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Course Schedule for ENGLISH - Spring 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1053 ENGL-104-01 Intro Amer Literature-I 1.00 LEC Hager,Christopher TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  A survey of literature, written and oral, produced in what is now the United States from the earliest times to around the Civil War. We will examine relationships among cultural and intellectual developments and the politics, economics, and societies of North America. Authors to be read include some that are well known—such as Emerson, Melville, Dickinson—and some who are less familiar—such as Cabeza de Vaca, John Rollin Ridge, and Harriet Jacobs. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
1049 ENGL-111-01 English Lit 1700-Present 1.00 LEC Rosen,David M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  Through readings in novels, drama, poetry, and prose from the Restoration to the 20th century, this course will examine shifts in the forms, functions, and meanings of English literature in the context of cultural and historical changes. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
1979 ENGL-117-01 Intro African Amer Lit Part II 1.00 LEC Paulin,Diana R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  This course surveys African American literature in multiple genres from the 20th-century to the present. We will examine texts by both canonical and emergent writers, such as James Weldon Johnson, Angelina Weld Grimke, Jean Toomer, Nella Larsen, Langston Hughes, Zora Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Ann Petry, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Octavia Butler, Rita Dove, August Wilson, Alice Walker, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, and others. Our discussions/strategies for reading will be informed by relevant social, historical, and political contexts. In addition to discussing issues of race, nation formation, diasporic identities, class, gender, and sexuality, we will identify/trace recurring ideas/themes, as well as develop a theoretical language to facilitate thoughtful engagement with these works. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
2124 ENGL-215-01 Literature and Environment 1.00 LEC Bergren,Katherine L. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. For Environmental Science majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a social science/humanities elective.
  In this course, we will examine the philosophies that underpin ideas of nature, culture, and the wilderness by reading a survey of poetry, fiction, drama, and nonfiction across centuries and cultures. We will consider why and how literary art seeks to represent nature, and think about the role of creative literature in the larger cultural conversation about environmental issues. Together we will discuss: How do we approach the relationship between nature and culture? What preconceptions are embedded in our use of quotidian terms like ‘environment,’ ‘wilderness,’ and even ‘nature’ itself? What are the practical environmental consequences of our views on language and literature? For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
2033 ENGL-225-01 Jane Austen&the RomanticPeriod 1.00 LEC Benedict,Barbara M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  Is Jane Austen a Romantic or a rationalist? Students in this course will analyze Jane Austen's novels. Readings will also include some Romantic poetry and supplementary materials. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
2089 ENGL-233-01 Evolution of the Western Film 1.00 LEC Younger,James Prakash MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-levle elective.
  The course examines how the Western genre emerged from global popular culture at the end of the 19th century to become one of the most powerful and complex forms for expressing the experience of Modernity. After careful consideration of the political and philosophical implications of the Western, we will track the development of the genre as it responds to the ideological contradictions and cultural tensions of 20th-century American history, focusing on broad trends within the mainstream, the contributions of individual directors, and the global dissemination of generic elements. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
2171 ENGL-238-01 Latin Am Novel in Engl&Spanish 1.00 LEC Goldman,Francisco T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  "Latin America is like Europe's insane asylum," Roberto Bolaño told a French interviewer in 2002. “A savage insane asylum, impoverished, violent, in which, despite its chaos and corruption, it's possible to see the shadow of the Louvre." This course looks at contemporary Latin American novels written in Spanish and English. Novels of politics, violence, love, gender confusion and other desperate circumstances. We examine the ways that writers subvert and expand our pre-conceived ideas about Latin America, and how the literary traditions of both western hemispheres -- north and south -- influence and dialogue with each other in fictional works. We discuss the fraught tension between so called national literatures, and those which aspire to, and even come to be regarded as, examples of "world literature." For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
1050 ENGL-260-01 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 LEC Wheatley,Chloe WF: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course may be used to fulfill the Literature and Psychology minor requirements.
  NOTE: This course has an enrollment limit of 18. The instructor of this course does not keep a waiting list for his/her individual section because registration for this course is handled entirely online. If the course is filled, please either check back online throughout the Add/Drop period to see if space should become available or come to the first class meeting to consult with the instructor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
1051 ENGL-260-02 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 LEC Bilston,Sarah R. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course may be used to fulfill the Literature and Psychology minor requirements.
  NOTE: This course has an enrollment limit of 18. The instructor of this course does not keep a waiting list for his/her individual section because registration for this course is handled entirely online. If the course is filled, please either check back online throughout the Add/Drop period to see if space should become available or come to the first class meeting ot consult with the instructor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
1180 ENGL-260-03 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 LEC Mrozowski,Daniel J. MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course may be used to fulfill the Literature and Psychology minor requirements.
