Select a level: Select a term:
Only show courses available to first-year students.

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Course Schedule for INTERNATIONAL STUDIES - Spring 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
4829 INTS-205-01 War on Terror 1.00 LEC Prashad,Vijay TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  9/11 inaugurated a new epoch not only for the United States, but decidedly for the world. Tentacular wars of and on terror stretched from Afghanistan into Yemen, from Madrid into Bali. This course will offer a social history of the war on terror. We will explore the roots of the war on terror in the histories of Afghanistan and Yemen, and plot the switch from the prehistory of the War on Terror (1993-2001) to the War on Terror Part 1 (2001-2007) to the War on Terror Part 2 (2007 to the present).
5043 INTS-212-01 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Tabar,Linda TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
5044 INTS-212-02 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Tabar,Linda TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
5147 INTS-214-01 Areas and Comparison 1.00 SEM Prashad,Vijay TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Area Studies seeks to explore zones of the world as discrete cultural and political units. These zones include "South Asia," "North Africa" and "South America." This course will explore the construction of the zones as well as the importance of comparative research that is occasioned by the production of these political and cultural areas.
4696 INTS-216-01 Undrstanding Lat Am & Caribbn 1.00 LEC Euraque,Dario A. MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This interdisciplinary course explores major historical themes and contemporary cultural and political topics related to Latin American and Caribbean societies and cultures. The goal is for the students to acquire a panoramic view of the Latin America and the Caribbean worlds while acquiring a deeper understanding of various issues that are explored more deeply in other upper-division courses at Trinity. We will engage issues of demography, geography, basis historical periods processes, particular anthropological and cultural debates, fundamental political and gender, sociological approaches to daily life, aesthetic and literary movements, and the regions’ positions within the historic and contemporary world economy. Open to all students, this course is required of INTS majors with a Caribbean and Latin American Studies focus.
5045 INTS-234-01 Gender and Education 1.00 LEC Bauer,Janet L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  What is gender equity in schooling and what impact does this have on gender equity more broadly? Different disciplinary perspectives on the impact of gender in learning, school experience, performance and achievement will be explored in elementary, secondary, post-secondary, and informal educational settings. The legal and public policy implications of these findings (such as gender-segregated schooling, men’s and women’s studies programs, curriculum reform, Title IX, affirmative action and other proposed remedies) will be explored. Findings on socialization and schooling in the U.S. will be contrasted with those from other cultures.
5046 INTS-235-01 Youth Culture in the Muslim Wo 1.00 SEM Bauer,Janet L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Increasingly much of the Muslim world is young and with the expansion of media and cyberspace technologies, the circulation of globalized youth culture increasingly challenges taken-for-granted notions in local societies. This course examines the impact of youth and youth culture on personal, social, and political expression in a variety of Muslim communities around the world. We will examine intergenerational struggles over marriage, gender, and sexuality, the renegotiation of religion and morality, and the often 'revolutionary' disputes over conventional politics as conveyed through music, texts, fashion, personal memoirs, and cyberspace blogging.
5047 INTS-240-01 Race & Modernity in Latin Amer 1.00 LEC Lambright,Anne TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Taking as a point of departure Enrique Dusell’s assertion that European modernity depended (and depends) on the invention of an American otherness, this course will look at the intersection of race and discourses on/projects of modernity in the Americas and Europe. Specifically, we will examine how 20th - and 21st- century Latin American intellectuals have theorized race and its relationship to nation-building and modernizing efforts from 19th century to the present. Rather than tracing the historical development of the concept of race, we will read deeply major texts that theorize the relationship between race and modernity. The course, thus, will look to understand not only the theories, but how these Latin American intellectuals think through problems, develop arguments, converse with peers, and articulate ideas.
5048 INTS-249-01 Immigrants & Refugees 1.00 SEM Bauer,Janet L. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  The post-cold war world is one of changing national boundaries and governments, environmental devastation and internal conflicts, resulting in an apparently unprecedented flow of people from their native homelands. At a time when multiculturalism is not a popular model for national integration, immigrants, refugees, and other sojourners find themselves in new places creating new lives for themselves. The processes by which this occurs illustrate some of the basic social, cultural, and political dilemmas of contemporary societies. Using historical and contemporary case studies from Europe and the Americas, this course looks at issues of flight, resettlement, integration, cultural adaptation, and public policy involved in creating culturally diverse nations. Questions to be raised include what are the conditions under which people leave, who can become a (authentic) member of society, what rights do non-citizens versus citizens have, are borders sacrosanct, are ethnic and racial diversity achievable or desirable, is multiculturalism an appropriate model, do people want to assimilate, what are the cultural consequences of movement, and how can individuals reconstruct their identities and feel they belong? This course includes a community learning component. (Also offered under American Studies, Public Policy & Law, and Women, Gender, & Sexuality.)
