Courses

Courses  
100 Level Courses
 
HISP 101
Elementary Spanish I
Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Spanish. Since all linguistic skills cannot be fully developed in 101 alone, stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, which it will be the function of 102 to develop and reinforce. Students who wish to acquire significant proficiency should therefore plan to take both 101 and 102 in sequence. Four hours of class work, plus one required drill hour. Placement by exam if previous Spanish experience. (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 102
Elementary Spanish II
Continuation of 101, emphasizing oral practice, consolidation of basic grammar skills, compositions, and reading comprehension. Four hours of classwork, plus one required drill hour. (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)  Prerequisite: Hispanic 101 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture

200 Level Courses
HISP 201
Intermediate Spanish I
An intermediate course for those who have had at least three years of secondary school Spanish or one year of college Spanish. A thorough review of grammar combined with oral practice. In addition, there is a strong cultural component and an introduction to reading literary texts. (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)  Prerequisite: Hispanic 102 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 202
Intermediate Spanish II
The review of grammar begun in Spanish 201 will be completed. In addition, there will be readings and discussion of contemporary Spanish and Spanish American literature, treating varied literary and cultural selections with a view to vocabulary-building and the reinforcement of the principles of grammar and syntax. Emphasis is placed on the development of competence in oral and written expression.(Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)  Prerequisite: Hispanic 201 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 221
Advanced Grammar & Composition
Emphasis on composition work, in conjunction with a review of grammar, especially of the more difficult and subtle aspects, together with a consideration of stylistics. The writings of selected modern Hispanic authors will serve as models. (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)  Prerequisite:  Hispanic 202 or equivalent.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 224
Spanish for Heritage Students
A comprehensive course for bilingual students who demonstrate spoken ability in Spanish but whose formal education has been in English. The course will cover all basic language skills while targeting the particular needs of bilingual students, including accentuation, homonyms, and usage of complex sentence structure. Special emphasis will be placed on reading and writing. Permission of the instructor is required. Admits to Hispanic Studies 221 or more advanced Hispanic Studies course. (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)  This course has a community learning component.
1.00 units, Lecture 
 
