Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for HISTORY - Spring 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2181 HIST-103-01 Latin Am & Carib through Film 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TBA TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 50
  This course introduces students to the history and current cultures of Latin America and the Caribbean through film and film movements. It covers their history from 1492 to the present. Themes include: conquest and colonization of Native peoples; African slavery in Brazil and the Caribbean; the interplay of gender, race, class, and sexuality, from the politics of love and solidarity to the politics of subordination and oppression; the contrast between rural and urban society, with an emphasis on urban-centered films; the cultural creativity of the region’s artists in music, film, visual arts, literature and architecture; the role of religion in daily life and politics; and the confrontations of oligarchies and military regimes with movements for reform, democracy and revolution.
2061 HIST-116-01 The Rise & Fall of Roman Rep 1.00 LEC Reger,Gary MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  By about 300 BCE the Roman state had in place its republican institutions, and began the expansionist process by which the Romans came to control the Mediterranean basin. Four hundred years later, the Roman empire extended from Britain to Egypt, but the state running that empire had undergone fundamental social, political, and cultural changes. This course traces the processes that created the empire and transformed the Roman world, with special emphasis on the interplay of political and social phenomena. We will look closely at primary sources on which our knowledge of these changes is based.
2062 HIST-206-01 Bible and History of the Book 1.00 SEM Elukin,Jonathan TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The Bible is arguably the most important book ever composed. In order to understand the evolution of the Bible, it is important to study the Bible in the larger context of the history of the book as a technological instrument. To that end, this seminar will explore the creation of the Bible and its development through formats of scroll, manuscript codex , printed book, and now digital representations. We will try to understand how the physical incarnations of the Bible shaped the ways people perceived, read, and treated Scripture (and the Torah and Koran). How could a physical object be thought to contain divine revelation? Ideally, the course will use the “biography” of the Bible to explore the larger questions of the history of the book.
2126 HIST-208-01 North Amer Environmental Hist 1.00 LEC Wickman,Thomas M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course surveys the environmental history of North America and the Caribbean from 1491 to the present. Topics include indigenous practice, colonization, agricultural intensification, industrialization, urbanization, war, waste disposal, and climate change. Above all, the course will be concerned with the political conflicts and social inequities that arose as the continent and its surrounding waters underwent centuries of ecological change. The global environmental contexts and consequences of American political and economic activities also will be emphasized.
1764 HIST-210-01 Paris:Capital of 19th Century 1.00 LEC Kete,Kathleen TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  In this history of Paris we explore the revolutions in politics, culture and class which usher into being one of the most dynamic and influential spaces in European and world history. Topics include the revolutions of 1830 and 1848; the rebuilding of Paris during the Second Empire; and the invention of modern art by the Impressionists and their successors. We also discuss the Commune of 1871 (in Marx’s view, the first socialist revolution), the Dreyfus Affair (which brings anti-Semitism to the center stage of European politics), and the advent of the ‘New Woman’ whose dress and behavior crystallize a feminist challenge to the masculine politics of the age.
2168 HIST-213-01 Modern Jewish History 1.00 LEC Kassow,Samuel D. TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students
  This course will examine major trends in Jewish history since 1789. There will be particular emphasis on Jewish society in Eastern Europe and the breakdown of orthodox hegemony. Topics will include the Haskalah, the Bund, the development of Zionism, the interwar period in Eastern Europe, the Holocaust, and the State of Israel. The approach will be primarily that of intellectual history with emphasis on the secular aspect of Jewish history.
2063 HIST-222-01 Japan from Dawn of Human Hist 1.00 LEC Bayliss,Jeffrey MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course provides a broad overview of the events and themes encountered in Japan’s early history, from the earliest archeological evidence of human habitation to the establishment of a stable political and social order under the Tokugawa bakufu (shogunate). The course will explore the role of diverse religious and cultural influences in shaping Japanese society and culture during the pre-modern era. Themes and topics of particular interest are the impact of Chinese civilization and the “indigenization” of imported traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, early political organization and the rise of the imperial clan, and civil war and the ascendance of the warrior class to political and cultural hegemony.
2182 HIST-224-01 Gender in Brazilian History 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Since colonization, Brazilian society stabilized specific roles for men and women in its national discourse. We will debate how gender roles marked the experiences of Brazilian indigenous, European and afro-descent populations before and after colonialism. Gender categories also affected the lives of enslaved and freed people, since they created specific experiences for black men and women, and peculiar ways of social uplift that depended on the gender of individuals. In the 20th Century, government propaganda produced a discourse of national identity that influenced the way in which Brazilian men and especially women were seemed national and internationally. The debates and demands carried by LGBT, feminists and other social movements in Brazil who are dedicated to equalizing the rights of people will also be discussed.
