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Course Schedule for INTERNATIONAL STUDIES - Fall 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3695 INTS-201-01 Gender & Sexuality/Transnatl 1.00 LEC Zhang, Shunyuan TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This broadly interdisciplinary course provides students with an introduction to the field of gender and sexuality studies. It pays particular attention to transnational approaches. Materials are drawn from a variety of disciplines and may include films, novels, ethnographies, oral histories, and legal cases.
3640 INTS-207-01 Global South 1.00 LEC Staff, Trinity TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  In 1985, the South Commission reported that two-thirds of the world's people lived in distress. To rectify this, the Commission proposed a laundry list of reforms. At the same time, political and social movements in what had been the Third World grew apace. These movements and this report inaugurate the creation of the "Global South", which is both a place and a project. This course will investigate the contours of the Global South, the conferences held to alleviate its many problems (Beijing/Women, Johannesburg/Environment, Durban/Race), and the people who live in the "South".
3006 INTS-212-01 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker, Raymond TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for sophomores.
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
3007 INTS-212-02 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker, Raymond TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for sophomores.
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
3008 INTS-212-03 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker, Raymond TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for sophomores.
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
3646 INTS-216-01 Undrstanding Lat Am & Caribbn 1.00 LEC Staff, Trinity TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This interdisciplinary course explores major historical themes and contemporary cultural and political topics related to Latin American and Caribbean societies and cultures. The goal is to give students a panoramic view of Latin America and the Caribbean and to introduce them to various issues that are explored more deeply in upper-division courses. We will address questions of demography and geography, basic historical periods and processes, particular anthropological and cultural debates, fundamental political and gender issues, sociological approaches to daily life, aesthetic and literary movements, and the regions' positions within the historical and contemporary world economy. Open to all students, this course is required of INTS majors with a Caribbean and Latin American Studies concentration.
3730 INTS-237-01 20th Cent Chinese Literature 1.00 LEC Shen, Yipeng MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  A survey of modern Chinese literature, 1918-2000. We will study three major periods of the 20th century: 1918-1949, 1949-1976, and 1976 to the present. The course will concentrate on the work of writers such as Lu Xun, Yu Dafu, Eileen Chang (Zhang Ailing), Xu Zhimo, Mao Dun, Shen Congwen, Bei Dao, Yu Hua, Su Tong, and Wang Anyi. Students will be introduced to the basic developmental trajectory of 20th-century Chinese literature, and will explore interactions between social-historical conditions and the production of modern Chinese literary works. Readings and discussion in English.
3010 INTS-302-01 Global Cities 1.00 SEM Myers, Garth TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: Open to INTS majors only
  This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of 'developed' and 'developing' worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization.
3710 INTS-310-01 Queer China 1.00 SEM Zhang, Shunyuan TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores non-mainstream gendered and sexual practices in China and other Sinophone cultures over the past hundred years. It will draw from a variety of materials-textual, visual, and video-and highlight interdisciplinary methodological and analytic approaches. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which non-normative gender expressions and sexual practices have been represented, embodied, and regulated over space and time.
2567 INTS-314-01 Black Internationalism 1.00 SEM Markle, Seth TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in International Studies 101, International Studies112, History 238, or History 253.
  This course introduces students to the history of people of African descent and their struggles for universal emancipation during the 20th century. We will begin by drawing on theoretical readings about race/blackness and the African Diaspora. The second part of the class will probe the relationship between nationalism and pan-Africanism through comparative assessments of Marcus Garvey and his UNIA organization; Rastafarianism and music; and the U.S. Black Power Movement. Over the entire course, we will also seek to locate and critically evaluate Africa’s importance to these political and cultural projects. The ultimate purpose of this course is to impress upon students how struggles for self-determination were simultaneously local, national and global.
3513 INTS-342-01 History of Sexuality 1.00 SEM Antrim, Zayde MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the ways in which notions of the body, gender, sexual desire, and sexuality have been organized over space and time. Taking as a starting point the geographical regions of the Middle East, Asia, and Latin America in the ancient and medieval periods, the course seeks to de-center discourses of Western sexual modernity. It then addresses the ways in which colonialism, racism, nationalism, and globalization have depended on and disrupted normative ideas about modern sexuality, including the hetero/homosexual binary. Throughout the course we will ask how historians use theoretical and primary sources to construct a history of sexuality. Course expectations include a final research paper.