HISP 226
Iberian and Latin American Film and Conversation
In this course students will analyze landmarks of Spanish/Latin American cinema in terms of the social, historical, and cultural questions they raise, as well as in terms of the ideological, aesthetic, and cinematographic movements to which they belong. The discussion of films will be conducted in Spanish and will provide an academic forum for the exchange of ideas, interpretations and critiques. (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)  Prerequisite: Hispanic 221 or 224 or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 233
Span Golden Age in Translation
This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the cultural dynamics of Spain's Golden Age, an era defined by the presence of literary giants such as Cervantes, Lope de Vega and Calderon de la Barca. All readings will be in English. (Same as Modern Languages 233-50.)
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 240
Latin American Literature and Film in Translation
This course is aimed at a broad and general audience. No knowledge of Spanish is required. Taught in English this survey course introduces students to a set of key Latin American literary works of the 19th and 20th century, from various areas (the Caribbean, Mexico, Latinos in the US/The Border, Central America, South America, the Southern Cone), of various kinds (novels, short novels, short stories, essays, testimonies, collages, etc.) and reflecting on a variety of social and cultural issues (depicting/ordering/making sense of reality, storytelling, mythmaking, constructing the nation, neo-colonialism, fascism, revolution, human rights, exile, border-culture, race, ethnicity, gender). Students wishing to count this course toward a major in Spanish should secure permission of the instructor. They will complete their assignments in Spanish and will meet with the instructor in supplementary sessions. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean Studies program.) (Also listed as LACS 240)
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 246
Latino Literature in the United States
This course will study the literary production of the Hispanic Diaspora, concentrating on those four groups historically understood to constitute "Latinos" in the United States: the immigrants of Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. Through the literature and cinema of these groups we will not only study the socio-cultural situation and history of this heterogeneous Diaspora but will also explore and come to question central themes traditionally used to discuss Latinos in the US: identity, language, culture, community, exile, and memory. In examining a literary and cultural production that spans three centuries, we will read texts in translation from the original Spanish, bilingual texts, and texts written in originally English. A reading knowledge of Spanish helpful but not essential. (Also listed as LACS 246 and HISP 246)
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 248
The Alchemy of Identity: Culture-Planning and Civil Society in Barcelona 1850 to 2000
This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the ways in which the city of Barcelona has created and maintained its unusually vibrant artistic and civic culture during much of the past 150 years of its existence. Besides studying the work of the city's more important contemporary artists, artistic movements, and cultural institutions (Gaudí, Miró, Picasso, Marsé, Mendoza; Modernisme, Noucentisme; the Liceu and, yes, the Barcelona Football Club), we will analyze the city's long and highly conscious tradition of culture-planning, which has done so much to make this history of civic and artistic innovation a reality. Whenever possible, the history of creating a sustainable urban culture in Barcelona will be compared with that of Hartford and other U.S. urban centers. This course is taught in English. (Listed as both LACS 248 and HISP 248)
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 233
Latin American Women's Lit
This course is aimed at a broad and general audience and introduces students to a set of key Latin American women's literary works of the 19th and 20th centuries from various areas (the Caribbean, Mexico, Latinos in the US/The Border, Central America, South America, the Southern Cone), of various kinds (novels, short stories, essay, testimony, etc.), and reflecting on a variety of social and cultural issues. (This course is also offered under the Latin American and Carribbean Studies; and Women Studies.) (Same as Modern Languages 233-51.)
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 261
Iberian Culture I (Middle Ages to the 19th Century)
The course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the primary cultural dynamics of the Iberian Peninsula from the Middle Ages to the 19th century. We will pay special attention to the more important cultural developments during this crucial era of Spanish history.  Prerequisite: Hispanic 221 or 224 or permission of the instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 262
Iberian Culture II (The 20th Century)
This course introduces students to the set of cultural problems that have shaped Spain’s contemporary development. It will do so through the study of novels, films, and historical narrative. Special emphasis given to the cultural history of the Franco years (1939-1975) and the country’s more recent transition to democracy (1975-1992).  Prerequisite: Hispanic 221 or 224 or permission of the instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 263
Latin American Culture I (Pre-Columbian Era to Enlightenment)
This course examines the history, societies, and cultures of the various regions that today are known as Latin America. The course moves from the major pre-Columbian civilizations, through the first encounter between Europe and these peoples, the subsequent conquest and colonization, and the first manifestations of the desire for independence. The course will concentrate specifically on how the peoples of these various regions and periods explored their social and political concerns through art, literature, and music. (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)  Prerequisite: Hispanic 221 or 224 or permission of the instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 264
Latin American Culture II (Independence to Present Day)
This course focuses on the social, political, economic, and cultural development of the Latin American nations. Emphasis will be on to the construction of national identities during the 19th century as well as main historic-political events of the 20th century. Discussions will be based on readings, documentaries, and feature films. Latin American newspapers on the Internet are used to inform our debates of current events. (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)  Prerequisite: Hispanic 221 or 224 or permission of the instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 270
Introduction to Cultural Analysis
This course serves as a transition to advanced courses in Spanish language, culture, and literature. Students will develop analytical skills through an intense exploration of cultural production in the Hispanic world and through an examination of diverse literary genres, film, and current events. The focus will be on improving the necessary linguistic and critical thinking skills that are the fundamental foundation for literary and cultural analysis in advanced Spanish study.  Prerequisite: Hispanic 221 or 224 or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 280
Hispanic Hartford
This course seeks to place Trinity students in active and informed dialogue with the Hartford region’s large and diverse set of Spanish-speaking communities. The course will help student recognize and analyze the distinct national histories (e.g. Peruvian, Puerto Rican, Chilean, Honduran, Cuban, Colombian, Mexican) which have contributed to the Hispanic diaspora in the city and the entire northeastern region of the U.S. Students will undertake field projects designed to look at the effects of transnational migration on urban culture, institution-building, and identity formation. (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)  This course has a community learning component. Prerequisite: Hispanic 221 or 224 or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 290
Studying in the Hispanic World Colloquium
This course is designed to provide students returning from study abroad in Barcelona, Santiago, Cordoba, and other Spanish-speaking venues (summer, semester or year-long programs) with a forum within which they can share, compare, and process analytically and historically the difficulties, conflicts, absences, and discoveries which they experienced in their time abroad. They will then be asked to investigate how these experiences have affected their view of the social and cultural norms that inhere within U.S. culture.  Prerequisite: Study abroad in an approved program in a Spanish-speaking country.
0.50 units, Seminar
 