  NOTE: This course has an enrollment limit of 18. The instructor of this course does not keep a waiting list for his/her individual section because registration for this course is handled entirely online. If the course is filled, please either check back online throughout the Add/Drop period to see if space should become available or come to the first class meeting ot consult with the instructor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
1419 ENGL-260-04 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 LEC Mrozowski,Daniel J. MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course may be used to fulfill the Literature and Psychology minor requirements.
  NOTE: This course has an enrollment limit of 18. The instructor of this course does not keep a waiting list for his/her individual section because registration for this course is handled entirely online. If the course is filled, please either check back online throughout the Add/Drop period to see if space should become available or come to the first class meeting ot consult with the instructor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
1171 ENGL-270-01 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rutherford,Ethan TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
1319 ENGL-270-02 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rossini,Clare M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
1250 ENGL-270-03 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rutherford,Ethan TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for Juniors, ten for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
1386 ENGL-270-04 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Davis,Susanne M. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
1980 ENGL-301-01 From Aristotle to Queer Theory 1.00 LEC Benedict,Barbara M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: For English majors this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This course explores the different ways in which literature has been—and can be—interpreted and justified. Students will read critical theories from Platonism to feminism and queer theory, and will apply these theories to selected texts by Shakespeare, Keats, Austen, Conrad, and others in order to define their own literary theory. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
2151 ENGL-304-01 Cinephilia and Philosophy 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: For English majors, this course will satisfy the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This course offers a systematic introduction to some of the most prominent approaches to treating film as philosophy (Cavell, Deleuze, cognitivism, and others)as preparation for a free-ranging exploration through a series of philosophical texts and films designed to challenge us and provoke creative thought, open-ended discussion, and elegant, poetic critical writing. The course will be conducted as an advanced seminar; some prior background in either philosophy or film studies is recommended, and a serious commitment to the common cinephilosophical endeavor is required. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
1052 ENGL-334-01 Adv Cr Writing:Fiction 1.00 SEM Goldman,Francisco W: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing majors.
  Students will write and rewrite fiction. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. For English creative writing concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
1172 ENGL-336-01 Adv Cr Writing:Poetry 1.00 SEM Berry,Ciaran M. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing majors. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
  Students will do in-class exercises, and write and revise their own poems. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers. This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing concentrators.
1982 ENGL-346-01 Dream Vision and Romance 1.00 LEC Fisher,Sheila M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is also research intensive.
  A study of two major medieval genres as they are developed in the works of Chaucer, Langland, the Gawain-poet, and Malory. The course will explore the structural and stylistic as well as the political, social, and psychological issues raised by these genres and the individual authors' treatments of them. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
1983 ENGL-356-01 Milton 1.00 LEC Wheatley,Chloe WF: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is also research intensive.
  In this course, we will consider the works of John Milton, with attention to how his prose and poetry synthesizes long-standing intellectual and literary traditions and grapples with issues that still engage us today: the relation of men and women, the realities of loss and mortality, the concept of significant individual choice, and the power and limitations of language as the tool with which we forge an understanding of the world. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is also research intensive.
1985 ENGL-373-01 Irish Poetry Since Yeats 1.00 LEC Berry,Ciaran M. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: For English majors this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900 and a class that emphasizes poetry.
  We’ll consider the blossoming of Irish poetry in English since the foundation of the Irish Free State. Given his centrality to both the state and the art form, we’ll begin by considering the work of W.B. Yeats. From Yeats, we’ll move up through the 20th century, looking at work by Patrick Kavanagh, Louis MacNeice, John Montague, Seamus Heaney, Michael Longley, Paul Durcan, Eamon Grennan, Eavan Boland, Paul Muldoon, Ciaran Carson, Vona Groarke, and Sinéad Morrissey. We’ll consider the poems through the lens of Irish independence and cultural identity, the Troubles, tensions over religion and class, the urban/rural divide, and the place of women within the tradition. We will also consider the poems as aesthetic objects, governed by different schools and traditions within the art form, Irish or otherwise. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature after 1900 and a class that emphasizes poetry.
1986 ENGL-379-01 Melville 1.00 LEC Hager,Christopher TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: For English mjaors this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written from 1700-1900emphasizing literature written from 1700-1900. This course is also research intensive.
