Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for HISTORY - Fall 2014
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3260 HIST-100-01 Modern Britain Since 1750 1.00 LEC Regan-Lefebvre,Jennifer M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  This course surveys the profound and continuous ways in which Britain changed over the course of the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries: in terms of its boundaries, political system, population, economy, and culture. In 1750 ‘Britain’ refers to an agrarian state composed of three countries, with a powerful monarchy, limited democracy and a growing empire. By 1900 Britain has become a United Kingdom, a highly industrialised and urbanised state with a massive empire and a broadening democratic system; by 2000, it has ‘lost’ its empire but is profoundly globalised and democratic. Why, when and how did these changes happen? This class will be as interactive lectures with particular time will be set aside for class discussions and analysis of primary sources.
2558 HIST-102-01 Europe Since 1715 1.00 LEC Kete,Kathleen MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  European history from 1715 to the present.
2566 HIST-216-01 World War II 1.00 LEC Kassow,Samuel D. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  This is a survey of the political, military, social, cultural and economic aspects of the Second World War.
3109 HIST-219-01 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Kete,Kathleen
Cocco,Sean
Wickman,Thomas M.
MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 90
  NOTE: 30 seats are reserved for Sophomores, 35 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3262 HIST-221-01 Science,Religion&Nature 1.00 LEC Cocco,Sean TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  The astronomer Galileo Galilei’s trial before the Roman Inquisition nearly four centuries ago endures as a symbol of the clash between science and religion. Undoubtedly, the rise of early modern science in 17th-century Europe provoked its share of battles, but was this the whole story? This course will lead students to consider the origin and extent of the apparently irreconcilable differences between world views. How wide was the rift between science and religion, especially before the Enlightenment? Students will be encouraged to explore this complex relationship in historical context, by weighing the coexistence of scientific curiosity and intense faith, and also by considering the religious response to the expanding horizons of knowledge. The course will highlight investigations of the heavens and the earth, thus seeking instructive comparisons between disciplines such as astronomy, botany, and geology. A number of broad themes will be the focus. These include the understanding of God and nature, authority (classical and scriptural) versus observation, the wide range of knowledge-making practices, the place of magic, and finally the influence of power and patronage. The class seeks to present a rich and exciting picture, looking forward as well to the influence of rational thinking and scientific inquiry on the making of modernity.
3315 HIST-224-01 Gender in Brazilian History 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  Since colonization, Brazilian society stabilized specific roles for men and women in its national discourse. We will debate how gender roles marked the experiences of Brazilian indigenous, European and afro-descent populations before and after colonialism. Gender categories also affected the lives of enslaved and freed people, since they created specific experiences for black men and women, and peculiar ways of social uplift that depended on the gender of individuals. In the 20th Century, government propaganda produced a discourse of national identity that influenced the way in which Brazilian men and especially women were seemed national and internationally. The debates and demands carried by LGBT, feminists and other social movements in Brazil who are dedicated to equalizing the rights of people will also be discussed.
3316 HIST-233-01 (Re)Connecting the Black Atlan 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  This course explores slavery, abolition, and freedom in Brazil and the United States from the 16th to the 19th century. Where only 400,000 Africans were transported to North America during this time, more than 4 million were brought to Brazil, the largest Latin American country. From such numbers, in both countries, in the United States somewhat organically through reproduction and in Brazil through importation, emerged the foundation of massive slave societies. Slavery in the U.S. relied on a highly racialized society, one that formally institutionalized a racial code; slavery in Brazil was less formalized, but no less racial. Such differences had important implications for the eradication of slavery in the two countries.
3030 HIST-238-01 Caribbean History 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  The location of the first encounter, conquest, and colonization of Native American peoples by Europeans, the Caribbean became a center of bitter rivalries between European imperial powers, and later in the 20th century a new, premiere location of the United States’ own imperial thrust. The Caribbean’s strategic location in relation to Atlantic Ocean trade routes and its tropical climate and fertile soils were key factors in shaping these imperial rivalries and the colonial and postcolonial societies that emerged in the region. The vast experience of African slavery, the later “indentured” migration of hundreds of thousands of Asians to some colonies, and the migration of similar numbers of Europeans (especially to the Hispanic Caribbean) have shaped deeply yet unevenly the nature of Caribbean societies since the 16th century, giving the Caribbean a complex multi-ethnic, yet also heavily “Western,” cultural landscape. This course will introduce students to these and other aspects of Caribbean history, from the pre-European era, through the epics of the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804) and the Cuban Revolution of 1959, to the present.
3263 HIST-247-01 Latinos/Latinas in USA 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  Who are “Latinos/Latinas” and how have they come to constitute a central ethnic/racial category in the contemporary United States? This is the organizing question around which this course examines the experiences of major Latino/Latina groups—Chicanos/Mexicanos, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans—and new immigrants from Central America and the Caribbean. We study U.S. colonialism and imperialism in the Old Mexican North and the Caribbean; migration and immigration patterns and policies; racial, gender, and class distinctions; cultural and political expressions and conflicts; return migrations and transnationalism; and inter-ethnic relations and the construction of pan-Latino/Latina diasporic identities.