300 Level Courses
 
HISP 301
An Introduction to Cervantes' Literary Industry
An analysis and interpretation of the complete text of Don Quijote de la Mancha, with attention given to Cervantes' use of irony (burla) as the keystone of his artifice. Keeping in mind the historical and cultural background of the text, we will examine how Cervantes' writings (El Quijote, Entremeses, Novelas Ejemplare) hinge on a parodic game that entails a process of encoding and decoding, one which has a demystifying power upon reality.  Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 303
20th Century Spanish Lit
A study of 20th century literature, including the novel, drama, poetry, and the essay. Included are such important literary movements as the Generation of '98 (Unamuno, Azorín, Baroja, Machado), and the Generation of 1927 (García Lorca, Alberti, Aleixandre, Cernuda). Consideration is given to literature of the Civil War, the Franco period, and the contemporary post-Fascist democracy. All texts are read for their literary, cultural and historical values. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 291 or a 300-level course or its equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 311
The Spanish Golden Age: An Overview
This course provides an overview of some of the most relevant canonical works of the Golden Age while establishing some basic guidelines for the understanding of this rich period of Spanish culture; The American Empire made Spain one of the most powerful countries in the history of humanity. We will focus on central aspects of the Imperial Age poetics, such as the relationship between literature and reality, as well as the key trends in politics and religion (the connections between Golden Age culture and the Reconquest and the Counter-Reformation), while simultaneously calling attention to some of the critical stances of well-known writers such as Cervantes. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 312
Foundational Tropes/Contested Tropes: "The Gaucho"
Several debates, themes, images or tropes seem to constitute a symbolic and discursive core of Latin American cultural history: "The Savage", "The Gaucho", "The Mestizo", "The Captive", "The Matriach", "The Landowner", "The Enightened Tyrant", "The Developer" and "The Immigrant". These concepts are, in turn, connected to notions of Europeanness, whiteness, civilization, capitalist development and progress. Through the examination of a series of literary texts and documents, coming from different historical periods and literary and ideological movements, this course explores the origin and historical evolution of these recurring and enduring themes and metaphors. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 313
The Vision of America and its Inhabitants Through the Renaissance and the Golden Age
The course concentrates on the contradictory worldviews of Amerindians’ voices/writings and the specific projections generated by explorers, travelers, historians, soldiers, friars, and conquistadors as they sought to explain the “otherness” of this new land. It also will focus on the shift of the official representation of America and the Amerindian provoked by the complexities brought on by the emergence of the modern state. We will also study, through the work of the leading playwrights of the Golden Age, the significance of these profound changes, their implications for the Spanish policies toward the Amerindians, and Spain’s response to this non-European world.  Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 314
Indigenous Peoples in Spanish American Literature and Culture
This course looks at the (primarily literary) representation of the indigenous peoples of Spanish America, from the first writings of Christopher Columbus to current indigenista and neo-indigenista prose and indigenous testimonies. Besides essays, poetry, theater, and narrative, the class examines art, film, photography, and popular culture, in order to examine how national cultural production portrays, appropriates, marginalizes, or celebrates the indigenous peoples and cultures. While we will look at the portrayal of the indigenous peoples in a variety of contexts (including the US), we will concentrate on those areas with the highest concentration of indigenous peoples: Mexico, Central America, and the Andes. (Also listed under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)  Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 317
Construction of Spanish Early Modern National Identity
Using the most recent interdisciplinary discussions concerning the construction of national identity as our guide (racial, religious, political, sexual, etc.), this course will examine those texts which catalyzed the emergence, evolution, propagation and preservation of the ideals of 'Spanish nation.' The course will also explore the main issues associated with the political and cultural history of Early Modern Spain, within both the Peninsula and the American New World. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 318
Gender and Sexuality in Spanish America
How is gender imagined in cultural production from Spanish America? What role has feminism played in transforming women’s writing? How is homosexuality represented in film and literature? What is the relationship between gender and ethnicity in articulating subjectivity? We will consider these questions and many others in our exploration of the construction of gender and sexuality in texts by men and women in Spanish America. (Also listed under Latin American and Caribbean Studies; and Women, Gender and Sexuality.)  Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 324
The Spanish Post War Novel (1939-Present)
The Civil War (1936-1939) severely damaged Spain's social and cultural fabric. In the six decades since the end of the war, however, Spaniards have demonstrated that violence, poverty and political oppression are no match for a vital literary and cultural tradition. In this course we will analyze a number of the more important novels of the post-War era with an eye toward gaining an understanding the social problems and transformations that have taken place in the country during this period. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 325
Literature of Popular Consciousness and Revolution
This course explores the way certain literary works, themes, genres and movements emerged or accompanied a series of popular uprisings and revolutions (i.e. the Mexican Revolution) as well as emerging urban, working class and nationalist forms of consciousness during the first half of the 20th century. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 327
Memory at Work in Latin American Culture
This course will examine memory as an evolving process that leads to the construction of individual and collective identities. We will look at the individual and collective dimensions of memory as articulated in literature, film, photography, music, and monuments. On the individual level, to what extent does fantasy interplay with memory in the reconstruction of the past? On the collective level, who has the right to remember? How do cultural discourses propose alternatives to the hegemonic interpretation of the national past? Is memory a form of resistance? And furthermore, how can memory and reconciliation be articulated in post-dictatorship societies? (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)  Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 orHISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 328
Iberian Film
In this course we will examine the relationship between history and film in Spain, one of the world's most important film-producing countries. Until quite recently, cinematic production there was marked by a general tendency to promote the primacy of Castilian culture and Church-derived social mores through the production of historicist narratives. Since the country's transition to democracy, a much more plural and heterodix cinematic tradition has taken root in the country. While still very much engaged with history, this new tradition promotes a broader view of the country's religious, sexual and linguistic heritage.  Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 329
The Transatlantic Radio Network
The aim of this course is to enhance written and oral skills in Spanish and to engender a detailed and sophisticated understanding of the major cultural, historical, and political tendencies of Spain and the societies of the Southern Cone of Latin America. After learning the basics of “podcasting” production (Internet telephony, digital editing, and RSS syndication), students will produce a bi-weekly internet radio program which will place special emphasis on the study of the urban cultures of Barcelona and Montevideo and the flow of ideas between the South America and the Iberian worlds. When researching, writing, and producing the required 10 hours of finished programming, student production teams are expected to communicate not only with faculty and student “correspondents” at Trinity’s global learning sites, but also with relevant artists, writers, politicians and cultural entrepreneurs on both sides of the Atlantic basin.  Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 330
Poetry in Action
In the 1960s singer-songwriters became key agents of social change in many countries around the world. Culturally, the nations of the Iberian peninsular (Castile, Cataloni, Galicia, Portugal and the Basque Country) the continued existence of the Franco and Salazar dictatorships gave the "protest songs" of such performers a heightened degree of social relevance. In this class, we will examine the esthetic and political importance of the "New Song" phenomenon in these places, paying special attention to the ways in which these "social poets" often relied upon texts, messages and tropes from as far back as the Middle Ages when composing their visions of contemporary life. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 331
The "Boom" and Beyond
This course will examine the period known as the "Boom" both as literary movement and as cultural phenomenon. What are the characteristics of the so-called "New Narrative"? What are the principle concerns of the writers of the "Boom"? What are the internal, global, cultural and market forces that produced this explosion in the production and reception of Latin American literature? Who is excluded from the "boom" and why? In order to consider these questions, this course will look at various genres while concentrating on those most immediately associated with the "Boom": the novel. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
 