5049 INTS-250-01 Hartford Global Migration Lab 0.50 LAB Bauer,Janet L. TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in International Studies 249 or 250.
  Optional Community Learning Component integrated with INTS249: Immigrants and Refugees and INTS250: Global Migration to provide field-based, participatory research experience with community partners on the consequences of global migration in the greater Hartford area.
5050 INTS-260-01 The City in African Studies: 1.00 SEM Myers,Garth A. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Africa is a rapidly urbanizing region of the world; the most rapidly urbanizing by World Bank standards. Contemporary urbanization in Africa has stimulated new scholarship on the history of African cities, African urban economies, urban politics and urban identities, among other topics. African urban studies has produced some of the most thoughtful and engaged work on Africa to date. In this course we will be exploring major themes in the field of African urban studies to gain deeper appreciation of the history of African cities, their contemporary iterations, and their future possibilities.
5051 INTS-262-01 People/Culture of Caribb 1.00 LEC Desmangles,Leslie G. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A review of the attempt to develop generalizations about the structure of Caribbean society. Theoretical materials will focus on the historical role of slavery, the nature of plural societies, race, class, ethnicity, and specific institutions such as the family, the schools, the church, and the political structure.
5122 INTS-311-01 Global Feminism 1.00 LEC Tabar,Linda W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines how the struggles of diverse gender based movements (religious and secular, urban and rural, black and white), from the Americas to the Middle East and Asia, shed light on vexing social problems like the lack of sexual and reproductive rights, political and social representation, and equal opportunities. Using historical and contemporary examples of women’s organizing and theorizing, course materials interrogate the meaning of ‘feminism’, the relationship between the gendered self and society, the impact of race, class, and cultural differences on women’s solidarity, the challenge of women’s (and gender based) activism to state and social order, the impact of women's networking, and the possibilities for achieving a transnational, cross-cultural or global ‘feminism.’
5104 INTS-319-01 Mapping the Middle East 1.00 SEM Antrim,Zayde F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course approaches the history of the Middle East through maps. It will look at the many different ways maps have told the story of the territory we now call the Middle East and the many different points of view that have defined it as a geographical entity. Readings will analyze maps as social constructions and will place mapmaking and map-use in a historical context. We will relate maps to questions of empire, colonialism, war and peace, nationalism, and environmental change. Students will be required to undertake an original research paper.
4563 INTS-395-01 Senior Seminar: Iss Cont China 1.00 SEM Cheng,Anna MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  The primary goal of this course is to become familiar with, discuss, and debate some cultural, political and economical situations of the contemporary Chinese speaking world through the modern media of newspapers, television and film. The course will also further improve advanced students' ability to use Chinese in their daily and professional lives.
4383 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
4539 INTS-401-01 Senior Sem Internationl Stdies 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. T: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to seniors majoring in International Studies; other students may enroll only with permission of instructor.
  This writing intensive course functions as the capstone experience for all INTS majors. The instructor will guide INTS seniors through the process of completing a substantial research paper that engages critically with dominant disciplinary approaches to and public discourses about the “global” or “international” sphere. The instruction of this course will rotate among INTS faculty, each of whom will organize the course around a particular theme.
4548 INTS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
4538 INTS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single semester thesis.
5091 AHIS-207-01 The Arts of China 1.00 LEC Wang,Chung-Lan TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will focus on the arts of China from the Neolithic period through the Qing Dynasty (ca. 6000 B.C.E.-1850 C.E.) We will study art produced for burial, Buddhist temples, the imperial court, and the scholar elite. We will consider architecture, sculpture, painting, bronze, jade lacquer, and ceramics, placing the art within its historical context and identifying what makes it uniquely Chinese. This 200-level lecture survey course will require a paper, a mid-term, and a final examination. (May be counted towards International Studies/Asian Studies)
4226 AHIS-294-01 The Arts of Africa 1.00 LEC Gilbert,Michelle V. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An examination of the art and architecture of sub-Saharan Africa as modes of symbolic communication: the ritual context of art, the concept of the artist, the notion of popular art, and the decorated body.
