Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for HISTORY - Spring 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
4939 HIST-135-01 War & Gender in Europe 1914-45 1.00 LEC Rodriguez,Allison A. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - S201 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  Between 1914 and 1945, Europe was destroyed, rebuilt and destroyed once more. All aspects of society were affected and changed by the wars, including the gender order. This course will examine the breaks, as well as the continuities, in the relationship between men and women over the course of two devastating World Wars. The wars forced women to take on jobs previously restricted to men, as well as navigate the challenges of the Home Front; meanwhile, men were tasked with reintegrating into society after facing the horrors of war, often returning to a home that was much different than the one they had left. Through memoirs, scholarly texts, and film, we will explore how the wars affected conceptions of both femininity and masculinity in Europe.
5137 HIST-212-01 The Crusades & Medievl Society 1.00 LEC Elukin,Jonathan MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM LSC - 134 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  An introductory survey of the political, social, military, and religious history of the Crusades. Using primary sources, the course will also examine how aspects of the Crusades reveal broader themes in medieval history, including: European identity, pilgrimage, religious violence, technological innovation, perceptions of non-Europeans, and the influence of the Crusades on early modern voyages of discovery. Lecture and discussion format.
5245 HIST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM LSC - AUD GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Course examines the historical evolution and current dynamics of Latin American cities, from the pre-colonial (pre-1492), to the colonial (1492–1825) and post-colonial (since the 1800's) periods. A variety of sources allow us to explore specific examples from several cities, including: Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Havana, Mexico City, Lima, Rio de Janeiro, and São Paulo, for example. Topics include colonialism, nationalism and transnationalism; urban slavery and race; rural-urban and ethnic migrations; industrialization and the urban working-class; urbanism, urban spaces and architecture; authoritarianism, populism and democratization; and consumer cultures, sports and leisure, among others.
5141 HIST-219-01 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Cocco,Sean MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM MC - AUD GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 10 seats for juniors.
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
5142 HIST-219-02 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Kete,Kathleen MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM MC - 303 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 10 seats for juniors.
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
5143 HIST-219-03 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Wickman,Thomas M. MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM MC - 106 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 10 seats for juniors.
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
5144 HIST-224-01 Gender in Brazilian History 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Since colonization, Brazilian society stabilized specific roles for men and women in its national discourse. We will debate how gender roles marked the experiences of Brazilian indigenous, European and afro-descent populations before and after colonialism. Gender categories also affected the lives of enslaved and freed people, since they created specific experiences for black men and women, and peculiar ways of social uplift that depended on the gender of individuals. In the 20th Century, government propaganda produced a discourse of national identity that influenced the way in which Brazilian men and especially women were seemed national and internationally. The debates and demands carried by LGBT, feminists and other social movements in Brazil who are dedicated to equalizing the rights of people will also be discussed.
5145 HIST-231-01 Abraham's Children 1.00 SEM Elukin,Jonathan TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM HIL - DININGROOM HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Jews, Christians and Muslims all claimed Abraham as the founder of their particular form of monotheism. In the Middle Ages, men and women from all three groups had to negotiate relationships in war and peace. Jews lived among Christians and Muslims. Christians and Muslims fought in the Crusades, and all three groups traded with each other in the cosmopolitan cities of the Mediterranean. What kinds of worlds did these people live in? Were they worlds of prejudice and hatred or a pragmatic tolerance? How were the identities of Jews, Christians and Muslims shaped by their interactions during the Middle Ages? Are we still living with the results of those interactions?
5146 HIST-233-01 (Re)Connecting the Black Atlan 1.00 LEC Da Cruz Brito,Luciana MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM MECC - 232 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course explores slavery, abolition, and freedom in Brazil and the United States from the 16th to the 19th century. Where only 400,000 Africans were transported to North America during this time, more than 4 million were brought to Brazil, the largest Latin American country. From such numbers, in both countries, in the United States somewhat organically through reproduction and in Brazil through importation, emerged the foundation of massive slave societies. Slavery in the U.S. relied on a highly racialized society, one that formally institutionalized a racial code; slavery in Brazil was less formalized, but no less racial. Such differences had important implications for the eradication of slavery in the two countries.
4783 HIST-242-01 History of China, Qing to Pres 1.00 LEC Lestz,Michael E. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM SH - N130 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  A survey of modern Chinese history in the period covering the last traditional dynastic state (1644-1911) and 20th-century China. Emphasis on the collapse of the Confucian state, China’s “Enlightenment,” and the Chinese Revolution.
5254 HIST-244-01 Star Trek in the 1960s 1.00 LEC Greenberg,Cheryl M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TC - 142 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  For many, the 1960s were the “final frontier,” as young people, African-Americans, women, conservatives, members of the “New Left” and many others struggled to re-imagine their lives and the life of their nation. Originally intended as a “Wagon Train to the Stars,” Star Trek came to embody the 1960s spirit, both reflecting and reflecting on the many pressing issues of the day. This course will examine important issues in the 1960s from Vietnam to the counterculture, from race to shifting sexual norms, from new technology to workers’ rights, through the television show that explored the “strange new worlds” of its time.
5201 HIST-247-01 Latinos/Latinas in USA 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - S204 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Who are “Latinos/Latinas” and how have they come to constitute a central ethnic/racial category in the contemporary United States? This is the organizing question around which this course examines the experiences of major Latino/Latina groups—Chicanos/Mexicanos, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans—and new immigrants from Central America and the Caribbean. We study U.S. colonialism and imperialism in the Old Mexican North and the Caribbean; migration and immigration patterns and policies; racial, gender, and class distinctions; cultural and political expressions and conflicts; return migrations and transnationalism; and inter-ethnic relations and the construction of pan-Latino/Latina diasporic identities.
5147 HIST-256-01 Human Rights in Lat Amer&Carib 1.00 LEC Euraque,Dario A. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MC - 311 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  In the 1970s and 1980s, thousands of people were “disappeared,” tortured and murdered in Latin America and the Caribbean, mostly by military regimes and by para-military death-squads. The period is often characterized as perhaps the lowest point in the modern abuse of “Human Rights” in the region. This course explores how these central notions, the human and rights, have evolved in theory and in practice in the history of the Americas. The course begins with the 16th-century debates among the Spaniards over the “humanity” of Indians and enslaved Africans; it then covers distinguishing elements of the human and rights within the legal structures of the nations created after independence from Spain in the 1820s and before the more contemporary conceptions of human rights in the aftermath of the Holocaust and the crimes against humanity during WWII. Finally, the modern conception and practice of human rights defense and legal monitoring are explored in case studies in the region from the late 1940s to the 1980s.
5133 HIST-258-01 America's War in Vietnam 1.00 LEC Heaney,Michael K. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM LSC - 134 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: Students who have completed AMST 380 will not receive American Studies credit for this course.
  America's Vietnam War was a culminating event in histories and cultures of both US and Vietnam, and a defining moment of the Cold War. For the US, war was a demoralizing, bitterly contested foreign adventure, spawning huge domestic anti-war movement of 1960s and -70s, ongoing post-war disagreement over appropriate "lessons" to be drawn - even over what actually happened - and continuing debate over whether the current Global War on Terror is comparable. War ended President Johnson's political career. For Vietnam, war was destructive, an exhausting battle-to-the-death, combining elements of insurgency with civil, revolutionary, and conventional war-making, ultimately elevating Ho Chi Minh to iconic status. This course treats war's complicated racial, gender, and class issues, and features guest speakers, and pop-cultural interpretations of conflict. Professor is combat veteran of the war.
5056 HIST-261-01 World War I 1.00 LEC Rodriguez,Allison A. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - S201 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  The First World War devastated Europe for four years, and in its wake left a new world order. Empires fell and new countries rose in their place. The social, political and gender order were all challenged during the war. This course will examine not only the war itself – the major battles, the Home Fronts, the revolutions that followed – but how the war has been remembered over the past century. We will examine novels and memoirs, war poetry, and popular film to discover how the war’s place in history and memory has changed.
5184 HIST-270-01 Parliamentary Debate 1.00 SEM Regan-Lefebvre,Jennifer M. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - AUD HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 32
  This course introduces the history of debate in the British parliamentary tradition and the practice of debate as a collegiate extra-curricular activity. The course is a dynamic mix of lecture, seminar-style discussion and experiential learning. The course has three components: historical background to and analysis of the British parliamentary system, drawing on the emerging field of the history of rhetoric; primary source analysis of historical speeches and debates; applied sessions when students will draft and practice their own debates in teams. Written exercises include developing a ‘time-space case’ based in British history. Students will complete the course with a broader understanding of British political history, a deeper sensitivity to political rhetoric, and stronger oral and written argumentation and communication skills. No debate experience is necessary.
5149 HIST-299-01 What is History? 1.00 LEC Euraque,Dario A. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - T121 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: This course is open only to History majors and minors.
  A study of the character and range of activities undertaken by historians. Students will critically evaluate the way in which historians treat evidence and draw conclusions. Topics considered will include an introduction of some of the subdisciplines within the field and an examination of a number of important exchanges on matters of substance and method currently under debate among historians.
5364 HIST-299-02 What is History? 1.00 LEC Wickman,Thomas M. MF: 2:40PM-3:55PM SH - N128 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: This course is open only to History majors and minors.
  A study of the character and range of activities undertaken by historians. Students will critically evaluate the way in which historians treat evidence and draw conclusions. Topics considered will include an introduction of some of the subdisciplines within the field and an examination of a number of important exchanges on matters of substance and method currently under debate among historians.
4428 HIST-300-01 History Workshop 1.00 SEM Lestz,Michael E. WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM 70VS - SEM Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one History course completed at Trinity, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course must be taken within two semesters of declaring the history major. Non-history majors accepted only with permission of the Chair.
  The Workshop seminar combines extensive readings on the topic of the seminar with a substantial research paper involving the use of primary source materials and original analysis. Prerequisite: At least one History Department course completed at Trinity. This course is primarily for History majors but permission of the instructor will allow other Trinity students interested to enroll.
5151 HIST-322-01 Shanghai:Treaty Port-Megacity 1.00 SEM Lestz,Michael E. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - S201  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  In a few decades after its forcible opening as a Treaty Port in 1842, Shanghai emerged as Asia's greatest port. It quickly grew to an international city that played a defining in China role as a catalyst for cultural, social, and economic change. After 1937, however, war, civil war, and revolution put the brakes on Shanghai's advance. After the late 1980's, Shanghai reemerged as one of the world's leading centers of trade and a meeting place of civilizations. Today the city is the linchpin of the economy of the Yangtze River basin and China's foremost gateway to the world. Using historical, literary, and documentary materials this course will reflect on the evolution of Shanghai and the role it played as a catalyst for change in various eras.
5183 HIST-327-01 World Histories of Wine 1.00 SEM Regan-Lefebvre,Jennifer M. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM SH - N129 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 14
  NOTE: 8 seats are reserved for History Majors or Minors
  This seminar explores the history of wine, a new and growing research field in world history. We will consider how wine has been produced, traded, and consumed in both continental Europe and the “New World” since circa 1600. Topics will include: approaches to commodity history; wine, terroir and the construction of national identity; protection and global markets; technological change and modernisation; networks, trade and information exchanges; and the creation of consumers and experts. There will be a field trip to a Connecticut winery. All students will write a major research paper and it is possible to gain additional course credit for Language Across the Curriculum by undertaking foreign-language research.
5262 HIST-328-01 Comparative Urbanism 1.00 SEM Figueroa,Luis A. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - S204 Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores urban history and urban planning by focusing on how certain models of urbanism emerged alongside modernity and capitalism since Paris was transformed into the emblematic city of capitalist modernity in 1850-1870. Topics include urban spaces, urban planning and architecture; the interplay between politics and social movements; finance capital and real-estate development; and mass consumption and sports mega-events. Examples will include cities in Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia.
4786 HIST-332-01 African Nationalism&Decoloniz. 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM LIB - 103 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines both the theoretical and empirical aspects of anticolonial nationalist movements in Africa from the end of World War II to the dismantling of the apartheid regime in South Africa in the early 1990s. Topics such as nonviolent civil disobedience, armed guerilla struggle, nationalist thought, and postcolonial state formation will inform the ways in which we seek to understand the end of European colonial rule and its social, economic, cultural, and political implications for Africa. A series of case studies will acquaint students to such themes as well as highlight the utility of an interdisciplinary approach for examining a broad array of historical developments. The second half of the course will focus on southern Africa, using the Aluka digital archive, "The Struggles for Freedom in South Africa Collection."
5152 HIST-334-01 Provinces of the Roman Empire 1.00 LEC Reger,Gary MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM MC - 305 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A history of the first two centuries of the provinces of the Roman Empire, including the processes of acquisition and Romanization and the survival of regional cultures. Important themes include social conditions, economic opportunities, and religious and political change. Extensive use of archaeological evidence.
4856 HIST-344-01 America's Most Wanted 1.00 SEM Greenberg,Cheryl TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 313 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: This course is open only to senior History or American Studies majors, or others by permission of instructor.
  Americans are fascinated by crime. We read detective fiction, watch police dramas, and hold murder mystery dinners. When the crimes are real, we debate guilt or innocence, punishment or rehabilitation, death penalty or life in prison at our dinner tables. Why this fascination, and what does it tell us about our culture and our concerns? In this course we examine several actual crimes and try to understand what made these crimes, and not others, so riveting. What drew us in? What kept us there? Along the way we will also discuss changing police and penal practices, how attitudes about race, class, religion, and gender play into public fixations on particular crimes, and how and why those attitudes shifted over time.
4073 HIST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
4237 HIST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
4264 HIST-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for each semester of this year-long thesis.
4215 HIST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser, and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4226 HIST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
4216 HIST-954-01 Thesis Part I 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Thesis Part I is an investigation and report on an original research topic. Conference hours are available by appointment. Registration for the thesis will not be considered final without the thesis approval form and the signatures of the thesis adviser, graduate adviser, and department chair. Please refer to the Graduate Studies Catalog for thesis requirements. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form and the thesis writer's packet. Two course credits. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
4217 HIST-955-01 Thesis Part II 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Continuation of History 954. Two course credits.
5242 ECON-220-01 British Economic History 1.00 LEC Woolley,Nicholas TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MECC - 220 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  This course aims to analyze British history through the lens of economics. The focus will be on modern history, from the age of empire to the post-war welfare system. Topics include industrialization, development of financial markets, the benefits of international trade, and the workings of the gold standard. Students from both the History and Economics departments will be given opportunities to play to their relative strengths, and only a basic understanding of economics is required.
5129 INTS-205-01 War on Terror 1.00 LEC Prashad,Vijay TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM LSC - 134 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  9/11 inaugurated a new epoch not only for the United States, but decidedly for the world. Tentacular wars of and on terror stretched from Afghanistan into Yemen, from Madrid into Bali. This course will offer a social history of the war on terror. We will explore the roots of the war on terror in the histories of Afghanistan and Yemen, and plot the switch from the prehistory of the War on Terror (1993-2001) to the War on Terror Part 1 (2001-2007) to the War on Terror Part 2 (2007 to the present).
5223 INTS-205-02 War on Terror 1.00 LEC Tabar,Linda TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM LSC - 134 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  9/11 inaugurated a new epoch not only for the United States, but decidedly for the world. Tentacular wars of and on terror stretched from Afghanistan into Yemen, from Madrid into Bali. This course will offer a social history of the war on terror. We will explore the roots of the war on terror in the histories of Afghanistan and Yemen, and plot the switch from the prehistory of the War on Terror (1993-2001) to the War on Terror Part 1 (2001-2007) to the War on Terror Part 2 (2007 to the present).
4979 INTS-216-01 Undrstanding Lat Am & Caribbn 1.00 LEC Euraque,Dario A. MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM SH - N130 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This interdisciplinary course explores major historical themes and contemporary cultural and political topics related to Latin American and Caribbean societies and cultures. The goal is for the students to acquire a panoramic view of the Latin America and the Caribbean worlds while acquiring a deeper understanding of various issues that are explored more deeply in other upper-division courses at Trinity. We will engage issues of demography, geography, basis historical periods processes, particular anthropological and cultural debates, fundamental political and gender, sociological approaches to daily life, aesthetic and literary movements, and the regions’ positions within the historic and contemporary world economy. Open to all students, this course is required of INTS majors with a Caribbean and Latin American Studies focus.
4762 INTS-344-01 Global Hip Hop Cultures 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 309 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Hip-Hop is both music and culture with a global imprint that dates back to the 1980s. This course is a reading and writing intensive course that critically examines hip-hop cultural and political formations in Africa and the African Diaspora. We begin with canonical texts that contributed to the growth of an emergent interdisciplinary field called, 'Hip-Hop Studies' in order to familiarize ourselves with a set of core concepts, discourses and frameworks that will help us assess hip-hop's global emergence. What does the globalization of African-American music and culture tell us about the power and impact of neoliberalism on post-colonial identities, culture and nation-states in the non-Western world? It is a question that will shape our discussions on race, youth, masculinity, and nationalism in contemporary urban societies.
4377 MUSC-211-01 Music from Plato through Bach 1.00 SEM Woldu,Gail H. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM AAC - 120 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101 or permission of instructor.
  This course explores music from the time of Plato and Aristotle through Baroque composers Bach, Vivaldi, and Handel. We will consider the most significant traditions, trends, genres, innovations, and historical developments in the history of music in Europe as we discover, listen to, and write about key works by composers whose music is the cornerstone for much of today's music.