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Course Schedule for INTERNATIONAL STUDIES - Fall 2014
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3163 INTS-101-01 Intro Lat Am& Carib Wrld 1.00 LEC Euraque,Dario A. MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM MC - 311 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This introductory course explores Latin American and Caribbean societies and cultures from the perspectives of various disciplines, and focuses on a wide range of themes. The course will enjoy the presence of some of the College’s experts, from historians to ethnomusicologists. The goal here is for the students to acquire a panoramic view of the Latin America and the Caribbean worlds while getting acquainted with various basic issues that are explored more deeply in 200- and 300-level courses at Trinity. We will touch on issues of demography, geography, basis historical periods processes, particular anthropological and cultural debates, fundamental political and gender, sociological approaches to daily life, aesthetic and literary movements, and the regions positions within the historic and contemporary world economy. (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)
3164 INTS-121-01 Modern South Asia 1.00 LEC Prashad,Vijay TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 102 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A close examination of the contemporary history of South Asia will allow us to study the dynamic and complex worlds of the South Asian subcontinent. Booming economies combined with violent political events, vast malls next to vast slums — the contradictions are apparent and cliched. In this course we will go beneath the stereotypes and study the social processes at work in modern South Asia through a reading of historical and journalistic texts, government reports and novels.
2376 INTS-202-01 Pacific Asia Fall&Resurg 1.00 LEC Wen,James G. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM LSC - 134 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Although the prospect for many developing economics has been very dim, economics in East Asia have thrived since 1945. The next century is likely to be the Pacific century. The most recent evidence of this possibility comes from China, the awakening giant with enormous potential. In an era of accelerating integration and globalization, it is important to understand how and why the Pacific Asian economies have been able to respond to the modernization challenges from the West. Topics to be discussed include: East Asia’s geographical characteristics, the early experience of interaction between this region and the West, the various modernization efforts in the region from an historical perspective, the similarities and differences in the responses of the main economies in the region to Western challenges, the competition and integration among these economies, especially between China, the emerging economic power, and its neighbors including Japan, and their interaction with the rest of the world, particularly with the U.S. today. This course is designed for non-economics majors and has no economics.
3165 INTS-205-01 War on Terror 1.00 LEC Prashad,Vijay TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 102 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  9/11 inaugurated a new epoch not only for the United States, but decidedly for the world. Tentacular wars of and on terror stretched from Afghanistan into Yemen, from Madrid into Bali. This course will offer a social history of the war on terror. We will explore the roots of the war on terror in the histories of Afghanistan and Yemen, and plot the switch from the prehistory of the War on Terror (1993-2001) to the War on Terror Part 1 (2001-2007) to the War on Terror Part 2 (2007 to the present).
2308 INTS-212-01 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM HL - 123 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 5 seats are reserved for sophomores.
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
3150 INTS-212-02 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM HL - 123 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 5 seats are reserved for sophomores
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
3166 INTS-218-01 Wmn, Gndr & Fam in Middle East 1.00 LEC Bauer,Janet L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 303 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 7 seats are reserved for first-year students
  As an introduction to the lives of women in the ‘men’s world’ of the Middle East, this course examines the impact of global sociopolitical and economic transformations on gender relations, sexuality, adolescence, family structure, local culture, and feminist movements across the Middle East and North Africa. Case studies survey male and female perspectives in a variety of ethnic/religious communities (Muslim, Jewish, Christian) and types of societies (Bedouin, agricultural, urban).
3112 INTS-237-01 20th Cent Chinese LIt 1.00 LEC Shen,Yipeng MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM LSC - 133 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A survey of modern Chinese literature, 1918-2000. We will study three major periods of the 20th century: 1918-1949, 1949-1976, and 1976 to the present. The course will concentrate on the work of writers such as Lu Xun, Yu Dafu, Eileen Chang (Zhang Ailing), Xu Zhimo, Mao Dun, Shen Congwen, Bei Dao, Yu Hua, Su Tong, and Wang Anyi. Students will be introduced to the basic developmental trajectory of 20th-century Chinese literature, and will explore interactions between social-historical conditions and the production of modern Chinese literary works. Readings and discussion in English.
