Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for HISTORY - Fall 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3553 HIST-100-01 Modern Britain Since 1750 1.00 LEC Regan-Lefebvre,Jennifer M. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  This course surveys the profound and continuous ways in which Britain changed over the course of the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries: in terms of its boundaries, political system, population, economy, and culture. In 1750 ‘Britain’ refers to an agrarian state composed of three countries, with a powerful monarchy, limited democracy and a growing empire. By 1900 Britain has become a United Kingdom, a highly industrialised and urbanised state with a massive empire and a broadening democratic system; by 2000, it has ‘lost’ its empire but is profoundly globalised and democratic. Why, when and how did these changes happen? This class will be as interactive lectures with particular time will be set aside for class discussions and analysis of primary sources.
3554 HIST-115-01 Hist of the Greek World:c.1500 1.00 LEC Caldwell,Lauren E. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  This course covers the history of the Greek world—Greece, the Aegean islands, western Asia Minor, the Black Sea, and southern Italy and Sicily—in the period between the end of the Bronze Age and the arrival of the Romans (c. 1500-200 BCE). The emergence of the polis, the Greek city-state, as the predominant way to organize political, social, economic, religious, and cultural life, and the spread of these institutions, form the central foci of the course. There will be emphasis on the reading and interpretation of primary source material through lectures, discussions, and analytical writing.
3555 HIST-200-01 Hartford: Past and Present 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  Since Dutch fur traders arrived in the 1610s, Hartford and its region have been part of many core themes in American urban history. This course examines Hartford's rise as a financial and manufacturing center from the 1800s to early 1900s; the roles played by ethnicity, gender, religion, race and social class in urban and suburban politics, culture, civic institutions and neighborhoods; the evolution in urban planning, architecture, transportation and public spaces; and the impact of post-¬-1945 suburbanization, capitalist restructuring and globalization on the social, political and cultural profile of Hartford and its suburbs.
3709 HIST-203-01 Urban Nightlife Since 1870 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students
  Using an array of studies, genres, and urban settings, from Havana to Chicago, Rio de Janeiro to London, Beirut to Shanghai, and Accra to Seoul, we examine the evolution of nightlife from the late 1800s to our presently globalized world, highlighting the central roles played by all manner of gender, sexual, racial\ethnic, and class identities. Throughout the semester, we will draw heavily on the rich scholarship in Queer Studies and Critical Race Studies that has helped recast urban nightlife as more than banal entertainment and debauchery. Instead, we will rethink nightlife, from before the Jazz Age to Stonewall and today, as a social arena where class, sexual norms, and racism can\are also subverted, helping propel broader dynamics of cultural, political, and social change.
3557 HIST-209-01 African-American History 1.00 LEC Greenberg,Cheryl TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  The experiences of African-Americans from the 17th century to the present with particular emphasis on life in slavery and in the 20th-century urban North.
3558 HIST-216-01 World War II 1.00 LEC Kassow,Samuel D. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  This is a survey of the political, military, social, cultural and economic aspects of the Second World War.
3559 HIST-219-01 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Cocco,Sean MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 10 for juniors
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3571 HIST-219-02 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Kete,Kathleen MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 10 for juniors
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3572 HIST-219-03 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Wickman,Thomas M. MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 3 for junior History majors, 3 for junior American Studies majors, and 4 for other juniors
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3560 HIST-223-01 Japan into the Mod World 1.00 LEC Bayliss,Jeffrey TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  Counts as one of the survey courses for the two-semester history sequence for the Asian Studies major. This course examines the social, economic, and cultural transformations that occurred in Japan from its initial encounter with Western modernity through its rise to military superpower status in the first half of the 20th century. Students will gain a greater understanding of the problems that have shaped Japan, by exploring the challenges, conflicts, triumphs, and tragedies of modernization, industrialization, and nation-building as the Japanese experienced them in the 19th and 20th centuries. The course concludes with a detailed exploration of the road to the Pacific War and the social, political, and cultural effects of mobilization for total war followed by total defeat.
3561 HIST-241-01 Hist China Shang-Ming 1.00 LEC Lestz,Michael E. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  A survey focused on the development of Chinese politics, culture, and society from 1600 B.C. to the conclusion of the Ming dynasty in 1644 A.D. This course will provide a historical introduction to the growth of a unified Chinese empire with its own homogeneous intellectual tradition and will explore the empire’s coexistence with an enormously varied cluster of regional cultures.
3562 HIST-298-01 Introductory History Seminar 1.00 SEM Elukin,Jonathan MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Seats are reserved for Sophomore and First Year Students
  The Introductory History Seminars are small, discussion-rich classes for first and second-year students who are considering majoring in history or who have just declared history as their major. The class will introduce students both to the field and the department in the more supportive setting of a seminar.
3563 HIST-299-01 What is History? 1.00 LEC Elukin,Jonathan M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: This course is open only to History majors and minors.
  A study of the character and range of activities undertaken by historians. Students will critically evaluate the way in which historians treat evidence and draw conclusions. Topics considered will include an introduction of some of the subdisciplines within the field and an examination of a number of important exchanges on matters of substance and method currently under debate among historians.
3564 HIST-300-01 History Workshop 1.00 SEM Euraque,Dario A. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one History course completed at Trinity, or permission of instructor.
  The Workshop seminar combines extensive readings on the topic of the seminar with a substantial research paper involving the use of primary source materials and original analysis. Prerequisite: At least one History Department course completed at Trinity. This course is primarily for History majors but permission of the instructor will allow other Trinity students interested to enroll.
3565 HIST-304-01 Renaissance Italy 1.00 SEM Cocco,Sean TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores the origin, distinctiveness, and importance of the Italian Renaissance. It is also about culture, society, and identity in the many “Italies” that existed before the modern period. Art, humanism, and the link between cultural patronage and political power will be a focus, as will the lives of 15th- and 16th-century women and men. Early lectures will trace the evolution of the Italian city-states, outlining the social and political conditions that fostered the cultural flowering of the 1400s and 1500s. We will consider Florence in the quattrocento, and subsequently shift to Rome in the High Renaissance. Later topics will include the papacy’s return to the Eternal City, the art of Michelangelo and Raphael, and the ambitions of the warlike and mercurial Pope Julius II. Italy was a politically fragmented peninsula characterized by cultural, linguistic, and regional differences. For this reason, other topics will include: the fortunes of Venice, the courts of lesser city-states like Mantua and Ferrara, the life of Alessandra Strozzi, and the exploits of the “lover and fighter” Benvenuto Cellini. We will also look at representations of the Renaissance in film.
3105 HIST-311-01 Place in the Native Northeast 1.00 SEM Wickman,Thomas M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Class enrollment is limited to 10 History majors and 5 American Studies majors.
  The coasts, rivers, fields, hills, villages, and cities of present-day Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia have been home for indigenous families, communities, and nations through numerous environmental, political, and economic transformations. Students will learn about the ways that Native nations of the Northeast, from Pequots to Mi'kmaqs, have adapted, recreated, and reaffirmed a deep connectedness to their homelands and territories, from the fifteenth century to the present. Fields trips to local sites and archives will facilitate original historical research. Primary sources to be assigned include autobiographies, travel narratives, war histories, maps, Native American stories, and dictionaries of indigenous place names, and secondary source readings will cover major themes in Native American studies, with special emphasis on sense of place.
3384 HIST-318-01 Gender&Sexuality in ME History 1.00 SEM Antrim,Zayde R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course takes constructions of femininity and masculinity and related representations of male and female sexuality in both the pre-modern and modern Middle East, with an emphasis on the Arab world, as its focus. Through theoretical readings and primary sources, both written and visual, we will explore the ways in which gender and sexuality have shaped political, economic, and cultural life in the Middle East.
3566 HIST-327-01 World Histories of Wine 1.00 SEM Regan-Lefebvre,Jennifer M. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar explores the history of wine, a new and growing research field in world history. We will consider how wine has been produced, traded, and consumed in both continental Europe and the “New World” since circa 1600. Topics will include: approaches to commodity history; wine, terroir and the construction of national identity; protection and global markets; technological change and modernisation; networks, trade and information exchanges; and the creation of consumers and experts. There will be a field trip to a Connecticut winery. All students will write a major research paper and it is possible to gain additional course credit for Language Across the Curriculum by undertaking foreign-language research.
3567 HIST-328-01 Comparative Urbanism 1.00 SEM Cancelled Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Please contact Prof. Euraque, Prof. Bayliss, or Ms. St. Peter for a permission number for this course.
  This course explores urban history and urban planning by focusing on how certain models of urbanism emerged alongside modernity and capitalism since Paris was transformed into the emblematic city of capitalist modernity in 1850-1870. Topics include urban spaces, urban planning and architecture; the interplay between politics and social movements; finance capital and real-estate development; and mass consumption and sports mega-events. Examples will include cities in Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia.
3568 HIST-332-01 South Africa/Anti-Apartheid Mv 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The creation of the apartheid state in South Africa gave birth to a litany of sociopolitical movements aimed at dismantling a system of white minority rule. In what ways can a digital archive open up a window onto this rich and dynamic history of the anti-antiapartheid movement in South Africa between 1948 and 1994? This course will seek to answer this question by primarily utilizing Aluka's "Struggles for Freedom in Southern Africa", a collection of over 190,000 primary and secondary sources that shed considerable light on how marginalized peoples and communities sought to realize a democratic alternative to settler colonialism during the era of decolonization in Africa. Topics such as political leadership, nonviolent civil disobedience, coalition building, state repression, armed guerilla resistance, nationalism, international solidarity and truth and reconciliation will inform the ways in which we search for sources of historical evidence contained in Aluka's digital archive.
3569 HIST-334-01 Provinces of the Roman Empire 1.00 SEM Caldwell,Lauren E. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A history of the first two centuries of the provinces of the Roman Empire, including the processes of acquisition and Romanization and the survival of regional cultures. Important themes include social conditions, economic opportunities, and religious and political change. Extensive use of archaeological evidence.
3595 HIST-353-01 American Slavery 1.00 SEM Gac,Scott M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  This course covers important themes and developments in the history of slavery in the United States. From origins in indigenous communities, colonization, and the black Atlantic, human bondage shaped (and continues to shape) the legal and social framework for generations of Americans. Readings feature voices from slaveholders to the enslaved, politicians and activists, as well as some of the best work done by recent historians.
3570 HIST-376-01 The French Revolution 1.00 SEM Kete,Kathleen W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An exploration of the Great French Revolution of 1789 that focuses on its social and political history, beginning with the Revolution’s origins in the crisis of the old regime and ending with its legacy in the nineteenth-century Europe. The course will grapple with the major historiographical debates, recently reinvigorated by an explosion of innovative scholarship on the Revolution. Topics to be examined include: the origins of the Revolution, the radicalization of the Revolution, counterrevolution, political culture and legitimacy, transformations in the civic order, the roles of different social actors (the bourgeoisie, nobles, artisans, peasants, women), the Thermidorian reaction, and the Napoleonic settlement. Students will be asked to evaluate competing interpretations and reach their own conclusions. The course will combine lecture and discussion of interpretive works and primary sources.
2287 HIST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
2288 HIST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
2683 HIST-498-01 Sr Thesis Part 1 & Seminar 2.00 SEM Bayliss,Jeffrey TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  A two-semester senior thesis including the required research seminar in the fall term. Permission of the instructor is required for Part I.
3471 AMST-285-01 Born in Blood 1.00 LEC Gac,Scott MW: 2:30PM-3:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  NOTE: 17 seats reserved for first year students, 17 for sophomores, 10 for juniors, and 5 for seniors
  This course explains how violence has made modern America and belongs alongside liberty, democracy, freedom, and equality in the pantheon of American political and cultural ideals. Using figures such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Dwight Eisenhower, and events from the American Revolution to the era of Civil Rights, "Born in Blood" situates state sanctioned violence against American citizens as a definitive force in American life.