HISP 355
Misplaced/Displaced Narratives in Latin America
What makes a novel "Latin American"? In this course we will study novels produced in Latin America in the last three decades that deal with topics, characters and settings that have little relation to the immediate reality of the continent. By questioning the imperative for national allegory assigned to the novel from the periphery of the West, we will explore notions of referentiality, language and representation and we will try to work out the geopolitics of the genre in the context of globalization, translation and world literature. Among others, we will read works by César Aira, Mario Bellatin, Bernardo Carvalho, Chico Buarque and Santiago Gamboa. Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 270 and one of the following: Hispanic Studies 261, 262, 263, or 264, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 340
U.S. Latino/Latina Writers
This course explores exemplary texts written by Latina/Latino authors in the19th and 20th centuries and examines them in relation to their representation of issues such as gender and sexualities, diasporic identities, and bilingualism. We will consider a diversity of Chicana/o and Latina/o literature (poetry, narrative, theater, and film) in our analysis of topics such transculturation, (im)migration, (im)migrant’s rights, feminist consciousness, exile, post-colonialism and linguistic identity. (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies; and the Women, Gender and Sexuality Program.) Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 341
Latin American Poetry
The students will become familiar with the main literary trends in the Spanish American Poetry since the "Modernismo movement" (end of XIXth century) to the present. The readings will include poets such as Pablo Neruda, Cesar Vallejo, Alejandra Pizarnik, Ruben Dario and Gioconda Belli, and some popular singers such as Silvio Rodriguez and Violeta Parra. There will be an emphasis on understanding the specificity of poetic language and the development of the appropriate tools of analysis. The course will enhance reading skills that will enable students to enjoy poetry in Spanish or any other language. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 342
Latin American Theater
This course explores the various manifestations of Latin American Theater of the late 19th and the 20th centuries. Texts to be studied include canonical authors (i.e. Florencio, Sanchez, Agustin Cuzzani, Augusto Boal) as well as other, equally important authors, movements and trends such as Teatro Campensino, Teatro Poblacional, Popular Theater, performances. Some attention will also be paid to the study of theatricality in social and political rituals and everyday life. (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)  Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 343
Latin American Cinema
This course explores the cinematic production of Latin America, particularly in the context of the New Latin American Cinema movement started in the late fifties and sixties. Parented by the continent's colonial experience and forged by its continuing underdevelopment and dependency, the movement has inscribed itself in Latin Americans' struggles for national and continental autonomy. Discussions will be based on films, film reviews, interviews, and political and artistic manifestoes belonging to this period. The course will also include later cinematic developments in individual countries such as Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Chile and Cuba. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 344
Spanish Amer Historical Novel
How is History portrayed in literature? How may literature be used to search for a greater, or alternative, historical "truths"? How might historical events be used to contemplate more intimate concerns and problems? These and other questions will be explored as this class examines some of the many historical novels produced both at the beginning of the twentieth century and today in Latin America. We will study how authors use History to explore problems of narration, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, subjectivity, and the nation. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 345
Special Topic
To be offered occasionally on a special topic of consideration in Spanish American or Iberian literatures and cultures. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture

HISP 366
20th Century Mexican Literature La Mexicanidad
This course examines the century-long quest for national identity in Mexico and in particular, the political, social, and cultural impact of the Mexican Revolution on intellectual discourse. Topics of study include Marxism, the development of civil and women’s rights, community art, secularism, and the importance of mestizaje in the shaping of Mexican identity and letters. We will read primarily novels and essays, by authors ranging from José Vasconcelos to Subcomandante Marcos. We will also critically examine the artwork of the Mexican muralists and Frida Kahlo. (Also offered under Latin American and Caribbean Studies.) Taught in Spanish.  Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in HISP270 and one of the following: HISP261 or HISP262 or HISP263 or HISP264; or Permission of the Instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar 
 
HISP 399
Independent Study
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units min / 2.00 units max, Independent Study
 
400 Level Courses
 
HISP 401
The Spanish Golden Age: A Thesis Project
The main goal of this course is to write a thesis-style project. This objective will be accomplished through the study of some of the more relevant canonical works of the Spanish Golden Age and its colonial experience. Thus, we will focus on central aspects of the imperial Spanish age, not only in the peninsula but also in the Americas. We will explore the relationship between literature and reality, as well as key trends in politics and religion such as the connection between Golden Age culture and the politics of the Counter-Reformation against Protestants and Muslims. Simultaneously, we will call special attention to some of the critical stances of well-known writers such as Cervantes.
1.00 units, Seminar
 
HISP 460
Tutorial
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units, Independent Study

HISP 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study