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Course Schedule for ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE - Spring 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1062 ENVS-149-01 Intro to Environmental Science 1.25 LEC Douglass,Cameron H. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 26
  NOTE: Enrollment is limited to 4 seniors, 4 juniors, 8 sophomores, and 10 first-year students, there will be 6 additional seats assigned by the instructor.
  An introduction to interrelationships among the natural environment, humans, and the human environment, including the biological, social, economic, technological, and political aspects of current environmental challenges. This course focuses on building the scientific framework necessary to understand environmental issues. It explores the structure, function, and dynamics of ecosystems, interactions between living and physical systems, and how human enterprise affects natural systems. It also examines current issues regarding human impacts on environmental quality, including global warming, air and water pollution, agriculture, overpopulation, energy, and urbanization. The laboratory section, which complements lecture material, incorporates laboratory and field exercises that include a focus on Hartford and a nearby rural area.
1063 ENVS-149-20 Intro to Environmental Science 1.25 LAB Gourley,Jonathan R. T: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 16
  An introduction to interrelationships among the natural environment, humans, and the human environment, including the biological, social, economic, technological, and political aspects of current environmental challenges. This course focuses on building the scientific framework necessary to understand environmental issues. It explores the structure, function, and dynamics of ecosystems, interactions between living and physical systems, and how human enterprise affects natural systems. It also examines current issues regarding human impacts on environmental quality, including global warming, air and water pollution, agriculture, overpopulation, energy, and urbanization. The laboratory section, which complements lecture material, incorporates laboratory and field exercises that include a focus on Hartford and a nearby rural area.
1064 ENVS-149-21 Intro to Environmental Science 1.25 LAB Gourley,Jonathan R. R: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 16
  An introduction to interrelationships among the natural environment, humans, and the human environment, including the biological, social, economic, technological, and political aspects of current environmental challenges. This course focuses on building the scientific framework necessary to understand environmental issues. It explores the structure, function, and dynamics of ecosystems, interactions between living and physical systems, and how human enterprise affects natural systems. It also examines current issues regarding human impacts on environmental quality, including global warming, air and water pollution, agriculture, overpopulation, energy, and urbanization. The laboratory section, which complements lecture material, incorporates laboratory and field exercises that include a focus on Hartford and a nearby rural area.
1876 ENVS-204-01 Earth Systems Science 1.25 LEC Geiss,Christoph TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Environmental Science 112 and Mathematics 107 or higher.
  Over recent centuries humans have evolved as the major agent of environmental change and are altering the global environment at a rate unprecedented in the Earth's history. This course provides the scientific background necessary for knowledgeable discussions on global change and the human impact on the environment. The major processes that affect the geo- and biosphere, as well as connections and feedback loops, will be discussed. The course also explores techniques that enable us to reconstruct short and long-term environmental changes from geological archives. Particular emphasis will be placed on climatic stability on Earth, the effects of global warming, the human threat to biodiversity, and the depletion of the ozone layer.
1877 ENVS-204-20 Earth Systems Science 1.25 LEC Gourley,Jonathan R. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB3  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Environmental Science 112 and Mathematics 107 or higher.
  Over recent centuries humans have evolved as the major agent of environmental change and are altering the global environment at a rate unprecedented in the Earth's history. This course provides the scientific background necessary for knowledgeable discussions on global change and the human impact on the environment. The major processes that affect the geo- and biosphere, as well as connections and feedback loops, will be discussed. The course also explores techniques that enable us to reconstruct short and long-term environmental changes from geological archives. Particular emphasis will be placed on climatic stability on Earth, the effects of global warming, the human threat to biodiversity, and the depletion of the ozone layer.
1916 ENVS-230-01 Environmental Chemistry 1.25 LEC Curran,Timothy P. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 111L and 112L, or permission of instructor.
  This course will cover basic chemical concepts, such as polarity, volatility, and solubility, as they relate to chemical behavior in the environment. The ability to predict environmental behavior from chemical structure will be emphasized. Human and environmental toxicology will be discussed, and specific pollutants will be examined. Case studies will be used to illustrate concepts. The laboratory will emphasize techniques used for environmental analysis.