3472 AMST-325-01 New York and its Neighborhoods 1.00 SEM Manevitz,Alexander D. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Founded as a small Dutch colonial port city on a narrow island inhabited by Lenape Indians, New York City became the most populous city in the United States, as well as a global economic and cultural hub. In order to better understand New York’s complex and uneven urban growth, we will analyze the ways a diverse array of New Yorkers struggled to define themselves and their communities. As we explore the dynamic history of the city and its residents, we will become better scholars and more responsible urban citizens. Each class meeting will focus on one of New York City’s diverse neighborhoods, using it as a lens to illustrate and investigate important themes of urban and American history that extend well beyond the five boroughs.
3573 AMST-354-01 US Civil War/Reconstruction 1.00 SEM Manevitz,Alexander D. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  As much as the American Civil War was a culmination of centuries of history, it was also a moment of fundamental rupture, transformation, and opportunity. The war, reconstruction, and their reverberations shook the whole nation. At the center of this tumultuous time was the destruction of slavery-on which the nation had been built-and the reconstruction of freedom, labor, and capital across the country. This course will highlight the social, political, economic, and cultural forces that shaped the epoch and changed the nation. Some of the issues we will investigate include: the causes and effects of the American Civil War, slavery, emancipation and freedom, race, racism and racial violence, gender and the role of women in the war and its aftermath, and historical memory.
3406 INTS-216-01 Undrstanding Lat Am & Caribbn 1.00 LEC Euraque,Dario A. MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This interdisciplinary course explores major historical themes and contemporary cultural and political topics related to Latin American and Caribbean societies and cultures. The goal is for the students to acquire a panoramic view of the Latin America and the Caribbean worlds while acquiring a deeper understanding of various issues that are explored more deeply in other upper-division courses at Trinity. We will engage issues of demography, geography, basis historical periods processes, particular anthropological and cultural debates, fundamental political and gender, sociological approaches to daily life, aesthetic and literary movements, and the regions’ positions within the historic and contemporary world economy. Open to all students, this course is required of INTS majors with a Caribbean and Latin American Studies focus.
2695 INTS-314-01 Black Internationalism 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in International Studies 101, International Studies112, History 238, or History 253.
  This course introduces students to the history of people of African descent and their struggles for universal emancipation during the 20th century. We will begin by drawing on theoretical readings about race/blackness and the African Diaspora. The second part of the class will probe the relationship between nationalism and pan-Africanism through comparative assessments of Marcus Garvey and his UNIA organization; Rastafarianism and music; and the U.S. Black Power Movement. Over the entire course, we will also seek to locate and critically evaluate Africa’s importance to these political and cultural projects. The ultimate purpose of this course is to impress upon students how struggles for self-determination were simultaneously local, national and global.
3150 INTS-344-01 Global Hip Hop Cultures 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Hip-Hop is both music and culture with a global imprint that dates back to the 1980s. This course is a reading and writing intensive course that critically examines hip-hop cultural and political formations in Africa and the African Diaspora. We begin with canonical texts that contributed to the growth of an emergent interdisciplinary field called, 'Hip-Hop Studies' in order to familiarize ourselves with a set of core concepts, discourses and frameworks that will help us assess hip-hop's global emergence. What does the globalization of African-American music and culture tell us about the power and impact of neoliberalism on post-colonial identities, culture and nation-states in the non-Western world? It is a question that will shape our discussions on race, youth, masculinity, and nationalism in contemporary urban societies.
3422 WMGS-301-01 Western Feminist Thought 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in one other course in Women Gender and Sexuality.
  An exploration of the main currents in American feminism, with occasional excursions into European thought. The course readings assume (rather than demonstrate) women’s historical subordination to man and put forward various explanations and strategies for change. Readings in J.S. Mill, C. P. Gilman, Emma Goldman, Simone de Beauvoir, Adrienne Rich, bell hooks, Mary Daly, Audre Lorde, and others. This course is not open to First-Year students.