Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for ENGLISH - Fall 2014
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2037 ENGL-105-01 Intro to Amer Lit II 1.00 LEC Mrozowski,Daniel J. WF: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-years.
  This course surveys major works of American literature after 1865, from literary reckonings with the Civil War and its tragic residues, to works of "realism" and "naturalism" that contended with the late 19th century’s rapid pace of social change, to the innovative works of the modern and postmodern eras. As we read works by authors such as Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, William Faulkner, and Toni Morrison, we will inquire: how have literary texts defined and redefined "America" and Americans? What are the means by which some groups have been excluded from the American community, and what are their experiences of that exclusion? And how do these texts shape our understanding of the unresolved problems of post-Civil War American democracy? For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
2127 ENGL-110-01 Survey of Engl Literature I 1.00 LEC Wheatley,Chloe TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-years.
  Through selected readings in works from the Anglo-Saxon period to the late 17th century, this course will study the development of English literature in the context of stylistic, cultural, and historical changes and influences. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
3190 ENGL-220-01 Crime&Passion:Stds in Vict Lit 1.00 LEC Bilston,Sarah R. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  This course introduces students to major writers and issues from the British Victorian period (1837-1901). It will focus on texts–-fiction, non-fictional prose, and poetry-–in which notions of propriety and morality are in productive dialogue with crimes, threatening secrets, and subversive passions. Texts to be studied include Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, Charles Dickens’ Bleak House, D.G. Rossetti’s Jenny, and M.E. Braddon’s Lady Audley’s Secret. (Please note: this course requires substantial amounts of reading; Victorian novels are long!) For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
3318 ENGL-250-01 Forms of Poetry: An Intro 1.00 SEM Berry,Ciaran M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  This hybrid course will focus on the study of poetry as form. We'll begin by investigating the workings of meter and rhyme before reading, and attempting to write in, a series of established poetic forms. Some of these forms, like the sonnet, will be well known; others, like the pantoum, a little less so. Some of the forms will be structural, like the villanelle; others thematic, like the epithalamium. In all cases, we'll mix deep reading from across the ages with invigorated writing. When we come to consider the sonnet, for example, we'll move from the classic (Shakespeare, Keats) to the contemporary (Muldoon, Heaney). This course is open to everyone and is strongly recommended for English majors looking to develop their grasp of poetic structure.
3279 ENGL-260-01 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Wheatley,Chloe WF: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minior.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
3280 ENGL-260-02 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minior.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
3281 ENGL-260-03 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minior.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
3282 ENGL-260-04 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Benedict,Barbara M. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minior.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2930 ENGL-265-01 Intro to Film Studies 1.00 LEC Younger,James Prakash MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM
M: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 65
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satifies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration.
  This course provides a general introduction to the study of film and focuses on the key terms and concepts used to describe and analyze the film experience. As we put this set of tools and methods in place, we will also explore different modes of film production (fictional narrative, documentary, experimental) and some of the critical issues and debates that have shaped the discipline of film studies (genre, auteurism, film aesthetics, ideology). Note: Film screening only on Monday evenings. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the film studies minor.
2430 ENGL-270-01 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Berry,Ciaran M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
3191 ENGL-270-02 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Libbey,Elizabeth B. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2431 ENGL-270-03 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Davis,Susanne M. TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first-year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2565 ENGL-270-04 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Davis,Susanne M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
3192 ENGL-321-01 Curiosity and Literature 1.00 SEM Benedict,Barbara M. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written from 1700-1900. It is a "research-intensive seminar". This course is not open to first-year students.
  This course will examine the way curiosity transformed literature and culture in the age of inquiry, when Peeping Tom was invented, modern science was institutionalized, and the detective novel was born. We will read texts that explore both approved and unapproved kinds, such as witchcraft, voyeurism, and the exhibition of monsters. Texts will include drama, journalism, poetry, satire, and novels by Aphra Behn, Defoe, Johnson, and others. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written from 1700-1900. It is a "research-intensive seminar." Not open to first-year students.