2169 HIST-226-01 The Rise of Modern Russia 1.00 LEC Kassow,Samuel D. TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students
  This course will examine the history of Russia from 1825 until the present. It will include the dilemmas of modernization and social stability in Tsarist Russia, the challenges of Empire and multinational populations, the impact of the intelligentsia and the causes of the revolutions of 1905 and 1917. We will then consider topics in the rise and fall of the USSR: Lenin, Stalin, World War II, the problems of de-Stalinization and the reasons that attempts to reform the Soviet system failed. The course will also make extensive use of literary materials.
2175 HIST-229-01 Middle East Since 1517 1.00 LEC Antrim,Zayde TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for first year students
  This course surveys Middle Eastern history from the foundations of the Ottoman and Safavid Empires through the 20th century. Major topics include modernity, imperialism, nationalism, and the role of Islam. Textbook readings are supplemented with primary sources and biographical sketches to situate the complexities of gender and culture in the context of political and economic change.
2183 HIST-233-01 (Re)Connecting the Black Atlan 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course explores slavery, abolition, and freedom in Brazil and the United States from the 16th to the 19th century. Where only 400,000 Africans were transported to North America during this time, more than 4 million were brought to Brazil, the largest Latin American country. From such numbers, in both countries, in the United States somewhat organically through reproduction and in Brazil through importation, emerged the foundation of massive slave societies. Slavery in the U.S. relied on a highly racialized society, one that formally institutionalized a racial code; slavery in Brazil was less formalized, but no less racial. Such differences had important implications for the eradication of slavery in the two countries.
2064 HIST-235-01 Colonialism in the Americas 1.00 LEC Euraque,Dario A. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Columbus’s voyage began a new period in the history of colonialism. This course examines the complex world that the Spanish Conquest destroyed, and it explores the “New World” created in its aftermath. It opens with a journey into the worlds of the Aztecs, the Mayas, and Incas, but it also considers indigenous peoples less well known to contemporary students, especially the Tainos, the Lencas, and the Guarani. The plight of millions of enslaved West Africans in the Americas is also a central topic. Spanish colonialism here extends between 1492 and 1898 in the Caribbean, and up to the 1820s in the U.S.
2065 HIST-242-01 History of China, Qing to Pres 1.00 LEC Lestz,Michael E. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  A survey of modern Chinese history in the period covering the last traditional dynastic state (1644-1911) and 20th-century China. Emphasis on the collapse of the Confucian state, China’s “Enlightenment,” and the Chinese Revolution.
2066 HIST-253-01 African Hist: 1850 to Contemp 1.00 LEC Markle,Seth M. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is the second part of a two-part introductory survey of African history. With a focus on "Black Africa" south of the Sahara, we will begin by exploring the impact of the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade on Africa and move to the establishment of - and resistance to - European colonial rule. We will then look at the impact of the two World Wars on Africa as well as the rise in nationalism and movements for independence. In the postcolonial period, we will explore Cold War policies in Africa, and address issues including the end of apartheid in South Africa, the politics of foreign aid and military interventions, global health and resource wars.
2152 HIST-260-01 American Civil Rights Movement 1.00 LEC Greenberg,Cheryl TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  African Americans and their allies have long struggled to win equal rights and equal opportunities in America. We will examine the course of that struggle in the twentieth century, focusing primarily on the period 1950-1968. We will consider questions of urbanization, employment, racism, politics, violence, non-violence, Black Power and the notion of “race blindness.” The end of the course will be spent considering the present day. What has been resolved, and what issues remain? Are there new challenges to achieving racial equality in the U.S? Have we become “post-racial” yet, and do we want to be?
1480 HIST-300-01 History Workshop 1.00 SEM Cocco,Sean W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one History course completed at Trinity, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course must be taken within two semesters of declaring the history major. Non-history majors accepted only with permission of the Chair.
  The Workshop seminar combines extensive readings on the topic of the seminar with a substantial research paper involving the use of primary source materials and original analysis. Prerequisite: At least one History Department course completed at Trinity. This course is primarily for History majors but permission of the instructor will allow other Trinity students interested to enroll.
2082 HIST-300-02 History Workshop 1.00 SEM Lestz,Michael E. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one History course completed at Trinity, or permission of instructor.
  The Workshop seminar combines extensive readings on the topic of the seminar with a substantial research paper involving the use of primary source materials and original analysis. Prerequisite: At least one History Department course completed at Trinity. This course is primarily for History majors but permission of the instructor will allow other Trinity students interested to enroll.
