Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for HISTORY - Spring 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
5059 HIST-201-01 Early America 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students, 5 seats reserved for American Studies majors, 10 seats reserved for History majors
  This course introduces students to major developments in the political, economic, and social history of North America from the sixteenth to the mid-nineteenth century. We will study indigenous sovereignty, encounters between Europeans and Native Americans, the founding of European colonies, the rise of the Atlantic slave trade, the Seven Years' War, the American Revolution, the spread of human enslavement, the War of 1812, Indian removal policy, U.S. wars with Native nations, westward expansion, the U.S.-Mexican War, abolitionism, and the Civil War. Students will be challenged to imagine American history within Atlantic and global contexts and to comprehend the expansiveness of Native American homelands and the shifting nature of North American borderlands.
5209 HIST-207-01 Law & Govt in Medieval England 1.00 LEC Elukin, Jonathan MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course will study the evolution of English law and government in the Middle Ages from the Norman Conquest to the Stuarts. It will emphasize key concepts of common law, the nature of English kingship, the development of Parliament, the status of particular groups in English society, the evolution of governmental power, as well as some comparative material from other medieval states. The course will be taught from primary source materials with supplementary readings from secondary scholarship.
5214 HIST-212-01 The Crusades & Medievl Society 1.00 LEC Elukin, Jonathan TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  An introductory survey of the political, social, military, and religious history of the Crusades. Using primary sources, the course will also examine how aspects of the Crusades reveal broader themes in medieval history, including: European identity, pilgrimage, religious violence, technological innovation, perceptions of non-Europeans, and the influence of the Crusades on early modern voyages of discovery. Lecture and discussion format.
5060 HIST-213-01 Modern Jewish History 1.00 LEC Kassow, Samuel TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  This course will examine major trends in Jewish history since 1789. There will be particular emphasis on Jewish society in Eastern Europe and the breakdown of orthodox hegemony. Topics will include the Haskalah, the Bund, the development of Zionism, the interwar period in Eastern Europe, the Holocaust, and the State of Israel. The approach will be primarily that of intellectual history with emphasis on the secular aspect of Jewish history.
5061 HIST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students; 5 seats reserved for sophomores
  Topics include: urbanism, religion and power in the ancient civilizations of Mexico, Central America and the Andes; colonial-era urbanism, religion, slavery and politics (1520s-1810s); post-colonial nation-building, modernization, Europeanization and early radical politics (1820s-1920s); populist-era industrialization, urban growth, class conflicts, revolutionary politics, and authoritarianism (1930s-1970s); democratization, social movements, and exclusionary and progressive urbanism in the era of neoliberalism and globalization (1980s-present). Throughout the course, we pay particular attention to gender, sexual, racial and ethnic identities, as well as to both popular culture and the fine arts, using examples from Bahia, Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Cusco, Havana, Lima, Mexico City, Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro, San Juan de Puerto Rico, São Paulo, and Santiago de Chile.
5062 HIST-226-01 The Rise of Modern Russia 1.00 LEC Kassow, Samuel TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  This course will examine the history of Russia from 1825 until the present. It will include the dilemmas of modernization and social stability in Tsarist Russia, the challenges of Empire and multinational populations, the impact of the intelligentsia and the causes of the revolutions of 1905 and 1917. We will then consider topics in the rise and fall of the USSR: Lenin, Stalin, World War II, the problems of de-Stalinization and the reasons that attempts to reform the Soviet system failed. The course will also make extensive use of literary materials.
5063 HIST-242-01 History of China, Qing to Pres 1.00 LEC Lestz, Michael MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  A survey of modern Chinese history in the period covering the last traditional dynastic state (1644-1911) and 20th-century China. Emphasis on the collapse of the Confucian state, China’s “Enlightenment,” and the Chinese Revolution.
5065 HIST-247-01 Latinas/Latinos in USA 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-year students; 8 seats reserved for sophomores
  The status of people of Latin American origin and descent is a hotly-contested topic in American politics and culture. To understand it properly requires a historical perspective. We will examine the experiences of Native peoples, Spanish settlers and Hispanicized multi-racial groups during the colonial period (1500s-1700s); the U.S. military conquests of northern Mexico (1836-1848) and Puerto Rico (1898); the subsequent U.S. imperial role in the Caribbean and Central America; the regionally and legally dissimilar migration experiences and civil rights struggles of Mexicans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, and Central and South Americans since the late 1800s; the four-centuries-long impact of Hispanic peoples on American society; newly emerging Pan-Latinx transnational identities; and earlier and current debates on U.S. immigration policies.
