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Course Schedule for ENGLISH - Spring 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
4048 ENGL-104-01 Intro Amer Literature-I 1.00 LEC Henton,Alice M.H. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM SH - N130 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  A survey of literature, written and oral, produced in what is now the United States from the earliest times to around the Civil War. We will examine relationships among cultural and intellectual developments and the politics, economics, and societies of North America. Authors to be read include some that are well known—such as Emerson, Melville, Dickinson—and some who are less familiar—such as Cabeza de Vaca, John Rollin Ridge, and Harriet Jacobs. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
4046 ENGL-111-01 English Lit 1700-Present 1.00 LEC Bergren,Katherine L. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM SH - N215 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  Through readings in novels, drama, poetry, and prose from the Restoration to the 20th century, this course will examine shifts in the forms, functions, and meanings of English literature in the context of cultural and historical changes. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
5231 ENGL-208-01 From Epic to X-Box:Narr Histry 1.00 LEC Henton,Alice M.H. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM SH - N130 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Note: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  This course looks at the way narrative techniques have changed over time and across various media: it begins with Old English Epics and concludes with digital games. How, we will ask, has the experience of narratives and fictional characters varied across time and forms? In what ways has it stayed constant? How have we gotten from stories about Beowulf to games featuring Master Chief, or the Hero of Ferelden? How, precisely, do we interact with stories and storytelling? How do these interactions change, or not change, when narrative becomes interactive, something one can "play" as opposed to "watch" or "hear" or "read?" To think about these questions, we will examine a variety of narratives and explore a number of narrative theories. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
4958 ENGL-260-01 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM LSC - 137 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
4959 ENGL-260-02 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM GW - L HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
4960 ENGL-260-03 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM SH - N128 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
4961 ENGL-260-04 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM SH - N128 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
4155 ENGL-270-01 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Berry,Ciaran M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM 115V - 106 Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission. Please contact the instructor for a PIN to enroll in this section.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4291 ENGL-270-02 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Ferriss,Lucy MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM LIB - 103 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4230 ENGL-270-03 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Davis,Susanne M. TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM 115V - 103 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for Juniors, ten for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4348 ENGL-270-04 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Davis,Susanne M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM 115V - 106 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4962 ENGL-277-01 The Strange Meaning of Things 1.00 LEC Benedict,Barbara M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  How important is your “stuff” to you? What does it mean? When is a thing just a thing, and when does it represent something else? In this course, students will examine the literary representations of material culture, including clothes, tools, collections of things, paintings, jewelry and books, in a range of works from the Renaissance to the present. We will analyze what different kinds of things mean at different periods of history, and how writers invest them with magical, religious, satirical and sentimental significance. Readings will include drama, novels, poetry, poltergeist tales, and journalism, as well as some history, and anthropological and literary theory. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
4963 ENGL-288-01 World Cinema 1.00 LEC Younger,James Prakash MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM
M: 6:30PM-9:30PM
AAC - 320 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course provides an introduction to the study of world cinema, with a focus on cinematic cultures other than those of the USA or Europe. We will begin by considering some of the theoretical questions involved in intercultural spectatorship and introducing/reviewing critical categories we can use to discuss the films. We will then proceed through a series of units based around specific cinematic cultures, focusing on movement, genres and auteurs and on the historical, cultural, and geopolitical issues that the films illuminate. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the film studies minor.
5032 ENGL-292-01 Tolkien and His Times 1.00 LEC Rosen,David M: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  J.R.R. Tolkien is rarely considered in the same breath as the great modernist writers with whom he shared the middle decades of the twentieth-century. And yet, with its explorations of war, totalitarian politics, ecology, religion, and other big issues, his work holds a fascinating mirror to its times. In this course, we will take Tolkien seriously both as a literary author and as an interpreter of twentieth-century Britain. Readings will include most of Tolkien’s published output, a handful of modernist texts, and selected readings in contemporary culture and politics. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
5062 ENGL-300-01 Shaping the World 1.00 SEM Berry,Ciaran M.
Rutherford,Ethan
TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM LSC - 137 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270.
  NOTE: Note: For English majors, this course is open to students wishing to fulfill their 200-level elective requirements upon petition.
  How do you get from that first scribbled note to the final draft of a story or poem? How do you use the work of other writers as a source of inspiration, a jumping off point? In this course we’ll analyze the craft of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. We’ll read and discuss important recent works in all three genres as well as a mixture of essays, interviews, and articles on craft issues and the writing life. Each week we’ll turn over a different topic, looking at how one aspect of craft operates across these genres. Students will respond to the readings and discussions via papers, creative work, and group work. We’ll also engage established writers in our conversations through class visits and Skype sessions. For English majors, this course is open to students wishing to fulfill their 200-level elective requirements under petition.
4711 ENGL-301-01 From Aristotle to Queer Theory 1.00 LEC Benedict,Barbara M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM 115V - 103 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This course explores the different ways in which literature has been—and can be—interpreted and justified. Students will read critical theories from Platonism to feminism and queer theory, and will apply these theories to selected texts by Shakespeare, Keats, Austen, Conrad, and others in order to define their own literary theory. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
5232 ENGL-303-01 "Major American Authors" 1.00 SEM Henton,Alice M.H. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM MC - 309 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Note: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection or a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
  Search any college bulletin from the beginning of the twentieth century onward and you will probably find a course on “Major American Authors.” While the authors listed on the syllabi have varied, the topic itself has remained a fixture of many English curricula. Why is it so popular and tenacious? What exactly makes a major American author? Why have these criteria changed, and when? What’s the difference between a class focusing on “Major American Authors,” and one, say, on “Major American Texts?” This course examines the evolving construct of authorship within the American literary canon and charts the trajectory of “major” American authors from Anne Bradstreet to George R.R. Martin. This seminar is research-intensive. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection or a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
5031 ENGL-322-01 Social Networks ofRomantic Era 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM MC - 309 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. It is a research-intensive seminar.
  Romantic-era writers like Percy Bysshe Shelley and William Wordsworth were deeply invested in the question of ‘genius,’ of how artistic inspiration chooses and works upon an individual. This investment has affected our conception of Romanticism, most obviously in our continued focus on the “big six” male poets as defining the era’s literary production. This course pivots away from Romantic individuality to approach the era through networks: friendship, collaboration, rivalry. Emphasizing the social nature of Romanticism, this course asks: How do relationships revise our ideas of Romantic authorship and authority? Is Romanticism still ‘Romantic’ when we emphasize connections over the myth of the individual genius? Readings will include works by the Wordsworths, Coleridge, Lamb, Wollstonecraft, Burke, Paine, Austen, the Shelleys, Polidori and Byron. This is a research-intensive seminar. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement o f a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
5063 ENGL-325-01 Spaghetti Westerns 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM
T: 6:30PM-9:30PM
115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective. It is a research-intensive seminar. Tuesday evening time slot is for screening only.
  This course interweaves a comparative exploration of the global range of the genre, Westerns made in Germany, India, Thailand, China, and Brazil, with a comprehensive examination of the remarkable series of Italian Westerns that were made during the 1960s and 1970s. Working as a team, the class will develop original insights by employing the methods of experimental cinephilia, paying close attention to the aesthetics at work in individual films, while at the same time considering the films’ relation to their social, cultural and political contexts; though we will begin with the guilty pleasures the Spaghetti films are known for, these pleasures shall lead us to a deeper understanding of how they function as art. This seminar is research-intensive. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement o f a 300-level elective.