2442 ENGL-334-01 Adv Cr Writing:Fiction 1.00 SEM Rutherford,Ethan MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing majors.
  Students will write and rewrite fiction. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. For English creative writing concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
3234 ENGL-347-01 Wrtg Women of the Renaissance 1.00 SEM Wheatley,Chloe WF: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. It is a research-intensive seminar.
  Anne Boleyn. Queen Elizabeth. Mary Queen of Scots. Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembroke. Penelope Rich. Lucy Russell, Countess of Bedford. These Renaissance women were important leaders, writers, patrons of the arts. There also exists a rich and long tradition of representing them in history, literature, and film. What does this sustained fascination reveal about the continual process of historical revision, and ultimately about our own cultural preoccupations? This course will examine a range of texts: biographies, early modern texts by and about these figures, and more contemporary representations (in popular histories, plays, and films) of their lives and times. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. It is a research-intensive seminar.
2375 ENGL-351-01 Shakespeare 1.00 LEC Riggio,Milla C. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to first-year students.
  NOTE: For English majors; this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is not open to first-year students.
  In this course we will study selected Shakespeare plays, with an emphasis on understanding cultural contexts and on plays in performance. We focus on Shakespeare's language and the language of the theater and the drama of his age, with an eye also to helping you understand why these plays and this dramatist have earned such an extraordinary place in the cultural history of so many people and places, from Russia to Africa. Plays to be studied may include: King Lear, The Merchant of Venice, Othello, Titus Andronicus, A Midsummer Night's Dream, and The Tempest. These choices are subject to change. For English majors this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700.
3193 ENGL-355-01 Narratives of Disability 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research-intensive.
  This course introduces students to the ways in which disability has been used to represent both "normalcy" and extraordinariness in literature. We will consider how "tales told by idiots," as framed in Shakespeare's Hamlet, often supply the unique and insightful perspective that mainstream characters cannot see, hear, or experience because of their own limitations. We will look at how the notion of disability has been aligned with other aspects of identity, such as Charles Chesnutt's representation of race as a disability in his turn of the century literature or of slaves using performances of disability to escape from the horrid institution during the 19th-century. We will read a variety of genres, fiction, memoir, and some literary criticism to come to a clearer understanding of the ways in which the meaning of disability and its representation in a variety of texts echoes a broader set of beliefs and practices in the U.S. For English majors this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research-intensive.
2352 ENGL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  A limited number of individual tutorials in topics not currently offered by the department. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3298 ENGL-401-01 Theories& Methods of Litry Std 1.00 SEM Rosen,David M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course is also research intensive. English 401 and English 801 are the same course.
  This seminar is designed to introduce students to the field of literary studies at the graduate level, to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will write weekly, have opportunities to lead class discussion, and work in stages to compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text. (Note: English 401 and English 801 are the same course.) For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course is also research intensive. For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students and we recommend that entering students enroll in this course during their first year of graduate study.
3289 ENGL-414-01 Remixing Literature, Part II 1.00 SEM Wall,Mary Beverly C. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course counts as an elective or fulfills the requirement of an advanced course for Literature and Film concentrators.
  Has "the remix" always been an essential art form in literature? This course will research new examples of classic literary works and their cultural adaptations and appropriations across multiple media arts, ranging from redactions of oral folktales to cinema blockbusters, digital mashups, and transmedia storytelling. Source texts will include Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur, Shakespeare's Hamlet, Austen's Sense and Sensibility, Bronte's Wuthering Heights, and Stoker's Dracula. We will study these texts and linked remixes, explore the reasons for their continued popularity, and address topics in creativity, originality, and remix theory. Students will help choose contemporary remixes and have opportunities to experiment individually and in small groups with crafting their own literary remixes and mashups. English 814 and English 414 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course counts as an elective or fulfills the requirement of an advanced course for literature and film concentrators. For graduate English students, this course counts as a core course for the Writing, Rhetoric, and Media Arts track or as an elective for the Literary Studies track.
3310 ENGL-439-16 The Documentary 1.00 SEM Riggio,Milla C. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors this course satisfies the post-1900 distribution requirement, or a core course for the literature and film concentration. English 439-16 and English 839-12 are the same course.
  Documentary films chronicle varied cultural, social, and political realities, from coal miners’ strikes and social revolutions to the development of musical genres. Documentary styles range from fictionalized recreations (docudramas) to narrative reenactments to non-narrative commentaries. This course will examine key documentary strategies through representative films, which may include Harlan County USA (Barbara Kopple, 1976) and Shut Up and Sing (Kopple and Cecilia Peck, 2006), Journalist and the Jihadi: The Murder of Daniel Pearl (Ahmad Jamal and Ramesh Sharma, 2006): segments of The Battle of Algiers, Poto Mitan: Haitian Women, Pillars of the Global Economy (Renee Bergan and Mark Schuller), Jazz (selected episodes) (Ken Burns, 2001), Say Amen, Somebody (George Nierenberg, 1982), An Inconvenient Truth (Davis Guggenheim, 2008), and Fair Game (Doug Liman, 2010). Note: English 439-16 and English 839-12 are the same course. For the English graduate program, this course counts as a core course for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track; it counts as an elective for the literary studies track. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement, or a core course for the literature and film concentration.
2262 ENGL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Students may assist professors as teaching assistants, performing a variety of duties usually involving assisting students in conceiving or revising papers; reading and helping to evaluate papers, quizzes, and exams; and other duties as determined by the student and instructor. See instructor of specific course for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3312 ENGL-468-06 Walt Whitman & Emily Dickinson 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-17900.
  Nothing that precedes them in the American literary tradition quite prepares us for the poems of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. We will steep ourselves in the verse of these two literary iconoclasts. At the same time, we will trace the critical history of both, reading essays from the 19th century to the present which have made the complex works and lives of Whitman and Dickinson more legible. The final class period will be reserved for reading selections from 20th-century poets -- not all of them American -- who have openly professed a debt to Whitman's and Dickinson's experimental and often exhilarating poems. Note: English 468-06 and English 868-16 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
2433 ENGL-492-01 Fiction Workshop 1.00 SEM Rutherford,Ethan T: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270 and one of the following English 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, Film Studies 337, Theater and Dance 345, or Theater and Dance 393.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing majors. One requirement of the class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers and an advanced creative writing workshop.
  Advanced seminar in the writing of fiction. Class discussions devoted primarily to the analysis of student fiction, with some attention to examples of contemporary short stories. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop. This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing concentrators.
2434 ENGL-494-01 Poetry Workshop 1.00 SEM Rossini,Clare M. F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270 and one of the following English 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, Film Studies 337, Theater and Dance 345, or Theater and Dance 393.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative wriring majors. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop.
  Advanced seminar in the writing of poetry. Class discussions devoted primarily to the analysis of student work, with some attention to examples of contemporary poetry. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop. This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing concentrators, and a senior project.
3288 ENGL-495-01 Senior Sem: Around Howards End 1.00 SEM Rosen,David W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For seniors, this course satisfies the requirement of a senior project. For English majors, it satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  How does literature change over time? How do earlier writers exercise an influence over their successors, and how do those later writers grapple with their most powerful forerunners? In this seminar, you will be invited to think about these large questions, which have formed a subtext to your work in the major thus far. To focus our discussion, we will consider one great modern novel, E. M. Forster's "Howards End" - a work which rewrites some key texts of nineteenth-century literature and philosophy, and which, itself, is emulated by several subsequent authors. Additional readings include: Austen, Woolf, James, Nietzsche and Zadie Smith. In the final project, you will have the opportunity to apply our broader conclusions about literary influence to your career as an English major.
3287 ENGL-495-02 Senior Sem: Indian Film & Lit 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash W: 1:15PM-3:55PM
W: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For seniors, this course satisfies the requirement of a senior project.
  NOTE: This course is open to Film Studies majors.
  This course offers an introduction to the rich culture and society of the Indian subcontinent through some of its most celebrated films and works of literature, with a special thematic focus on the history of post-Independence India (1947-present). We will explore work in different genres (Bollywood films, Bengali art cinema, documentaries, short stories, novels, poetry and non-fiction writing) and several distinctive linguistic cultures (English and Hindi, Urdu, Bengali and other regional languages in translation) as a means to feel at home within the oceanic complexity, the sublime diversity, "the Wonder that is India".
2283 ENGL-497-01 One-Semester Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Individual tutorial in writing of a one-semester senior thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required.
2330 ENGL-498-01 Sr Thesis Part 1/Sr Colloquim 2.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is designed to teach senior English majors the techniques of research and analysis needed for writing a year-long essay on a subject of their choice. It is intended to help the students to write such year-long theses, and to encourage them to do so. It will deal with problems such as designing longer papers, focusing topics, developing and limiting bibliographies, working with manuscripts, using both library and Internet resources, and understanding the uses of theoretical paradigms. This course is required of all senior English majors who are planning to write two-semester, year-long theses. Please refer to the department's website for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
3299 ENGL-801-01 Theories& Methods of Litry Std 1.00 SEM Rosen,David M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students and we recommend that entering students enroll in this course during their first year of graduate study.
  This seminar is designed to introduce students to the field of literary studies at the graduate level, to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will write weekly, have opportunities to lead class discussion, and work in stages to compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text. (Note: English 401 and English 801 are the same course.) For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course is also research intensive. For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students and we recommend that entering students enroll in this course during their first year of graduate study.
3290 ENGL-814-01 Remixing Literature, Part II 1.00 SEM Wall,Mary Beverly C. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For graduate English students, this course counts as a core course for the Writing, Rhetoric, and Media Arts track or as an elective for the Literary Studies track.
  Has "the remix" always been an essential art form in literature? This course will research new examples of classic literary works and their cultural adaptations and appropriations across multiple media arts, ranging from redactions of oral folktales to cinema blockbusters, digital mashups, and transmedia storytelling. Source texts will include Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur, Shakespeare's Hamlet, Austen's Sense and Sensibility, Bronte's Wuthering Heights, and Stoker's Dracula. We will study these texts and linked remixes, explore the reasons for their continued popularity, and address topics in creativity, originality, and remix theory. Students will help choose contemporary remixes and have opportunities to experiment individually and in small groups with crafting their own literary remixes and mashups. English 814 and English 414 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course counts as an elective or fulfills the requirement of an advanced course for literature and film concentrators. For graduate English students, this course counts as a core course for the Writing, Rhetoric, and Media Arts track or as an elective for the Literary Studies track.
3313 ENGL-839-12 The Documentary 1.00 SEM Riggio,Milla C. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: Forr the English graduate program, this course counts as a core course for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track; it counts as an elective for the literary studies track.
  Documentary films chronicle varied cultural, social, and political realities, from coal miners’ strikes and social revolutions to the development of musical genres. Documentary styles range from fictionalized recreations (docudramas) to narrative reenactments to non-narrative commentaries. This course will examine key documentary strategies through representative films, which may include Harlan County USA (Barbara Kopple, 1976) and Shut Up and Sing (Kopple and Cecilia Peck, 2006), Journalist and the Jihadi: The Murder of Daniel Pearl (Ahmad Jamal and Ramesh Sharma, 2006): segments of The Battle of Algiers, Poto Mitan: Haitian Women, Pillars of the Global Economy (Renee Bergan and Mark Schuller), Jazz (selected episodes) (Ken Burns, 2001), Say Amen, Somebody (George Nierenberg, 1982), An Inconvenient Truth (Davis Guggenheim, 2008), and Fair Game (Doug Liman, 2010). Note: English 839-12 and English 439-16 are the same course. For the English graduate program, this course counts as a core course for the writing, rhetoric and media arts track; it counts as an elective for the literary studies track. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement, or a core course for the literature and film concentration.
3314 ENGL-868-16 Walt Whitman & Emily Dickinson 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course satisfies the requirements of a course in American literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
  Nothing that precedes them in the American literary tradition quite prepares us for the poems of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. We will steep ourselves in the verse of these two literary iconoclasts. At the same time, we will trace the critical history of both, reading essays from the 19th century to the present which have made the complex works and lives of Whitman and Dickinson more legible. The final class period will be reserved for reading selections from 20th-century poets--not all of them American--who have openly professed a debt to Whitman's and Dickinson's experimental and often exhilarating poems. Note: English 868-16 and English 468-06 are the same course. For the English graduate program, this course satisfies the requirements of a course in American literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
2205 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2207 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2510 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
2206 ENGL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 100
2574 RHET-302-01 Writing Theory & Practic 1.00 LEC O'Donnell,Tennyson L. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective.
  A study of the art of discourse, with special emphasis on the dynamics of contemporary composition and argumentation. This course examines rhetorical theory from the Classical period to the New Rhetoric, as well as provides students with frequent practice in varied techniques of composing and evaluating expository prose. A wide selection of primary readings across the curriculum will include some controversial ideas about writing from Plato’s Phaedrus, the heart of Aristotle’s Rhetoric, and examples of the best writing in the arts and sciences. By invitation only. For students admitted to the Writing Associates Program.
3033 THDN-393-01 Playwrights Workshop 1.00 SEM Preston,Michael
Karger,Barbara
MW: 3:30PM-5:30PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  Prerequisite: At least one theater and dance course or permission of instructor.
  An introduction to different styles and techniques of playwrighting through the study of selected plays from various world theater traditions. Assignments and exercises will lead to the development of short plays scripted by students.
3178 WMGS-318-01 Hollywood Stars 1.00 SEM Corber,Robert J. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in one film studies course, or permission of instructor.
  This course examines one of the most important aspects of studio-era Hollywood cinema, the production of stars. It pays particular attention to a paradox of the studio era, how some stars underwrote the dominant constructions of male and female identity while others challenged them. It also addresses the role of racial and class differences in shaping stardom. Case studies may include Rudolph Valentino, Mae West, Katharine Hepburn, Shirley Temple, Doris Day, Rock Hudson, Charleton Heston, and Sidney Poitier. Readings by Richard Dyer, Judith Mayne, Gaylyn Studlar, Janet Staiger, and Pamela Robertson.
3179 WMGS-335-01 Mapping American Masculinities 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  This course examines the construction of masculinity in American society starting with Theodore Roosevelt’s call at the turn of the twentieth century for men to revitalize the nation by pursuing the “strenuous life." Through close readings of literary and filmic texts, it considers why American manhood has so often been seen as in crisis. It pays particular attention to the formation of non-normative masculinities (African-American, female, and gay) in relation to entrenched racial, class, and sexual hierarchies, as well as the impact of the feminist, civil rights, and gay liberation movements on the shifting construction of male identity. In addition to critical essays, readings also include Tarzan of the Apes, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, The Great Gatsby, The Sun also Rises, Native Son, Another Country, and Kiss Me Deadly (Spillane). Film screenings include Kiss Me Deadly (Aldrich), Shaft, Magnum Force, Philadelphia, Brokeback Mountain, Cleopatra Jones, and Boys Don’t Cry.
3180 WMGS-345-01 Film Noir 1.00 SEM Corber,Robert J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course traces the development of film noir, a distinctive style of Hollywood filmmaking inspired by the hardboiled detective fiction of Dashiell Hammett, James Cain, and Raymond Chandler. It pays particular attention to the genre’s complicated gender and sexual politics. In addition to classic examples of film noir, the course also considers novels by Hammett, Cain, and Chandler.