Select a level: Select a term:
Only show courses available to first-year students.

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Course Schedule for INTERNATIONAL STUDIES - Fall 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2318 INTS-202-01 Pacific Asia Fall&Resurg 1.00 LEC Wen,James G. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 303 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Although the prospect for many developing economics has been very dim, economics in East Asia have thrived since 1945. The next century is likely to be the Pacific century. The most recent evidence of this possibility comes from China, the awakening giant with enormous potential. In an era of accelerating integration and globalization, it is important to understand how and why the Pacific Asian economies have been able to respond to the modernization challenges from the West. Topics to be discussed include: East Asia’s geographical characteristics, the early experience of interaction between this region and the West, the various modernization efforts in the region from an historical perspective, the similarities and differences in the responses of the main economies in the region to Western challenges, the competition and integration among these economies, especially between China, the emerging economic power, and its neighbors including Japan, and their interaction with the rest of the world, particularly with the U.S. today. This course is designed for non-economics majors and has no economics.
2262 INTS-212-01 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM HL - 123 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 7 seats are reserved for sophomores.
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
2856 INTS-212-02 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM HL - 123 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 7 seats are reserved for sophomores
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
3535 INTS-213-01 Worldly Islam 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM HL - 123 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for sophomores.
  This course explores the diverse domestic, regional, and international politics of the Islamic world. A rich historical perspective illuminates contemporary political struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human rights and needs. (Also offered under Political Science and Middle Eastern Studies.)
3423 INTS-227-01 Ukraine & Belarus Histor Persp 1.00 LEC Kananovich,Uladzimir TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is designed to equip students with a detailed understanding of the critical historical events that have influenced modern Ukraine and Belarus. In the late medieval and early modern periods (fifteenth-seventeenth centuries), this region (Western Rus’) underwent a series of important political, social, and cultural transformations that led to the formation of new ethnic entities and later nation-states (Ukraine and Belarus). Late medieval and early modern Ukraine and Belarus will be placed in a wider international context that linked them to Orthodox Europe and the Occident, as well as to the world of Islam. Understanding the history of these dynamic societies will help make some sense of the contemporary relations between Ukraine and Russia.
2830 INTS-237-01 20th Cent Chinese LIt 1.00 LEC Shen,Yipeng MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM SH - N130 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A survey of modern Chinese literature, 1918-2000. We will study three major periods of the 20th century: 1918-1949, 1949-1976, and 1976 to the present. The course will concentrate on the work of writers such as Lu Xun, Yu Dafu, Eileen Chang (Zhang Ailing), Xu Zhimo, Mao Dun, Shen Congwen, Bei Dao, Yu Hua, Su Tong, and Wang Anyi. Students will be introduced to the basic developmental trajectory of 20th-century Chinese literature, and will explore interactions between social-historical conditions and the production of modern Chinese literary works. Readings and discussion in English.
3268 INTS-238-01 Cont Africa:Res Wars & Hum Rts 1.00 LEC Markle,Seth M. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM 70VS - SEM GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one college-level course that addresses the history of Africa before or during the colonial era, including History 252, 253, or 331.
  Human civilizations and communities have been shaped by the ability and desire to gain access to critical resources for survival. Economic globalization has created competition for resources—ranging from oil to diamonds to water—that has influenced social and political structures in the contemporary world. This course looks at the impact of modern globalization on the continent of Africa. Situating Africa historically in its relationship to “the West” through the Atlantic slave trade and European colonialism, we will explore the consequences of Africa’s unequal role in this system. We will be investigating the links between civil conflict, resource control, social justice, poverty, and international movements that attempt to address these issues.
3269 INTS-260-01 The City in African Studies: 1.00 SEM Myers,Garth A. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 225 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Africa is a rapidly urbanizing region of the world; the most rapidly urbanizing by World Bank standards. Contemporary urbanization in Africa has stimulated new scholarship on the history of African cities, African urban economies, urban politics and urban identities, among other topics. African urban studies has produced some of the most thoughtful and engaged work on Africa to date. In this course we will be exploring major themes in the field of African urban studies to gain deeper appreciation of the history of African cities, their contemporary iterations, and their future possibilities.
2873 INTS-314-01 Black Internationalism 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM 70VS - SEM Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in International Studies 101, International Studies112, History 238, or History 253.