4964 ENGL-330-01 Sex, Violence, Substance Abuse 1.00 LEC Goldman,Francisco W: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 106  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Some of the greatest and most lasting depictions of México in fiction, non-fiction, cinema and photography have been produced by non-Mexicans. Rather than exposing any lack of significant Mexican creators in all these genres, such works reflect the strong pull, the attraction and at times repulsion, exerted by this complicated country and culture on outsiders. We will choose readings from such twentieth and twenty-first century works such as John Reed's Insurgent México, Malcolm Lowry's Under the Volcano, DH Lawrence's The Plumed Serpent, Graham Greene's The Power and the Glory, the short-stories of Katherine Anne Porter and Paul Bowles, the novels of B. Traven, Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian, the poetic meditations on Pre-Colombian México by recent French Nobel Prize winner Le Clézio, the contemporary México novels of the Chilean Roberto Bolaño, and, in Ana Castillo’s fiction, a U.S. Chicana's return to México, as well as other contemporary writings. Movies will be chosen from among A Touch of Evil, The Treasure of Sierra Madre, The Wild Bunch, Bring me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, The Night of the Iguana, The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, and Sín Nombre. The emphasis will be on the prose, novels especially, with three or four movies, and a class devoted to photography. We study the works themselves, their relation to their own literary-cultural traditions, their depiction of México, and the multiple issues raised by their status as works created by "foreigners." Supplemental readings, some by Mexicans. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
4965 ENGL-333-01 Creative Nonfiction 1.00 SEM Rutherford,Ethan TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM LSC - 131 Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  In this writing workshop, we explore the genre of creative nonfiction. The term "nonfiction" implies that the writer is telling the truth--that the reader can assume and trust that the writer is describing people who are real and events that have happened. The writer strives for accuracy, even if the nature of that accuracy remains within the bounds of human limitations. The adjective "creative" refers to the fact that in creative nonfiction there is an important transformation of life into art, through the use of poetic and fictional techniques. Our readings will enhance our understanding of how creative nonfiction essays are constructed; they will also serve as springboards for writing exercises. In writing workshops, the main focus of the course, we will produce various types of creative nonfiction. For English literature concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of an elective. For English creative writing concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. For writing, rhetoric,and media arts minors, it counts as a core course. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4047 ENGL-334-01 Adv Cr Writing:Fiction 1.00 SEM Goldman,Francisco T: 6:30PM-9:10PM 115V - 103 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing majors.
  Students will write and rewrite fiction. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. For English creative writing concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4156 ENGL-336-01 Adv Cr Writing:Poetry 1.00 SEM Libbey,Elizabeth B. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM 115V - 106 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing majors. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
  Students will do in-class exercises, and write and revise their own poems. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers. This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing concentrators.
4966 ENGL-341-01 Am Ltry Modrnsm &the Great War 1.00 LEC Mrozowski,Daniel J. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MC - 305 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will consider the impact of the Great War on American literary modernism. Grappling with apocalyptic devastation in Europe, massive shifts in global politics, and dramatic changes in technology, the Lost Generation responded with enduring and enigmatic works, haunted by wounds both psychic and spiritual. We will consider canonical writings by Ernest Hemingway and e.e. cummings, lesser-known works by Jessie Redmon Fauset and Edith Wharton, and first person accounts by combatants such as Thomas Boyd. As our focus will be on introducing the aesthetics of modernism through the context of the war itself, we will study maps, songs, photographs, newspapers, and other historical materials alongside traditional literary objects. Assignments will include a creative research project, weekly responses, and short essays. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. It is research intensive.
4967 ENGL-348-01 Women Writers of Middle Ages 1.00 LEC Fisher,Sheila M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM HL - 121 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  This course will study works in a variety of genres, from the lyric and the romance to the autobiography and the moral treatise, written by medieval women in England, Europe, and Asia. In addition to analyzing the texts themselves, we will be examining them within their social, historical, and political contexts as we discuss such issues as medieval women's literacy, education, and relationships to the male-authored literary traditions of their cultures. Through the term, we will be trying to determine the degree to which we can construct a recognizable woman's literary tradition for this period. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
4968 ENGL-353-01 Challenging Auth: Lit of 17thC 1.00 LEC Wheatley,Chloe F: 1:15PM-3:55PM HHN - 105 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  The early 17th century was one of the most important and contentious periods in English history, and literature was a formative part of its rich culture of debate and innovation. The Stuart monarchy was trying to establish an absolutist culture, and the resistance to it led to the first political revolution in modern Europe. The 17th century also witnessed the movement of women into public life and print as highly vocal poets, preachers, prophetesses, and political theorists. Advances in scientific inquiry reshaped how writers thought about the cosmos and their place in it. Readings will include works by Donne, Jonson, Marvell, the women poets Lanyer and Bradstreet, the quasi-scientific writings of Bacon and Burton, and samplings from the period's rich popular literature and pamphlet wars. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. It is research intensive.