  Though a superstar during his early career, Herman Melville watched his reputation decline as his literary ambitions escalated. One review of his seventh novel bore the headline, "Herman Melville Crazy." Not until the 20th century did even his best-known work, Moby Dick, attract considerable attention, but it now stands at the center of the American literary pantheon. Melville's work merits intensive, semester-long study not only because he is a canonical author of diverse narratives—from maritime adventures to tortured romances to philosophical allegories—but also because his career and legacy themselves constitute a narrative of central concern to literary studies and American culture. Through reading and discussion of several of his major works, we will explore Melville's imagination, discover his work's historical context, and think critically about literary form. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is also research-intensive.
1282 ENGL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of individual tutorials in topics not currently offered by the department. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1987 ENGL-402-01 Rhetoric & Media Arts 1.00 SEM Wall,Mary Beverly C. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  Aristotle defined Rhetoric over 2,000 years ago as “the art of discovering, in any given case, the available means of persuasion.” This seminar is designed to introduce the theoretical traditions of this art of persuasion and its development across the media arts from classical to contemporary times. Students will examine representative examples of literary texts, political discourse, contemporary films, and digital modes of communication in popular culture and the public sphere. Emphasis will be placed on exploring media semiotics and the dynamics of evolving cultural concepts of page, voice, and screen—ranging from classical orations to televised speeches and hypertext webs. Students will write weekly, have opportunities to lead class discussion, and develop a substantial project on a rhetorical topic of interest to them. English 402 and English 802 are the same course. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective. For the English graduate program, this course is required for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track; it counts as an elective for the literary studies track.
2083 ENGL-404-01 Women and Empire 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement. This course is also research intensive.
  This course examines women's involvement in and relationship to British imperialism in the 19th and 20th centuries. What part did ideologies of femininity play in pro-imperialist discourse? In what ways did women writers attempt to “feminize” the imperialist project? What was the relationship between the emerging feminist movement and imperialism at the turn of the 20th century? How have women writers resisted and complicated imperialist axiomatics? How – and in what language – do women authors from once-colonized countries write about the history and experiences of imperialism? Authors to be studied include Charlotte Brontë, Flora Annie Steel, Rudyard Kipling, Jean Rhys, Jamaica Kincaid, Louise Bennett, Nuala Ni Dhomhnail and Jhumpa Lahiri. English 404 and English 804 are the same course. For English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement. This course is also research intensive. For the English graduate program, this course satisfies the requirement of a course in British literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
2318 ENGL-409-01 Non-Fiction Screenwriting 1.00 SEM Brink,Robert W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  Analyzing contemporary nonfiction audiovisual scripts through the prism of classical persuasive rhetoric and modern visual communication theory, students will build both an intellectual framework and the practical skills that are in high demand in business, education, marketing, documentary and news writing. Specifically, students will develop pitching and writing skills, learn formatting conventions and sources for professional advancement while developing a written portfolio of four nonfiction pieces for audiovisual media. Reading assignments include selections ranging from Aristotle to Vorkapich. Guest presenters will include writer/producers from news, documentary, marketing, advertising, and educational video fields. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective. This course counts as an advanced film course for literature and film majors.
2127 ENGL-448-01 Plant Lives in Lit and Film 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. English 448 and English 848 are the same course. This course is also research intensive.
  This course engages with the plant world through novels, poetry, philosophy, film, and painting. We will track major trends in the human understanding of plants, allowing us to analyze how plants are represented in art and popular culture. In rethinking the being and meaning of plants we will necessarily revisit the idea of ‘the human’ and ‘the animal,’ employing these categories while attending to borderline cases where their utility falters. Readings may include well-known Romantic texts like Wordsworth’s “The Thorn,” Shelley’s “The Sensitive Plant,” and Austen’s Mansfield Park, as well as Erasmus Darwin’s epic “The Loves of the Plants”; essays by John Wilkins, Michael Pollan, and Michael Marder; and horror films like “The Happening” and “The Ruins.” English 448 and English 848 are the same course. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive. For the English graduate program this course satisfies the requirement of a course in British literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
1283 ENGL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Students may assist professors as teaching assistants, performing a variety of duties usually involving assisting students in conceiving or revising papers; reading and helping to evaluate papers, quizzes, and exams; and other duties as determined by the student and instructor. See instructor of specific course for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1420 ENGL-470-01 Film Theory: An Introduction 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection..
  NOTE: This course fulfills the requirements toward the film studies minor.