1801 HIST-303-01 Modern Ireland, Global Island 1.00 SEM Regan-Lefebvre,Jennifer M. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores the complicated and contentious process through which Ireland transformed from a single political entity within the British Empire to two separate entities: the Republic of Ireland, an independent state, and Northern Ireland, which remained part of the United Kingdom but has suffered decades of civil strife. Through class discussion and careful analysis of primary and secondary sources, we will look at the major political, social and economic changes on the island of Ireland since 1800. We will pay special attention to the island’s interaction with the wider world, including through its diaspora, and we will examine whether Ireland’s political history can be understood in terms of decolonisation and post-colonialism.
1765 HIST-304-01 Renaissance Italy 1.00 SEM Cocco,Sean TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores the origin, distinctiveness, and importance of the Italian Renaissance. It is also about culture, society, and identity in the many “Italies” that existed before the modern period. Art, humanism, and the link between cultural patronage and political power will be a focus, as will the lives of 15th- and 16th-century women and men. Early lectures will trace the evolution of the Italian city-states, outlining the social and political conditions that fostered the cultural flowering of the 1400s and 1500s. We will consider Florence in the quattrocento, and subsequently shift to Rome in the High Renaissance. Later topics will include the papacy’s return to the Eternal City, the art of Michelangelo and Raphael, and the ambitions of the warlike and mercurial Pope Julius II. Italy was a politically fragmented peninsula characterized by cultural, linguistic, and regional differences. For this reason, other topics will include: the fortunes of Venice, the courts of lesser city-states like Mantua and Ferrara, the life of Alessandra Strozzi, and the exploits of the “lover and fighter” Benvenuto Cellini. We will also look at representations of the Renaissance in film.
1845 HIST-311-01 Place in the Native Northeast 1.00 SEM Wickman,Thomas M. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The coasts, rivers, fields, and hills of present-day Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia have been home for indigenous families and communities through numerous environmental, political, and economic transformations. Students will learn about the ways that Native Northeasterners, from Pequots to Micmacs, have adapted, recreated, and reaffirmed a deep connectedness to their homelands, from the fifteenth century to the present. Fields trips to local sites and archives and consultations with tribal historians will facilitate original historical research. Primary sources to be assigned include autobiographies, travel narratives, war histories, maps, Native American stories, and dictionaries of indigenous place names, and secondary source readings will cover major themes in Native American studies, with special emphasis on sense of place.
2103 HIST-315-01 The Pacific War: 1931-1945 1.00 SEM Lestz,Michael E. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the consequences of Japan's occupation of Manchuria, Tokyo's rejection of membership in the League of Nations, and the birth of the Japanese puppet state of Manchukuo. Subsequently, Japanese expansionism in north and south China and the formation of an increasingly close relationship with Italy and Germany paved the way for the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Key topics to be examined will include the Japan's response to Chinese nationalism, Japanese perceptions of Versaille order as it impinged upon East Asia, Japan's theory and practice of "total war," war in Burma and the Pacific, and the effect of the Pacific War on European colonial empires.
2112 HIST-320-01 Gender & Masculinity Latn Amer 1.00 SEM Euraque,Dario A. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course addresses discourses of sexuality and gender in men in Latin America and the Caribbean between the 1870s and the 1970s. It will examine sexual practices and their cultural and social meanings in this region. Students will read social history, biographies, memoirs, poetry and see films to study sexual practices and behaviors, as well as expressions of love, in the daily life of men in relations with men and women in the Americas. The century will be divided two sub-periods, 1870s -1930s, and the 1940s to the late 1970s. The former registered new concepts, "homosexual" in 1867" and "heterosexual" at the beginning of the 20th century; by the 1960s and 1970s gay rights movements in the U.S. influenced Latin America and the Caribbean masculinities.
1766 HIST-325-01 Italy and the Mediterranean 1.00 SEM Cocco,Sean F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar examines the history of Italian coasts from the Middle Ages up to the period of nineteenth-century national unification. The focus in the first instance will be the history of port cities as well as the coastal stretches that lay between urban centers of power and commerce. As the chronology shifts toward later periods, the historical investigation of shores will also develop comparisons to coastal cultures elsewhere in the world.