4257 ENGL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of individual tutorials in topics not currently offered by the department. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4972 ENGL-412-01 Modern Poetry 1.00 SEM Rosen,David W: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 103 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of an advanced class in literature written after 1900. It also satisfies the requirement of a poetry course.
  “It appears that poets in our civilization, as it exists at present, must be difficult.” When T. S. Eliot wrote these lines in 1921, “difficulty” was self-evidently a term of praise: it signaled a willingness to grapple with the intellectual, esthetic, moral, and erotic complexities of modernity. Today, however, that same difficulty gives poetry of the early 20th century its somewhat scary reputation. Why read tough texts when so much else goes down easily? A premise of this course is that the excitement, the beauty, and the sheer greatness of modern poetry are inseparable from the challenges it poses to the reader. Between 1885 and World War II, Eliot, Yeats, Pound, Crane, Moore, Bishop, Williams, Stevens, Frost, and Auden made poetry possible for modern life. We read their work. (Note: English 412 and English 812 are the same course.) For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of an advanced class in literature written after 1900. It also satisfies the requirement of a poetry course. For the English graduate program, this course counts as a course in American literature or British literature for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, or media arts track. This course is research intensive.
5114 ENGL-423-01 Southern Gothic Lit & Film 1.00 SEM Wall,Mary Beverly C. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Southern Gothic literature and film provide an excellent case study for exploring theories of genre. With the tools of modern genre criticism, this course will seek to define and map a controversial and disputed literary and cinematic territory, one that focuses on a culture of terror and horror as it spins tales of murder, madness, freaks, and monsters. It is a narrative mode that pushes what Flannery O’Connor called “the limits of mystery” in attempts to deal with tragic extremes of human behavior and comic twists of the grotesque. Readings include works by Edgar Allan Poe, William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, Flannery O’Connor, Tennessee Williams, and Cormac McCarthy, along with contemporary Southern “pop-gothic” movies such as Deliverance, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, and Beasts of the Southern Wild. English 423 and English 823 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 distribution requirement. For literature and film concentrators, this course fulfills the requirement of an advanced course toward the major, and counts as a course in literature and film. For English graduate students, this course counts as a core course in the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track; it counts as an elective in the literary studies track.
5033 ENGL-463-01 Feminist Approaches to Literat 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For English majors, this course will satisfy the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This course will examine the sexual politics of literature, criticism, and literary history, focusing in particular on how feminist writers have negotiated the relationship between politics, the body, and eroticism. Topics to be studied include the absence of women from conventional literary histories, the theories (and influence) of Sigmund Freud, daughterhood, adolescence, and identity, the pleasures – and dangers – of romance plots, and feminist explorations of sexual power dynamics. Writers to be studied include Harriet Jacobs, Charlotte Bronte, Sarah Grand, Jeanette Winterson, Helen Cixous, Monique Wittig, Andrea Dworkin, and Maxine Hong Kingston. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
4258 ENGL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Students may assist professors as teaching assistants, performing a variety of duties usually involving assisting students in conceiving or revising papers; reading and helping to evaluate papers, quizzes, and exams; and other duties as determined by the student and instructor. See instructor of specific course for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4374 ENGL-470-01 Film Theory: An Introduction 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash M: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 103 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection..
  NOTE: This course fulfills the requirements toward the film studies minor.
  NOTE: SCREENING ONLINE for this course.
  This course introduces the most important theoretical models which have been used to explain how films function as art, ideology, language, history, politics and philosophy. Some theorists are mainly concerned with the aesthetic potentials of the cinema: How do categories such as realism, authorship and genre explain and enhance our experience of films? Other theorists are focused on the relations between films and the societies that produce them, or on general processes of spectatorship: How do Hollywood films address their audiences? How do narrative structures shape our responses to fictional characters? As the variety of these questions suggests, film theory opens onto a wide set of practices and possibilities; though it always begins with what we experience at the movies, it is ultimately concerned with the wider world that we experience through the movies. Theorists to be examined include Munsterberg, Eisenstein, Burch, Kracauer, Balazs, Bazin, Altman, Gunning, Mulvey, Metz, Wollen, Havel, Benjamin, Pasolini, Deleuze and Jameson. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course fulfills requirements toward the film studies minor. Film screenings to be discussed at the first class meeting.