3111 INTS-249-01 Immigrants & Refugees 1.00 SEM Bauer,Janet L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 303 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  The post-cold war world is one of changing national boundaries and governments, environmental devastation and internal conflicts, resulting in an apparently unprecedented flow of people from their native homelands. At a time when multiculturalism is not a popular model for national integration, immigrants, refugees, and other sojourners find themselves in new places creating new lives for themselves. The processes by which this occurs illustrate some of the basic social, cultural, and political dilemmas of contemporary societies. Using historical and contemporary case studies from Europe and the Americas, this course looks at issues of flight, resettlement, integration, cultural adaptation, and public policy involved in creating culturally diverse nations. Questions to be raised include what are the conditions under which people leave, who can become a (authentic) member of society, what rights do non-citizens versus citizens have, are borders sacrosanct, are ethnic and racial diversity achievable or desirable, is multiculturalism an appropriate model, do people want to assimilate, what are the cultural consequences of movement, and how can individuals reconstruct their identities and feel they belong? This course includes a community learning component. (Also offered under American Studies, Public Policy & Law, and Women, Gender, & Sexuality.)
3168 INTS-250-20 Hartford Global Migration Lab 0.50 LAB Bauer,Janet L. TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in International Studies 249 or 250.
  Optional Community Learning Component integrated with INTS249: Immigrants and Refugees and INTS250: Global Migration to provide field-based, participatory research experience with community partners on the consequences of global migration in the greater Hartford area.
3169 INTS-262-01 People/Culture of Caribb 1.00 LEC Desmangles,Leslie G. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 225 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A review of the attempt to develop generalizations about the structure of Caribbean society. Theoretical materials will focus on the historical role of slavery, the nature of plural societies, race, class, ethnicity, and specific institutions such as the family, the schools, the church, and the political structure.
3116 INTS-302-01 Global Cities 1.00 SEM Myers,Garth A. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MECC - 232 Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of 'developed' and 'developing' worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization.
3170 INTS-314-01 Black Internationalism 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM LSC - 135 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in International Studies 101, International Studies112, History 238, or History 253.
  This course introduces students to the history of people of African descent and their struggles for universal emancipation during the 20th century. We will begin by drawing on theoretical readings about race/blackness and the African Diaspora. The second part of the class will probe the relationship between nationalism and pan-Africanism through comparative assessments of Marcus Garvey and his UNIA organization; Rastafarianism and music; and the U.S. Black Power Movement. Over the entire course, we will also seek to locate and critically evaluate Africa’s importance to these political and cultural projects. The ultimate purpose of this course is to impress upon students how struggles for self-determination were simultaneously local, national and global.
3244 INTS-383-01 Sports, Race & Nationalism 1.00 SEM Figueroa,Luis A. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - S204 Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An examination of the how sports emerged as a major sphere of society and international politics since the late 19th century and how capitalism, race, ethnicity and nationalism have played a major role in this story. We will focus our attention mainly on baseball, basketball, soccer, cricket, and “mega” sporting events, such as the Olympics and FIFA’s World Cup, with case studies from around the world. Additional attention will be given also to the interplay between sports and mega sporting events, on the one hand, and urbanization, urbanism and urban life, on the other. This course counts for both the History and INTS majors (“Global Core” in INTS). For more information, please visit the course blog at = http://sportshistory.trincoll.edu
2497 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2907 INTS-401-01 Senior Sem Internationl Stdies 1.00 SEM Lambright,Anne MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM MC - 309 Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to seniors majoring in International Studies; other students may enroll only with permission of instructor.
  This writing intensive course functions as the capstone experience for all INTS majors. The instructor will guide INTS seniors through the process of completing a substantial research paper that engages critically with dominant disciplinary approaches to and public discourses about the “global” or “international” sphere. The instruction of this course will rotate among INTS faculty, each of whom will organize the course around a particular theme.
2328 INTS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
3183 AHIS-207-01 The Arts of China 1.00 LEC Hyland,Alice R. M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - N215 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will focus on the arts of China from the Neolithic period through the Qing Dynasty (ca. 6000 B.C.E.-1850 C.E.) We will study art produced for burial, Buddhist temples, the imperial court, and the scholar elite. We will consider architecture, sculpture, painting, bronze, jade lacquer, and ceramics, placing the art within its historical context and identifying what makes it uniquely Chinese. This 200-level lecture survey course will require a paper, a mid-term, and a final examination. (May be counted towards International Studies/Asian Studies)
3375 AMST-336-01 Globalization:Amer in Mod Wrld 1.00 SEM Heatherton,Christina TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MECC - 232 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Our current moment of global crisis forces us to reckon with the contradictions of globalization. What does globalization mean? How can we trace its history? This course examines the roots of globalization through the twentieth century: from liberal democracy and communist internationalism to Bandung humanism, fascism, and global capitalism. It explores U.S. social movements, their organization and interpretations, as a site to uncover how America was depicted and understood throughout the world. These movements developed and subsequently imagined visions of freedom, governance, justice, and progress that could themselves be globalized. Through literature, film, poetry, and more, this course examines the transnational interaction of social movements within a global sphere.
2935 AMST-409-02 American Empire 1.00 SEM Baldwin,Davarian L. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM SH - N215 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior American Studies majors.
  Thomas Jefferson once boldly described the United States as an “empire of liberty.” But whether or not America has ever taken on the identity, ever functioned, as an empire has been one of the most hotly debated topics of our current global times. In this senior seminar we want to take both a historical and contemporary look at what happens when the foreign policy of the United States converges with the general practices of military engagement, occupation, nation-building, commercial market control, and/or annexation of “foreign lands.” Do such foreign relations constitute an empire? In this course we will examine a number of critical moments including the internal U.S. expansion into native American and Mexican lands, “Manifest Destiny” projects in the turn-of-the-twentieth century Caribbean and Asian Pacific, Marshall Plan policies in Cold War Europe, and “War on Terror” initiatives in the present day Middle East. What have been the aspirations of U.S. foreign policy, what have been the consequences, how do they affect the policies and practices “back home.” Have any of these experiences constituted an American Empire?
2960 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan MW: 6:30PM-7:45PM MECC - 270 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 45
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2961 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Notar,Beth E. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM HL - 14 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 45
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2942 ANTH-228-01 Anth from Margins/South Asia 1.00 LEC Hussain,Shafqat TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM LSC - 132  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course will examine how the northwestern and northern mountainous regions of South Asia have been constructed in the Western popular imagination, both in literary texts and in academic debates. Starting with the era of the Great Game in the late 19th century and ending with the current "war on terror," the course will explore the transformation and continuation of past social and political conditions, and their representations within the region. This will help illuminate some of the enduring themes in anthropological debates, such as culture contact; empires, territories, and resources; and human agency.
3413 ANTH-245-01 Anth & Global Health 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan T: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 303 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course examines the growing collaborative and critical roles of anthropology applied to international health. Anthropologists elicit disease taxonomies, describe help-seeking strategies, critique donor models, and design behavioral interventions. They ask about borders and the differences among conceptions of health and disease as global, international, or domestic topics. These issues will be explored through case studies of specific diseases, practices, therapies, agencies, and policies.
2445 CHIN-413-01 Advanced Chinese III 1.00 LEC Cancelled GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 302 or equivalent.
  Students will further develop skills in written and spoken Mandarin, with increasing emphasis on longer texts, additional characters, and extensive discussion. In order to secure maximum proficiency, students should plan to take both 413 and 415 in sequence.
3456 CHIN-430-01 Chinese Speaking and Writing I 1.00 LEC Wang,Jui-Chien TBA TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 202 or equivalent.
  The course introduces Chinese speaking and writing skills for graduate school-level use. The targeted students will be those who major or minor in Chinese, and/or have received significant amount of Chinese language training, and/or have great interest in pursuing a Chinese-related career. In order to secure maximum proficiency, students should plan to take both 430 and 440 in sequence. (Also listed under the Asian Studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
2067 ECON-101-01 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Hoag,Christopher S. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM LSC - 132 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2068 ECON-101-02 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Hoag,Christopher S. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM LSC - 132 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2069 ECON-101-03 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Cancelled SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2070 ECON-101-04 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Ramirez,Miguel D. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 313 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2128 ECON-101-05 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Szembrot,Nichole E. MWF: 8:00AM-8:50AM MC - 102 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2260 ECON-101-06 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Szembrot,Nichole E. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM MC - 102 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
3149 ECON-101-07 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Skouloudis,Alexander MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM LSC - 132 Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Students who took Econ 101 prior to fall 2103 are reminded that a grade of C+ or better is required in Economics 101 (or B- if the course is retaken) in order to major in economics. Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
3315 HIST-224-01 Gender in Brazilian History 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  Since colonization, Brazilian society stabilized specific roles for men and women in its national discourse. We will debate how gender roles marked the experiences of Brazilian indigenous, European and afro-descent populations before and after colonialism. Gender categories also affected the lives of enslaved and freed people, since they created specific experiences for black men and women, and peculiar ways of social uplift that depended on the gender of individuals. In the 20th Century, government propaganda produced a discourse of national identity that influenced the way in which Brazilian men and especially women were seemed national and internationally. The debates and demands carried by LGBT, feminists and other social movements in Brazil who are dedicated to equalizing the rights of people will also be discussed.
3263 HIST-247-01 Latinos/Latinas in USA 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM SH - S204 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  Who are “Latinos/Latinas” and how have they come to constitute a central ethnic/racial category in the contemporary United States? This is the organizing question around which this course examines the experiences of major Latino/Latina groups—Chicanos/Mexicanos, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans—and new immigrants from Central America and the Caribbean. We study U.S. colonialism and imperialism in the Old Mexican North and the Caribbean; migration and immigration patterns and policies; racial, gender, and class distinctions; cultural and political expressions and conflicts; return migrations and transnationalism; and inter-ethnic relations and the construction of pan-Latino/Latina diasporic identities.
3332 HIST-259-01 Gender & Sexuality African His 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  This course traces the historical experiences of women and conceptions of gender in Sub-Saharan Africa from the pre-colonial period to the recent past. Themes include the role of women in pre-colonial politics and warfare, and gendered notions of labor in agriculture and trade. We will discuss African marital and familial relationships, and the extent to which colonial rule and the missionary encounter transformed those institutions. We will also explore how attitudes toward masculinity, femininity, and homosexuality have been constituted in Africa, and what impact these historical constructions have on debates in contemporary Africa.
2956 JWST-219-01 Israeli Film & Visual Media 1.00 LEC Ayalon,Michal M: 6:30PM-9:30PM LSC - 133 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Israeli film from the heroic nationalist sentiments of the 1950s to the conflicted alienation of the 21st century, offers a unique window into the history and society of the modern state. This course uses visual media to promote a wide variety of perspectives on Israeli culture and society, and assumes no previous knowledge about Israel. In addition to commercial movies and TV, assigned readings will address Israeli cinema as well as related historical and social issues.
2559 MUSC-113-01 Introduction to World Music 1.00 LEC Galm,Eric A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM AAC - 101 GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-year students.
  A comprehensive survey of global musical traditions that encompasses rural and urban music from Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean, India, Asia, and the Americas. This course is designed to highlight the central role of musical expression in human life, exploring musical sound and movement in sacred, secular, ritual, and non-ritual contexts. No previous musical knowledge is required. Students are expected to learn basic listening skills and identify musical styles. The course culminates in a final research project about a world music tradition, ensemble, performer, or other related topic. Also listed in International Studies-African studies, International Studies-Asian studies, and International Studies-Latin American and Caribbean studies.
3138 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Carbonetti,Benjamin C. MW: 6:30PM-7:45PM MC - 106 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
3328 POLS-104-02 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 106 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  This course traces the evolution of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. It examines issues and concepts such as the balance of power, collective security, the nature of warfare, the role of international organizations and international law, globalization, human rights, overpopulation, global environmental devastation, etc.
3141 POLS-312-01 Politics: Mid East & N. Africa 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM LSC - 132 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course offers an introduction to the comparative analysis of politics in the Middle East and North Africa. Organized thematically and conceptually, we examine topics ranging from state formation, nationalism, and civil-military relations, to oil and economic development, democratization efforts, political Islam, and regional concerns.
2546 RELG-151-01 Religions of Asia 1.00 LEC Findly,Ellison Banks MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM SH - N217 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 50
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for first-year students.
  An introduction to the major religions of Asia: Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism, with special emphasis on how each of these modes of thought gives rise to a special vision of man in the universe, a complex of myth and practice, and a pattern of ethical behavior. (May be counted toward international studies/Asian studies.)
2887 RELG-253-01 Indian and Islamic Painting 1.00 LEC Findly,Ellison Banks MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM SH - N215 GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  A survey of the history of miniature painting from the Persian, Mughal, and Rajput schools, with emphasis on their religious and cultural backgrounds. (May be counted toward art history, international studies/Asian studies, international studies/comparative development studies, and international studies/Middle Eastern studies.)
2278 SOCL-227-01 From Hartford to World Cities 1.00 LEC Chen,Xiangming M: 1:15PM-3:55PM HL - 14 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  The 21st century is truly a global urban age characterized by the simultaneous decline and revival of post-industrial cities in the United States and the co-existence of boom and poverty in the rapidly industrializing cities in developing countries, as well as by how globalization is exerting a growing impact on urban places and processes everywhere. This course adopts an integrated and comparative approach to studying the local and global characteristics, conditions, and consequences of the growth and transformation of cities and communities. Using Hartford—Trinity's hometown—as a point or place of departure, the course takes students to a set of world or global cities outside the United States, especially a few dynamic mega-cities in developing countries to explore the differences and surprising similarities among them.