3325 HIST-256-01 Human Rights in Lat Amer&Carib 1.00 LEC Euraque,Dario A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  In the 1970s and 1980s, thousands of people were “disappeared,” tortured and murdered in Latin America and the Caribbean, mostly by military regimes and by para-military death-squads. The period is often characterized as perhaps the lowest point in the modern abuse of “Human Rights” in the region. This course explores how these central notions, the human and rights, have evolved in theory and in practice in the history of the Americas. The course begins with the 16th-century debates among the Spaniards over the “humanity” of Indians and enslaved Africans; it then covers distinguishing elements of the human and rights within the legal structures of the nations created after independence from Spain in the 1820s and before the more contemporary conceptions of human rights in the aftermath of the Holocaust and the crimes against humanity during WWII. Finally, the modern conception and practice of human rights defense and legal monitoring are explored in case studies in the region from the late 1940s to the 1980s.
3332 HIST-259-01 Gender & Sexuality African His 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  This course traces the historical experiences of women and conceptions of gender in Sub-Saharan Africa from the pre-colonial period to the recent past. Themes include the role of women in pre-colonial politics and warfare, and gendered notions of labor in agriculture and trade. We will discuss African marital and familial relationships, and the extent to which colonial rule and the missionary encounter transformed those institutions. We will also explore how attitudes toward masculinity, femininity, and homosexuality have been constituted in Africa, and what impact these historical constructions have on debates in contemporary Africa.
3412 HIST-299-01 Historiography 1.00 LEC Kete,Kathleen TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: This course is open only to History majors and minors.
  A study of the character and range of activities undertaken by historians. Students will critically evaluate the way in which historians treat evidence and draw conclusions. Topics considered will include an introduction of some of the subdisciplines within the field and an examination of a number of important exchanges on matters of substance and method currently under debate among historians.
2863 HIST-300-01 History Workshop 1.00 SEM Elukin,Jonathan W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one History course completed at Trinity, or permission of instructor.
  The Workshop seminar combines extensive readings on the topic of the seminar with a substantial research paper involving the use of primary source materials and original analysis. Prerequisite: At least one History Department course completed at Trinity. This course is primarily for History majors but permission of the instructor will allow other Trinity students interested to enroll.
3308 HIST-338-01 Eastern Europe in 20th Century 1.00 SEM Rodriguez,Allison A. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Eastern Europe was the site of tremendous upheaval and change throughout the twentieth century. A part of the Habsburg Empire until the end of the First World War, the nations of Eastern Europe - Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Yugoslavia - attempted to democratize, served as ground zero for the devastation of World War II and the Holocaust, and then were absorbed into the Soviet Bloc, where they asserted themselves through reform and revolution. Through academic texts, memoirs and primary sources, this course will delve into the history of the region explore Eastern Europe in all its myriad forms.
2857 HIST-354-01 Civil War and Reconstr 1.00 SEM Gac,Scott MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines not only the military dimensions of the war years but also such topics as politics in the Union and the Confederacy, the presidential leadership of Lincoln and Jefferson Davis, women in the Union and Confederate war efforts, and the struggle over emancipation. The latter part of the course considers post-war political, social, and economic developments, including nearly four million African Americans' transition from slavery to freedom, the conflict over how to reconstruct the former Confederate states, the establishment of bi-racial governments in those states, and the eventual overthrow of Reconstruction by conservative white "Redeemers." Lectures and discussions.
3307 HIST-368-01 Gender & War in 20th Cen. Eur 1.00 SEM Rodriguez,Allison A. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Between 1914 and 1945, Europe was engulfed in what can be termed its "Second" Thirty Years War. The First and Second World Wars lay waste to Europe, changing and challenging every aspect of society, including the gender order. Women were asked to make sacrifices for their nations on the Home Front, as well as enter into realms of the public sphere which had previously been forbidden. Men who took up arms had to readjust to civilian life after years spent in battle. This course will examine how the First and Second World Wars affected both men and women - how notions of femininity and masculinity were challenged and renegotiated during and after the wars. Readings will include academic texts and contemporary sources.
3266 HIST-374-01 Alexander the Great 1.00 SEM Reger,Gary MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course covers the life and times of Alexander the Great, a man who was able to subjugate most of the known world, but failed to erect a lasting political structure. When he died at the age of 33 years, he left a vast empire to be torn to pieces by his successors. However, his achievements were more than military, and his colonists built cities in places as far from Greece as modern Afghanistan, creating a new world in which Greek culture flourished.
3032 HIST-383-01 Sports, Race & Nationalism 1.00 SEM Figueroa,Luis A. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An examination of the how sports emerged as a major sphere of society and international politics since the late 19th century and how capitalism, race, ethnicity and nationalism have played a major role in this story. We will focus our attention mainly on baseball, basketball, soccer, cricket, and “mega” sporting events, such as the Olympics and FIFA’s World Cup, with case studies from around the world. Additional attention will be given also to the interplay between sports and mega sporting events, on the one hand, and urbanization, urbanism and urban life, on the other. This course counts for both the History and INTS majors (“Global Core” in INTS). For more information, please visit the course blog at = http://sportshistory.trincoll.edu
3267 HIST-393-01 Prot & Proph Postwar Japan Cin 1.00 LEC Bayliss,Jeffrey W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Through a variety of readings and film viewings, this course explores how Japanese directors from 1945 to the present have used the past as a setting in which to voice political and social commentary about contemporary Japan. We will explore films of a variety of genres -- including war films, samurai dramas, science fiction films, documentaries, avant-garde films, and anime -- created over the last 65 years by directors such as Fukasaku Kinji, Ichikawa Kon, Imamura Shohei, Kurosawa Akira, Mizoguchi Kenji, Oshima Nagisa, Suzuki Seijun, Tsuburaya Eiji, and others. The readings for the course will give students an appreciation of the historical settings that the films portray, the political and social contexts in which they were produced, and an understanding of each director’s political, social, and cinematic vision. These readings will allow us to discuss selected scenes of films viewed in our class meetings in a way that will highlight how postwar discourses of pacifism, internationalism, nationalism, and anti-colonialism are reflected in these cinematic works.
2343 HIST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
2344 HIST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
3108 HIST-498-01 Sr Thesis Part 1 & Seminar 2.00 SEM Euraque,Dario A. TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  A two-semester senior thesis including the required research seminar in the fall term. Permission of the instructor is required for Part I.
2381 HIST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser, and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2380 HIST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2208 HIST-954-01 Thesis Part I 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Thesis Part I is an investigation and report on an original research topic. Conference hours are available by appointment. Registration for the thesis will not be considered final without the thesis approval form and the signatures of the thesis adviser, graduate adviser, and department chair. Please refer to the Graduate Studies Catalog for thesis requirements. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form and the thesis writer's packet. Two course credits. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2209 HIST-955-01 Thesis Part II 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Continuation of History 954. Two course credits.
2210 HIST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
3330 AMST-285-01 Born in Blood 1.00 LEC Gac,Scott MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  This course explains how violence has made modern America and belongs alongside liberty, democracy, freedom, and equality in the pantheon of American political and cultural ideals. Using figures such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Dwight Eisenhower, and events from the American Revolution to the era of Civil Rights, "Born in Blood" situates state sanctioned violence against American citizens as a definitive force in American life.
3163 INTS-101-01 Intro Lat Am& Carib Wrld 1.00 LEC Euraque,Dario A. MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This introductory course explores Latin American and Caribbean societies and cultures from the perspectives of various disciplines, and focuses on a wide range of themes. The course will enjoy the presence of some of the College’s experts, from historians to ethnomusicologists. The goal here is for the students to acquire a panoramic view of the Latin America and the Caribbean worlds while getting acquainted with various basic issues that are explored more deeply in 200- and 300-level courses at Trinity. We will touch on issues of demography, geography, basis historical periods processes, particular anthropological and cultural debates, fundamental political and gender, sociological approaches to daily life, aesthetic and literary movements, and the regions positions within the historic and contemporary world economy. (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)
3170 INTS-314-01 Black Internationalism 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in International Studies 101, International Studies112, History 238, or History 253.
  This course introduces students to the history of people of African descent and their struggles for universal emancipation during the 20th century. We will begin by drawing on theoretical readings about race/blackness and the African Diaspora. The second part of the class will probe the relationship between nationalism and pan-Africanism through comparative assessments of Marcus Garvey and his UNIA organization; Rastafarianism and music; and the U.S. Black Power Movement. Over the entire course, we will also seek to locate and critically evaluate Africa’s importance to these political and cultural projects. The ultimate purpose of this course is to impress upon students how struggles for self-determination were simultaneously local, national and global.
2275 ITAL-236-01 Modern Italy 1.00 LEC Alcorn,John MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 5 seats are reserved for students who are Italian majors or Italian Studies minors. 10 seats are open for all other students.
  An introduction to modern Italy, through discussion of outstanding works of history, social science, film, and literature. Topics include the unification of Italy, the sharp changes in relations between church and state, the Great Emigration, Fascism, modernization, the Sicilian mafia, and the persistence of regional divisions. All work is done in English. Students who wish to count this course toward a major in Italian should request permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Italian and will meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. (Listed as both LACS 236 and ITAL 236-01; and under the History Department.)
3334 LACS-236-01 Modern Italy 1.00 LEC Alcorn,John MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An introduction to modern Italy, through discussion of outstanding works of history, social science, film, and literature. Topics include the unification of Italy, the sharp changes in relations between church and state, the Great Emigration, Fascism, modernization, the Sicilian mafia, and the persistence of regional divisions. All work is done in English. Students who wish to count this course toward a major in Italian should request permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Italian and will meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. (Listed as both LACS 236 and ITAL 236-01; and under the History Department.)