4974 ENGL-496-01 Sem: What You Should Have Read 1.00 SEM Fisher,Sheila M. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open to senior English majors only.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a senior seminar.
  This is your final semester as an English major, and this senior seminar will provide you with an opportunity to reflect back on the intellectual paths you have and have not taken. What texts do you consider true classics, but have not yet read? This course will give you a chance to address those perceived gaps in your literary education, as students in the course will generate the primary reading list. What has led you to think of these specific works as central to the study of English literature? In addition to our list of selected classics, we will read critical essays that discuss issues of canonicity, the history of the English major, and the fate of literature (and literary study) in this latest "information age." Writing requirements will include weekly responses to assigned reading, class presentations, and a longer seminar paper. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a senior seminar.
4289 ENGL-497-01 One-Semester Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Individual tutorial in writing of a one-semester senior thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required.
4204 ENGL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Individual tutorial in the writing of a year-long thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Seniors writing year-long, two-credit theses are required to register for the second half of their thesis for the spring of their senior year. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
5194 ENGL-812-01 Modern Poetry 1.00 SEM Rosen,David W: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 103 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course counts as a course in American literature or British literature for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, or media arts track.
  “It appears that poets in our civilization, as it exists at present, must be difficult.” When T. S. Eliot wrote these lines in 1921, “difficulty” was self-evidently a term of praise: it signaled a willingness to grapple with the intellectual, esthetic, moral, and erotic complexities of modernity. Today, however, that same difficulty gives poetry of the early 20th century its somewhat scary reputation. Why read tough texts when so much else goes down easily? A premise of this course is that the excitement, the beauty, and the sheer greatness of modern poetry are inseparable from the challenges it poses to the reader. Between 1885 and World War II, Eliot, Yeats, Pound, Crane, Moore, Bishop, Williams, Stevens, Frost, and Auden made poetry possible for modern life. We read their work. (Note: English 412 and English 812 are the same course.) For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of an advanced class in literature written after 1900. It also satisfies the requirement of a poetry course. For the English graduate program, this course counts as a course in American literature or British literature for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, or media arts track. This course is research intensive.
5104 ENGL-823-01 Southern Gothic Lit & Film 1.00 SEM Wall,Mary Beverly C. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM AAC - 231 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Southern Gothic literature and film provide an excellent case study for exploring theories of genre. With the tools of modern genre criticism, this course will seek to define and map a controversial and disputed literary and cinematic territory, one that focuses on a culture of terror and horror as it spins tales of murder, madness, freaks, and monsters. It is a narrative mode that pushes what Flannery O’Connor called “the limits of mystery” in attempts to deal with tragic extremes of human behavior and comic twists of the grotesque. Readings include works by Edgar Allan Poe, William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, Flannery O’Connor, Tennessee Williams, and Cormac McCarthy, along with contemporary Southern “pop-gothic” movies such as Deliverance, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, and Beasts of the Southern Wild. English 423 and English 823 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 distribution requirement. For literature and film concentrators, this course fulfills the requirement of an advanced course toward the major, and counts as a course in literature and film. For English graduate students, this course counts as a core course in the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track; it counts as an elective in the literary studies track.
5034 ENGL-863-01 Feminist Approaches to Literat 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For English majors, this course will satisfy the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This course will examine the sexual politics of literature, criticism, and literary history, focusing in particular on how feminist writers have negotiated the relationship between politics, the body, and eroticism. Topics to be studied include the absence of women from conventional literary histories, the theories (and influence) of Sigmund Freud, daughterhood, adolescence, and identity, the pleasures – and dangers – of romance plots, and feminist explorations of sexual power dynamics. Writers to be studied include Harriet Jacobs, Charlotte Bronte, Sarah Grand, Jeanette Winterson, Helen Cixous, Monique Wittig, Andrea Dworkin, and Maxine Hong Kingston. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
4830 ENGL-870-01 Film Theory: An Introduction 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash M: 6:30PM-9:30PM 115V - 103  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course can count as an elective for the literary studies track, or a core course for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
  This course introduces the most important theoretical models which have been used to explain how films function as art, ideology, language, history, politics and philosophy. Some theorists are mainly concerned with the aesthetic potentials of the cinema: How do categories such as realism, authorship and genre explain and enhance our experience of films? Other theorists are focused on the relations between films and the societies that produce them, or on general processes of spectatorship: How do Hollywood films address their audiences? How do narrative structures shape our responses to fictional characters? As the variety of these questions suggests, film theory opens onto a wide set of practices and possibilities; though it always begins with what we experience at the movies, it is ultimately concerned with the wider world that we experience through the movies. Theorists to be examined include Munsterberg, Eisenstein, Burch, Kracauer, Balazs, Bazin, Altman, Gunning, Mulvey, Metz, Wollen, Havel, Benjamin, Pasolini, Deleuze and Jameson. (Note: English 470 and English 870 are the same course.) For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection. For the English graduate program, this course can count as an elective for the literary studies track, or a core course for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track. This course fulfills requirements toward the film studies minor.
4450 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4225 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
4203 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4220 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
5439 ENGL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4935 RHET-406-01 Composition Pedagogy 1.00 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Language and literacy have always served as lightning rods for social and political issues, as well as for conflicts of theory and practice in education. This course will explore the contemporary teaching of writing, with attention to the range of current pedagogies in US colleges. We will examine influences of 20th-century revival of rhetoric, process and post-process writing, cultural and feminist studies, cognitive theory, the digital revolution, and the implications of "the global turn" for 21st-century students and teachers of writing. For undergraduate English majors, this course counts as an elective.
5410 RHET-806-01 Composition Pedagogy 1.00 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Language and literacy have always served as lightning rods for social and political issues, as well as for conflicts of theory and practice in education. This course will explore the contemporary teaching of writing, with attention to the range of current pedagogies in US colleges. We will examine influences of 20th-century revival of rhetoric, process and post-process writing, cultural and feminist studies, cognitive theory, the digital revolution, and the implications of "the global turn" for 21st-century students and teachers of writing. For undergraduate English majors, this course counts as an elective.
5219 THDN-239-01 Contemporary American Theater 1.00 LEC Polin,Mitchell A. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM AAC - 231 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will provide a detailed study of the plays, performances, and techniques of major figures in American theater from the early 20th century to the present day. Artists examined include: Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, The Group Theater, Edward Albee, Guillermo Gomez-Pena, and the Wooster Group, among others. Also listed under American studies and English.
5277 WMGS-335-01 Mapping American Masculinities 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - S205  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course examines the construction of masculinity in American society starting with Theodore Roosevelt’s call at the turn of the twentieth century for men to revitalize the nation by pursuing the “strenuous life." Through close readings of literary and filmic texts, it considers why American manhood has so often been seen as in crisis. It pays particular attention to the formation of non-normative masculinities (African-American, female, and gay) in relation to entrenched racial, class, and sexual hierarchies, as well as the impact of the feminist, civil rights, and gay liberation movements on the shifting construction of male identity. In addition to critical essays, readings also include Tarzan of the Apes, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, The Great Gatsby, The Sun also Rises, Native Son, Another Country, and Kiss Me Deadly (Spillane). Film screenings include Kiss Me Deadly (Aldrich), Shaft, Magnum Force, Philadelphia, Brokeback Mountain, Cleopatra Jones, and Boys Don’t Cry.
5096 WMGS-345-01 Film Noir 1.00 SEM Corber,Robert J. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM HL - 123  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course traces the development of film noir, a distinctive style of Hollywood filmmaking inspired by the hardboiled detective fiction of Dashiell Hammett, James Cain, and Raymond Chandler. It pays particular attention to the genre’s complicated gender and sexual politics. In addition to classic examples of film noir, the course also considers novels by Hammett, Cain, and Chandler.