4905 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Beebe,Rebecca MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: seats are reserved as follows: 5 seniors, 5 juniors, 10 sophomores, 20 first-year
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
4629 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
4859 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Hussain,Shafqat TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 20 seats reserved for first year students, 10 reserved for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
4403 CHIN-415-01 Advanced Chinese IV 1.00 LEC Wang,Jui-Chien MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 413 or equivalent.
  Students will improve skills in written and spoken Mandarin for formal occasions and conversations. Focuses will be given to students' ability to use the language formally and idiomatically.
5203 CLCV-314-01 The Classics in Colonial India 1.00 SEM Ramgopal,Sailakshmi WF: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course traces the complex relationship between the study of classical antiquity and the British colonial presence in India. How did Indians employ the classical tradition to produce strategies of resistance and collaboration to overturn the British Raj and agitate for the creation of Bharat? The class will engage with a diverse range of texts like Sophocles’ Antigone, Nehru’s “India and Greece”, a play based on Aristophanes’ Wealth, whose replacement of a male with a female protagonist raises issues of gender and sexuality, and films like Gandhi (1982). By excavating the mostly uncharted history of classical reception in British India, the course not only considers the relationship between classics and colonialism, but performs the crucial function of decentering the occidental orientation of classical reception studies.
4161 ECON-101-01 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Clark,Carol TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4162 ECON-101-02 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Szembrot,Nichole E. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4163 ECON-101-03 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Schneider,Arthur M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4164 ECON-101-04 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Schneider,Arthur M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4341 ECON-101-05 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Helming,Troy MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4888 ECON-101-06 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Helming,Troy MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
4435 ECON-316-01 International Finance 1.00 LEC Ramirez,Miguel D. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 302.
  This course examines the major theoretical and policy issues faced by business firms, the government, and individual investors in their international financial transactions. Topics include the following: basic theories of the balance of payments, exchange rates, and the balance of trade; interest rates and interest parity; alternative exchange rate systems; and recent developments in the international money markets.
4943 EDUC-305-01 Immigrants & Education 1.00 SEM Dyrness,Andrea W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200, or majoring in International Studies, or permission of instructor
  This course examines the experience of immigrants in education in comparative perspective, focusing on questions of citizenship and belonging. How do schools respond to the challenges and opportunities of large-scale migration, cultural diversity, and inequality and attempt to produce national and/or global citizens? How do immigrants in schools negotiate and respond to global and national forces as they craft their own identities and forms of belonging? We will examine the experience of immigrant groups in the United States and in several countries in Europe, including France, Spain, the U.K., and Denmark. The course will include a community learning component in which students will conduct interviews with immigrants who have been involved in U.S. education institutions.
5033 ENGL-461-01 World Cinema Auteurs 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash T: 6:30PM-9:10PM
M: 6:30PM-9:10PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: This advanced undergraduate / graduate hybrid course - while not required, some prior experience with film analysis, film theory, or World Cinema is strongly recommended.
  NOTE: English 461 and English 861 are the same course. Monday evening meetings of the class are for film screenings only.
  NOTE: This course is research intensive. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
  This advanced course offers an in-depth exploration of the work of major auteur-directors from the domain of World Cinema, cinema from countries other than the United States or Europe. Three or four auteurs grouped by country, region or culture (e.g. Japan, India, Iran, Brazil, West Africa, or the Three Chinas: PRC, Hong Kong, and Taiwan) will be examined in their aesthetic, cultural and geo-political dimensions using the cutting-edge new methodologies of comparative and experimental cinephilia. Note: This advanced undergraduate/graduate hybrid course - while not required, some prior experience with film analysis, film theory, or World Cinema is strongly recommended. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research-intensive.
4744 HISP-223-01 Portuguese for Spanish Spkr II 1.00 SEM Hubert,Maria Del Rosario TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 222 or permission of instructor
  The second part of the introductory language course designed for English/Spanish bilinguals or students with a strong foundation of Spanish. Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Spanish speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
5214 HISP-322-01 Asians in America 1.00 SEM Cancelled GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 or permission of instructor.
  Since the times of the Spanish and Portuguese empires, American economies were mostly driven by foreign human labour. With limited local populations to work immense agricultural areas, thousands of Africans and Asians were transported to the region to work on sugar, tobacco and rice. In this seminar we will study narratives of Chinese and Japanese labor in nineteenth century Latin America, paying close attention to questions of literacy, diplomacy, abolitionism, race and religion. Apart from surveying a historical and literary bibliography on the topic, we will pay close attention to research methodologies on immigration, comparative literature, and global history. Readings will be in English, Spanish and Portuguese (optional).