5066 HIST-256-01 Human Rights in Lat Amer&Carib 1.00 LEC Davis, Teresa TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  In the 1970s and 1980s, thousands of people were “disappeared,” tortured and murdered in Latin America and the Caribbean, mostly by military regimes and by para-military death-squads. The period is often characterized as perhaps the lowest point in the modern abuse of “Human Rights” in the region. This course explores how these central notions, the human and rights, have evolved in theory and in practice in the history of the Americas. The course begins with the 16th-century debates among the Spaniards over the “humanity” of Indians and enslaved Africans; it then covers distinguishing elements of the human and rights within the legal structures of the nations created after independence from Spain in the 1820s and before the more contemporary conceptions of human rights in the aftermath of the Holocaust and the crimes against humanity during WWII. Finally, the modern conception and practice of human rights defense and legal monitoring are explored in case studies in the region from the late 1940s to the 1980s.
5053 HIST-259-01 The Islamic City 1.00 LEC Antrim, Zayde TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course explores the cities founded, claimed, and inhabited by Muslims over the centuries, with a particular focus on the Middle East. Scholars have long debated whether there is such a thing as a prototypical "Islamic city" shaped by religious and cultural norms. Through a combination of lectures and discussions, we will grapple with this question by situating cities in their historical contexts, examining their built environments, and considering the ways in which gender, economic and social life, political movements, and war shape urban space.
5654 HIST-270-01 Parliamentary Debate 1.00 LEC Regan-Lefebvre, Jennifer T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 32
  This course introduces the history of debate in the British parliamentary tradition and the practice of debate as a collegiate extra-curricular activity. The course is a dynamic mix of lecture, seminar-style discussion and experiential learning. The course has three components: historical background to and analysis of the British parliamentary system, drawing on the emerging field of the history of rhetoric; primary source analysis of historical speeches and debates; applied sessions when students will draft and practice their own debates in teams. Written exercises include developing a ‘time-space case’ based in British history. Students will complete the course with a broader understanding of British political history, a deeper sensitivity to political rhetoric, and stronger oral and written argumentation and communication skills. No debate experience is necessary.
5646 HIST-299-01 What is History? 1.00 SEM Euraque, Dario MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: This course is open only to History majors and minors.
  A study of the character and range of activities undertaken by historians. Students will critically evaluate the way in which historians treat evidence and draw conclusions. Topics considered will include an introduction of some of the subdisciplines within the field and an examination of a number of important exchanges on matters of substance and method currently under debate among historians.
5647 HIST-299-02 What is History? 1.00 SEM Wickman, Thomas MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: This course is open only to History majors and minors.
  A study of the character and range of activities undertaken by historians. Students will critically evaluate the way in which historians treat evidence and draw conclusions. Topics considered will include an introduction of some of the subdisciplines within the field and an examination of a number of important exchanges on matters of substance and method currently under debate among historians.
5070 HIST-300-01 History Workshop 1.00 SEM Elukin, Jonathan M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one History course completed at Trinity, or permission of instructor.
  The Workshop seminar combines extensive readings on the topic of the seminar with a substantial research paper involving the use of primary source materials and original analysis. Prerequisite: At least one History Department course completed at Trinity. This course is primarily for History majors but permission of the instructor will allow other Trinity students interested to enroll.
5077 HIST-300-02 History Workshop 1.00 SEM Lestz, Michael M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one History course completed at Trinity, or permission of instructor.
  The Workshop seminar combines extensive readings on the topic of the seminar with a substantial research paper involving the use of primary source materials and original analysis. Prerequisite: At least one History Department course completed at Trinity. This course is primarily for History majors but permission of the instructor will allow other Trinity students interested to enroll.
5653 HIST-301-01 Biography as History 1.00 SEM Euraque, Dario TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar deals with the theory, methodology and historiography of  historical biography. We begin with varied readings on the theory, method and historiography of biography, and then  transition to deep, critical analysis of substantial classic and contemporary biographies about personae who lived and died in different parts of the world. Students read biographies of political greats, revolutionaries, mystics, artists, poets, musicians and more. No expertise in historical analysis required, or any perquisite history courses. Students enrolled must love to read substantial books, and analyze them.