  This course introduces students to the history of people of African descent and their struggles for universal emancipation during the 20th century. We will begin by drawing on theoretical readings about race/blackness and the African Diaspora. The second part of the class will probe the relationship between nationalism and pan-Africanism through comparative assessments of Marcus Garvey and his UNIA organization; Rastafarianism and music; and the U.S. Black Power Movement. Over the entire course, we will also seek to locate and critically evaluate Africa’s importance to these political and cultural projects. The ultimate purpose of this course is to impress upon students how struggles for self-determination were simultaneously local, national and global.
3270 INTS-317-01 Planetary History 1.00 SEM Prashad,Vijay TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - S204 Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to International Studies majors or by instructor consent.
  How have humans understood their relationship with each other and nature, over time and space? This course will investigate the various theories of planetary history, and will develop an understanding of the interdependency of our social ecology. In the main, we shall concentrate on the world after 1300, and trace the principle social processes of our time (such as capitalism, democracy, science, and religion).
3430 INTS-336-01 Women, War, and Violence 1.00 SEM Tabar,Linda W: 1:15PM-3:55PM MECC - 260 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the intersections of imperialist wars, global capitalism, militarism, and patriarchal violence. Using a feminist anti-racist, anti-imperialist lens, it explores the rise of public sexual violence in the Middle East. Examining US imperialism, Israeli colonialism, and neoliberal capitalism as male and white projects, the course looks at how these systems re-entrench local patriarchal forces and exacerbate the conditions that promote sexual violence against women. Examining cases ranging from the US occupation of Iraq, to Egypt, Palestine and elsewhere in the region, the course considers the implications of the US neoconservative project of a “New Middle East,” the rise of imperial feminism, NGO’s, and ISIS for Arab women’s movements and the politics of women’s everyday lives.
3530 INTS-350-01 Contemporary Muslim Artists 1.00 SEM Cancelled GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  How have war, violence, and crisis marked much of the current Islamic world and how are performance artists reflecting this world? This course is intended to stimulate and complicate the dialogue on Islam and contemporary “Islamic” art. We will consider the role of performance among artists who, whether Muslim by faith or not, are classified under the Islamic umbrella as a result of their political, social, or aesthetic choices. We will study the ways in which these “Muslim” artists have applied multiple lenses to their performance practices and how they invoke crisis in their works. Some artists featured in this course include Wafaa Bilal, Arahmaiani, Lida Abdul, Mos Def, Lalla Essaydi and more.
3429 INTS-351-01 Politics of Memory 1.00 SEM Tabar,Linda T: 6:30PM-9:10PM SH - T121 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course introduces students to the theories, methods, and pedagogies of memories and life writings. Using feminist epistemologies, it explores women, people of color and indigenous peoples’ memories as an alternative body of knowledge. The course examines the politics, aesthetics, and ethics of remembering and narrating histories of oppression, violence, and resistance.
3531 INTS-375-01 Global Agitation 1.00 SEM Ali,Anida Y. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM MECC - 260 GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course investigates the role of the artist in agitating cultural norms and participating in global social movements. We will study art as a site of contested representations, embedded in power formations whereby the artists play a critical role in challenging societies. We will look at artists and collectives from all over the world, such as Tania Bruguera, Ai Wei Wei, Shirin Neshat, Pussy Riot, Raqs Media Collective, and The Propeller Group. We will study art removed from private studio spaces, “unexhibited” on gallery walls, and displaced from temperature controlled museum halls. To that end, we will also consider art that spills into the streets, onto social media, and occupies the public sphere.
2408 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2736 INTS-401-01 Senior Sem Internationl Stdies 1.00 SEM Prashad,Vijay T: 1:30PM-4:10PM SH - S204 Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to seniors majoring in International Studies; other students may enroll only with permission of instructor.
  This writing intensive course functions as the capstone experience for all INTS majors. The instructor will guide INTS seniors through the process of completing a substantial research paper that engages critically with dominant disciplinary approaches to and public discourses about the “global” or “international” sphere. The instruction of this course will rotate among INTS faculty, each of whom will organize the course around a particular theme.
2280 INTS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2884 AHIS-207-01 The Arts of China 1.00 LEC Hyland,Alice R. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM CT - 105 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will focus on the arts of China from the Neolithic period through the Qing Dynasty (ca. 6000 B.C.E.-1850 C.E.) We will study art produced for burial, Buddhist temples, the imperial court, and the scholar elite. We will consider architecture, sculpture, painting, bronze, jade lacquer, and ceramics, placing the art within its historical context and identifying what makes it uniquely Chinese. This 200-level lecture survey course will require a paper, a mid-term, and a final examination. (May be counted towards International Studies/Asian Studies)
3024 AMST-336-01 Globalization:Amer in Mod Wrld 1.00 SEM Heatherton,Christina TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - N128 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Our current moment of global crisis forces us to reckon with the contradictions of globalization. What does globalization mean? How can we trace its history? This course examines the roots of globalization through the twentieth century: from liberal democracy and communist internationalism to Bandung humanism, fascism, and global capitalism. It explores U.S. social movements, their organization and interpretations, as a site to uncover how America was depicted and understood throughout the world. These movements developed and subsequently imagined visions of freedom, governance, justice, and progress that could themselves be globalized. Through literature, film, poetry, and more, this course examines the transnational interaction of social movements within a global sphere.
