalism has been re-imagined to suit differing cultural, political and development projects in the non-Western world.
4366 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
4504 INTS-401-01 Senior Sem Internationl Stdies 1.00 SEM Antrim, Zayde F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to seniors majoring in International Studies; other students may enroll only with permission of instructor.
  This writing intensive course functions as the capstone experience for all INTS majors. The instructor will guide INTS seniors through the process of completing a substantial research paper that engages critically with dominant disciplinary approaches to and public discourses about the “global” or “international” sphere. The instruction of this course will rotate among INTS faculty, each of whom will organize the course around a particular theme.
4511 INTS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
4503 INTS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single semester thesis. This course will be graded as Pass/Fail.
5281 AHIS-209-01 The Arts of China 20th Century 1.00 LEC Sena, Yunchiahn TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  In this course, we will examine the development of art in China during the long 20th century, starting with the 1911 Revolution which concluded China's imperial past and ending with the post-Mao economic policies which culminated in the 2008 Beijing Olympics. We will study major works of various formats and genres which define and redefine Chinese art. We will explore issues related to the tension between Chinese nationalism and Westernization, the adaptation of modern aesthetics and visual technologies, the conflict between state sponsorship and censorship, the changing perception of gender and self-image, the emergence of urban space and consumer culture, and the connection between art and the global economy.
4217 AHIS-294-01 The Arts of Africa 1.00 LEC Gilbert, Michelle R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An examination of the art and architecture of sub-Saharan Africa as modes of symbolic communication: the ritual context of art, the concept of the artist, the notion of popular art, and the decorated body.
4667 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Beebe, Rebecca MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
4568 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro, Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
4643 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Trostle, James TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
5017 ANTH-228-01 Anth from Margins/South Asia 1.00 LEC Hussain, Shafqat MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course will examine how the northwestern and northern mountainous regions of South Asia have been constructed in the Western popular imagination, both in literary texts and in academic debates. Starting with the era of the Great Game in the late 19th century and ending with the current "war on terror," the course will explore the transformation and continuation of past social and political conditions, and their representations within the region. This will help illuminate some of the enduring themes in anthropological debates, such as culture contact; empires, territories, and resources; and human agency.
4884 ANTH-236-01 Religions of Africa 1.00 SEM Landry, Timothy TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is an exploration of the ways in which Africans make sense of their worlds through religion. By reading a wide range of ethnographic and historical texts, students will consider the challenges that post-colonial politics present to understanding religion in Africa and in the diaspora Students will examine a variety of African religious traditions ranging from indigenous practices to the ways in which Christianity and Islam have developed uniquely African beliefs. In so doing, students will frame African religions as global phenomena while considering the historical and contemporary salience of the many canonical themes found in African religion such as spirit possession, divination, healing, magic, witchcraft, sorcery, and animal sacrifice.
5019 ANTH-310-01 Anth of Development 1.00 SEM Hussain, Shafqat M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This seminar will explore international economic and social development from an anthropological perspective. We will critically examine concepts of development, underdevelopment, and progress. We will compare how multilateral lenders and small nongovernmental organizations employ development rhetoric and methods. We will examine specific case studies of development projects in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, asking what has been attained, and what is attainable.
5091 CHIN-415-01 Advanced Chinese IV 1.00 LEC Wu, Guanda MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 413 or equivalent.
  Students will improve skills in written and spoken Mandarin for formal occasions and conversations. Focuses will be given to students' ability to use the language formally and idiomatically.
4156 ECON-101-01 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Schneider, Arthur TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4157 ECON-101-02 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Ramirez, Miguel MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4158 ECON-101-03 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Szembrot, Nichole TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4159 ECON-101-04 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Szembrot, Nichole TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4326 ECON-101-05 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Clark, Carol TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4657 ECON-101-06 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Helming, Troy MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
5005 ECON-101-07 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Helming, Troy MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
5191 ECON-101-08 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Clark, Carol TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4411 ECON-316-01 International Finance 1.00 LEC Ramirez, Miguel WF: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302.
  This course examines the major theoretical and policy issues faced by business firms, the government, and individual investors in their international financial transactions. Topics include the following: basic theories of the balance of payments, exchange rates, and the balance of trade; interest rates and interest parity; alternative exchange rate systems; and recent developments in the international money markets.
4919 ENGL-310-01 Postcolonial Literature&Theory 1.00 SEM Bergren, Katherine MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900, or a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This course provides an introduction to Anglophone literatures produced after decolonization. We will read postcolonial theory alongside novels, short stories, poetry, graphic novels, film, and drama in order to consider how these literatures represent issues of identity, nationalism, globalization, and race. The seminar will address the effects of literary form on these fraught representations, as well as the implications of approaching literature through the lens of “postcolonialism,” as opposed to globalization studies, World Literature, transnationalism, or the study of the Global South. Readings may include theory by Homi Bhabha, Franz Fanon, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak; and literature from Anglophone Africa, South Asia, Pacific Oceania, the Caribbean and the British Isles. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900, or a course emphasizing critical reflection.
4604 HISP-223-01 Portuguese for Spanish Spkr II 1.00 SEM Patruno, Luigi MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: the equivalent of two semesters of study of any Romance Language (Spanish, French, Italian, Catalan)
  A continuation of Hispanic Studies/Portuguese 222, designed for students with any prior knowledge of a Romance Language (Spanish, Italian, French, Catalan). Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Romance Languages speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
5061 HIST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students; 5 seats reserved for sophomores
  Topics include: urbanism, religion and power in the ancient civilizations of Mexico, Central America and the Andes; colonial-era urbanism, religion, slavery and politics (1520s-1810s); post-colonial nation-building, modernization, Europeanization and early radical politics (1820s-1920s); populist-era industrialization, urban growth, class conflicts, revolutionary politics, and authoritarianism (1930s-1970s); democratization, social movements, and exclusionary and progressive urbanism in the era of neoliberalism and globalization (1980s-present). Throughout the course, we pay particular attention to gender, sexual, racial and ethnic identities, as well as to both popular culture and the fine arts, using examples from Bahia, Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Cusco, Havana, Lima, Mexico City, Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro, San Juan de Puerto Rico, São Paulo, and Santiago de Chile.
5063 HIST-242-01 History of China, Qing to Pres 1.00 LEC Lestz, Michael MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  A survey of modern Chinese history in the period covering the last traditional dynastic state (1644-1911) and 20th-century China. Emphasis on the collapse of the Confucian state, China’s “Enlightenment,” and the Chinese Revolution.
5071 HIST-315-01 The Pacific War: 1931-1945 1.00 SEM Lestz, Michael T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the consequences of Japan's occupation of Manchuria, Tokyo's rejection of membership in the League of Nations, and the birth of the Japanese puppet state of Manchukuo. Subsequently, Japanese expansionism in north and south China and the formation of an increasingly close relationship with Italy and Germany paved the way for the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Key topics to be examined will include the Japan's response to Chinese nationalism, Japanese perceptions of Versaille order as it impinged upon East Asia, Japan's theory and practice of "total war," war in Burma and the Pacific, and the effect of the Pacific War on European colonial empires.
5082 JWST-219-01 Israeli Film & Visual Media 1.00 LEC Ayalon, Michal W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Israeli film from the heroic nationalist sentiments of the 1950s to the conflicted alienation of the 21st century, offers a unique window into the history and society of the modern state. This course uses visual media to promote a wide variety of perspectives on Israeli culture and society, and assumes no previous knowledge about Israel. In addition to commercial movies and TV, assigned readings will address Israeli cinema as well as related historical and social issues.
5285 JWST-227-01 Arab World & Israel 1.00 LEC Feinstein, Barry TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course focuses on conflict and cooperation between Arab States and Israel, particularly in the economic sphere. How are international relations, business, and trade conducted with and between regional parties in conflict? What are the unique cultural issues which color such relations? Among the topics considered will be the overall international investment climate, pertinent international and local laws and regulations, and international contracting. Students also will gain deeper insight into international business transactions between Israel and the Arab world, including societal, legal and regulatory impediments, as well as countervailing political and economic pressures which encourage economic cooperation.
4147 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert, Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, and 5 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
4339 POLS-104-02 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert, Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, and 5 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
5040 POLS-265-01 Understand Conflict in Africa 1.00 LEC Kamola, Isaac MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, and 5 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  Many Americans claim to know certain truths about Africa when, in reality, such understandings rely heavily upon ahistorical representations of the continent. In recent decades, the portrayal of Africa as conflict-prone and violent has become the predominant way of "knowing" Africa . This course disarms such limited understandings by engaging, historicizing, and contextualizing political violence in Africa. The course starts with recent conflicts, including wars in Somalia, Rwanda, Congo, Sudan, and Libya. We then situate these conflicts within the legacy of colonialism, the Cold War, and the contemporary reorganization of the world economy. The class concludes by debating possible solutions, including foreign intervention (peacekeeping, AFRICOM, the International Criminal Court) as well as responses crafted by African-led organizations and movements (ECOWAS, African Union, and Arab Spring).
4683 POLS-331-01 Comparative Politics East Asia 1.00 SEM Matsuzaki, Reo MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: Course is only open to Sophomores and Juniors. Closed to seniors.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement.
  This seminar examines East Asian countries through the lens of major themes found within the comparative politics subfield of political science. With an empirical emphasis on Japan, South Korea, North Korea, Taiwan, and China, topics covered in this course include the following: evolution of political power and authority in modern East Asia; Japanese colonialism and its legacies on postcolonial economic development and contemporary international relations; dynamics of regime change and democratization in South Korea and Taiwan; and the nature and durability of authoritarian governance within North Korea and China.
5031 POLS-344-01 Politics of Africa 1.00 LEC Kamola, Isaac MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused
  Political Scientists often study Africa as a distinct place, defined by a unique set of crises, which set the continent apart from the rest of the world. This class, in contrast, starts from the assertion that Africa is not a discrete location to be studied in isolation but instead a site of active and dynamic human practices that intersect and define the political and economic lives of all people across the world. "Africa" is, in the words of James Ferguson, a "category through which a 'world' is structured." We first examine the colonial and Cold War histories shaping the modern world, and how they played out in Africa specifically. We then study contemporary issues that tie Africa to the rest of the world, including: civil conflict and the "responsibility to protect"; debt, structural adjustment, aid, and development; Chinese/Africa economic cooperation; "the land question"; and the Arab Spring.
5034 POLS-380-01 War & Peace in the Middle East 1.00 SEM Flibbert, Andrew W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 104.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement. Closed to seniors.
  This course addresses the causes and consequences of nationalist, regional, and international conflict in the Middle East. We use theoretical perspectives from political science to shed light on the dynamics of conflict, the successes and failures of attempts to resolve it, and the roles played by the United States and other major international actors. The course is organized on a modified chronological basis, starting with the early phases of the Arab-Israeli conflict and ending with current developments in Iraq.
5172 PORT-223-01 Portuguese for Spanish Spkr II 1.00 SEM Patruno, Luigi MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A continuation of Hispanic Studies/Portuguese 222, designed for students with any prior knowledge of a Romance Language (Spanish, Italian, French, Catalan). Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Romance Languages speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
4969 RELG-282-01 Modern Islamic Movements 1.00 LEC Koertner, Mareike MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course examines the rise and ideological foundation of modern Islamic movements, including the Muslim Brotherhood, Hizbollah, Hamas, al-Qa’ida, and ISIS. We will study the emergence of Islamic fundamentalism in its historical and political context as well as major intellectual figures of these movements, and take a close look at the notion of jihad in classical and modern legal contexts.
4883 RELG-285-01 Religions of Africa 1.00 SEM Landry, Timothy TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is an exploration of the ways in which Africans make sense of their worlds through religion. By reading a wide range of ethnographic and historical texts, students will consider the challenges that post-colonial politics present to understanding religion in Africa and in the diaspora Students will examine a variety of African religious traditions ranging from indigenous practices to the ways in which Christianity and Islam have developed uniquely African beliefs. In so doing, students will frame African religions as global phenomena while considering the historical and contemporary salience of the many canonical themes found in African religion such as spirit possession, divination, healing, magic, witchcraft, sorcery, and animal sacrifice.
4666 THDN-220-01 Kathak: Philosophy & Practice 1.00 STU Agrawal, Rachna MW: 4:00PM-5:30PM TBA GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 16
  This course emphasizes the practice, theory, and philosophy of Kathak, a classical dance of India, which originated over 2,000 years ago. Evolving from a blend of Middle Eastern dance styles and ancient Indian storytelling art form, Kathak combines dance, drama, and music to convey ideas and emotions. Modern Kathak emphasizes geometric patterns and design with special emphasis on footwork, pirouettes and intricate rhythms. The course covers specific techniques as well as the cultural context from which they evolved. The course also includes analyses of philosophical, economic, political, and gender issues that facilitated the development of Kathak. Also listed under international studies/Asian studies.
5054 URST-210-01 Sustainable Urban Development 1.00 LEC Hasan, Fadia MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  With the era in which city dwellers comprise a majority of the world's population has come a new urgency for understanding the balance between urban development and the environment. This course introduces students to the sub-field of urban studies which deals with sustainable development, including exploration of the debates on the meanings of sustainability and development in cities. Taking a comparative approach and a global perspective, topics to be examined may include the ecological footprint of cities, urban programs for sustainable urban planning, urban transportation and service delivery, energy issues, and the critical geopolitics of urban sustainability around the world. May be counted toward INTS major requirements.
5271 URST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 17
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students; 5 seats reserved for sophomores
  Topics include: urbanism, religion and power in the ancient civilizations of Mexico, Central America and the Andes; colonial-era urbanism, religion, slavery and politics (1520s-1810s); post-colonial nation-building, modernization, Europeanization and early radical politics (1820s-1920s); populist-era industrialization, urban growth, class conflicts, revolutionary politics, and authoritarianism (1930s-1970s); democratization, social movements, and exclusionary and progressive urbanism in the era of neoliberalism and globalization (1980s-present). Throughout the course, we pay particular attention to gender, sexual, racial and ethnic identities, as well as to both popular culture and the fine arts, using examples from Bahia, Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Cusco, Havana, Lima, Mexico City, Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro, San Juan de Puerto Rico, São Paulo, and Santiago de Chile.