5246 HISP-326-01 Culture & Dilplom in Latn Amer 1.00 SEM Hubert,Maria Del Rosario TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 17
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 or permission of instructor.
  While the term "cultural diplomacy" has only recently been established formally as the branch of international relations that deals with the exchange of ideas, values, traditions and other aspects of culture or identity to strengthen relationships, enhance socio-cultural cooperation and promote national interests, evidence of its practice can be seen throughout history. Explorers, travelers, traders, teachers and artists can all be considered living examples of “informal ambassadors” or early “cultural diplomats”. This course explores the many articulations of cultural diplomacy in Latin America in the XX century. By looking into the experience of travelling writers, policymakers and global revolutionaries, we will inquire into topics such as the relationship between culture and politics, state interventions on culture and cosmopolitanism in Latin America.
5138 HIST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Cancelled GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Course examines the historical evolution and current dynamics of Latin American cities, from the pre-colonial (pre-1492), to the colonial (1492–1825) and post-colonial (since the 1800's) periods. A variety of sources allow us to explore specific examples from several cities, including: Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Havana, Mexico City, Lima, Rio de Janeiro, and São Paulo, for example. Topics include colonialism, nationalism and transnationalism; urban slavery and race; rural-urban and ethnic migrations; industrialization and the urban working-class; urbanism, urban spaces and architecture; authoritarianism, populism and democratization; and consumer cultures, sports and leisure, among others.
4985 HIST-228-01 Islamic Civilization to 1517 1.00 LEC Antrim,Zayde TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course surveys the transformation of the Middle East into an Islamic civilization from the life of Muhammad in the early seventh century through the collapse of the Mamluk Empire in 1517. It focuses on social, cultural, and political history and addresses regional variations from Morocco to Iran. Topics include women, religious minorities, and slavery, as well as Islamic education, mysticism, and literature.
4611 HIST-242-01 History of China, Qing to Pres 1.00 LEC Lestz,Michael E. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  A survey of modern Chinese history in the period covering the last traditional dynastic state (1644-1911) and 20th-century China. Emphasis on the collapse of the Confucian state, China’s “Enlightenment,” and the Chinese Revolution.
4986 HIST-253-01 African Hist: 1850 to Contemp 1.00 LEC Markle,Seth M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is the second part of a two-part introductory survey of African history. With a focus on "Black Africa" south of the Sahara, we will begin by exploring the impact of the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade on Africa and move to the establishment of - and resistance to - European colonial rule. We will then look at the impact of the two World Wars on Africa as well as the rise in nationalism and movements for independence. In the postcolonial period, we will explore Cold War policies in Africa, and address issues including the end of apartheid in South Africa, the politics of foreign aid and military interventions, global health and resource wars.
4992 HIST-312-01 Korea & Japan in Hist Perspect 1.00 SEM Bayliss,Jeffrey W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course provides an overview of the history of relations between Korea and Japan, within the shifting contexts of imperialism and post-colonialism. Through extensive readings and class discussions, students will also gain a detailed understanding of the historiography of Korean-Japanese relations and the debates that still inform the ways the Japanese and Koreans – both North and South – view one another today. Students will produce a significant historiographical essay on a topic to be decided upon in consultation with the instructor. No prior coursework in Korean or Japanese history is required, but students with no background in the histories of Korea and Japan will be required to do additional reading to obtain a better understanding of the historical contexts encountered in the regular readings.
4993 HIST-315-01 The Pacific War: 1931-1945 1.00 SEM Lestz,Michael E. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the consequences of Japan's occupation of Manchuria, Tokyo's rejection of membership in the League of Nations, and the birth of the Japanese puppet state of Manchukuo. Subsequently, Japanese expansionism in north and south China and the formation of an increasingly close relationship with Italy and Germany paved the way for the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Key topics to be examined will include the Japan's response to Chinese nationalism, Japanese perceptions of Versaille order as it impinged upon East Asia, Japan's theory and practice of "total war," war in Burma and the Pacific, and the effect of the Pacific War on European colonial empires.
5192 HIST-322-01 Shanghai:Treaty Port-Megacity 1.00 SEM Lestz,Michael E. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  In a few decades after its forcible opening as a Treaty Port in 1842, Shanghai emerged as Asia's greatest port. It quickly grew to an international city that played a defining in China role as a catalyst for cultural, social, and economic change. After 1937, however, war, civil war, and revolution put the brakes on Shanghai's advance. After the late 1980's, Shanghai reemerged as one of the world's leading centers of trade and a meeting place of civilizations. Today the city is the linchpin of the economy of the Yangtze River basin and China's foremost gateway to the world. Using historical, literary, and documentary materials this course will reflect on the evolution of Shanghai and the role it played as a catalyst for change in various eras.
4459 JWST-220-01 Mod Israeli Lit & Jew Heritage 1.00 LEC Ayalon,Michal MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Artists, and especially writers and poets, are the seismographs and mirrors of society, anticipating and reflecting its many forces and movements. During the past two hundred years Jewish life has been profoundly affected by such forces and movements as emancipation, the Enlightenment, assimilation, Zionism, and the Holocaust. A primary focus of modern Israeli writers is the birth of the State of Israel and its ongoing struggles, internally as well as with its Arab neighbors. One of the main ways Hebrew literature captures these significant changes is through the use of biblical themes, images and archetypes which resonate through the generations. This course will examine the ways in which modern Hebrew literature enriches and brings deeper understanding of collective Jewish experiences and detects and shapes the reality of modern Israel.
4898 PHIL-223-01 African Philosophy 1.00 LEC Wade,Maurice L. WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  What is African philosophy? Currently, among the scholars addressing this question, no single answer prevails. Some hold that philosophy, by its nature, transcends race, ethnicity, and region and hence that terms such as “African philosophy,” “European philosophy,”and “Asian philosophy,” are all rooted in misunderstanding what philosophy fundamentally is. Some argue that prior to the very recent work of African scholars trained in formal (often European) departments of philosophy, African philosophy did not (and could not) exist. Others argue that while (many of) the peoples of Africa have little or no tradition of formal (written) philosophizing, the differing worldviews embodied in the myths, religions, rituals, and other cultural practices of ethnic Africans constitute genuine African philosophy. Yet others find African philosophy in the critical musings of indigenous African (so-called) wise men or sages. In this course we will critically examine the variety of possibilities, forms, and practices in Africa and elsewhere that might be referred to appropriately as “African philosophy” and attempt to understand why the notion of “African philosophy” is so especially contentious. (May be counted toward African Studies.)
4702 POLS-103-01 Intro Compar Politics 1.00 LEC Matsuzaki,Reo MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  NOTE: This section of POLS 103 is methodologically focused.
  This lecture course examines major themes and approaches within comparative politics. Its purpose is twofold: First, it provides the necessary theoretical and conceptual foundation for upper-level classes within this subfield. To this end, a broad array of key classics and recent works within comparative politics will be examined. Second, students will learn about the political and economic institutions that undergird foreign countries within a comparative framework. Readings will draw from various regions of the world, including Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Questions that will be discussed include, but are not limited to, the following: What role, if any, can the government play in promoting economic growth? Why do civil wars occur and what is the role of ethnicity in perpetuating conflict?
4152 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
4355 POLS-104-02 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
5019 POLS-322-01 Intl Political Economy 1.00 LEC Kamola,Isaac A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 104.
  This course examines the interplay of politics and economics in the current world system since the European expansion in the 16th century. Focus will be on the penetration and colonization of Latin America, Asia, and Africa; economic relations in the industrialized world and between the north and the south; the role of international institutions such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund; the role of international trade and transnational corporations; the changing division of labor in the world economy; and current problems of the world economy.
4926 POLS-331-01 Comparative Politics East Asia 1.00 SEM Matsuzaki,Reo MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: Course is only open to Sophomores and Juniors Political Science majors or students intending to major in Political Science.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement.
  This course is comprised of two distinct components. In part I, students will be introduced to key political and economic events in post-World War II East Asia. Specifically, the focus will be on the following countries and territories: Japan, South and North Korea, Taiwan, and China. In part II, students will study thematic and theoretical issues concerning East Asia that have received scholarly attention in recent years. Topics that will be discussed include the following: rapid economic growth and its consequences; economic integration under globalization; political liberalization and democratization; identity politics and nationalism; and human security. With its focus on major conceptual and theoretical debates within the comparative politics subfield, this course will provide useful background for those contemplating a senior thesis on an East Asian country.
5020 POLS-343-01 Theory & Pol of African Decol 1.00 SEM Kamola,Isaac A. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 103 or 104.
  NOTE: This course is only open to Juniors and Sophomores.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement.