3465 AMST-409-01 American Empire 1.00 SEM Baldwin,Davarian L. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM HHN - 105 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Ten seats are reserved for American Studies majors.
  Thomas Jefferson once boldly described the United States as an “empire of liberty.” But whether or not America has ever taken on the identity, ever functioned, as an empire has been one of the most hotly debated topics of our current global times. In this senior seminar we want to take both a historical and contemporary look at what happens when the foreign policy of the United States converges with the general practices of military engagement, occupation, nation-building, commercial market control, and/or annexation of “foreign lands.” Do such foreign relations constitute an empire? In this course we will examine a number of critical moments including the internal U.S. expansion into native American and Mexican lands, “Manifest Destiny” projects in the turn-of-the-twentieth century Caribbean and Asian Pacific, Marshall Plan policies in Cold War Europe, and “War on Terror” initiatives in the present day Middle East. What have been the aspirations of U.S. foreign policy, what have been the consequences, how do they affect the policies and practices “back home.” Have any of these experiences constituted an American Empire?
2752 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MECC - 220 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2753 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Notar,Beth E. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM SH - N217 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3561 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Landry,Timothy R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MECC - 232 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2748 ANTH-228-01 Anth from Margins/South Asia 1.00 LEC Hussain,Shafqat TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM HL - 121  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course will examine how the northwestern and northern mountainous regions of South Asia have been constructed in the Western popular imagination, both in literary texts and in academic debates. Starting with the era of the Great Game in the late 19th century and ending with the current "war on terror," the course will explore the transformation and continuation of past social and political conditions, and their representations within the region. This will help illuminate some of the enduring themes in anthropological debates, such as culture contact; empires, territories, and resources; and human agency.
3562 ANTH-241-01 Women in the Caribbean 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 303 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course explores the diverse lives of women of the Caribbean. We will begin with feminist theories of women and power and trace how those understandings have emerged and changed over time. We will use ethnographies to examine women’s lives in both historical and contemporary Caribbean settings, and explore major theoretical approaches in feminist and Caribbean anthropology. We will analyze how women’s experiences have been shaped by multiple forces, including slavery and emancipation, fertility and constructs of motherhood, gender and violence, race and identity, tourism and sex work, illness and poverty, globalization and labor.
3563 ANTH-245-01 Anth & Global Health 1.00 LEC Trostle,James A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 303 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course examines the growing collaborative and critical roles of anthropology applied to international health. Anthropologists elicit disease taxonomies, describe help-seeking strategies, critique donor models, and design behavioral interventions. They ask about borders and the differences among conceptions of health and disease as global, international, or domestic topics. These issues will be explored through case studies of specific diseases, practices, therapies, agencies, and policies.
3566 ANTH-310-01 Anth of Development 1.00 SEM Hussain,Shafqat TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM GW - L SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This seminar will explore international economic and social development from an anthropological perspective. We will critically examine concepts of development, underdevelopment, and progress. We will compare how multilateral lenders and small nongovernmental organizations employ development rhetoric and methods. We will examine specific case studies of development projects in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, asking what has been attained, and what is attainable.
3351 CHIN-413-01 Advanced Chinese III 1.00 LEC Wang,Jui-Chien MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM SH - T408 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 302 or equivalent.
  Students will further develop skills in written and spoken Mandarin, with increasing emphasis on longer texts, additional characters, and extensive discussion. In order to secure maximum proficiency, students should plan to take both 413 and 415 in sequence.
