Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for HISTORY - Spring 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
5157 HIST-105-01 Nationalism in Europe's 19th C 1.00 LEC Rodriguez,Allison A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  The Nineteenth Century in Europe was the Age of –Isms: Liberalism, Conservatism, Socialism and, above all, Nationalism. The course will follow the development of Nationalism and national movements from the French Revolution to the Outbreak of WWI. What began the century as a tenet of Liberalism will end it as a hallmark of a new, virulent form of Conservatism, as Nationalism was exported to the colonies. We will examine national movements among subject nationalities (Poles, Czechs and Irish, to name a few), as well as unite a country or two. Readings will consist of scholarly texts and contemporary novels.
5195 HIST-116-01 The Rise & Fall of Roman Rep 1.00 LEC Reger,Gary MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  By about 300 BCE the Roman state had in place its republican institutions, and began the expansionist process by which the Romans came to control the Mediterranean basin. Four hundred years later, the Roman empire extended from Britain to Egypt, but the state running that empire had undergone fundamental social, political, and cultural changes. This course traces the processes that created the empire and transformed the Roman world, with special emphasis on the interplay of political and social phenomena. We will look closely at primary sources on which our knowledge of these changes is based.
5163 HIST-210-01 Paris:Capital of 19th Century 1.00 LEC Kete,Kathleen TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  In this history of Paris we explore the revolutions in politics, culture and class which usher into being one of the most dynamic and influential spaces in European and world history. Topics include the revolutions of 1830 and 1848; the rebuilding of Paris during the Second Empire; and the invention of modern art by the Impressionists and their successors. We also discuss the Commune of 1871 (in Marx’s view, the first socialist revolution), the Dreyfus Affair (which brings anti-Semitism to the center stage of European politics), and the advent of the ‘New Woman’ whose dress and behavior crystallize a feminist challenge to the masculine politics of the age.
4984 HIST-213-01 Modern Jewish History 1.00 LEC Kassow,Samuel D. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course will examine major trends in Jewish history since 1789. There will be particular emphasis on Jewish society in Eastern Europe and the breakdown of orthodox hegemony. Topics will include the Haskalah, the Bund, the development of Zionism, the interwar period in Eastern Europe, the Holocaust, and the State of Israel. The approach will be primarily that of intellectual history with emphasis on the secular aspect of Jewish history.
5138 HIST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Cancelled GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Course examines the historical evolution and current dynamics of Latin American cities, from the pre-colonial (pre-1492), to the colonial (1492–1825) and post-colonial (since the 1800's) periods. A variety of sources allow us to explore specific examples from several cities, including: Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Havana, Mexico City, Lima, Rio de Janeiro, and São Paulo, for example. Topics include colonialism, nationalism and transnationalism; urban slavery and race; rural-urban and ethnic migrations; industrialization and the urban working-class; urbanism, urban spaces and architecture; authoritarianism, populism and democratization; and consumer cultures, sports and leisure, among others.
5040 HIST-226-01 The Rise of Modern Russia 1.00 LEC Kassow,Samuel D. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course will examine the history of Russia from 1825 until the present. It will include the dilemmas of modernization and social stability in Tsarist Russia, the challenges of Empire and multinational populations, the impact of the intelligentsia and the causes of the revolutions of 1905 and 1917. We will then consider topics in the rise and fall of the USSR: Lenin, Stalin, World War II, the problems of de-Stalinization and the reasons that attempts to reform the Soviet system failed. The course will also make extensive use of literary materials.
4985 HIST-228-01 Islamic Civilization to 1517 1.00 LEC Antrim,Zayde TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course surveys the transformation of the Middle East into an Islamic civilization from the life of Muhammad in the early seventh century through the collapse of the Mamluk Empire in 1517. It focuses on social, cultural, and political history and addresses regional variations from Morocco to Iran. Topics include women, religious minorities, and slavery, as well as Islamic education, mysticism, and literature.
4611 HIST-242-01 History of China, Qing to Pres 1.00 LEC Lestz,Michael E. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  A survey of modern Chinese history in the period covering the last traditional dynastic state (1644-1911) and 20th-century China. Emphasis on the collapse of the Confucian state, China’s “Enlightenment,” and the Chinese Revolution.
5140 HIST-247-01 Latinos/Latinas in USA 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Who are “Latinos/Latinas” and how have they come to constitute a central ethnic/racial category in the contemporary United States? This is the organizing question around which this course examines the experiences of major Latino/Latina groups—Chicanos/Mexicanos, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans—and new immigrants from Central America and the Caribbean. We study U.S. colonialism and imperialism in the Old Mexican North and the Caribbean; migration and immigration patterns and policies; racial, gender, and class distinctions; cultural and political expressions and conflicts; return migrations and transnationalism; and inter-ethnic relations and the construction of pan-Latino/Latina diasporic identities.
4986 HIST-253-01 African Hist: 1850 to Contemp 1.00 LEC Markle,Seth M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is the second part of a two-part introductory survey of African history. With a focus on "Black Africa" south of the Sahara, we will begin by exploring the impact of the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade on Africa and move to the establishment of - and resistance to - European colonial rule. We will then look at the impact of the two World Wars on Africa as well as the rise in nationalism and movements for independence. In the postcolonial period, we will explore Cold War policies in Africa, and address issues including the end of apartheid in South Africa, the politics of foreign aid and military interventions, global health and resource wars.
5226 HIST-298-01 Introductory History Seminar 1.00 SEM Wickman,Thomas M. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The Introductory History Seminars are small, discussion-rich classes for first and second-year students who are considering majoring in history or who have just declared history as their major. The class will introduce students both to the field and the department in the more supportive setting of a seminar.
4988 HIST-299-01 What is History? 1.00 LEC Euraque,Dario A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: This course is open only to History majors and minors.
  A study of the character and range of activities undertaken by historians. Students will critically evaluate the way in which historians treat evidence and draw conclusions. Topics considered will include an introduction of some of the subdisciplines within the field and an examination of a number of important exchanges on matters of substance and method currently under debate among historians.
4989 HIST-299-02 What is History? 1.00 LEC Wickman,Thomas M. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 14
  Prerequisite: This course is open only to History majors and minors.
  A study of the character and range of activities undertaken by historians. Students will critically evaluate the way in which historians treat evidence and draw conclusions. Topics considered will include an introduction of some of the subdisciplines within the field and an examination of a number of important exchanges on matters of substance and method currently under debate among historians.
4990 HIST-300-01 History Workshop 1.00 SEM Bayliss,Jeffrey M: 1:15PM-3:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one History course completed at Trinity, or permission of instructor.
  The Workshop seminar combines extensive readings on the topic of the seminar with a substantial research paper involving the use of primary source materials and original analysis. Prerequisite: At least one History Department course completed at Trinity. This course is primarily for History majors but permission of the instructor will allow other Trinity students interested to enroll.
5025 HIST-300-02 History Workshop 1.00 SEM Elukin,Jonathan M: 1:15PM-3:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one History course completed at Trinity, or permission of instructor.
  The Workshop seminar combines extensive readings on the topic of the seminar with a substantial research paper involving the use of primary source materials and original analysis. Prerequisite: At least one History Department course completed at Trinity. This course is primarily for History majors but permission of the instructor will allow other Trinity students interested to enroll.
5117 HIST-303-01 Modern Ireland, Global Island 1.00 SEM Golden,James J. MW: 6:30PM-7:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores the complicated and contentious process through which Ireland transformed from a single political entity within the British Empire to two separate entities: the Republic of Ireland, an independent state, and Northern Ireland, which remained part of the United Kingdom but has suffered decades of civil strife. Through class discussion and careful analysis of primary and secondary sources, we will look at the major political, social and economic changes on the island of Ireland since 1800. We will pay special attention to the island’s interaction with the wider world, including through its diaspora, and we will examine whether Ireland’s political history can be understood in terms of decolonisation and post-colonialism.
4992 HIST-312-01 Korea & Japan in Hist Perspect 1.00 SEM Bayliss,Jeffrey W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course provides an overview of the history of relations between Korea and Japan, within the shifting contexts of imperialism and post-colonialism. Through extensive readings and class discussions, students will also gain a detailed understanding of the historiography of Korean-Japanese relations and the debates that still inform the ways the Japanese and Koreans – both North and South – view one another today. Students will produce a significant historiographical essay on a topic to be decided upon in consultation with the instructor. No prior coursework in Korean or Japanese history is required, but students with no background in the histories of Korea and Japan will be required to do additional reading to obtain a better understanding of the historical contexts encountered in the regular readings.
