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Course Schedule for INTERNATIONAL STUDIES - Fall 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3506 INTS-131-01 Modern Iran 1.00 LEC Bauer,Janet L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course provides an introduction to 20th-century Iranian society, culture, and politics, examining secular and religious debates over gender roles, modernity, Islamism, democracy, and the West.
2329 INTS-202-01 Pacific Asia Fall&Resurg 1.00 LEC Wen,James G. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Although the prospect for many developing economics has been very dim, economics in East Asia have thrived since 1945. The next century is likely to be the Pacific century. The most recent evidence of this possibility comes from China, the awakening giant with enormous potential. In an era of accelerating integration and globalization, it is important to understand how and why the Pacific Asian economies have been able to respond to the modernization challenges from the West. Topics to be discussed include: East Asia’s geographical characteristics, the early experience of interaction between this region and the West, the various modernization efforts in the region from an historical perspective, the similarities and differences in the responses of the main economies in the region to Western challenges, the competition and integration among these economies, especially between China, the emerging economic power, and its neighbors including Japan, and their interaction with the rest of the world, particularly with the U.S. today. This course is designed for non-economics majors and has no economics.
3507 INTS-207-01 Global South 1.00 LEC Prashad,Vijay TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  In 1985, the South Commission reported that two-thirds of the world's people lived in distress. To rectify this, the Commission proposed a laundry list of reforms. At the same time, political and social movements in what had been the Third World grew apace. These movements and this report inaugurate the creation of the "Global South", which is both a place and a project. This course will investigate the contours of the Global South, the conferences held to alleviate its many problems (Beijing/Women, Johannesburg/Environment, Durban/Race), and the people who live in the "South".
3508 INTS-212-01 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Tabar,Linda TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
3067 INTS-227-01 Ukraine & Belarus Histor Persp 1.00 LEC Kananovich,Uladzimir TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is designed to equip students with a detailed understanding of the critical historical events that have influenced modern Ukraine and Belarus. In the late medieval and early modern periods (fifteenth-seventeenth centuries), this region (Western Rus’) underwent a series of important political, social, and cultural transformations that led to the formation of new ethnic entities and later nation-states (Ukraine and Belarus). Late medieval and early modern Ukraine and Belarus will be placed in a wider international context that linked them to Orthodox Europe and the Occident, as well as to the world of Islam. Understanding the history of these dynamic societies will help make some sense of the contemporary relations between Ukraine and Russia.
2745 INTS-237-01 20th Cent Chinese Literrature 1.00 LEC Shen,Yipeng MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A survey of modern Chinese literature, 1918-2000. We will study three major periods of the 20th century: 1918-1949, 1949-1976, and 1976 to the present. The course will concentrate on the work of writers such as Lu Xun, Yu Dafu, Eileen Chang (Zhang Ailing), Xu Zhimo, Mao Dun, Shen Congwen, Bei Dao, Yu Hua, Su Tong, and Wang Anyi. Students will be introduced to the basic developmental trajectory of 20th-century Chinese literature, and will explore interactions between social-historical conditions and the production of modern Chinese literary works. Readings and discussion in English.
3569 INTS-255-01 Chinese Modernization 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  The road to modernization for China has been full of quakes, storms and struggles. The struggles are ongoing, but the most difficult times have passed. This course will explore China's road to modernization since 1949, with a close examination of Mao Zedong, DEng Xiaoping and the social movements such as the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, post-Mao reforms and the Tiananmen event.
3671 INTS-307-01 Women's Rights as Human Rights 1.00 SEM Bauer,Janet L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course is a cross-cultural investigation of the gendered nature of human rights and of the changes in different societies that have resulted from struggles for human rights for women. Topics covered will include rights to protection against sexual abuse and gender violence (such as female genital mutilation), subsistence rights, reproductive rights, human rights and sexual orientation, and the rights of female immigrants and refugees. The course will make use of formal legal documents as well as cultural materials such as novels, films, personal testimonies, religious rituals, and folk traditions in music.