  The process of African decolonization was among the most important political events of the 20th century-in just three decades more than fifty new countries won independence from European imperial powers. This class reads the diverse group of African intellectuals writing during this period, whose work shaped how people thought about the anti-colonial project and world politics more generally. The course starts with an overview of colonialism's historical and intellectual legacy before examining how these theorists tackled three central political questions, namely: how to forge an independent African nation-state, how to create a post-colonial African identity, and how to establish an independent economy. Readings will include Aime Cesaire, Franz Fanon, Steve Biko, Amilcar Cabral, Walter Rodney, Albert Memmi, Léopold Sédar Senghor, Julius Nyerere, Thomas Sankara, among others.
5021 POLS-346-01 World Economy of Higher Educ 1.00 LEC Kamola,Isaac A. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  Colleges and universities are commonly understood as "ivory towers" removed from the economic pressures of "the real world." However, higher education has always been an important dimension of the world economy. Universities and colleges train employees, develop human capital, design marketable goods, and sometimes sell education for profit. This class examines theorists of higher education, the rise of the American-style university, the Cold War politics of higher education, the World Bank's reconceptualization of higher education as key to economic development, the reframing of education as an exportable service, and branch campuses in the Middle East. In short, this course helps students better understand various pressures and dynamics of the contemporary world economy through an examination of the particular institution of which we are a part.
4930 POLS-380-01 War & Peace in the Middle East 1.00 SEM Flibbert,Andrew MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  All seats are reserved for juniors and sophomores.
  NOTE: This course is only open to Juniors and Sophomores
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement.
  This course addresses the causes and consequences of nationalist, regional, and international conflict in the Middle East. We use theoretical perspectives from political science to shed light on the dynamics of conflict, the successes and failures of attempts to resolve it, and the roles played by the United States and other major international actors. The course is organized on a modified chronological basis, starting with the early phases of the Arab-Israeli conflict and ending with current developments in Iraq.
5062 RELG-258-01 Buddhist Texts:The Bodhisattva 1.00 SEM Findly,Ellison Banks TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  An exploration of the Bodhisattva ideal as found in classical Asian texts, focusing on the recognition of enlightenment, the practice of perfections, and the dynamics of skillful means. Central to our discussion will be the use of compassion to realize wisdom, and we will pay special attention to Avalokiteshvara, Tara, Manjushri, and Jizo. We will use elect Indian, Tibetan, and Japanese texts.
5064 RELG-282-01 Modern Islamic Movements 1.00 LEC Koertner,Mareike MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course examines the rise and ideological foundation of modern Islamic movements, including the Muslim Brotherhood, Hizbollah, Hamas, al-Qa’ida, and ISIS. We will study the emergence of Islamic fundamentalism in its historical and political context as well as major intellectual figures of these movements, and take a close look at the notion of jihad in classical and modern legal contexts.
5217 RELG-318-01 Islamophobia 1.00 LEC Koertner,Mareike M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This survey course explores the historical roots and contemporary forms of Western anxieties toward Muslims and Islam by critically engaging the following questions: What are the theological, historical, political, and cultural forces that have given rise to perceptions of Islam as inherently violent, intolerant, misogynist, and backwards? How does Islamophobia differ from legitimate disagreements with specific Islamic beliefs and practices? How has the fear of Islam translated into concrete acts of exclusion, discrimination, and psychological and physical harm? What do negative perceptions of Muslims and Islam reveal about Western assumptions concerning religion and the religious ‘Other’?
4904 THDN-220-01 Kathak: Philosophy & Practice 1.00 STU Agrawal,Rachna R. MW: 4:00PM-5:30PM TBA GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 16
  This course emphasizes the practice, theory, and philosophy of Kathak, a classical dance of India, which originated over 2,000 years ago. Evolving from a blend of Middle Eastern dance styles and ancient Indian storytelling art form, Kathak combines dance, drama, and music to convey ideas and emotions. Modern Kathak emphasizes geometric patterns and design with special emphasis on footwork, pirouettes and intricate rhythms. The course covers specific techniques as well as the cultural context from which they evolved. The course also includes analyses of philosophical, economic, political, and gender issues that facilitated the development of Kathak. Also listed under international studies/Asian studies.
5240 URST-210-01 Sustainable Urban Development 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  With the era in which city dwellers comprise a majority of the world's population has come a new urgency for understanding the balance between urban development and the environment. This course introduces students to the sub-field of urban studies which deals with sustainable development, including exploration of the debates on the meanings of sustainability and development in cities. Taking a comparative approach and a global perspective, topics to be examined may include the ecological footprint of cities, urban programs for sustainable urban planning, urban transportation and service delivery, energy issues, and the critical geopolitics of urban sustainability around the world. May be counted toward INTS major requirements.