4993 HIST-315-01 The Pacific War: 1931-1945 1.00 SEM Lestz,Michael E. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines the consequences of Japan's occupation of Manchuria, Tokyo's rejection of membership in the League of Nations, and the birth of the Japanese puppet state of Manchukuo. Subsequently, Japanese expansionism in north and south China and the formation of an increasingly close relationship with Italy and Germany paved the way for the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Key topics to be examined will include the Japan's response to Chinese nationalism, Japanese perceptions of Versaille order as it impinged upon East Asia, Japan's theory and practice of "total war," war in Burma and the Pacific, and the effect of the Pacific War on European colonial empires.
4995 HIST-319-01 Mapping the Middle East 1.00 SEM Antrim,Zayde F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course approaches the history of the Middle East through maps. It will look at the many different ways maps have told the story of the territory we now call the Middle East and the many different points of view that have defined it as a geographical entity. Readings will analyze maps as social constructions and will place mapmaking and map-use in a historical context. We will relate maps to questions of empire, colonialism, war and peace, nationalism, and environmental change. Students will be required to undertake an original research paper.
5192 HIST-322-01 Shanghai:Treaty Port-Megacity 1.00 SEM Lestz,Michael E. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  In a few decades after its forcible opening as a Treaty Port in 1842, Shanghai emerged as Asia's greatest port. It quickly grew to an international city that played a defining in China role as a catalyst for cultural, social, and economic change. After 1937, however, war, civil war, and revolution put the brakes on Shanghai's advance. After the late 1980's, Shanghai reemerged as one of the world's leading centers of trade and a meeting place of civilizations. Today the city is the linchpin of the economy of the Yangtze River basin and China's foremost gateway to the world. Using historical, literary, and documentary materials this course will reflect on the evolution of Shanghai and the role it played as a catalyst for change in various eras.
4628 HIST-344-01 America's Most Wanted 1.00 SEM Greenberg,Cheryl TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: 12 seats reserved for senior History and/or American Studies majors
  Americans are fascinated by crime. We read detective fiction, watch police dramas, and hold murder mystery dinners. When the crimes are real, we debate guilt or innocence, punishment or rehabilitation, death penalty or life in prison at our dinner tables. Why this fascination, and what does it tell us about our culture and our concerns? In this course we examine several actual crimes and try to understand what made these crimes, and not others, so riveting. What drew us in? What kept us there? Along the way we will also discuss changing police and penal practices, how attitudes about race, class, religion, and gender play into public fixations on particular crimes, and how and why those attitudes shifted over time.
4120 HIST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
4269 HIST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
4296 HIST-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for each semester of this year-long thesis.
4248 HIST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser, and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4259 HIST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
4249 HIST-954-01 Thesis Part I 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Thesis Part I is an investigation and report on an original research topic. Conference hours are available by appointment. Registration for the thesis will not be considered final without the thesis approval form and the signatures of the thesis adviser, graduate adviser, and department chair. Please refer to the Graduate Studies Catalog for thesis requirements. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form and the thesis writer's packet. Two course credits. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
4250 HIST-955-01 Thesis Part II 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Continuation of History 954. Two course credits.
5198 AMST-232-01 Slavery/Freedom in America 1.00 SEM Manevitz,Alexander D. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  The history of America is a history of slavery. In this course we will delve into the long history of slavery, emancipation, and their reverberations throughout American history. In doing so, we will gain a better understanding of how they have permeated the foundations of our political, economic, social, and cultural worlds from the colonial period to the present. We will also place the United States in a transnational context in order to better understand how race, slavery, and freedom here has interacted with those topics in the broader Atlantic World where European empires, Native Americans, and Africans overlapped and collided. This is designed as an introductory course for students to develop a familiarity with American slavery as a significant theme that crosses fields and majors.
5199 AMST-325-01 New York and its Neighborhoods 1.00 SEM Manevitz,Alexander D. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Founded as a small Dutch colonial port city on a narrow island inhabited by Lenape Indians, New York City became the most populous city in the United States, as well as a global economic and cultural hub. In order to better understand New York’s complex and uneven urban growth, we will analyze the ways a diverse array of New Yorkers struggled to define themselves and their communities. As we explore the dynamic history of the city and its residents, we will become better scholars and more responsible urban citizens. Each class meeting will focus on one of New York City’s diverse neighborhoods, using it as a lens to illustrate and investigate important themes of urban and American history that extend well beyond the five boroughs.