2758 INTS-314-01 Black Internationalism 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in International Studies 101, International Studies112, History 238, or History 253.
  This course introduces students to the history of people of African descent and their struggles for universal emancipation during the 20th century. We will begin by drawing on theoretical readings about race/blackness and the African Diaspora. The second part of the class will probe the relationship between nationalism and pan-Africanism through comparative assessments of Marcus Garvey and his UNIA organization; Rastafarianism and music; and the U.S. Black Power Movement. Over the entire course, we will also seek to locate and critically evaluate Africa’s importance to these political and cultural projects. The ultimate purpose of this course is to impress upon students how struggles for self-determination were simultaneously local, national and global.
3511 INTS-336-01 Women, War, and Violence 1.00 SEM Tabar,Linda W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the intersections of imperialist wars, global capitalism, militarism, and patriarchal violence. Using a feminist anti-racist, anti-imperialist lens, it explores the rise of public sexual violence in the Middle East. Examining US imperialism, Israeli colonialism, and neoliberal capitalism as male and white projects, the course looks at how these systems re-entrench local patriarchal forces and exacerbate the conditions that promote sexual violence against women. Examining cases ranging from the US occupation of Iraq, to Egypt, Palestine and elsewhere in the region, the course considers the implications of the US neoconservative project of a “New Middle East,” the rise of imperial feminism, NGO’s, and ISIS for Arab women’s movements and the politics of women’s everyday lives.
3377 INTS-342-01 History of Sexuality 1.00 SEM Antrim,Zayde MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the ways in which notions of the body, gender, sexual desire, and sexuality have been organized over space and time. Taking as a starting point the geographical regions of the Middle East, Asia, and Latin America in the ancient and medieval periods, the course seeks to de-center discourses of Western sexual modernity. It then addresses the ways in which colonialism, racism, nationalism, and globalization have depended on and disrupted normative ideas about modern sexuality, including the hetero/homosexual binary. Throughout the course we will ask how historians use theoretical and primary sources to construct a history of sexuality. Course expectations include a final research paper.
3512 INTS-344-01 Global Hip Hop Cultures 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Hip-Hop is both music and culture with a global imprint that dates back to the 1980s. This course is a reading and writing intensive course that critically examines hip-hop cultural and political formations in Africa and the African Diaspora. We begin with canonical texts that contributed to the growth of an emergent interdisciplinary field called, 'Hip-Hop Studies' in order to familiarize ourselves with a set of core concepts, discourses and frameworks that will help us assess hip-hop's global emergence. What does the globalization of African-American music and culture tell us about the power and impact of neoliberalism on post-colonial identities, culture and nation-states in the non-Western world? It is a question that will shape our discussions on race, youth, masculinity, and nationalism in contemporary urban societies.
2386 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2673 INTS-401-01 Senior Sem Internationl Stdies 1.00 SEM Prashad,Vijay M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to seniors majoring in International Studies; other students may enroll only with permission of instructor.
  This writing intensive course functions as the capstone experience for all INTS majors. The instructor will guide INTS seniors through the process of completing a substantial research paper that engages critically with dominant disciplinary approaches to and public discourses about the “global” or “international” sphere. The instruction of this course will rotate among INTS faculty, each of whom will organize the course around a particular theme.
2293 INTS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
3313 INTS-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2802 AMST-336-01 Globalization:Amer in Mod Wrld 1.00 SEM Heatherton,Christina TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Our current moment of global crisis forces us to reckon with the contradictions of globalization. What does globalization mean? How can we trace its history? This course examines the roots of globalization through the twentieth century: from liberal democracy and communist internationalism to Bandung humanism, fascism, and global capitalism. It explores U.S. social movements, their organization and interpretations, as a site to uncover how America was depicted and understood throughout the world. These movements developed and subsequently imagined visions of freedom, governance, justice, and progress that could themselves be globalized. Through literature, film, poetry, and more, this course examines the transnational interaction of social movements within a global sphere.
2686 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein,Jane H. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2687 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Trostle,James A. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3179 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Landry,Timothy R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3502 ANTH-245-01 Anth & Global Health 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for Anthropology majors.
  This course examines the growing collaborative and critical roles of anthropology applied to international health. Anthropologists elicit disease taxonomies, describe help-seeking strategies, critique donor models, and design behavioral interventions. They ask about borders and the differences among conceptions of health and disease as global, international, or domestic topics. These issues will be explored through case studies of specific diseases, practices, therapies, agencies, and policies.
3009 CHIN-413-01 Advanced Chinese III 1.00 LEC Shen,Yipeng MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 302 or equivalent.
  Students will further develop skills in written and spoken Mandarin, with increasing emphasis on longer texts, additional characters, and extensive discussion. In order to secure maximum proficiency, students should plan to take both 413 and 415 in sequence.
2083 ECON-101-01 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Ramirez,Miguel D. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2084 ECON-101-02 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Hoag,Christopher S. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
3075 ECON-101-03 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Hoag,Christopher S. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2085 ECON-101-04 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Clark,Carol MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2128 ECON-101-05 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Xhurxhi,Irena P. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2244 ECON-101-06 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Skouloudis,Alexander MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2013 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
3013 HISP-222-01 Portuguese for Spanish Speakrs 1.00 SEM Hubert,Maria Del Rosario TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 202 or equivalent.
  An introductory language course designed for English/Spanish bilinguals or students with a strong foundation of Spanish. Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Spanish speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
3613 HIST-106-01 Crusade and 'Convivencia' 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: Course will be counted toward Language and Culture Studies majors if written work is done in Spanish.
  This course examines the history and society of Spain from the disintegration of the Roman empire through the Arab conquest and the so-called Christian Reconquista. Although Muslim and Christian rulers framed their wars in religious terms, throughout this period Muslims, Christians and Jews lived together on both sides of the frontier. That coexistence, or convivencia, was never equal, nor was it free from violence. Through primary sources, both words and images, we will explore the cultures of medieval Spain and how they developed in relation to, and in conflict with, one another. The course concludes with an examination of how colonial experiences in medieval Iberia also set the stage for later Spanish conquests in the New World.
3146 HIST-241-01 Hist China Shang-Ming 1.00 LEC Lestz,Michael E. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  A survey focused on the development of Chinese politics, culture, and society from 1600 B.C. to the conclusion of the Ming dynasty in 1644 A.D. This course will provide a historical introduction to the growth of a unified Chinese empire with its own homogeneous intellectual tradition and will explore the empire’s coexistence with an enormously varied cluster of regional cultures.
3460 HIST-332-01 African Nationalism&Decoloniz. 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines both the theoretical and empirical aspects of anticolonial nationalist movements in Africa from the end of World War II to the dismantling of the apartheid regime in South Africa in the early 1990s. Topics such as nonviolent civil disobedience, armed guerilla struggle, nationalist thought, and postcolonial state formation will inform the ways in which we seek to understand the end of European colonial rule and its social, economic, cultural, and political implications for Africa. A series of case studies will acquaint students to such themes as well as highlight the utility of an interdisciplinary approach for examining a broad array of historical developments. The second half of the course will focus on southern Africa, using the Aluka digital archive, "The Struggles for Freedom in South Africa Collection."
3461 HIST-363-01 Living on Margins of Mod Japn 1.00 LEC Bayliss,Jeffrey W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores the histories and identities of groups that, for a variety of reasons, have not been considered part of “mainstream” Japanese society. Among these are ethnic minorities, such as the Ainu, Okinawans, and resident Koreans, and social minorities, such as the descendants of former outcastes groups who are referred to collectively as the Burakumin. In addition to these groups, we will also explore the nature of groups viewed as outside of the mainstream by dint of the lifestyle they lead or the circumstances that have been forced upon them, such as the yakuza (gangsters), ultra-rightwing activists, residents of slums, and others. Through such an exploration, we will come to challenge the perception, all-too-common both inside and outside of Japan, that Japanese society is homogeneous. We will also look into how this illusion of homogeneity has been constructed, and what the consequences are for those who find themselves marginalized in the process.
