Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for ENGLISH - Fall 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3425 ENGL-104-01 Intro Amer Literature-I 1.00 LEC Hager,Christopher MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  NOTE: 15 spaces are reserved for first-year students, 2 seats for HMTCA students.
  This course introduces students to American literature before 1865 by surveying a wide range of texts-some very famous, some little-known-written by and about people living in the present-day United States, from the earliest Europeans' arrival in the Americas until the time of the U.S. Civil War. The course will trace political, intellectual, and social developments as they interacted with literary culture. Students will both acquire knowledge of American cultural history and develop skills of literary analysis. F or English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
2127 ENGL-110-01 Survey of Engl Literature I 1.00 LEC Wheatley,Chloe TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-years, 2 seats for HMTCA students.
  Through selected readings in works from the Anglo-Saxon period to the late 17th century, this course will study the development of English literature in the context of stylistic, cultural, and historical changes and influences. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
3426 ENGL-116-01 Intro African Amer Lit Part I 1.00 LEC Paulin,Diana R. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  This course surveys African American literature in a variety of genres from the 18th to the early 20th centuries. Through the study of texts by Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Wilson, Harriet Jacobs, William Wells Brown, Julia Collins, William and Ellen Craft, Charles Chesnutt, Paul Dunbar, Ida Wells, W.E.B. Du Bois, and others, we will explore how these writers represented and influenced the history of people of African descent in the U.S., from slavery and abolition to early struggles for civil rights; how their work has intervened in racial formation and imagined the black diaspora; how literary innovations have engaged with continuing political questions of nation, gender, sexuality, and class. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
3499 ENGL-252-01 Young Adult Literature 1.00 LEC Henton,Alice M.H. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course emphasizes critical reflection.
  According to Philip Pullman, “There are some themes, some subjects, too large for adult fiction; they can only be dealt with adequately in a children’s book.” What themes and subjects might these be? What are the implications of this argument? We will read children’s and young adult literature from the 19th-century to the present day, discussing, as we go, its origins, evolutions, and continuities. How did we get from 18th-century conduct guides to Alice in Wonderland to The Hunger Games? Along the way, we will consider common YA themes and subjects, like fantastic settings as alternate spaces that enable moral, psychological, and social experimentation and the function of allusion, allegory, and revision: many YA novels are, on a variety of levels, re-tellings of previous works.
2788 ENGL-260-01 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Benedict,Barbara M. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2789 ENGL-260-02 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2790 ENGL-260-03 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2791 ENGL-260-04 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Henton,Alice M.H. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2361 ENGL-270-01 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rossini,Clare M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2763 ENGL-270-02 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Libbey,Elizabeth B. F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2362 ENGL-270-03 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Davis,Susanne M. TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first-year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2435 ENGL-270-04 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Davis,Susanne M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
3498 ENGL-313-01 Contemporary American Prose 1.00 SEM Ferriss,Lucy TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
  Between the de-escalation of the Cold War (mid-1980s) and the beginning of the war in Iraq (2003), a quiet revolution took place in the way American writers articulated their concerns and their sense of what it meant to be American. Beginning with Don DeLillo and Toni Morrison and continuing through David Foster Wallace and Marilynne Robinson, we will explore both the “how” and the “what” of American fiction and nonfiction in the waning years of the 20th and the dawn of the 21st centuries. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
2368 ENGL-334-01 Adv Cr Writing:Fiction 1.00 SEM Ferriss,Lucy TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing majors.
  Students will write and rewrite fiction. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. For English creative writing concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2963 ENGL-345-01 Chaucer 1.00 LEC Fisher,Sheila M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700.
  NOTE: This course is research intensive.
  A study of The Canterbury Tales and related writings in the context of late medieval conceptions of society, God, love, and marriage. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
3642 ENGL-359-01 Vic London: Lit of Chgng City 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
  London grew from a city of one million in 1800 to over four million inhabitants by the year of Queen Victoria’s death. We will investigate literary responses to the rapid transformation of the city, focusing on how different urban spaces and occupations were represented. Questions to be addressed include: what were the hopes of urbanization, and what were its problems? How was the relationship between the center, the suburbs, and the slums conceptualized? How was the urban interior represented, and what about the urban garden? Writers to be studied include Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, and Jane Ellen Panton; students will complete a research paper on Victorial London at the end of the course. This is a research-intensive seminar. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
3429 ENGL-377-01 The Revolutionary Generations 1.00 LEC Mrozowski,Daniel J. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
  Hannah Arendt suggested that the United States failed to remember its revolutionary tradition because it failed to talk about it. This course will recover those memories by reading the texts that founded the American rebellion, the writings produced in the aftermath of independence, and the creative works crafted in the wake of revolution. Our focus will be on the literature from 1740 until 1820 that struggled to define ways of being in the world that seemed specifically American; therefore, we will look beyond the context of New England to consider the roles played by Africa and the Caribbean in the cultural imagination, and we will trace how social class, race, and gender inflected the output of American writers in a post-1776 world. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.This course is research-intensive.
2316 ENGL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of individual tutorials in topics not currently offered by the department. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3484 ENGL-401-01 Intro to Literary Theory 1.00 SEM Henton,Alice M.H. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: English 401 and English 801 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This seminar is designed to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text.
