Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for HISTORY - Fall 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2465 HIST-216-01 World War II 1.00 LEC Kassow,Samuel D. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  This is a survey of the political, military, social, cultural and economic aspects of the Second World War.
3420 HIST-217-01 Hist Urbanism Eastern Europe 1.00 LEC Kananovich,Uladzimir MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course will examine the economic, social, and cultural history of East European urban development during the medieval and early modern periods. We will focus on local governance, urban landscape and planning, social and educational institutions, commercial and artisan activities, religious and ethnic communities, and a new type of citizen: the burgher. To better understand urban life in the important towns of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (contemporary Belarus, Lithuania, and a part of Ukraine), we will draw comparison to the major centers of Danzig-Gdansk, Königsberg-Królewiec, and Kraków in central Europe and Russian towns like Great Novgorod and Moscow. The varied sources of information for the course include diaries, testaments, memories, private correspondence, engravings, drawings, and architectural monuments.
3422 HIST-227-01 Ukraine & Belarus Histor Persp 1.00 LEC Kananovich,Uladzimir TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is designed to equip students with a detailed understanding of the critical historical events that have influenced modern Ukraine and Belarus. In the late medieval and early modern periods (fifteenth-seventeenth centuries), this region (Western Rus’) underwent a series of important political, social, and cultural transformations that led to the formation of new ethnic entities and later nation-states (Ukraine and Belarus). Late medieval and early modern Ukraine and Belarus will be placed in a wider international context that linked them to Orthodox Europe and the Occident, as well as to the world of Islam. Understanding the history of these dynamic societies will help make some sense of the contemporary relations between Ukraine and Russia.
3425 HIST-230-01 Greek Democracy 1.00 LEC Reger,Gary MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  As we all know, the Greeks invented democracy – or did they? This course explores the emergence and development of democracy in the city-states (poleis) of the ancient Greek world from roughly 1000 BCE to 300 CE. We focus especially on possible Near Eastern origins for democratic institutions and practices and the borrowing or parallel development of democracy in early Greek poleis; the features of the best-known Greek democracy, that of Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries BCE; and the adaptation of democracy to rule by Hellenistic kings and Roman emperors. We will also examine closely the treatment of democracy in Greek philosophy, especially Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics.
3506 HIST-239-01 Atlantic World History 1.00 LEC Doyle,Christopher Leonard MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course analyzes the interaction of peoples, commodities, germs, and ideas between Europe, the Americas, and Africa. We focus on the period from Columbus’s “discovery” of the Americas through the revolutions in America, France, and Haiti. Studying from an Atlantic perspective complicates traditional historical narratives concerned with national development; it also leads to a more inclusive view of the colonial period in American history. The professor will sometimes lecture, but class discussion and the seminar style will predominate.
2295 HIST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
2296 HIST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
2826 HIST-498-01 Sr Thesis Part 1 & Seminar 2.00 SEM Euraque,Dario A. W: 8:00AM-9:00AM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  A two-semester senior thesis including the required research seminar in the fall term. Permission of the instructor is required for Part I.
2321 HIST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser, and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2320 HIST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2173 HIST-954-01 Thesis Part I 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Thesis Part I is an investigation and report on an original research topic. Conference hours are available by appointment. Registration for the thesis will not be considered final without the thesis approval form and the signatures of the thesis adviser, graduate adviser, and department chair. Please refer to the Graduate Studies Catalog for thesis requirements. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form and the thesis writer's packet. Two course credits. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2174 HIST-955-01 Thesis Part II 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Continuation of History 954. Two course credits.
2175 HIST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
2990 AMST-285-01 Born in Blood 1.00 LEC Gac,Scott MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM
W: 2:40PM-3:55PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  This course explains how violence has made modern America and belongs alongside liberty, democracy, freedom, and equality in the pantheon of American political and cultural ideals. Using figures such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Dwight Eisenhower, and events from the American Revolution to the era of Civil Rights, "Born in Blood" situates state sanctioned violence against American citizens as a definitive force in American life.
3268 INTS-238-01 Cont Africa:Res Wars & Hum Rts 1.00 LEC Markle,Seth M. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one college-level course that addresses the history of Africa before or during the colonial era, including History 252, 253, or 331.
  Human civilizations and communities have been shaped by the ability and desire to gain access to critical resources for survival. Economic globalization has created competition for resources—ranging from oil to diamonds to water—that has influenced social and political structures in the contemporary world. This course looks at the impact of modern globalization on the continent of Africa. Situating Africa historically in its relationship to “the West” through the Atlantic slave trade and European colonialism, we will explore the consequences of Africa’s unequal role in this system. We will be investigating the links between civil conflict, resource control, social justice, poverty, and international movements that attempt to address these issues.
2873 INTS-314-01 Black Internationalism 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in International Studies 101, International Studies112, History 238, or History 253.
  This course introduces students to the history of people of African descent and their struggles for universal emancipation during the 20th century. We will begin by drawing on theoretical readings about race/blackness and the African Diaspora. The second part of the class will probe the relationship between nationalism and pan-Africanism through comparative assessments of Marcus Garvey and his UNIA organization; Rastafarianism and music; and the U.S. Black Power Movement. Over the entire course, we will also seek to locate and critically evaluate Africa’s importance to these political and cultural projects. The ultimate purpose of this course is to impress upon students how struggles for self-determination were simultaneously local, national and global.
3459 WMGS-315-01 Women in America 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An examination of women’s varied experiences in the public and private spheres, from their own perspective as well as that of the dominant society. The experiences of women of different classes and races will be compared, as will the relationship between images of women and changing realities of their lives. Emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries.