Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for HISTORY - Fall 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3575 HIST-100-01 Modern Britain Since 1750 1.00 LEC Golden,James J. MW: 6:30PM-7:45PM SH - N130 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course surveys the profound and continuous ways in which Britain changed over the course of the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries: in terms of its boundaries, political system, population, economy, and culture. In 1750 ‘Britain’ refers to an agrarian state composed of three countries, with a powerful monarchy, limited democracy and a growing empire. By 1900 Britain has become a United Kingdom, a highly industrialised and urbanised state with a massive empire and a broadening democratic system; by 2000, it has ‘lost’ its empire but is profoundly globalised and democratic. Why, when and how did these changes happen? This class will be as interactive lectures with particular time will be set aside for class discussions and analysis of primary sources.
3452 HIST-102-01 Europe Since 1715 1.00 LEC Kete,Kathleen TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - N130 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  European history from 1715 to the present.
3613 HIST-106-01 Crusade and 'Convivencia' 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: Course will be counted toward Language and Culture Studies majors if written work is done in Spanish.
  This course examines the history and society of Spain from the disintegration of the Roman empire through the Arab conquest and the so-called Christian Reconquista. Although Muslim and Christian rulers framed their wars in religious terms, throughout this period Muslims, Christians and Jews lived together on both sides of the frontier. That coexistence, or convivencia, was never equal, nor was it free from violence. Through primary sources, both words and images, we will explore the cultures of medieval Spain and how they developed in relation to, and in conflict with, one another. The course concludes with an examination of how colonial experiences in medieval Iberia also set the stage for later Spanish conquests in the New World.
3701 HIST-135-01 War & Gender in Europe 1914-45 1.00 LEC Rodriguez,Allison A. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MC - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Between 1914 and 1945, Europe was destroyed, rebuilt and destroyed once more. All aspects of society were affected and changed by the wars, including the gender order. This course will examine the breaks, as well as the continuities, in the relationship between men and women over the course of two devastating World Wars. The wars forced women to take on jobs previously restricted to men, as well as navigate the challenges of the Home Front; meanwhile, men were tasked with reintegrating into society after facing the horrors of war, often returning to a home that was much different than the one they had left. Through memoirs, scholarly texts, and film, we will explore how the wars affected conceptions of both femininity and masculinity in Europe.
3380 HIST-200-01 Hartford: Past and Present 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM LSC - AUD HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students, 8 seats reserved for sophomores.
  Since Dutch fur traders arrived in the 1610s, Hartford and its region have been part of many core themes in American urban history. This course examines Hartford's rise as a financial and manufacturing center from the 1800s to early 1900s; the roles played by ethnicity, gender, religion, race and social class in urban and suburban politics, culture, civic institutions and neighborhoods; the evolution in urban planning, architecture, transportation and public spaces; and the impact of post-¬-1945 suburbanization, capitalist restructuring and globalization on the social, political and cultural profile of Hartford and its suburbs.
3454 HIST-201-01 Early America 1.00 LEC Wickman,Thomas M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: Enrollment is limited to 10 History majors, 5 American Studies majors, 18 sophomores, and 2 HMTCA students.
  This course introduces students to major developments in the political, economic, and social history of North America from the sixteenth to the mid-nineteenth century. We will study indigenous sovereignty, encounters between Europeans and Native Americans, the founding of European colonies, the rise of the Atlantic slave trade, the Seven Years' War, the American Revolution, the spread of human enslavement, the War of 1812, Indian removal policy, U.S. wars with Native nations, westward expansion, the U.S.-Mexican War, abolitionism, and the Civil War. Students will be challenged to imagine American history within Atlantic and global contexts and to comprehend the expansiveness of Native American homelands and the shifting nature of North American borderlands.
3503 HIST-216-01 World War II 1.00 LEC Kassow,Samuel D. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MECC - 220 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  This is a survey of the political, military, social, cultural and economic aspects of the Second World War.
3064 HIST-217-01 Hist Urbanism Eastern Europe 1.00 LEC Kananovich,Uladzimir MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM SH - T308 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course will examine the economic, social, and cultural history of East European urban development during the medieval and early modern periods. We will focus on local governance, urban landscape and planning, social and educational institutions, commercial and artisan activities, religious and ethnic communities, and a new type of citizen: the burgher. To better understand urban life in the important towns of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (contemporary Belarus, Lithuania, and a part of Ukraine), we will draw comparison to the major centers of Danzig-Gdansk, Königsberg-Królewiec, and Kraków in central Europe and Russian towns like Great Novgorod and Moscow. The varied sources of information for the course include diaries, testaments, memories, private correspondence, engravings, drawings, and architectural monuments.
3455 HIST-222-01 Japan from Dawn of Human Hist 1.00 LEC Bayliss,Jeffrey TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - N129 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course provides a broad overview of the events and themes encountered in Japan’s early history, from the earliest archeological evidence of human habitation to the establishment of a stable political and social order under the Tokugawa bakufu (shogunate). The course will explore the role of diverse religious and cultural influences in shaping Japanese society and culture during the pre-modern era. Themes and topics of particular interest are the impact of Chinese civilization and the “indigenization” of imported traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, early political organization and the rise of the imperial clan, and civil war and the ascendance of the warrior class to political and cultural hegemony.
3066 HIST-227-01 Ukraine & Belarus Histor Persp 1.00 LEC Kananovich,Uladzimir TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM SH - T308 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is designed to equip students with a detailed understanding of the critical historical events that have influenced modern Ukraine and Belarus. In the late medieval and early modern periods (fifteenth-seventeenth centuries), this region (Western Rus’) underwent a series of important political, social, and cultural transformations that led to the formation of new ethnic entities and later nation-states (Ukraine and Belarus). Late medieval and early modern Ukraine and Belarus will be placed in a wider international context that linked them to Orthodox Europe and the Occident, as well as to the world of Islam. Understanding the history of these dynamic societies will help make some sense of the contemporary relations between Ukraine and Russia.
3146 HIST-241-01 Hist China Shang-Ming 1.00 LEC Lestz,Michael E. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM MC - 205 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  A survey focused on the development of Chinese politics, culture, and society from 1600 B.C. to the conclusion of the Ming dynasty in 1644 A.D. This course will provide a historical introduction to the growth of a unified Chinese empire with its own homogeneous intellectual tradition and will explore the empire’s coexistence with an enormously varied cluster of regional cultures.
3457 HIST-260-01 The Struggle for Civil Rights 1.00 LEC Greenberg,Cheryl TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - S204 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students
  African Americans and their allies have long struggled to win equal rights and equal opportunities in America. We will examine the course of that struggle in the twentieth century, focusing primarily on the period 1950-1968. We will consider questions of urbanization, employment, racism, politics, violence, non-violence, Black Power and the notion of “race blindness.” The end of the course will be spent considering the present day. What has been resolved, and what issues remain? Are there new challenges to achieving racial equality in the U.S? Have we become “post-racial” yet, and do we want to be?
3148 HIST-299-01 What is History? 1.00 LEC Cocco,Sean MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM SH - N130 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: This course is open only to History majors and minors.
  A study of the character and range of activities undertaken by historians. Students will critically evaluate the way in which historians treat evidence and draw conclusions. Topics considered will include an introduction of some of the subdisciplines within the field and an examination of a number of important exchanges on matters of substance and method currently under debate among historians.
3458 HIST-300-01 History Workshop 1.00 SEM Figueroa,Luis A. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM LSC - 135 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in at least one History course completed at Trinity, or permission of instructor.
  The Workshop seminar combines extensive readings on the topic of the seminar with a substantial research paper involving the use of primary source materials and original analysis. Prerequisite: At least one History Department course completed at Trinity. This course is primarily for History majors but permission of the instructor will allow other Trinity students interested to enroll.
3459 HIST-311-01 Place in the Native Northeast 1.00 SEM Wickman,Thomas M. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - N215 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Class enrollment is limited to 10 History majors and 5 American Studies majors.
  The coasts, rivers, fields, hills, villages, and cities of present-day Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia have been home for indigenous families, communities, and nations through numerous environmental, political, and economic transformations. Students will learn about the ways that Native nations of the Northeast, from Pequots to Mi'kmaqs, have adapted, recreated, and reaffirmed a deep connectedness to their homelands and territories, from the fifteenth century to the present. Fields trips to local sites and archives will facilitate original historical research. Primary sources to be assigned include autobiographies, travel narratives, war histories, maps, Native American stories, and dictionaries of indigenous place names, and secondary source readings will cover major themes in Native American studies, with special emphasis on sense of place.
3614 HIST-313-01 Environment and Empire 1.00 SEM Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines how Europeans interacted with their environments during the early modern period, when Europe went from being a relatively poor, inward-looking society to a power that would dominate much of the world. We will use primary sources, including art and maps, to reconstruct how the rise of capitalism and the first age of globalization influenced Europeans’ relationships with their environments, and how they in turn transformed the environments in which they found themselves. Themes include the effect of climate change on history, the impact of a capitalist search for resources on the world’s environments, and colonialism as an environmental enterprise.
3460 HIST-332-01 African Nationalism&Decoloniz. 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM SH - N215 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines both the theoretical and empirical aspects of anticolonial nationalist movements in Africa from the end of World War II to the dismantling of the apartheid regime in South Africa in the early 1990s. Topics such as nonviolent civil disobedience, armed guerilla struggle, nationalist thought, and postcolonial state formation will inform the ways in which we seek to understand the end of European colonial rule and its social, economic, cultural, and political implications for Africa. A series of case studies will acquaint students to such themes as well as highlight the utility of an interdisciplinary approach for examining a broad array of historical developments. The second half of the course will focus on southern Africa, using the Aluka digital archive, "The Struggles for Freedom in South Africa Collection."
3364 HIST-342-01 History of Sexuality 1.00 SEM Antrim,Zayde MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM MC - 313 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: This course fulfills the senior seminar requirement for WMGS majors/minors and one of the 300-level seminar requirements for HIST majors.
  This course examines the ways in which notions of the body, gender, sexual desire, and sexuality have been organized over space and time. Taking as a starting point the geographical regions of the Middle East, Asia, and Latin America in the ancient and medieval periods, the course seeks to de-center discourses of Western sexual modernity. It then addresses the ways in which colonialism, racism, nationalism, and globalization have depended on and disrupted normative ideas about modern sexuality, including the hetero/homosexual binary. Throughout the course we will ask how historians use theoretical and primary sources to construct a history of sexuality. Course expectations include a final research paper.
3481 HIST-354-01 Civil War and Reconstr 1.00 SEM Manevitz,Alexander D. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM SH - S204 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines not only the military dimensions of the war years but also such topics as politics in the Union and the Confederacy, the presidential leadership of Lincoln and Jefferson Davis, women in the Union and Confederate war efforts, and the struggle over emancipation. The latter part of the course considers post-war political, social, and economic developments, including nearly four million African Americans' transition from slavery to freedom, the conflict over how to reconstruct the former Confederate states, the establishment of bi-racial governments in those states, and the eventual overthrow of Reconstruction by conservative white "Redeemers." Lectures and discussions.
3461 HIST-363-01 Living on Margins of Mod Japn 1.00 LEC Bayliss,Jeffrey W: 1:15PM-3:55PM MC - 309 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores the histories and identities of groups that, for a variety of reasons, have not been considered part of “mainstream” Japanese society. Among these are ethnic minorities, such as the Ainu, Okinawans, and resident Koreans, and social minorities, such as the descendants of former outcastes groups who are referred to collectively as the Burakumin. In addition to these groups, we will also explore the nature of groups viewed as outside of the mainstream by dint of the lifestyle they lead or the circumstances that have been forced upon them, such as the yakuza (gangsters), ultra-rightwing activists, residents of slums, and others. Through such an exploration, we will come to challenge the perception, all-too-common both inside and outside of Japan, that Japanese society is homogeneous. We will also look into how this illusion of homogeneity has been constructed, and what the consequences are for those who find themselves marginalized in the process.
3545 HIST-374-01 Alexander the Great 1.00 SEM Reger,Gary TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 205 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course covers the life and times of Alexander the Great, a man who was able to subjugate most of the known world, but failed to erect a lasting political structure. When he died at the age of 33 years, he left a vast empire to be torn to pieces by his successors. However, his achievements were more than military, and his colonists built cities in places as far from Greece as modern Afghanistan, creating a new world in which Greek culture flourished.
3462 HIST-393-01 Prot & Proph Postwar Japan Cin 1.00 SEM Bayliss,Jeffrey M: 6:30PM-9:10PM HHN - 105 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Through a variety of readings and film viewings, this course explores how Japanese directors from 1945 to the present have used the past as a setting in which to voice political and social commentary about contemporary Japan. We will explore films of a variety of genres -- including war films, samurai dramas, science fiction films, documentaries, avant-garde films, and anime -- created over the last 65 years by directors such as Fukasaku Kinji, Ichikawa Kon, Imamura Shohei, Kurosawa Akira, Mizoguchi Kenji, Oshima Nagisa, Suzuki Seijun, Tsuburaya Eiji, and others. The readings for the course will give students an appreciation of the historical settings that the films portray, the political and social contexts in which they were produced, and an understanding of each director’s political, social, and cinematic vision. These readings will allow us to discuss selected scenes of films viewed in our class meetings in a way that will highlight how postwar discourses of pacifism, internationalism, nationalism, and anti-colonialism are reflected in these cinematic works.
2308 HIST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
2309 HIST-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
2743 HIST-498-01 Sr Thesis Part 1 & Seminar 2.00 SEM Euraque,Dario A. TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM SH - T305 Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  A two-semester senior thesis including the required research seminar in the fall term. Permission of the instructor is required for Part I.
2332 HIST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Independent studies on selected topics are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser, and department chair. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2331 HIST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chair must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2194 HIST-954-01 Thesis Part I 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Thesis Part I is an investigation and report on an original research topic. Conference hours are available by appointment. Registration for the thesis will not be considered final without the thesis approval form and the signatures of the thesis adviser, graduate adviser, and department chair. Please refer to the Graduate Studies Catalog for thesis requirements. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form and the thesis writer's packet. Two course credits. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2195 HIST-955-01 Thesis Part II 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  Continuation of History 954. Two course credits.
2196 HIST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
3558 AMST-423-01 The History of American Sports 1.00 SEM Goldstein,Warren T: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 205 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This course will examine American sports from their beginnings in Puritan-era games to the multi-billion-dollar industries of today. We will begin by looking at the relationship between work, play, and religion in the colonies. We will trace the beginnings of horseracing, baseball, and boxing, and their connections to saloons, gambling, and the bachelor subculture of the Victorian underworld. We will study the rise of respectable sports in the mid- and late 19th century; follow baseball as it became the national pastime; see how college football took over higher education; and account for the rise of basketball. We will look at sports and war, sports and moral uplift, and sports and the culture of consumption. Finally, we will examine the rise of mass leisure, the impact of radio and television, racial segregation and integration, the rise of women’s sports, battles between players and owners in the last 25 years, and the entrance of truly big money into professional sports. Readings in primary and secondary sources will emphasize the historical experience of sports in the United States so that students can develop a framework for understanding current events, including the NHL lockout, the Kobe Bryant affair, and the controversies over steroids.
3559 AMST-823-01 The History of American Sports 1.00 SEM Goldstein,Warren T: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 205 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course will examine American sports from their beginnings in Puritan-era games to the multi-billion-dollar industries of today. We will begin by looking at the relationship between work, play, and religion in the colonies. We will trace the beginnings of horseracing, baseball, and boxing, and their connections to saloons, gambling, and the bachelor subculture of the Victorian underworld. We will study the rise of respectable sports in the mid- and late 19th century; follow baseball as it became the national pastime; see how college football took over higher education; and account for the rise of basketball. We will look at sports and war, sports and moral uplift, and sports and the culture of consumption. Finally, we will examine the rise of mass leisure, the impact of radio and television, racial segregation and integration, the rise of women’s sports, battles between players and owners in the last 25 years, and the entrance of truly big money into professional sports. Readings in primary and secondary sources will emphasize the historical experience of sports in the United States so that students can develop a framework for understanding current events, including the NHL lockout, the Kobe Bryant affair, and the controversies over steroids.
3368 CLCV-218-01 Archaeology of the Holy Land 1.00 LEC Risser,Martha K. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - S201 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: Two seats are reserved for HMTCA students
  Through a survey of arts, architecture, material remains, and written accounts, this course traces the complex past of a region regarded as Holy Land by people of several major religions. We will evaluate incongruities between written texts and physical evidence; the contentious political and religious agendas that affected studies of these lands; and evidence for the ancient societies, cultures, economies, religions, and politics that contributed to shaping the modern Middle East.
3506 INTS-131-01 Modern Iran 1.00 LEC Bauer,Janet L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM LSC - 138-9 GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course provides an introduction to 20th-century Iranian society, culture, and politics, examining secular and religious debates over gender roles, modernity, Islamism, democracy, and the West.
2758 INTS-314-01 Black Internationalism 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - T121 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in International Studies 101, International Studies112, History 238, or History 253.
  This course introduces students to the history of people of African descent and their struggles for universal emancipation during the 20th century. We will begin by drawing on theoretical readings about race/blackness and the African Diaspora. The second part of the class will probe the relationship between nationalism and pan-Africanism through comparative assessments of Marcus Garvey and his UNIA organization; Rastafarianism and music; and the U.S. Black Power Movement. Over the entire course, we will also seek to locate and critically evaluate Africa’s importance to these political and cultural projects. The ultimate purpose of this course is to impress upon students how struggles for self-determination were simultaneously local, national and global.
3512 INTS-344-01 Global Hip Hop Cultures 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM HL - 123 Y GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Hip-Hop is both music and culture with a global imprint that dates back to the 1980s. This course is a reading and writing intensive course that critically examines hip-hop cultural and political formations in Africa and the African Diaspora. We begin with canonical texts that contributed to the growth of an emergent interdisciplinary field called, 'Hip-Hop Studies' in order to familiarize ourselves with a set of core concepts, discourses and frameworks that will help us assess hip-hop's global emergence. What does the globalization of African-American music and culture tell us about the power and impact of neoliberalism on post-colonial identities, culture and nation-states in the non-Western world? It is a question that will shape our discussions on race, youth, masculinity, and nationalism in contemporary urban societies.
3096 WMGS-315-01 Women in America 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM SH - N215 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An examination of women’s varied experiences in the public and private spheres, from their own perspective as well as that of the dominant society. The experiences of women of different classes and races will be compared, as will the relationship between images of women and changing realities of their lives. Emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries.