Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for HISTORY - Fall 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3132 HIST-100-01 Modern Britain Since 1750 1.00 LEC Regan-Lefebvre, Jennifer TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  This course surveys the profound and continuous ways in which Britain changed over the course of the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries: in terms of its boundaries, political system, population, economy, and culture. In 1750 ‘Britain’ refers to an agrarian state composed of three countries, with a powerful monarchy, limited democracy and a growing empire. By 1900 Britain has become a United Kingdom, a highly industrialised and urbanised state with a massive empire and a broadening democratic system; by 2000, it has ‘lost’ its empire but is profoundly globalised and democratic. Why, when and how did these changes happen? This class will be as interactive lectures with particular time will be set aside for class discussions and analysis of primary sources.
3134 HIST-200-01 Hartford: Past and Present 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  Focusing on both Hartford and its region since the 1630s, this course explores key themes in American urban, social, economic, cultural, and political history, paying close attention to issues of race\ethnicity, gender\sexuality, class relations, religion, and urbanism. We first examine interactions between Native groups, English settlers, African slaves, and their descendants, from the Colonial Era to the Early Republic (1630s-1830s). We then explore urban cultures, abolitionism, European and African American migration, and Hartford's as a global financial and manufacturing center (1830s-1940s). Finally, from the 1940s to the present, topics include suburbanization, deindustrialization, racial segregation, Civil Rights movements, West Indian and Puerto Ricans migration, neoliberalism, globalization, and relations between Hartford and its suburbs. We also track Trinity College's history since 1823.
3733 HIST-203-01 Urban Nightlife since 1850 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students
  Dance music scenes and their urban spaces are social arenas in which discriminatory norms of sexism, homophobia, racism, nationalism and elitism can be subverted and transformed. Using New York City as our base in comparison to cities like Accra, Berlin, Chicago, Havana, London, Philadelphia, Rio de Janeiro, and Shanghai, we examine urban nightlife's music scenes, from the 1800s to the present, highlighting the roles played by the evolution of capitalism, and regional and international migrations. To do this, we tap into a growing, innovative research in Critical Race Studies, Ethnic Studies, Feminist Studies, Queer Studies, and Urban Studies, which has recast nightlife as far more than banal entertainment and debauchery, viewing it instead as a force propelling broader dynamics of cultural, political, and social change.
3137 HIST-216-01 World War II 1.00 LEC Kassow, Samuel MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 39
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  This is a survey of the political, military, social, cultural and economic aspects of the Second World War.
3138 HIST-219-01 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Cocco, Sean MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 seats for juniors and 4 seats for History majors
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3148 HIST-219-02 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Kete, Kathleen MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 seats for juniors and 4 seats for History majors
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3149 HIST-219-03 Planet Earth 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students, 10 for sophomores, 5 seats for juniors and 4 seats for History majors
  This course explores the effect of the natural world on human history and of humans on the natural world. Our focus is on the earth as a global system. We begin with a consideration of human and natural histories in deep time, well before the written record, and offer an argument for why those histories matter. We then examine how the historical past can be understood in the context of these planetary themes, reframing familiar events in ancient and modern history by highlighting major natural changes that accompanied them, such as the redistribution of plants and animals, the fluctuation of climate, and the development of planet-altering technologies. The course culminates in a consideration of the future planetary conditions that past and present actions may cause.
3478 HIST-222-01 Japan from Dawn of Human Hist 1.00 LEC Bayliss, Jeffrey MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course provides a broad overview of the events and themes encountered in Japan’s early history, from the earliest archeological evidence of human habitation to the establishment of a stable political and social order under the Tokugawa bakufu (shogunate). The course will explore the role of diverse religious and cultural influences in shaping Japanese society and culture during the pre-modern era. Themes and topics of particular interest are the impact of Chinese civilization and the “indigenization” of imported traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, early political organization and the rise of the imperial clan, and civil war and the ascendance of the warrior class to political and cultural hegemony.