1549 HIST-326-01 Disaster Archipelago: Japan 1.00 SEM Bayliss,Jeffrey F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Japan is one of the most seismically active countries in the world. Throughout history, people have dealt with devastation from volcanic eruptions, frequent earthquakes, and killer tsunamis. This course explores the history of these catastrophes and their aftermaths from a variety of perspectives: economic, political, social, and cultural. How have the Japanese people coped with these disasters and attempted to prepare for them, in light of shifting political contexts and evolving knowledge of the geologic mechanisms involved? Students will explore and discuss a wide variety of primary and secondary sources on Japanese ways of appreciating and dealing with disasters past and present, including memoirs, novels, and films. The course will culminate with an in-depth examination of the march 2011 tsunami and its aftermath.
2173 HIST-327-01 World Histories of Wine 1.00 SEM Regan-Lefebvre,Jennifer M. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Students interested in earning credit for Language Across the Curriculum should discuss this with Professor Regan-Lefebvre.
  This seminar explores the history of wine, a new and growing research field in world history. We will consider how wine has been produced, traded, and consumed in both continental Europe and the “New World” since circa 1600. Topics will include: approaches to commodity history; wine, terroir and the construction of national identity; protection and global markets; technological change and modernisation; networks, trade and information exchanges; and the creation of consumers and experts. There will be a field trip to a Connecticut winery. All students will write a major research paper and it is possible to gain additional course credit for Language Across the Curriculum by undertaking foreign-language research.
2067 HIST-328-01 Transnational Urbanism 1.00 SEM Figueroa,Luis A. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores urban history and the history of urbanism by focusing on a selected group of cities in Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia. It traces the global routes that urbanism has taken since Paris was transformed in the 19th century into the ideal city of modernity. Topics examined include not only urban space, planning, and architecture, but also politics and social movements, capitalism, and mass consumption, as well as sports, literature, and film. Throughout we will pay close attention to how each city's national and international context produced particular urban forms and urban cultures that nonetheless shared certain global patterns.
2068 HIST-332-01 African Nationalism&Decoloniz. 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines both the theoretical and empirical aspects of anticolonial nationalist movements in Africa from the end of World War II to the dismantling of the apartheid regime in South Africa in the early 1990s. Topics such as nonviolent civil disobedience, armed guerilla struggle, nationalist thought, and postcolonial state formation will inform the ways in which we seek to understand the end of European colonial rule and its social, economic, cultural, and political implications for Africa. A series of case studies will acquaint students to such themes as well as highlight the utility of an interdisciplinary approach for examining a broad array of historical developments. The second half of the course will focus on southern Africa, using the Aluka digital archive, "The Struggles for Freedom in South Africa Collection."
2069 HIST-335-01 Chivalry 1.00 SEM Elukin,Jonathan TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Chivalry, which literally means mounted warriors, is one of the most important developments of medieval European culture; it shaped ideals of honor and norms of social behavior from the Middle Ages to the present. We will explore how so-called nobles used art, literature and other written records to articulate ideals of chivalry that helped to obscure or atone for the violence and cruelty powerful lords in medieval society. We will explore as well how these mythical ideals about proper conduct in battle and at court affected warfare, relations between men and women, female power, and the evolution of government through the 17th century. Finally, we will consider how chivalry or contested notions of its ideals are still with us in the modem world.
2149 HIST-344-01 America's Most Wanted 1.00 SEM Greenberg,Cheryl TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Americans are fascinated by crime. We read detective fiction, watch police dramas, and hold murder mystery dinners. When the crimes are real, we debate guilt or innocence, punishment or rehabilitation, death penalty or life in prison at our dinner tables. Why this fascination, and what does it tell us about our culture and our concerns? In this course we examine several actual crimes and try to understand what made these crimes, and not others, so riveting. What drew us in? What kept us there? Along the way we will also discuss changing police and penal practices, how attitudes about race, class, religion, and gender play into public fixations on particular crimes, and how and why those attitudes shifted over time.
2166 HIST-395-01 History of the Alps 1.00 SEM Kete,Kathleen TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  In the 1990s the European Union recognized the Alpine region as a distinct regional unit. This course is a history of that storied region extending from the Mediterranean to the Adriatic by way of Italy, France, Switzerland, Germany, Austria and the Balkans. Topics include the ‘discovery’ of the Alps by European elites in the Age of Enlightenment; the Alps as archive of geological time and center of romantic science; the invention and commercialization of alpine sports; the appeal of the Alps as a place of retreat and healing, and their politicization by fascist Italy and Nazi Germany in the 1920s and 1930s respectively. We end with a consideration of the future of the region in the face of global warming and the promises of trans-nationalism.