2280 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2503 INTS-401-01 Senior Sem Internationl Stdies 1.00 SEM Antrim, Zayde MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to seniors majoring in International Studies; other students may enroll only with permission of instructor.
  This writing intensive course functions as the capstone experience for all INTS majors. The instructor will guide INTS seniors through the process of completing a substantial research paper that engages critically with dominant disciplinary approaches to and public discourses about the “global” or “international” sphere. The instruction of this course will rotate among INTS faculty, each of whom will organize the course around a particular theme.
2201 INTS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2802 INTS-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
3789 INTS-497-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment in this single semester thesis. This course will be graded as Pass/Fail.
3591 AHIS-209-01 Art/Arch. of Egypt/Mesopotamia 1.00 LEC Foster, Karen TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: 5 seats for Art History majors
  Introduction to the art and archaeology of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, with special attention to new discoveries and interconnections with the rest of the Bronze Age world. For Egypt, we examine material from the Predynastic period to the end of the New Kingdom. For Mesopotamia, we consider evidence from the Uruk period to the end of the Neo-Babylonian era. No prior experience with the subject is expected.
3709 AMST-310-01 Young People Rise Up! 1.00 LEC Hanna, Karen MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  How have students imagined resistance? What methods have they used to actualize their ideas, and what have been outcomes of their efforts? This course centers student movements primarily in the United States, but also includes those elsewhere, discussing their relationship to American politics. Topics may include the formation of the Third World Liberation Front and movement for Ethnic Studies, anti-Vietnam War protests, #blacklivesmatter, campus sexual violence, gun violence, and student movements in the Philippines, Iran, and South Africa. Using primary documents, film, literature, popular media, and scholarly analysis, the course will assess the global social forces that spark and shape students' collective action, conditions that impact responses from the university, police and other institutional powers, and how these social actors shape one another.
2510 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Notar, Beth MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2511 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Staff, Trinity TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2721 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Nadel-Klein, Jane TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3629 ANTH-101-04 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro, Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3083 ANTH-227-01 Intro to Political Ecology 1.00 LEC Hussain, Shafqat TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course covers social science approaches to issues concerning ecology, the environment, and nature. It looks at how social identities and cultural meaning are symbolically tied to the physical environment. Ecology and the environment are affected by larger political, social, and economic forces, so we will also broaden the analysis to include wider spatial and temporal scales. The course will also examine how sociology and geography relate to political ecology. Regional foci will include South and Southeast Asia, Africa, and Latin America.
2693 CHIN-413-01 Advanced Chinese III 1.00 LEC Shen, Yipeng MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 302 or equivalent.
  Students will further develop skills in written and spoken Mandarin, with increasing emphasis on longer texts, additional characters, and extensive discussion. In order to secure maximum proficiency, students should plan to take both 413 and 415 in sequence.
3590 CLCV-209-01 Art/Arch. of Egypt/Mesopotamia 1.00 LEC Foster, Karen TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: 5 seats for Classics majors
  Introduction to the art and archaeology of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, with special attention to new discoveries and interconnections with the rest of the Bronze Age world. For Egypt, we examine material from the Predynastic period to the end of the New Kingdom. For Mesopotamia, we consider evidence from the Uruk period to the end of the Neo-Babylonian era. No prior experience with the subject is expected.
3026 EDUC-320-01 Anthropology & Education 1.00 SEM Wong, Jia-Hui Stefanie TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or Anthropology 101 or permission of instructor.
  The anthropology of education has a rich history of investigating the links between culture, learning, and schooling. Anthropologists studying education have sought to illuminate learning and educational achievement as social processes and cultural products that cannot be understood apart from the socio-cultural contexts in which they occur. In this upper-level seminar, we will explore selected works in the anthropology of education, both classic and contemporary, in order to understand the unique contributions anthropology makes to the study of education, and in particular, the experience of minority groups in education. We will explore topics such as race, gender, and language in education and how they have been addressed by anthropologists. Students will have an opportunity to read critically a variety of detailed ethnographic and qualitative studies focusing on formal schooling and informal education in the United States and in other countries. Reviewing these studies, we will explore the central questions: What is a cultural analysis of schooling? What unique insights does ethnography (anthropology's signature method) offer into key educational problems? And finally, how can a cultural analysis of schooling inform efforts to create a more socially just educational system?