3479 HIST-231-01 Abraham's Children 1.00 SEM Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Jews, Christians and Muslims all claimed Abraham as the founder of their particular form of monotheism. In the Middle Ages, men and women from all three groups had to negotiate relationships in war and peace. Jews lived among Christians and Muslims. Christians and Muslims fought in the Crusades, and all three groups traded with each other in the cosmopolitan cities of the Mediterranean. What kinds of worlds did these people live in? Were they worlds of prejudice and hatred or a pragmatic tolerance? How were the identities of Jews, Christians and Muslims shaped by their interactions during the Middle Ages? Are we still living with the results of those interactions?
3735 HIST-247-01 Latinas/Latinos in USA 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-year students
  Today, 1 in 5 Americans are Latinas\Latinos (Latinx), projected to approach 1 in 3 by the 2060s, and their status is a hotly-contested topic in American politics. Yet public discussions often lack a basic understanding of Latinx's centuries-long roots in North America, or their great diversity in terms of culture, social-class, gender, race, ethnicity and politics. Inspired by the title of a 2001 book, this newly-updated course focuses on three historical contexts: the 19th-century wars of territorial conquest that forcibly put over one million Latinx within U.S. borders; the formation of early Latinx American identities and civil rights movements (1920s-1970s); and contemporary debates on globalization, immigration, legal and cultural citizenship, and transnational, gender\sexual, racial\ethnic identities.
3480 HIST-260-01 The Struggle for Civil Rights 1.00 LEC Greenberg, Cheryl TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  African Americans and their allies have long struggled to win equal rights and equal opportunities in America. We will examine the course of that struggle in the twentieth century, focusing primarily on the period 1950-1968. We will consider questions of urbanization, employment, racism, politics, violence, non-violence, Black Power and the notion of “race blindness.” The end of the course will be spent considering the present day. What has been resolved, and what issues remain? Are there new challenges to achieving racial equality in the U.S? Have we become “post-racial” yet, and do we want to be?
3141 HIST-299-01 What is History? 1.00 LEC Elukin, Jonathan W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: This course is open only to History majors and minors.
  A study of the character and range of activities undertaken by historians. Students will critically evaluate the way in which historians treat evidence and draw conclusions. Topics considered will include an introduction of some of the subdisciplines within the field and an examination of a number of important exchanges on matters of substance and method currently under debate among historians.
3142 HIST-300-01 History Workshop 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one History course completed at Trinity, or permission of instructor.
  The Workshop seminar combines extensive readings on the topic of the seminar with a substantial research paper involving the use of primary source materials and original analysis. Prerequisite: At least one History Department course completed at Trinity. This course is primarily for History majors but permission of the instructor will allow other Trinity students interested to enroll.
3683 HIST-302-01 The Knight in History 1.00 LEC Elukin, Jonathan TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The knight, a mounted warrior defined by his aristocratic lineage and prowess on the battlefield, was central to the society of medieval Europe. The knight began as a mounted servant in the retinue of a local strongman and evolved into the central figure of aristocratic society in the Middle Ages. The knight became the fulcrum of medieval chivalric culture, warfare, and politics. This seminar will study the changing role the knight played in medieval society by exploring a variety of primary sources, including literature, handbooks of knightly conduct, letters, sermons, chronicles and art. We will conclude by exploring how the image of the knight has survived in post-medieval culture.
3685 HIST-305-01 Emperor Nero: Murder & Mayhem 1.00 SEM Caldwell, Lauren TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 3
  In the lifetime of the Emperor Nero (who was in power 54-68 CE), Rome appears as a dark world of murder, mayhem, debauchery, and palace intrigue. Imperial authors including Suetonius, Tacitus, and Seneca offer compelling accounts of the trials and tribulations of the emerging imperial system. Topics to consider include the relationship between imperialism and corruption, the role of the emperor, the tension between republican ideals and autocratic realities, the problematic status of imperial women, and the historiographic and philosophical approaches of the authors. The course is taught in English and readings are in English for students taking CLCV 305/HIST 305. Students taking this course as LATN 305 will read selections from course texts in Latin.
2850 HIST-311-01 Place in the Native Northeast 1.00 SEM Wickman, Thomas TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Class enrollment is limited to 8 History majors and 7 American Studies majors.
