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Course Schedule for INTERNATIONAL STUDIES - Fall 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3640 INTS-207-01 Global South 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  In 1985, the South Commission reported that two-thirds of the world's people lived in distress. To rectify this, the Commission proposed a laundry list of reforms. At the same time, political and social movements in what had been the Third World grew apace. These movements and this report inaugurate the creation of the "Global South", which is both a place and a project. This course will investigate the contours of the Global South, the conferences held to alleviate its many problems (Beijing/Women, Johannesburg/Environment, Durban/Race), and the people who live in the "South".
3403 INTS-212-01 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for sophomores.
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
3404 INTS-212-02 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for sophomores.
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
3405 INTS-212-03 Global Politics 1.00 SEM Baker,Raymond W. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for sophomores.
  This discussion course, taking the entire globe and all its peoples as a unit of study, will examine the unifying elements of the contemporary world system. Emphasis on struggles for justice, democracy, and basic human needs and rights in our global age. Particular attention to global crises originating in the Middle East.
3406 INTS-216-01 Undrstanding Lat Am & Caribbn 1.00 LEC Euraque,Dario A. MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This interdisciplinary course explores major historical themes and contemporary cultural and political topics related to Latin American and Caribbean societies and cultures. The goal is for the students to acquire a panoramic view of the Latin America and the Caribbean worlds while acquiring a deeper understanding of various issues that are explored more deeply in other upper-division courses at Trinity. We will engage issues of demography, geography, basis historical periods processes, particular anthropological and cultural debates, fundamental political and gender, sociological approaches to daily life, aesthetic and literary movements, and the regions’ positions within the historic and contemporary world economy. Open to all students, this course is required of INTS majors with a Caribbean and Latin American Studies focus.
3409 INTS-302-01 Global Cities 1.00 SEM Myers,Garth A. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This seminar examines the contemporary map of interactions between cities in the world. There is now a considerable array of research analyzing what are variously termed global or world cities in the hierarchy of the world economy, and a counter-critique has emerged which seeks to analyze all cities as ordinary, moving beyond old binaries of 'developed' and 'developing' worlds of cities. We will interrogate this debate in both its theoretical and its empirical dimensions, with case studies from Africa and assessment of cultural, political, economic and environmental globalization.
2695 INTS-314-01 Black Internationalism 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in International Studies 101, International Studies112, History 238, or History 253.
  This course introduces students to the history of people of African descent and their struggles for universal emancipation during the 20th century. We will begin by drawing on theoretical readings about race/blackness and the African Diaspora. The second part of the class will probe the relationship between nationalism and pan-Africanism through comparative assessments of Marcus Garvey and his UNIA organization; Rastafarianism and music; and the U.S. Black Power Movement. Over the entire course, we will also seek to locate and critically evaluate Africa’s importance to these political and cultural projects. The ultimate purpose of this course is to impress upon students how struggles for self-determination were simultaneously local, national and global.
3411 INTS-315-01 Global Ideologies 1.00 SEM Prashad,Vijay TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  From the 1920s to the 1980s, the countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America forged a "Third World project." This project came undone in the 1980s, as debt, war and corruption overwhelmed the three continents. Along came neo-liberalism and globalization, which emerged as the dominant ideologies of the time. With the rise of Bolivarianism in Latin America, and with the financial crisis, neo-liberalism has lost its shine. This course will trace the "Third World project," neo-liberalism, and the emergent ideology of the Global South.
3383 INTS-321-01 Gender&Sexuality in ME History 1.00 SEM Antrim,Zayde R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course takes constructions of femininity and masculinity and related representations of male and female sexuality in both the pre-modern and modern Middle East, with an emphasis on the Arab world, as its focus. Through theoretical readings and primary sources, both written and visual, we will explore the ways in which gender and sexuality have shaped political, economic, and cultural life in the Middle East.
3650 INTS-336-01 Women, War, and Violence 1.00 SEM Staff,Trinity W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the intersections of imperialist wars, global capitalism, militarism, and patriarchal violence. Using a feminist anti-racist, anti-imperialist lens, it explores the rise of public sexual violence in the Middle East. Examining US imperialism, Israeli colonialism, and neoliberal capitalism as male and white projects, the course looks at how these systems re-entrench local patriarchal forces and exacerbate the conditions that promote sexual violence against women. Examining cases ranging from the US occupation of Iraq, to Egypt, Palestine and elsewhere in the region, the course considers the implications of the US neoconservative project of a “New Middle East,” the rise of imperial feminism, NGO’s, and ISIS for Arab women’s movements and the politics of women’s everyday lives.
3150 INTS-344-01 Global Hip Hop Cultures 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Hip-Hop is both music and culture with a global imprint that dates back to the 1980s. This course is a reading and writing intensive course that critically examines hip-hop cultural and political formations in Africa and the African Diaspora. We begin with canonical texts that contributed to the growth of an emergent interdisciplinary field called, 'Hip-Hop Studies' in order to familiarize ourselves with a set of core concepts, discourses and frameworks that will help us assess hip-hop's global emergence. What does the globalization of African-American music and culture tell us about the power and impact of neoliberalism on post-colonial identities, culture and nation-states in the non-Western world? It is a question that will shape our discussions on race, youth, masculinity, and nationalism in contemporary urban societies.
2358 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2617 INTS-401-01 Senior Sem Internationl Stdies 1.00 SEM Prashad,Vijay TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to seniors majoring in International Studies; other students may enroll only with permission of instructor.
  This writing intensive course functions as the capstone experience for all INTS majors. The instructor will guide INTS seniors through the process of completing a substantial research paper that engages critically with dominant disciplinary approaches to and public discourses about the “global” or “international” sphere. The instruction of this course will rotate among INTS faculty, each of whom will organize the course around a particular theme.
2273 INTS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2992 INTS-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
3473 AMST-409-01 American Empire 1.00 SEM Baldwin,Davarian L. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  Thomas Jefferson once boldly described the United States as an “empire of liberty.” But whether or not America has ever taken on the identity, ever functioned, as an empire has been one of the most hotly debated topics of our current global times. In this senior seminar we want to take both a historical and contemporary look at what happens when the foreign policy of the United States converges with the general practices of military engagement, occupation, nation-building, commercial market control, and/or annexation of “foreign lands.” Do such foreign relations constitute an empire? In this course we will examine a number of critical moments including the internal U.S. expansion into native American and Mexican lands, “Manifest Destiny” projects in the turn-of-the-twentieth century Caribbean and Asian Pacific, Marshall Plan policies in Cold War Europe, and “War on Terror” initiatives in the present day Middle East. What have been the aspirations of U.S. foreign policy, what have been the consequences, how do they affect the policies and practices “back home.” Have any of these experiences constituted an American Empire?
2627 ANTH-101-01 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Notar,Beth E. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors, and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2628 ANTH-101-02 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Hussain,Shafqat TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
2900 ANTH-101-03 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 1.00 LEC Landry,Timothy R. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 for juniors and 5 for seniors.
  Anthropology as a field asks what it means to be human: how do we know what is universal to human existence? What is natural and what is cultural? How can the strange become familiar and the familiar strange? This course introduces the theory and method of cultural anthropology as applied to case studies from different geographic and ethnographic areas. Topics to be considered include family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbol systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, globalization and social change.
3142 ANTH-245-01 Anth & Global Health 1.00 LEC Trostle,James A. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for Anthropology majors.
  This course examines the growing collaborative and critical roles of anthropology applied to international health. Anthropologists elicit disease taxonomies, describe help-seeking strategies, critique donor models, and design behavioral interventions. They ask about borders and the differences among conceptions of health and disease as global, international, or domestic topics. These issues will be explored through case studies of specific diseases, practices, therapies, agencies, and policies.
3503 ANTH-253-01 Urban Anthropology 1.00 LEC DiVietro,Susan M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course will trace the social scientific (especially ethnographic and cultural) study of the modern city from its roots in the Industrial Revolution through the current urban transformations brought about by advanced capitalism and globalization. Why are cities organized as they are? How does their organization shape, and get shaped by, everyday practices of city inhabitants? This course will explore the roles of institutional actors (such as governments and corporations) in urban organization, and the effects of economic change, immigration, and public policy on the social organization and built environment of cities. It will examine social consequences of cities, including economic inequality, racial stratification, community formation, poverty, and urban social movements. Though it will focus on American urbanism, this course will also be international and ethnographic.