3490 ENGL-422-01 Milton 1.00 SEM Wheatley,Chloe T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: English 422 and English 822 are the same course. 10 seats are reserved for English 422 students.
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700.
  In this course, we will consider the works of John Milton, with attention to how his prose and poetry synthesizes long-standing intellectual and literary traditions and grapples with issues that still engage us today: the relation of men and women, the realities of loss and mortality, the concept of significant individual choice, and the power and limitations of language as the tool with which we forge an understanding of the world. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
3430 ENGL-451-01 Queer Harlem Renaissance 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: Note: English 451 and English 851 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research-intensive.
  This course approaches the Harlem Renaissance or "the New Negro" Movement through the lens of sexuality, paying particular attention to the ways in which understandings of racial identity were filtered through representations of sex and gender. We will consider how writers of the Harlem Renaissance explored notions of sexuality and gender given the history of slavery and exploitation that generated rigid formulations of race and gender. How did cultural producers challenge, reinforce, question and imagine sexuality and its intersection with other aspects of identity, such as class, gender, and national origins. Writers/artists include, Wallace Thurman, Carl Van Vechten, Bessie Smith, Angelina Weld Grimke, Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Langston Hughes, and Bruce Nugent.
2246 ENGL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Students may assist professors as teaching assistants, performing a variety of duties usually involving assisting students in conceiving or revising papers; reading and helping to evaluate papers, quizzes, and exams; and other duties as determined by the student and instructor. See instructor of specific course for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2363 ENGL-492-01 Fiction Workshop 1.00 SEM Rutherford,Ethan M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270 and one of the following English 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, 441, Film Studies 337, Theater and Dance 345, or Theater and Dance 393.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing majors. One requirement of the class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers and an advanced creative writing workshop.
  Advanced seminar in the writing of fiction. Class discussions devoted primarily to the analysis of student fiction, with some attention to examples of contemporary short stories. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop. This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing concentrators, and a senior project.
2364 ENGL-494-01 Poetry Workshop 1.00 SEM Rossini,Clare M. R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270 and one of the following English 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, 441, Film Studies 337, Theater and Dance 345, or Theater and Dance 393.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing majors. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop.
  Advanced seminar in the writing of poetry. Class discussions devoted primarily to the analysis of student work, with some attention to examples of contemporary poetry. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop. This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing concentrators, and a senior project.
2967 ENGL-495-01 Sem: Phenom of Ltry Popularty 1.00 SEM Benedict,Barbara M. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a senior seminar.
  Why is Shakespeare considered great? Why is Jane Austen so popular? Or Romantic Poetry? Or Stephen King? In this course students will explore the way theorists and critics from Aristotle to Edward Said have understood literary value and meaning, while they also read key texts in British literature. Students will have the chance to develop their own literary theories and apply them to their favorite texts.For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a senior seminar.
2255 ENGL-497-01 One-Semester Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Individual tutorial in writing of a one-semester senior thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required.
3666 ENGL-498-01 Sr Thesis Part 1/Sr Colloquim 2.00 SEM TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is designed to teach senior English majors the techniques of research and analysis needed for writing a year-long essay on a subject of their choice. It is intended to help the students to write such year-long theses, and to encourage them to do so. It will deal with problems such as designing longer papers, focusing topics, developing and limiting bibliographies, working with manuscripts, using both library and Internet resources, and understanding the uses of theoretical paradigms. This course is required of all senior English majors who are planning to write two-semester, year-long theses. Please refer to the department's website for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
3645 ENGL-800-01 Intro to Graduate Stdy English 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  English 800 offers an introduction to the methods of graduate-level scholarship in literature. We will build a foundation of how to read, discuss, research, and write about individual works, genres, periods, and critical debates in literary studies. We will acquire advanced skills in interpretive analysis; summarizing and contextualizing critical positions; identifying, locating, evaluating and citing scholarly resources; developing research within a critical conversation; composing persuasive arguments; and designing and implementing research plans for larger projects. Our goal is to provide the groundwork for the M.A. in English at Trinity College.
3483 ENGL-801-01 Intro to Literary Theory 1.00 SEM Henton,Alice M.H. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students pursuing the thesis capstone.
  This seminar is designed to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text.
3489 ENGL-822-01 Milton 1.00 SEM Wheatley,Chloe T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  NOTE: Five seats in ENGL422/822 are for Graduate Students
  NOTE: For Graduate students this course fulfills the requirement of an elective.
  In this course, we will consider the works of John Milton, with attention to how his prose and poetry synthesizes long-standing intellectual and literary traditions and grapples with issues that still engage us today: the relation of men and women, the realities of loss and mortality, the concept of significant individual choice, and the power and limitations of language as the tool with which we forge an understanding of the world. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
3442 ENGL-851-01 Queer Harlem Renaissance 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: English 451 and English 851 are the same course. This course is research intensive. For the M.A. pursuing the pedagogy capstone, this course counts as an elective in ethnic literatures of the U.S..
  This course approaches the Harlem Renaissance or "the New Negro" Movement through the lens of sexuality, paying particular attention to the ways in which understandings of racial identity were filtered through representations of sex and gender. We will consider how writers of the Harlem Renaissance explored notions of sexuality and gender given the history of slavery and exploitation that generated rigid formulations of race and gender. How did cultural producers challenge, reinforce, question and imagine sexuality and its intersection with other aspects of identity, such as class, gender, and national origins. Writers/artists include, Wallace Thurman, Carl Van Vechten, Bessie Smith, Angelina Weld Grimke, Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Langston Hughes, and Bruce Nugent.
2191 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2193 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2395 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2852 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
2192 ENGL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
3476 AMST-212-02 Disability Studies:Theory&Hist 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course offers a rigorous interdisciplinary introduction to Disability Studies. We will look at the history of disability studies as it emerged in relation to the Civil Rights movement. We will consider how the efforts of disability activists and scholars have shaped disability studies and how this field informs and is also informed by other disciplines, such as Performance and Trauma Studies. We will examine how disability has been defined over time and how particular definitions of disability intersect with other aspects of identity, such as socio-economic class, race and/or ethnicity, sexuality and gender. In addition to reading and critiquing history and theory, we will also look at a variety of “disability texts” that will include various genres, such as fiction, memoir, film, and drama.
2064 HMTS-112-01 The Greek and Roman World 1.00 LEC Reger,Gary MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Only students in the Humanities Gateway program are allowed to enroll in this course.
  NOTE: Course is only open to students who have been accepted into the Guided Studies Program.
  NOTE: This course will meet the requirement in the English major for a 200 level elective.
  This course focuses on two important moments in Greek and Roman culture: The first is the high point of power of the city-state of Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries BCE, two centuries that saw the consolidation of Athenian democracy, the construction and collapse of an Athenian empire. The second moment comes in the first century BCE and early first century CE, when the Roman Republic, also the head by then of a massive empire, faced challenges that led to its collapse and replacement by an authoritarian state headed by a single man. Both periods saw also the composition of important works of literature which cannot be understood without reference to the political and cultural scenes in which they were produced. This course counts towards partial fulfillment of Humanities Gateway I: Ancient Texts and Western Traditions. It can be counted toward completion of the Classics major.
2443 RHET-302-01 Writing Theories and Practices 1.00 LEC O'Donnell,Tennyson L. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective.
  This course investigates the theories and practices of writing consultation in North American university writing centers as informed by studies in composition pedagogy, literacy, and rhetoric. Students will be introduced to the broad range of topics found at the intersection of practice and theory in writing centers, including socio-cultural dynamics, grammar instruction, English as a Second Language, learning disorders, critical reading, writing processes, and interpersonal communication. The course will encourage students to create new knowledge about writing and tutor research. By invitation only. For students admitted to the Writing Associates Program.
3572 ROME-215-01 America's Rome 1.00 LEC Riggio,Milla C. TBA TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  Rome is a favorite city for Americans not only to visit but also to write about and to film. As you live in this historic city, we will study how Rome is portrayed in American films, such as Three Coins in the Fountain, Roman Holiday, Portrait of a Lady (with the James novel), The Talented Mr. Ripley, and Gladiator. We will visit historic sites featured in films, in Rome and also Venice, with a Venetian field trip. We will focus on the Roman Colosseum, the Spanish steps, and the Trevi fountain to illustrate how history influences our contemporary sense of place.
3398 THDN-305-04 Writing for Stage and Screen 1.00 SEM Polin,Mitchell A. W: 1:00PM-4:00PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for English Department creative writing concentrators.
  The course covers the essentials of playwriting, and the specific demands of different media for dramatic writing. It is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of developing and writing scripts for film/television, and the live stage. Students will explore examples of both genres of dramatic writing and learn to write effectively in each. NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for English Department creative writing concentrators.
3391 WMGS-245-01 The Hollywood Musical 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Perhaps more than any other genre, the musical epitomized Hollywood’s “golden age.” This course traces the development of the enormously popular genre from its emergence at the beginning of the Great Depression to its decline amid the social upheavals of the 1960s. It pays particular attention to the genre’s queering of masculinity and femininity, as well as its relationship to camp modes of reception. Readings by Jane Feuer, Rick Altman, Richard Dyer, Janet Staiger, and Steven Cohan.
3097 WMGS-319-01 The Woman's Film 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective.
  In the 1930s Hollywood created a new genre, the woman’s picture or “weepie,” designed specifically for female audiences. This course examines the development of this enormously popular genre from the 1930s to the 1960s, including important cycles of women’s pictures such as the female gothic and the maternal melodrama. It pays particular attention to the genre’s exploration of female sexuality and its homoerotic organization of the look. It also considers the genre’s role in the formation of contemporary theories of female spectatorship. Film screenings include both versions of Imitations of Life, These Three, Stage Door, Blonde Venus, Stella Dallas, Mildred Pierce, Rebecca, Suspicion, Gaslight, The Old Maid, Old Acquaintance, The Great Lie, Letter from an Unknown Woman, All that Heaven Allows, and Marnie. Readings by Doane, Williams, Modleski, de Lauretis, Jacobs, and White.