  The coasts, rivers, fields, hills, villages, and cities of present-day Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia have been home for indigenous families, communities, and nations through numerous environmental, political, and economic transformations. Students will learn about the ways that Native nations of the Northeast, from Pequots to Mi'kmaqs, have adapted, recreated, and reaffirmed a deep connectedness to their homelands and territories, from the fifteenth century to the present. Fields trips to local sites and archives will facilitate original historical research. Primary sources to be assigned include autobiographies, travel narratives, war histories, maps, Native American stories, and dictionaries of indigenous place names, and secondary source readings will cover major themes in Native American studies, with special emphasis on sense of place.
3481 HIST-315-01 The Pacific War: 1931-1945 1.00 SEM Lestz, Michael W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the consequences of Japan's occupation of Manchuria, Tokyo's rejection of membership in the League of Nations, and the birth of the Japanese puppet state of Manchukuo. Subsequently, Japanese expansionism in north and south China and the formation of an increasingly close relationship with Italy and Germany paved the way for the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Key topics to be examined will include the Japan's response to Chinese nationalism, Japanese perceptions of Versaille order as it impinged upon East Asia, Japan's theory and practice of "total war," war in Burma and the Pacific, and the effect of the Pacific War on European colonial empires.
3145 HIST-332-01 South Africa/Anti-Apartheid Mv 1.00 SEM Markle, Seth TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The creation of the apartheid state in South Africa gave birth to a litany of sociopolitical movements aimed at dismantling a system of white minority rule. In what ways can a digital archive open up a window onto this rich and dynamic history of the anti-antiapartheid movement in South Africa between 1948 and 1994? This course will seek to answer this question by primarily utilizing Aluka's "Struggles for Freedom in Southern Africa", a collection of over 190,000 primary and secondary sources that shed considerable light on how marginalized peoples and communities sought to realize a democratic alternative to settler colonialism during the era of decolonization in Africa. Topics such as political leadership, nonviolent civil disobedience, coalition building, state repression, armed guerilla resistance, nationalism, international solidarity and truth and reconciliation will inform the ways in which we search for sources of historical evidence contained in Aluka's digital archive.
3482 HIST-342-01 History of Sexuality 1.00 SEM Antrim, Zayde MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the ways in which notions of the body, gender, sexual desire, and sexuality have been organized over space and time. Taking as a starting point the geographical regions of the Middle East, Asia, and Latin America in the ancient and medieval periods, the course seeks to de-center discourses of Western sexual modernity. It then addresses the ways in which colonialism, racism, nationalism, and globalization have depended on and disrupted normative ideas about modern sexuality, including the hetero/homosexual binary. Throughout the course we will ask how historians use theoretical and primary sources to construct a history of sexuality. Course expectations include a final research paper.
3171 HIST-353-01 American Slavery 1.00 SEM Gac, Scott M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: Request pin code from professor for registration
  This course covers important themes and developments in the history of slavery in the United States. From origins in indigenous communities, colonization, and the black Atlantic, human bondage shaped (and continues to shape) the legal and social framework for generations of Americans. Readings feature voices from slaveholders to the enslaved, politicians and activists, as well as some of the best work done by recent historians. This course fulfills transnational approaches.
3510 HIST-356-01 Germany and the Great War 1.00 SEM Doerre, Jason MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The outbreak of World War I marks the end of Germany's long nineteenth century and the beginning of a chaotic twentieth century. Its defeat in the war ushered in a period of remarkable social progress, scientific and artistic achievement, as well as unprecedented political instability, which led to some of the greatest tragedies of the twentieth century. This course will examine Germany's entry into the war to its defeat and aftermath. With focus on the totality of the experience of this war in German and Austro-Hungarian regions, we will explore important historical works, primary documents, novels, films, works of art and more. Taught in English.
3586 HIST-375-01 Mythmaking the Italian Nation 1.00 SEM King, Joshua TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will be dedicated to a study of the role that 19th century literary and cultural movements played in creating the myths necessary for defining an Italian nation, as well as later "revisionists" of the process of Italian state formation. Texts will include those by the pillars of Italian Romanticism: Foscolo, Manzoni, and Leopardi, as well as later "revisionist" writers like De Roberto, di Lampedusa, Sciascia, and Consolo. Our approach will be necessarily interdisciplinary. While our focus will be on literary and cultural movements, texts will include those by prominent historians as well. This course will be taught in English, and all texts will be in English. Films will be offered with English subtitles.
3147 HIST-376-01 The French Revolution 1.00 SEM Kete, Kathleen W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An exploration of the Great French Revolution of 1789 that focuses on its social and political history, beginning with the Revolution’s origins in the crisis of the old regime and ending with its legacy in the nineteenth-century Europe. The course will grapple with the major historiographical debates, recently reinvigorated by an explosion of innovative scholarship on the Revolution. Topics to be examined include: the origins of the Revolution, the radicalization of the Revolution, counterrevolution, political culture and legitimacy, transformations in the civic order, the roles of different social actors (the bourgeoisie, nobles, artisans, peasants, women), the Thermidorian reaction, and the Napoleonic settlement. Students will be asked to evaluate competing interpretations and reach their own conclusions. The course will combine lecture and discussion of interpretive works and primary sources.
2215 HIST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
2216 HIST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
2561 HIST-498-01 Sr Thesis Part 1 & Seminar 2.00 SEM Elukin, Jonathan T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  A two-semester senior thesis including the required research seminar in the fall term. Permission of the instructor is required for Part I.
3057 AMST-285-01 Born in Blood 1.00 LEC Gac, Scott MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM
W: 2:40PM-3:55PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  NOTE: 17 seats reserved for first year students, 17 for sophomores, 10 for juniors, and 5 for seniors
  This course explains how violence has made modern America and belongs alongside liberty, democracy, freedom, and equality in the pantheon of American political and cultural ideals. Using figures such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Dwight Eisenhower, and events from the American Revolution to the era of Civil Rights, "Born in Blood" situates state sanctioned violence against American citizens as a definitive force in American life.
3058 AMST-325-01 New York and its Neighborhoods 1.00 SEM Manevitz, Alexander W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Founded as a small Dutch colonial port city on a narrow island inhabited by Lenape Indians, New York City became the most populous city in the United States, as well as a global economic and cultural hub. In order to better understand New York’s complex and uneven urban growth, we will analyze the ways a diverse array of New Yorkers struggled to define themselves and their communities. As we explore the dynamic history of the city and its residents, we will become better scholars and more responsible urban citizens. Each class meeting will focus on one of New York City’s diverse neighborhoods, using it as a lens to illustrate and investigate important themes of urban and American history that extend well beyond the five boroughs.
3646 INTS-216-01 Undrstanding Lat Am & Caribbn 1.00 LEC Staff, Trinity TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This interdisciplinary course explores major historical themes and contemporary cultural and political topics related to Latin American and Caribbean societies and cultures. The goal is for the students to acquire a panoramic view of the Latin America and the Caribbean worlds while acquiring a deeper understanding of various issues that are explored more deeply in other upper-division courses at Trinity. We will engage issues of demography, geography, basis historical periods processes, particular anthropological and cultural debates, fundamental political and gender, sociological approaches to daily life, aesthetic and literary movements, and the regions’ positions within the historic and contemporary world economy. Open to all students, this course is required of INTS majors with a Caribbean and Latin American Studies focus.
2567 INTS-314-01 Black Internationalism 1.00 SEM Markle, Seth TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in International Studies 101, International Studies112, History 238, or History 253.
  This course introduces students to the history of people of African descent and their struggles for universal emancipation during the 20th century. We will begin by drawing on theoretical readings about race/blackness and the African Diaspora. The second part of the class will probe the relationship between nationalism and pan-Africanism through comparative assessments of Marcus Garvey and his UNIA organization; Rastafarianism and music; and the U.S. Black Power Movement. Over the entire course, we will also seek to locate and critically evaluate Africa’s importance to these political and cultural projects. The ultimate purpose of this course is to impress upon students how struggles for self-determination were simultaneously local, national and global.
3527 MUSC-265-01 Music from Plato through Bach 1.00 SEM Woldu, Gail TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101 or permission of instructor.
  This course explores music from the time of Plato and Aristotle through Baroque composers Bach, Vivaldi, and Handel. We will consider the most significant traditions, trends, genres, innovations, and historical developments in the history of music in Europe as we discover, listen to, and write about key works by composers whose music is the cornerstone for much of today's music.