5721 HIST-308-01 Race & Property in Early Amer 1.00 SEM Manevitz, Alexander MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Early Americans redefined the meaning of property during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and these changes reflected the economic, social, and political reorganization of the young United States. Using the history of property as a framework to connect diverse topics, this course will examine major themes in American history, drawing connections among them. It is focused on the most influential property relationships in colonial and early America from the enslavement of human beings and real estate to wheat futures. We will examine issues of slavery, resistance, and freedom, housing and real estate, intellectual property, natural resources and nature's commodification, and the ever-changing roll of capitalism in the American past.
5071 HIST-315-01 The Pacific War: 1931-1945 1.00 SEM Lestz, Michael T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the consequences of Japan's occupation of Manchuria, Tokyo's rejection of membership in the League of Nations, and the birth of the Japanese puppet state of Manchukuo. Subsequently, Japanese expansionism in north and south China and the formation of an increasingly close relationship with Italy and Germany paved the way for the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Key topics to be examined will include the Japan's response to Chinese nationalism, Japanese perceptions of Versaille order as it impinged upon East Asia, Japan's theory and practice of "total war," war in Burma and the Pacific, and the effect of the Pacific War on European colonial empires.
5073 HIST-344-01 America's Most Wanted 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Americans are fascinated by crime. We read detective fiction, watch police dramas, and hold murder mystery dinners. When the crimes are real, we debate guilt or innocence, punishment or rehabilitation, death penalty or life in prison at our dinner tables. Why this fascination, and what does it tell us about our culture and our concerns? In this course we examine several actual crimes and try to understand what made these crimes, and not others, so riveting. What drew us in? What kept us there? Along the way we will also discuss changing police and penal practices, how attitudes about race, class, religion, and gender play into public fixations on particular crimes, and how and why those attitudes shifted over time.
5655 HIST-362-01 The Samurai Warrior in History 1.00 SEM Bayliss, Jeffrey MF: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The samurai were as important for Japan’s historical and cultural transformation as they are misunderstood. This course aims at separating the myth from the reality of the samurai by examining the history of Japanese warriors and the culture they created, from their lowly origins in antiquity through their rise to hegemony during the 13th through 18th centuries, to their eventual disappearance as a distinct class in the 19th century. We will also examine the evolving image of the samurai warrior and his supposedly rigid moral code of conduct, as it appears in literature and film, from some of the earliest appearances of such images right up to today. Our purpose in examining these images of the samurai is not only to distinguish myth from reality, but also to explore the political purposes such images have been put to in legitimating samurai rule prior to the 20th century, and in informing Japanese views of themselves and non-Japanese views of Japan in the years since.
5258 HIST-368-01 Classics and Colonialism 1.00 SEM Ramgopal, Sailakshmi MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course explores the reception of classical literature and history in colonial contexts. Through texts like Sophocles' Antigone; Nehru's "India and Greece"; and Fugard's The Island, we will examine how colonized peoples used the classical tradition to develop strategies of collaboration and resistance to oust European colonizers from environments like India, South Africa, and the Caribbean. By studying the reception of classics through the perspectives of colonized communities, the course considers the relationship between classics and colonialism and performs the crucial function of decentering classical reception studies.
5075 HIST-374-01 Alexander the Great 1.00 SEM Caldwell, Lauren TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course covers the life and times of Alexander the Great, a man who was able to subjugate most of the known world, but failed to erect a lasting political structure. When he died at the age of 33 years, he left a vast empire to be torn to pieces by his successors. However, his achievements were more than military, and his colonists built cities in places as far from Greece as modern Afghanistan, creating a new world in which Greek culture flourished.
5764 HIST-374-02 Alexander the Great 1.00 SEM Caldwell, Lauren TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course covers the life and times of Alexander the Great, a man who was able to subjugate most of the known world, but failed to erect a lasting political structure. When he died at the age of 33 years, he left a vast empire to be torn to pieces by his successors. However, his achievements were more than military, and his colonists built cities in places as far from Greece as modern Afghanistan, creating a new world in which Greek culture flourished.
4116 HIST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
4257 HIST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
4284 HIST-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for each semester of this year-long thesis.
5274 AMST-308-01 Race & Property in Early Amer 1.00 SEM Manevitz, Alexander MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Early Americans redefined the meaning of property during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and these changes reflected the economic, social, and political reorganization of the young United States. Using the history of property as a framework to connect diverse topics, this course will examine major themes in American history, drawing connections among them. It is focused on the most influential property relationships in colonial and early America from the enslavement of human beings and real estate to wheat futures. We will examine issues of slavery, resistance, and freedom, housing and real estate, intellectual property, natural resources and nature's commodification, and the ever-changing roll of capitalism in the American past.
4987 AMST-412-01 Popular Narratives of US Hist 1.00 SEM Manevitz, Alexander T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  History surrounds us in popular culture—from hit Broadway musicals like Hamilton and video games like the Assassin’s Creed series today to the earliest American novels. Though some have dismissed these media as “non-scholarly,” they are the main source of history for many who might not be interested in a traditional scholarly monograph and should be taken seriously. We will spend the semester learning how to analyze the unexpected history presented through these methods, and investigating the possibilities and pitfalls of communicating American history in these different forms. In conversation with practitioners of narrative, experimental, and popular history, students will create a final project of their own design that pushes on the boundaries of how we communicate history and how we define our audience.
5230 AMST-812-01 Popular Narratives of US Hist 1.00 SEM Manevitz, Alexander T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3
  History surrounds us in popular culture—from hit Broadway musicals like Hamilton and video games like the Assassin’s Creed series today to the earliest American novels. Though some have dismissed these media as “non-scholarly,” they are the main source of history for many who might not be interested in a traditional scholarly monograph and should be taken seriously. We will spend the semester learning how to analyze the unexpected history presented through these methods, and investigating the possibilities and pitfalls of communicating American history in these different forms. In conversation with practitioners of narrative, experimental, and popular history, students will create a final project of their own design that pushes on the boundaries of how we communicate history and how we define our audience.
4915 INTS-309-01 Development in Africa 1.00 LEC Myers, Garth MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course examines the history of development ideas and practices in Africa. Beginning with the early colonial era, when Europeans spoke of their “civilizing mission,” and ending with present-day critiques of World Bank policies, it traces continuity and change in state and grassroots efforts to bring about development in Africa. It explores the theories behind development policies. including the ways in which experts have conceptualized African farming systems and Africa’s place in the world economy, and it asks to what extent these theories match reality. It also examines how development policies have been put into practice, how African communities have responded to and reshaped development, whether communities have a “right to development” and who should define what that development should be. Finally, it considers why so many development efforts have failed and whether past failures have led to improved practice. (Also offered under History.)
5097 ITAL-236-01 Modern Italy 1.00 LEC Alcorn, John TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An introduction to modern Italy, through discussion of outstanding works of history, social science, film, and literature. Topics include the unification of Italy, the sharp changes in relations between church and state, the Great Emigration, Fascism, modernization, the Sicilian mafia, and the persistence of regional divisions. All work is done in English. Students who wish to count this course toward a major in Italian should request permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Italian and will meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. (Listed as both LACS 236 and ITAL 236-01; and under the History Department.)
5096 LACS-236-02 Modern Italy 1.00 LEC Alcorn, John TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An introduction to modern Italy, through discussion of outstanding works of history, social science, film, and literature. Topics include the unification of Italy, the sharp changes in relations between church and state, the Great Emigration, Fascism, modernization, the Sicilian mafia, and the persistence of regional divisions. All work is done in English. Students who wish to count this course toward a major in Italian should request permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Italian and will meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. (Listed as both LACS 236 and ITAL 236-01; and under the History Department.)
4379 MUSC-265-01 Music from Plato through Bach 1.00 SEM Woldu, Gail TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101 or permission of instructor.
  This course explores music from the time of Plato and Aristotle through Baroque composers Bach, Vivaldi, and Handel. We will consider the most significant traditions, trends, genres, innovations, and historical developments in the history of music in Europe as we discover, listen to, and write about key works by composers whose music is the cornerstone for much of today's music.
4964 RELG-231-01 Christianity in the Making 1.00 LEC Jones, Tamsin TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  This course will examine the philosophical, cultural, religious and political contexts out of which Christianity emerged from the time of Jesus through the 5th century. Emphasis will be placed on the complexity and diversity of early Christian movements, as well as the process that occurred to establish Christianity as a religion that would dominate the Roman Empire. Topics to be covered will include the writings of the New Testament, Gnostics, martyrdom, desert monasticism and asceticism, the construction of orthodoxy and heresy, women in the early Church, the formation of the biblical canon, and the identity and role of Jesus of Nazareth.