1915 ENVS-230-20 Environmental Chemistry 1.25 LAB Fitzgerald,Edward C. R: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA NAT  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 111L and 112L, or permission of instructor.
  This course will cover basic chemical concepts, such as polarity, volatility, and solubility, as they relate to chemical behavior in the environment. The ability to predict environmental behavior from chemical structure will be emphasized. Human and environmental toxicology will be discussed, and specific pollutants will be examined. Case studies will be used to illustrate concepts. The laboratory will emphasize techniques used for environmental analysis.
1589 ENVS-350-01 Field Study Environ Science 0.50 IND Geiss,Christoph
Gourley,Jonathan R.
TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  This 10-12 day field trip to a particular region of the U.S. introduces Trinity students to field methods in the environmental sciences. Students will study the geology, ecology, and history of human impact on the region visited, which varies from year to year. Students will also gain experience in basic field sampling techniques, observational skills, field note-taking, and methods for data analysis and interpretation. Pre-trip readings and an oral presentation given during the trip are required. Camping throughout. Permission of instructor required. Does not count toward science distribution..
1219 ENVS-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1065 ENVS-401-01 Advanced Sem Environmntl Scien 1.00 SEM Gourley,Jonathan R. TBA TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open to senior environmental science majors and minors, and others by permission of instructor.
  This capstone seminar will engage students in the interdisciplinary study of a local environmental issue. The course will include interaction with community groups and government agencies, library research, and the collection and analysis of data to explore the connections between science, public policy, and social issues. This course does not meet the natural science distribution requirement.
1066 ENVS-405-01 Internship in Env Science 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course allows students to meet the integrating experience requirement for the environmental science major through an approved integrated internship. Students who wish to use an internship toward the major must have their integrated internship contract approved by the Environmental Science Program director before the internship is begun. All students undertaking approved internships will be required to keep a detailed log of their activities, prepare a final written report and make an oral presentation of their work to the Environmental Science Program staff and students in order to complete the internship credit.
1220 ENVS-419-01 Research in Env Science Libr 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Students will conduct library research projects under the direction of an individual staff member. Students electing this type of independent study should plan on a full semester culminating with the completion of a final formal paper. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1221 ENVS-425-01 Research in Env Science Lab 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Students will conduct original laboratory research projects under the direction of an individual staff member. Students electing to pursue independent study of this type should plan on initiating the work no later than the fall of the senior year, and should also plan on no less than two semesters of study with a final formal report to be submitted to the staff. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1222 ENVS-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1216 ENVS-497-01 Honors Research 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  An extended paper on the subject of the student's two-semester research project with a professor in environmental science, to be read by three or more members of the program. This course is open only to those environmental science majors who wish to qualify for honors (See paragraph on honors in environmental science in the description of the major). Simultaneous enrollment in Environmental Science 419 or 425 during the spring semester of senior year, submission of the special registration form available in the Registrar's Office, and approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
2124 ENGL-215-01 Literature and Environment 1.00 LEC Bergren,Katherine L. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. For Environmental Science majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a social science/humanities elective.
  In this course, we will examine the philosophies that underpin ideas of nature, culture, and the wilderness by reading a survey of poetry, fiction, drama, and nonfiction across centuries and cultures. We will consider why and how literary art seeks to represent nature, and think about the role of creative literature in the larger cultural conversation about environmental issues. Together we will discuss: How do we approach the relationship between nature and culture? What preconceptions are embedded in our use of quotidian terms like ‘environment,’ ‘wilderness,’ and even ‘nature’ itself? What are the practical environmental consequences of our views on language and literature? For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
2126 HIST-208-01 North Amer Environmental Hist 1.00 LEC Wickman,Thomas M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course surveys the environmental history of North America and the Caribbean from 1491 to the present. Topics include indigenous practice, colonization, agricultural intensification, industrialization, urbanization, war, waste disposal, and climate change. Above all, the course will be concerned with the political conflicts and social inequities that arose as the continent and its surrounding waters underwent centuries of ecological change. The global environmental contexts and consequences of American political and economic activities also will be emphasized.