2050 ECON-101-01 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Szembrot,Nichole E. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 303 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2051 ECON-101-02 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Butos,William N. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - N129 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
3432 ECON-101-03 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Hoag,Christopher S. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM LSC - 136 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2052 ECON-101-04 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Hoag,Christopher S. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM LSC - 136 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2101 ECON-101-05 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Clark,Carol TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MECC - 220 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2225 ECON-101-06 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Skouloudis,Alexander TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 213 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
3433 ECON-101-07 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Skouloudis,Alexander TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 307 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
3285 EDUC-305-01 Immigrants & Education 1.00 SEM Dyrness,Andrea W: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 309  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200, or majoring in International Studies, or permission of instructor
  This course examines the experience of immigrants in education in comparative perspective, focusing on questions of citizenship and belonging. How do schools respond to the challenges and opportunities of large-scale migration, cultural diversity, and inequality and attempt to produce national and/or global citizens? How do immigrants in schools negotiate and respond to global and national forces as they craft their own identities and forms of belonging? We will examine the experience of immigrant groups in the United States and in several countries in Europe, including France, Spain, the U.K., and Denmark. The course will include a community learning component in which students will conduct interviews with immigrants who have been involved in U.S. education institutions.
3267 EDUC-316-01 Educ&Soc Change Across Globe 1.00 LEC Dyrness,Andrea TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MECC - 270 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Educational Studies or International Studies Course.
  Through a comparative framework, this course examines the relationship between education and social change in various regions of the world. How do governments use schooling to produce certain kinds of citizens, and how do grassroots movements use education to resist these agendas? What role does education play in promoting democracy versus social and economic inequality? Students will conduct independent research on education in a country of their choice to contribute to the comparative framework.
3381 ENGL-310-01 Postcolonial Literature&Theory 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 305 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900, or a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This course provides an introduction to Anglophone literatures produced after decolonization. We will read postcolonial theory alongside novels, short stories, poetry, graphic novels, film, and drama in order to consider how these literatures represent issues of identity, nationalism, globalization, and race. The seminar will address the effects of literary form on these fraught representations, as well as the implications of approaching literature through the lens of “postcolonialism,” as opposed to globalization studies, World Literature, transnationalism, or the study of the Global South. Readings may include theory by Homi Bhabha, Franz Fanon, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak; and literature from Anglophone Africa, South Asia, Pacific Oceania, the Caribbean and the British Isles. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900, or a course emphasizing critical reflection.
3355 HISP-222-01 Portuguese for Spanish Speakrs 1.00 SEM Hubert,Maria Del Rosario TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM SH - T121  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 202 or equivalent.
  An introductory language course designed for English/Spanish bilinguals or students with a strong foundation of Spanish. Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Spanish speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
3378 HISP-337-01 21st Cent Latin American Film 1.00 SEM Lambright,Anne TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM LSC - 135 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 or permission of instructor.
  This course examines the most current trends, movements, and themes in Latin American film from 2000 to the present. We contemplate how contemporary film produced in Latin America or abroad, by Latin American directors, explores such topics as transitional justice and human rights, violence, urbanism, identity issues, and globalization, through films produced in traditional film hotbeds (Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico), as well as emerging film industries. We will also look closely at key filmmakers whose significant body of work is garnering worldwide attention (Cuarón, González Iñárritu, Laraín, Llosa, Reygadas). In an era of intense global interaction and international intervention in filmmaking , we ponder what it means to be a “Latin American” filmmaker and to make a “Latin American” film. Course taught in Spanish.
3584 HIST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Cancelled GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Course examines the historical evolution and current dynamics of Latin American cities, from the pre-colonial (pre-1492), to the colonial (1492–1825) and post-colonial (since the 1800's) periods. A variety of sources allow us to explore specific examples from several cities, including: Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Havana, Mexico City, Lima, Rio de Janeiro, and São Paulo, for example. Topics include colonialism, nationalism and transnationalism; urban slavery and race; rural-urban and ethnic migrations; industrialization and the urban working-class; urbanism, urban spaces and architecture; authoritarianism, populism and democratization; and consumer cultures, sports and leisure, among others.
3516 HIST-223-01 Japan into the Mod World 1.00 LEC Bayliss,Jeffrey WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM MC - 106 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Counts as one of the survey courses for the two-semester history sequence for the Asian Studies major. This course examines the social, economic, and cultural transformations that occurred in Japan from its initial encounter with Western modernity through its rise to military superpower status in the first half of the 20th century. Students will gain a greater understanding of the problems that have shaped Japan, by exploring the challenges, conflicts, triumphs, and tragedies of modernization, industrialization, and nation-building as the Japanese experienced them in the 19th and 20th centuries. The course concludes with a detailed exploration of the road to the Pacific War and the social, political, and cultural effects of mobilization for total war followed by total defeat.
3519 HIST-241-01 Hist China Shang-Ming 1.00 LEC Lestz,Michael E. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM SH - S201 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  A survey focused on the development of Chinese politics, culture, and society from 1600 B.C. to the conclusion of the Ming dynasty in 1644 A.D. This course will provide a historical introduction to the growth of a unified Chinese empire with its own homogeneous intellectual tradition and will explore the empire’s coexistence with an enormously varied cluster of regional cultures.
3522 HIST-315-01 The Pacific War: 1931-1945 1.00 SEM Lestz,Michael E. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 205 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the consequences of Japan's occupation of Manchuria, Tokyo's rejection of membership in the League of Nations, and the birth of the Japanese puppet state of Manchukuo. Subsequently, Japanese expansionism in north and south China and the formation of an increasingly close relationship with Italy and Germany paved the way for the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Key topics to be examined will include the Japan's response to Chinese nationalism, Japanese perceptions of Versaille order as it impinged upon East Asia, Japan's theory and practice of "total war," war in Burma and the Pacific, and the effect of the Pacific War on European colonial empires.
2750 JWST-219-01 Israeli Film & Visual Media 1.00 LEC Ayalon,Michal M: 6:30PM-9:30PM CT - 210 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Israeli film from the heroic nationalist sentiments of the 1950s to the conflicted alienation of the 21st century, offers a unique window into the history and society of the modern state. This course uses visual media to promote a wide variety of perspectives on Israeli culture and society, and assumes no previous knowledge about Israel. In addition to commercial movies and TV, assigned readings will address Israeli cinema as well as related historical and social issues.
2458 MUSC-113-01 Introduction to World Music 1.00 LEC Galm,Eric A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM AAC - 320 GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-year students.
  A comprehensive survey of global musical traditions that encompasses rural and urban music from Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean, India, Asia, and the Americas. This course is designed to highlight the central role of musical expression in human life, exploring musical sound and movement in sacred, secular, ritual, and non-ritual contexts. No previous musical knowledge is required. Students are expected to learn basic listening skills and identify musical styles. The course culminates in a final research project about a world music tradition, ensemble, performer, or other related topic. Also listed in International Studies-African studies, International Studies-Asian studies, and International Studies-Latin American and Caribbean studies.
2988 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - N130 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
3316 POLS-104-02 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM CT - 308 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
2848 POLS-312-01 Politics: Mid East & N. Africa 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM CT - 210 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course offers an introduction to the comparative analysis of politics in the Middle East and North Africa. Organized thematically and conceptually, we examine topics ranging from state formation, nationalism, and civil-military relations, to oil and economic development, democratization efforts, political Islam, and regional concerns.
3322 POLS-322-01 Intl Political Economy 1.00 LEC Kamola,Isaac A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM LSC - 133 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 104.
  This course examines the interplay of politics and economics in the current world system since the European expansion in the 16th century. Focus will be on the penetration and colonization of Latin America, Asia, and Africa; economic relations in the industrialized world and between the north and the south; the role of international institutions such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund; the role of international trade and transnational corporations; the changing division of labor in the world economy; and current problems of the world economy.
2448 RELG-151-01 Religions of Asia 1.00 LEC Findly,Ellison Banks MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM MECC - 270 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for first-year students.
  An introduction to the major religions of Asia: Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism, with special emphasis on how each of these modes of thought gives rise to a special vision of man in the universe, a complex of myth and practice, and a pattern of ethical behavior. (May be counted toward international studies/Asian studies.)
2235 SOCL-227-01 From Hartford to World Cities 1.00 LEC Chen,Xiangming M: 1:15PM-3:55PM HL - 14 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  The 21st century is truly a global urban age characterized by the simultaneous decline and revival of post-industrial cities in the United States and the co-existence of boom and poverty in the rapidly industrializing cities in developing countries, as well as by how globalization is exerting a growing impact on urban places and processes everywhere. This course adopts an integrated and comparative approach to studying the local and global characteristics, conditions, and consequences of the growth and transformation of cities and communities. Using Hartford—Trinity's hometown—as a point or place of departure, the course takes students to a set of world or global cities outside the United States, especially a few dynamic mega-cities in developing countries to explore the differences and surprising similarities among them.
3585 URST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Cancelled GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Course examines the historical evolution and current dynamics of Latin American cities, from the pre-colonial (pre-1492), to the colonial (1492–1825) and post-colonial (since the 1800's) periods. A variety of sources allow us to explore specific examples from several cities, including: Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Havana, Mexico City, Lima, Rio de Janeiro, and São Paulo, for example. Topics include colonialism, nationalism and transnationalism; urban slavery and race; rural-urban and ethnic migrations; industrialization and the urban working-class; urbanism, urban spaces and architecture; authoritarianism, populism and democratization; and consumer cultures, sports and leisure, among others.