3462 HIST-393-01 Prot & Proph Postwar Japan Cin 1.00 SEM Bayliss,Jeffrey M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Through a variety of readings and film viewings, this course explores how Japanese directors from 1945 to the present have used the past as a setting in which to voice political and social commentary about contemporary Japan. We will explore films of a variety of genres -- including war films, samurai dramas, science fiction films, documentaries, avant-garde films, and anime -- created over the last 65 years by directors such as Fukasaku Kinji, Ichikawa Kon, Imamura Shohei, Kurosawa Akira, Mizoguchi Kenji, Oshima Nagisa, Suzuki Seijun, Tsuburaya Eiji, and others. The readings for the course will give students an appreciation of the historical settings that the films portray, the political and social contexts in which they were produced, and an understanding of each director’s political, social, and cinematic vision. These readings will allow us to discuss selected scenes of films viewed in our class meetings in a way that will highlight how postwar discourses of pacifism, internationalism, nationalism, and anti-colonialism are reflected in these cinematic works.
2684 JWST-219-01 Israeli Film & Visual Media 1.00 LEC Ayalon,Michal T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Israeli film from the heroic nationalist sentiments of the 1950s to the conflicted alienation of the 21st century, offers a unique window into the history and society of the modern state. This course uses visual media to promote a wide variety of perspectives on Israeli culture and society, and assumes no previous knowledge about Israel. In addition to commercial movies and TV, assigned readings will address Israeli cinema as well as related historical and social issues.
2430 MUSC-113-01 Introduction to World Music 1.00 LEC Galm,Eric A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-year students.
  A comprehensive survey of global musical traditions that encompasses rural and urban music from Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean, India, Asia, and the Americas. This course is designed to highlight the central role of musical expression in human life, exploring musical sound and movement in sacred, secular, ritual, and non-ritual contexts. No previous musical knowledge is required. Students are expected to learn basic listening skills and identify musical styles. The course culminates in a final research project about a world music tradition, ensemble, performer, or other related topic. Also listed in International Studies-African studies, International Studies-Asian studies, and International Studies-Latin American and Caribbean studies.
2796 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
2980 POLS-104-02 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
2749 POLS-312-01 Politics: Mid East & N. Africa 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course offers an introduction to the comparative analysis of politics in the Middle East and North Africa. Organized thematically and conceptually, we examine topics ranging from state formation, nationalism, and civil-military relations, to oil and economic development, democratization efforts, political Islam, and regional concerns.
3521 RELG-151-01 Religions of Asia 1.00 LEC Findly,Ellison Banks MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  An introduction to the major religions of Asia: Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism, with special emphasis on how each of these modes of thought gives rise to a special vision of man in the universe, a complex of myth and practice, and a pattern of ethical behavior. (May be counted toward international studies/Asian studies.)
2779 RELG-181-01 Introduction to Islam 1.00 LEC Blackburn,Steven P. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students
  This survey course explores the diversity of Muslim experiential and intellectual approaches to the key sacred sources of the religion, the Qur'an, and the figure of the Prophet. The course addresses pre-Islamic Arabia and the rise of Islam; Muhammad and the Qur'an; prophetic traditions and jurisprudence; theology and mysticism; art and poetry; basic beliefs and practices of the Muslim community; responses to colonialism and modernity; and Islam in the United States.
3536 URST-210-01 Sustainable Urban Development 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  With the era in which city dwellers comprise a majority of the world's population has come a new urgency for understanding the balance between urban development and the environment. This course introduces students to the sub-field of urban studies which deals with sustainable development, including exploration of the debates on the meanings of sustainability and development in cities. Taking a comparative approach and a global perspective, topics to be examined may include the ecological footprint of cities, urban programs for sustainable urban planning, urban transportation and service delivery, energy issues, and the critical geopolitics of urban sustainability around the world. May be counted toward INTS major requirements.