1078 HIST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
1258 HIST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
1289 HIST-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for each semester of this year-long thesis.
1235 HIST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser, and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1246 HIST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
1236 HIST-954-01 Thesis Part I 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Thesis Part I is an investigation and report on an original research topic. Conference hours are available by appointment. Registration for the thesis will not be considered final without the thesis approval form and the signatures of the thesis adviser, graduate adviser, and department chair. Please refer to the Graduate Studies Catalog for thesis requirements. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form and the thesis writer's packet. Two course credits. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
1237 HIST-955-01 Thesis Part II 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Continuation of History 954. Two course credits.
2123 AMST-423-01 The History of American Sports 1.00 SEM Goldstein,Warren T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This course will examine American sports from their beginnings in Puritan-era games to the multi-billion-dollar industries of today. We will begin by looking at the relationship between work, play, and religion in the colonies. We will trace the beginnings of horseracing, baseball, and boxing, and their connections to saloons, gambling, and the bachelor subculture of the Victorian underworld. We will study the rise of respectable sports in the mid- and late 19th century; follow baseball as it became the national pastime; see how college football took over higher education; and account for the rise of basketball. We will look at sports and war, sports and moral uplift, and sports and the culture of consumption. Finally, we will examine the rise of mass leisure, the impact of radio and television, racial segregation and integration, the rise of women’s sports, battles between players and owners in the last 25 years, and the entrance of truly big money into professional sports. Readings in primary and secondary sources will emphasize the historical experience of sports in the United States so that students can develop a framework for understanding current events, including the NHL lockout, the Kobe Bryant affair, and the controversies over steroids.
2085 AMST-823-01 The History of American Sports 1.00 SEM Goldstein,Warren T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course will examine American sports from their beginnings in Puritan-era games to the multi-billion-dollar industries of today. We will begin by looking at the relationship between work, play, and religion in the colonies. We will trace the beginnings of horseracing, baseball, and boxing, and their connections to saloons, gambling, and the bachelor subculture of the Victorian underworld. We will study the rise of respectable sports in the mid- and late 19th century; follow baseball as it became the national pastime; see how college football took over higher education; and account for the rise of basketball. We will look at sports and war, sports and moral uplift, and sports and the culture of consumption. Finally, we will examine the rise of mass leisure, the impact of radio and television, racial segregation and integration, the rise of women’s sports, battles between players and owners in the last 25 years, and the entrance of truly big money into professional sports. Readings in primary and secondary sources will emphasize the historical experience of sports in the United States so that students can develop a framework for understanding current events, including the NHL lockout, the Kobe Bryant affair, and the controversies over steroids.
2139 AMST-838-01 America Collects Itself 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Collecting American history is as alive and well in America today as it was soon after the republic was constituted. In the late 18th-century Americans became enamored of “writing” the new nation’s history, both in the literal sense of creating narratives, and the figurative sense of collecting the books and documents which would inform and underpin those narratives. The first institution created specifically to collect and preserve American history was the Massachusetts Historical Society, founded in 1791, during George Washington’s presidency. This course will trace the conscious collecting (by both individuals and institutions) of documents and artifacts from the 18th century to the present day relating to "America," as that term was variously defined over time.
2040 INTS-344-01 Global Hip Hop Cultures 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. R: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Hip-Hop is both music and culture with a global imprint that dates back to the 1980s. This course is a reading and writing intensive course that critically examines hip-hop cultural and political formations in Africa and the African Diaspora. We begin with canonical texts that contributed to the growth of an emergent interdisciplinary field called, 'Hip-Hop Studies' in order to familiarize ourselves with a set of core concepts, discourses and frameworks that will help us assess hip-hop's global emergence. What does the globalization of African-American music and culture tell us about the power and impact of neoliberalism on post-colonial identities, culture and nation-states in the non-Western world? It is a question that will shape our discussions on race, youth, masculinity, and nationalism in contemporary urban societies.
1974 WMGS-215-01 Drink & Disorder in Amer 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Drinking as an institution has reflected the varieties of cultures, interest groups, and ideologies that have swept America. We will examine the tumultuous history of this institution from the origins of the Republic to the present in order to understand what the ‘wets’ and the ‘drys’ can tell us about the nature of community in America. Special attention to the ways in which gender, race, class, and ethnicity shape perceptions of drinking, leisure, and social control. (Also listed under American Studies and History.)
2150 WMGS-301-01 Western Feminist Thought 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in one other course in Women Gender and Sexuality.
  An exploration of the main currents in American feminism, with occasional excursions into European thought. The course readings assume (rather than demonstrate) women’s historical subordination to man and put forward various explanations and strategies for change. Readings in J.S. Mill, C. P. Gilman, Emma Goldman, Simone de Beauvoir, Adrienne Rich, bell hooks, Mary Daly, Audre Lorde, and others. This course is not open to First-Year students.