5200 AMST-412-01 Popular Narratives of US Hist 1.00 SEM Manevitz,Alexander D. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  History surrounds us in popular culture—from hit Broadway musicals like Hamilton and video games like the Assassin’s Creed series today to the earliest American novels. Though some have dismissed these media as “non-scholarly,” they are the main source of history for many who might not be interested in a traditional scholarly monograph and should be taken seriously. We will spend the semester learning how to analyze the unexpected history presented through these methods, and investigating the possibilities and pitfalls of communicating American history in these different forms. In conversation with practitioners of narrative, experimental, and popular history, students will create a final project of their own design that pushes on the boundaries of how we communicate history and how we define our audience.
5201 AMST-812-01 Popular Narratives of US Hist 1.00 SEM Manevitz,Alexander D. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3
  History surrounds us in popular culture—from hit Broadway musicals like Hamilton and video games like the Assassin’s Creed series today to the earliest American novels. Though some have dismissed these media as “non-scholarly,” they are the main source of history for many who might not be interested in a traditional scholarly monograph and should be taken seriously. We will spend the semester learning how to analyze the unexpected history presented through these methods, and investigating the possibilities and pitfalls of communicating American history in these different forms. In conversation with practitioners of narrative, experimental, and popular history, students will create a final project of their own design that pushes on the boundaries of how we communicate history and how we define our audience.
5203 CLCV-314-01 The Classics in Colonial India 1.00 SEM Ramgopal,Sailakshmi WF: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course traces the complex relationship between the study of classical antiquity and the British colonial presence in India. How did Indians employ the classical tradition to produce strategies of resistance and collaboration to overturn the British Raj and agitate for the creation of Bharat? The class will engage with a diverse range of texts like Sophocles’ Antigone, Nehru’s “India and Greece”, a play based on Aristophanes’ Wealth, whose replacement of a male with a female protagonist raises issues of gender and sexuality, and films like Gandhi (1982). By excavating the mostly uncharted history of classical reception in British India, the course not only considers the relationship between classics and colonialism, but performs the crucial function of decentering the occidental orientation of classical reception studies.
4974 ECON-220-01 British Economic History 1.00 LEC Woolley,Nicholas TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  This course aims to analyze British history through the lens of economics. The focus will be on modern history, from the age of empire to the post-war welfare system. Topics include industrialization, development of financial markets, the benefits of international trade, and the workings of the gold standard. Students from both the History and Economics departments will be given opportunities to play to their relative strengths, and only a basic understanding of economics is required.
4829 INTS-205-01 War on Terror 1.00 LEC Prashad,Vijay TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  9/11 inaugurated a new epoch not only for the United States, but decidedly for the world. Tentacular wars of and on terror stretched from Afghanistan into Yemen, from Madrid into Bali. This course will offer a social history of the war on terror. We will explore the roots of the war on terror in the histories of Afghanistan and Yemen, and plot the switch from the prehistory of the War on Terror (1993-2001) to the War on Terror Part 1 (2001-2007) to the War on Terror Part 2 (2007 to the present).
4696 INTS-216-01 Undrstanding Lat Am & Caribbn 1.00 LEC Euraque,Dario A. MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This interdisciplinary course explores major historical themes and contemporary cultural and political topics related to Latin American and Caribbean societies and cultures. The goal is for the students to acquire a panoramic view of the Latin America and the Caribbean worlds while acquiring a deeper understanding of various issues that are explored more deeply in other upper-division courses at Trinity. We will engage issues of demography, geography, basis historical periods processes, particular anthropological and cultural debates, fundamental political and gender, sociological approaches to daily life, aesthetic and literary movements, and the regions’ positions within the historic and contemporary world economy. Open to all students, this course is required of INTS majors with a Caribbean and Latin American Studies focus.
4397 MUSC-211-01 Music from Plato through Bach 1.00 SEM Woldu,Gail H. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Music 101 or permission of instructor.
  This course explores music from the time of Plato and Aristotle through Baroque composers Bach, Vivaldi, and Handel. We will consider the most significant traditions, trends, genres, innovations, and historical developments in the history of music in Europe as we discover, listen to, and write about key works by composers whose music is the cornerstone for much of today's music.