3630 ENGL-288-01 World Cinema 1.00 LEC Younger, James M: 1:15PM-3:55PM
W: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the film studies minor. Film screening only on Wednesday evenings.
  This course provides an introduction to the study of world cinema, with a focus on cinematic cultures other than those of the USA or Europe. We will begin by considering some of the theoretical questions involved in intercultural spectatorship and introducing/reviewing critical categories we can use to discuss the films. We will then proceed through a series of units based around specific cinematic cultures, focusing on movement, genres and auteurs and on the historical, cultural, and geopolitical issues that the films illuminate. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the film studies minor.
3564 ENGL-339-01 Indian Film and Literature 1.00 SEM Younger, James MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM
M: 6:30PM-9:10PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 requirement.
  This course offers an introduction to the rich culture and society of the Indian subcontinent through some of its most celebrated films and works of literature. We will explore work in different genres (Bollywood films, Bengali art cinema, documentaries, short stories, novels, poetry and non-fiction writing) and several distinctive linguistic cultures (English and Hindi, Urdu, Bengali and other regional languages in translation) as a means to feel at home within the oceanic complexity, the sublime diversity, "the Wonder that is India". This course is research intensive. For English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 requirement.
2694 HISP-222-01 Portuguese for Spanish Speakrs 1.00 SEM Patruno, Luigi TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: the equivalent of two semesters of study of any Romance Language (Spanish, French, Italian, Catalan)
  An introductory language course designed for students with any prior knowledge of a Romance Language (Spanish, Italian, French, Catalan). Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Romance Languages speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
3479 HIST-231-01 Abraham's Children 1.00 SEM Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Jews, Christians and Muslims all claimed Abraham as the founder of their particular form of monotheism. In the Middle Ages, men and women from all three groups had to negotiate relationships in war and peace. Jews lived among Christians and Muslims. Christians and Muslims fought in the Crusades, and all three groups traded with each other in the cosmopolitan cities of the Mediterranean. What kinds of worlds did these people live in? Were they worlds of prejudice and hatred or a pragmatic tolerance? How were the identities of Jews, Christians and Muslims shaped by their interactions during the Middle Ages? Are we still living with the results of those interactions?
3145 HIST-332-01 South Africa/Anti-Apartheid Mv 1.00 SEM Markle, Seth TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The creation of the apartheid state in South Africa gave birth to a litany of sociopolitical movements aimed at dismantling a system of white minority rule. In what ways can a digital archive open up a window onto this rich and dynamic history of the anti-antiapartheid movement in South Africa between 1948 and 1994? This course will seek to answer this question by primarily utilizing Aluka's "Struggles for Freedom in Southern Africa", a collection of over 190,000 primary and secondary sources that shed considerable light on how marginalized peoples and communities sought to realize a democratic alternative to settler colonialism during the era of decolonization in Africa. Topics such as political leadership, nonviolent civil disobedience, coalition building, state repression, armed guerilla resistance, nationalism, international solidarity and truth and reconciliation will inform the ways in which we search for sources of historical evidence contained in Aluka's digital archive.
3663 JWST-220-01 Mod Israeli Lit & Jew Heritage 1.00 LEC Ayalon, Michal W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Artists, and especially writers and poets, are the seismographs and mirrors of society, anticipating and reflecting its many forces and movements. During the past two hundred years Jewish life has been profoundly affected by such forces and movements as emancipation, the Enlightenment, assimilation, Zionism, and the Holocaust. A primary focus of modern Israeli writers is the birth of the State of Israel and its ongoing struggles, internally as well as with its Arab neighbors. One of the main ways Hebrew literature captures these significant changes is through the use of biblical themes, images and archetypes which resonate through the generations. This course will examine the ways in which modern Hebrew literature enriches and brings deeper understanding of collective Jewish experiences and detects and shapes the reality of modern Israel.