2853 CHIN-413-01 Advanced Chinese III 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chinese 302 or equivalent.
  Students will further develop skills in written and spoken Mandarin, with increasing emphasis on longer texts, additional characters, and extensive discussion. In order to secure maximum proficiency, students should plan to take both 413 and 415 in sequence.
2074 ECON-101-01 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Butos,William N. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2075 ECON-101-02 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Hoag,Christopher S. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2868 ECON-101-03 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Hoag,Christopher S. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2076 ECON-101-04 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Jacobs,Cindy MW: 6:30PM-7:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
2117 ECON-101-05 Basic Economic Principles 1.00 LEC Clark,Carol MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
  An introduction to modern economic analysis. A study of the principles of production and exchange, the distribution of income, money and banking, and national income analysis. Required of all majors in economics and recommended for all students planning business, legal, or public service careers. Note: Effective fall 2013 a grade of B- or better is required in order to major in Economics. (If Econ 101 is retaken a grade of B or better is required if the course was originally taken during or after fall 2013.) Concurrent enrollment in Economics 101 and either Economics 301 or Economics 302 is not allowed.
3427 EDUC-320-01 Anthropology & Education 1.00 SEM Dyrness,Andrea TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or Anthropology 101 (formerly 201), or permission of instructor.
  The anthropology of education has a rich history of investigating the links between culture, learning, and schooling. Anthropologists studying education have sought to illuminate learning and educational achievement as social processes and cultural products that cannot be understood apart from the socio-cultural contexts in which they occur. In this upper-level seminar, we will explore selected works in the anthropology of education, both classic and contemporary, in order to understand the unique contributions anthropology makes to the study of education, and in particular, the experience of minority groups in education. We will explore topics such as race, gender, and language in education and how they have been addressed by anthropologists. Students will have an opportunity to read critically a variety of detailed ethnographic and qualitative studies focusing on formal schooling and informal education in the United States and in other countries. Reviewing these studies, we will explore the central questions: What is a cultural analysis of schooling? What unique insights does ethnography (anthropology's signature method) offer into key educational problems? And finally, how can a cultural analysis of schooling inform efforts to create a more socially just educational system?
2854 HISP-222-01 Portuguese for Spanish Speakrs 1.00 SEM Staff,Trinity MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 202 or equivalent.
  An introductory language course designed for English/Spanish bilinguals or students with a strong foundation of Spanish. Along with the fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—the course will focus on those features of Portuguese that are most difficult for Spanish speakers: pronunciation, idioms and grammatical structures particular to Portuguese. Students will be introduced to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings and authentic materials, including films, music and videotapes.
3560 HIST-223-01 Japan into the Mod World 1.00 LEC Bayliss,Jeffrey TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  Counts as one of the survey courses for the two-semester history sequence for the Asian Studies major. This course examines the social, economic, and cultural transformations that occurred in Japan from its initial encounter with Western modernity through its rise to military superpower status in the first half of the 20th century. Students will gain a greater understanding of the problems that have shaped Japan, by exploring the challenges, conflicts, triumphs, and tragedies of modernization, industrialization, and nation-building as the Japanese experienced them in the 19th and 20th centuries. The course concludes with a detailed exploration of the road to the Pacific War and the social, political, and cultural effects of mobilization for total war followed by total defeat.
3561 HIST-241-01 Hist China Shang-Ming 1.00 LEC Lestz,Michael E. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  A survey focused on the development of Chinese politics, culture, and society from 1600 B.C. to the conclusion of the Ming dynasty in 1644 A.D. This course will provide a historical introduction to the growth of a unified Chinese empire with its own homogeneous intellectual tradition and will explore the empire’s coexistence with an enormously varied cluster of regional cultures.
2396 MUSC-113-01 Introduction to World Music 1.00 LEC Galm,Eric A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB1  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-year students.
  A comprehensive survey of global musical traditions that encompasses rural and urban music from Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean, India, Asia, and the Americas. This course is designed to highlight the central role of musical expression in human life, exploring musical sound and movement in sacred, secular, ritual, and non-ritual contexts. No previous musical knowledge is required. Students are expected to learn basic listening skills and identify musical styles. The course culminates in a final research project about a world music tradition, ensemble, performer, or other related topic. Also listed in International Studies-African studies, International Studies-Asian studies, and International Studies-Latin American and Caribbean studies.
3508 POLS-104-01 Intro Intl Relations 1.00 LEC Lefebvre,Thomas X. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This section is methodologically focused
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, and 5 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course offers an introduction to international relations (IR), addressing fundamental questions in the fields of international security, international political economy, and international law & organization. We learn about the leading theoretical perspectives in political science-Realism, Liberalism, and Constructivism-as well as a range of alternatives rooted in domestic politics, political psychology, postmodernism, Marxism, and feminism. The course serves as a foundational introduction to the IR subfield, with equal emphasis on substantive issues and theoretical concerns.
3499 POLS-265-01 Understand Conflict in Africa 1.00 LEC Kamola,Isaac A. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 for sophomores, 5 for junior Political Science majors. No seniors without instructor permission
  Many Americans claim to know certain truths about Africa when, in reality, such understandings rely heavily upon ahistorical representations of the continent. In recent decades, the portrayal of Africa as conflict-prone and violent has become the predominant way of "knowing" Africa . This course disarms such limited understandings by engaging, historicizing, and contextualizing political violence in Africa. The course starts with recent conflicts, including wars in Somalia, Rwanda, Congo, Sudan, and Libya. We then situate these conflicts within the legacy of colonialism, the Cold War, and the contemporary reorganization of the world economy. The class concludes by debating possible solutions, including foreign intervention (peacekeeping, AFRICOM, the International Criminal Court) as well as responses crafted by African-led organizations and movements (ECOWAS, African Union, and Arab Spring).
3514 POLS-322-01 Intl Political Economy 1.00 LEC Kamola,Isaac A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course examines the interplay of politics and economics in the current world system since the European expansion in the 16th century. Focus will be on the penetration and colonization of Latin America, Asia, and Africa; economic relations in the industrialized world and between the north and the south; the role of international institutions such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund; the role of international trade and transnational corporations; the changing division of labor in the world economy; and current problems of the world economy.
3155 RELG-151-01 Religions of Asia 1.00 LEC Fifield,Justin MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An introduction to the major religions of Asia: Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism, with special emphasis on how each of these modes of thought gives rise to a special vision of man in the universe, a complex of myth and practice, and a pattern of ethical behavior. (May be counted toward international studies/Asian studies.)
2706 RELG-181-01 Introduction to Islam 1.00 LEC Koertner,Mareike MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students
  This survey course explores the diversity of Muslim experiential and intellectual approaches to the key sacred sources of the religion, the Qur'an, and the figure of the Prophet. The course addresses pre-Islamic Arabia and the rise of Islam; Muhammad and the Qur'an; prophetic traditions and jurisprudence; theology and mysticism; art and poetry; basic beliefs and practices of the Muslim community; responses to colonialism and modernity; and Islam in the United States.
3458 RELG-259-01 Hindu Texts: Bhagavad Gita 1.00 SEM Fifield,Justin MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  An exploration of the great Indian devotional text, “The Song of God,” focusing on its context in the Mahabharata epic, its social teaching, and its understanding of the god Krishna. Central to our discussion will be Arjuna’s dilemma, the renunciation of attachment to the fruits of action, and the mind stabilized on the divine. We will use elect translations of the text and their commentaries.
3167 URST-210-01 Sustainable Urban Development 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TBA TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  With the era in which city dwellers comprise a majority of the world's population has come a new urgency for understanding the balance between urban development and the environment. This course introduces students to the sub-field of urban studies which deals with sustainable development, including exploration of the debates on the meanings of sustainability and development in cities. Taking a comparative approach and a global perspective, topics to be examined may include the ecological footprint of cities, urban programs for sustainable urban planning, urban transportation and service delivery, energy issues, and the critical geopolitics of urban sustainability around the world. May be counted toward INTS major requirements.