3537 PHIL-223-01 African Philosophy 1.00 LEC Wade, Maurice WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  What is African philosophy? Currently, among the scholars addressing this question, no single answer prevails. Some hold that philosophy, by its nature, transcends race, ethnicity, and region and hence that terms such as “African philosophy,” “European philosophy,”and “Asian philosophy,” are all rooted in misunderstanding what philosophy fundamentally is. Some argue that prior to the very recent work of African scholars trained in formal (often European) departments of philosophy, African philosophy did not (and could not) exist. Others argue that while (many of) the peoples of Africa have little or no tradition of formal (written) philosophizing, the differing worldviews embodied in the myths, religions, rituals, and other cultural practices of ethnic Africans constitute genuine African philosophy. Yet others find African philosophy in the critical musings of indigenous African (so-called) wise men or sages. In this course we will critically examine the variety of possibilities, forms, and practices in Africa and elsewhere that might be referred to appropriately as “African philosophy” and attempt to understand why the notion of “African philosophy” is so especially contentious. (May be counted toward African Studies.)
2028 POLS-103-01 Intro Compar Politics 1.00 LEC Messina, Anthony MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This section of POLS 103 is methodologically focused.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course introduces the study of comparative politics which is a subfield of political science. More specifically, it introduces many of the key concepts and theoretical approaches that have been adopted in comparative politics and surveys the political institutions and politics of select foreign countries. Students of comparative politics primarily focus on the political processes and institutions within countries (whereas students of international relations primarily, but not exclusively, study interactions among countries). Inspired by current world events and puzzles, comparativists investigate such major questions as: Why are some countries or regions more democratic than others? How do different countries organize their politics, i.e., how and why do their political party systems, electoral rules, governmental institutions, etc. differ?
3445 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Lefebvre, Thomas MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  NOTE: Seats are reserved: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS Major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
3451 POLS-256-01 State & Society in Comp Persp 1.00 LEC Matsuzaki, Reo MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This methodologically focused course examines the various ways government officials and social forces interact as both collaborators and competitors in the exercise of political power and authority across the globe. First, we will examine the role of society in the maintenance of governance within democratic and authoritarian regimes. Second, students will investigate why some countries are able to achieve social cohesion and unity, while others fragment along ethnic and racial lines. The final portion of the course will focus on societies in conflict: We will explore how individuals may successfully challenge the authority of the state and force change in government policy through collective action, as well as the causes of civil wars and the factors that determine the timing and nature of their resolution.
3454 POLS-312-01 Politics: Mid East & N. Africa 1.00 LEC Flibbert, Andrew TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course offers an introduction to the comparative analysis of politics in the Middle East and North Africa. Organized thematically and conceptually, we examine topics ranging from state formation, nationalism, and civil-military relations, to oil and economic development, democratization efforts, political Islam, and regional concerns.
3099 POLS-353-01 Authoritarianism in Eurasia 1.00 LEC Matsuzaki, Reo MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 5 seats are reserved for sophomore students.
  More than half of the countries in the world are authoritarian or mixed regimes. Yet the study of authoritarianism—specifically, how authoritarian regimes function, and sources of their resilience and collapse—has long been neglected in political science. Authoritarian regimes in Tunisia, Egypt, and Syria, all widely regarded as models of resilience right up until their demise, turned out to be strikingly and unexpectedly fragile. Conversely, analysts have predicted the collapse of North Korea for decades, only to witness its survival through war, famine, economic collapse, and potentially destabilizing leadership transitions. In this course, we will examine the nascent scholarship on authoritarianism, especially as it pertains to Eurasia—namely, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and East and Southeast Asia.
3263 PORT-222-01 Portuguese for Spanish Speakrs 1.00 SEM Patruno, Luigi TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An introductory language course designed for students with any prior knowledge of a Romance Language (Spanish, Italian, French, Catalan). Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Romance Languages speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
2868 RELG-151-01 Religions of Asia 1.00 LEC Fifield, Justin TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  An introduction to the major religions of Asia: Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism, with special emphasis on how each of these modes of thought gives rise to a special vision of man in the universe, a complex of myth and practice, and a pattern of ethical behavior. (May be counted toward international studies/Asian studies.)
3622 RELG-286-01 Islam in America 1.00 LEC Koertner, Mareike MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Islam has become the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse religious group in the United States. This course is divided into two parts: the first provides an historical survey of Islam in America, from its discovery to the present; the second part examines contemporary issues of Muslim American communities and their interactions with American society at large. Topics include religious movements among African-American and immigrant groups, educational, cultural and youth initiatives, Sufism, civil rights groups, progressive Muslims, women's and feminist movements, and Islam in popular culture and in the media.