  This course introduces the most important theoretical models which have been used to explain how films function as art, ideology, language, history, politics and philosophy. Some theorists are mainly concerned with the aesthetic potentials of the cinema: How do categories such as realism, authorship and genre explain and enhance our experience of films? Other theorists are focused on the relations between films and the societies that produce them, or on general processes of spectatorship: How do Hollywood films address their audiences? How do narrative structures shape our responses to fictional characters? As the variety of these questions suggests, film theory opens onto a wide set of practices and possibilities; though it always begins with what we experience at the movies, it is ultimately concerned with the wider world that we experience through the movies. Theorists to be examined include Munsterberg, Eisenstein, Burch, Kracauer, Balazs, Bazin, Altman, Gunning, Mulvey, Metz, Wollen, Havel, Benjamin, Pasolini, Deleuze and Jameson. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course fulfills requirements toward the film studies minor. Film screenings to be discussed at the first class meeting.
1988 ENGL-496-01 Sem: What You Should Have Read 1.00 SEM Fisher,Sheila M. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open to senior English majors only.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satifies the requirement of a senior seminar.
  This is your final semester as an English major, and this senior seminar will provide you with an opportunity to reflect back on the intellectual paths you have and have not taken. What texts do you consider true classics, but have not yet read? This course will give you a chance to address those perceived gaps in your literary education, as students in the course will generate the primary reading list. What has led you to think of these specific works as central to the study of English literature? In addition to our list of selected classics, we will read critical essays that discuss issues of canonicity, the history of the English major, and the fate of literature (and literary study) in this latest "information age." Writing requirements will include weekly responses to assigned reading, class presentations, and a longer seminar paper. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a senior project.
1317 ENGL-497-01 One-Semester Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Individual tutorial in writing of a one-semester senior thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required.
1224 ENGL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Individual tutorial in the writing of a year-long thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Seniors writing year-long, two-credit theses are required to register for the second half of their thesis for the spring of their senior year. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
2142 ENGL-802-01 Rhetoric & Media Arts 1.00 SEM Wall,Mary Beverly C. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For English graduate students, this course is required for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track; it counts as an elective for the literary studies track.
  Aristotle defined Rhetoric over 2,000 years ago as “the art of discovering, in any given case, the available means of persuasion.” This seminar is designed to introduce the theoretical traditions of this art of persuasion and its development across the media arts from classical to contemporary times. Students will examine representative examples of literary texts, political discourse, contemporary films, and digital modes of communication in popular culture and the public sphere. Emphasis will be placed on exploring media semiotics and the dynamics of evolving cultural concepts of page, voice, and screen—ranging from classical orations to televised speeches and hypertext webs. Students will write weekly, have opportunities to lead class discussion, and develop a substantial project on a rhetorical topic of interest to them. English 402 and English 802 are the same course. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective. For the English graduate program, this course is required for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track; it counts as an elective for the literary studies track.
2084 ENGL-804-01 Women and Empire 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course satisfies the requirement of a course in British literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
  This course examines women's involvement in and relationship to British imperialism in the 19th and 20th centuries. What part did ideologies of femininity play in pro-imperialist discourse? In what ways did women writers attempt to “feminize” the imperialist project? What was the relationship between the emerging feminist movement and imperialism at the turn of the 20th century? How have women writers resisted and complicated imperialist axiomatics? How – and in what language – do women authors from once-colonized countries write about the history and experiences of imperialism? Authors to be studied include Charlotte Brontë, Flora Annie Steel, Rudyard Kipling, Jean Rhys, Jamaica Kincaid, Louise Bennett, Nuala Ni Dhomhnail and Jhumpa Lahiri. English 404 and English 804 are the same course. For English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement. This course is also research intensive. For the English graduate program, this course satisfies the requirement of a course in British literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
2317 ENGL-809-01 Non-Fiction Screenwriting 1.00 SEM Brink,Robert W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Analyzing contemporary nonfiction audiovisual scripts through the prism of classical persuasive rhetoric and modern visual communication theory, students will build both an intellectual framework and the practical skills that are in high demand in business, education, marketing, documentary and news writing. Specifically, students will develop pitching and writing skills, learn formatting conventions and sources for professional advancement while developing a written portfolio of four nonfiction pieces for audiovisual media. Reading assignments include selections ranging from Aristotle to Vorkapich. Guest presenters will include writer/producers from news, documentary, marketing, advertising, and educational video fields. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective. This course counts as an advanced film course for literature and film majors.
2128 ENGL-848-01 Plant Lives in Lit and Film 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program this course satisfies the requirement of a course in British literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track. English 448 and English 848 are the same course.
  This course engages with the plant world through novels, poetry, philosophy, film, and painting. We will track major trends in the human understanding of plants, allowing us to analyze how plants are represented in art and popular culture. In rethinking the being and meaning of plants we will necessarily revisit the idea of ‘the human’ and ‘the animal,’ employing these categories while attending to borderline cases where their utility falters. Readings may include well-known Romantic texts like Wordsworth’s “The Thorn,” Shelley’s “The Sensitive Plant,” and Austen’s Mansfield Park, as well as Erasmus Darwin’s epic “The Loves of the Plants”; essays by John Wilkins, Michael Pollan, and Michael Marder; and horror films like “The Happening” and “The Ruins.” English 448 and English 848 are the same course. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive. For the English graduate program this course satisfies the requirement of a course in British literature, or a course emphasizing cultural contexts for the literary studies track; it counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
2121 ENGL-870-01 Film Theory: An Introduction 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course can count as an elective for the literary studies track, or a core course for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
  This course introduces the most important theoretical models which have been used to explain how films function as art, ideology, language, history, politics and philosophy. Some theorists are mainly concerned with the aesthetic potentials of the cinema: How do categories such as realism, authorship and genre explain and enhance our experience of films? Other theorists are focused on the relations between films and the societies that produce them, or on general processes of spectatorship: How do Hollywood films address their audiences? How do narrative structures shape our responses to fictional characters? As the variety of these questions suggests, film theory opens onto a wide set of practices and possibilities; though it always begins with what we experience at the movies, it is ultimately concerned with the wider world that we experience through the movies. Theorists to be examined include Munsterberg, Eisenstein, Burch, Kracauer, Balazs, Bazin, Altman, Gunning, Mulvey, Metz, Wollen, Havel, Benjamin, Pasolini, Deleuze and Jameson. (Note: English 470 and English 870 are the same course.) For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection. For the English graduate program, this course can count as an elective for the literary studies track, or a core course for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track. This course fulfills requirements toward the film studies minor.
1512 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1245 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
1223 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
1240 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
2195 AMST-340-01 Body in 19th C Am Culture 1.00 SEM Miller,Karen Li M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  We will explore representations of the body in relation to American identities, including controlling ethnic bodies through slavery and exotic exhibits, as well as defining gender ideals by conflating the female body with corsets and hysteria and the male with the "strong man" aesthetic. Although anxious about ill bodies in the tenements and disfigured ones in factories, Americans were also fascinated by the extremes of the human body as indicated by the popularity of sideshows, magicians, and miracle cures. Our materials will include literary texts, art studies, and popular media. We will discuss such writers and artists as Louisa May Alcott, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Mark Twain, Catherine Beecher, William Sydney Mount, John Gadsby Chapman, and Lily Martin Spencer.
2217 AMST-346-01 Sexuality Nation Race Gende 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course examines how cultural production generates and sustains “normalcy” and abnormality in a variety of representational arenas in the U.S., such as sites of cultural production (literature, drama, film, television, music, etc.), medical and educational institutions, and familial structures. It also considers how individual and intersecting diversities, such as sex, race, gender, and class, inform both representations and lived experience. To do this is to destabilize the line that separates normalcy from abnormalcy. In doing so we will denaturalize and critique the often invisible processes that determine who and what gets classified as “normal.” Where is the line drawn between inclusion and exclusion? Texts include: Helen Oyeyemi's Boy, Snow, Bird and Rosemarie Garland-Thomson's Staring: How We Look.
1861 JWST-223-01 American Jewish Lit Since 1865 1.00 LEC Pozorski,Aimee L. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course begins with a question: How would one characterize or define the tradition of American Jewish literature since 1865 – the period following the Civil War that also necessarily accounts for the first and second world wars, the polio and AIDS crises in America, U.S. responses to the Holocaust, and ongoing questions about how to balance assimilation with maintaining one’s ethnic identity in U.S. cities large and small. Through close reading of the works of eight canonical American Jewish writers (two poets, two short story writers, two dramatist, and two novelists), we will consider such questions as: What makes these works Jewish? What makes these works American? What makes these works literary?
2212 RHET-406-01 Composition Pedagogy 1.00 SEM O'Donnell,Tennyson L. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Language and literacy have always served as lightning rods for social and political issues, as well as for conflicts of theory and practice in education. This course will explore the contemporary teaching of writing, with attention to the range of current pedagogies in US colleges. We will examine influences of 20th-century revival of rhetoric, process and post-process writing, cultural and feminist studies, cognitive theory, the digital revolution, and the implications of "the global turn" for 21st-century students and teachers of writing. For undergraduate English majors, this course counts as an elective.
2215 WMGS-245-01 The Hollywood Musical 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Perhaps more than any other genre, the musical epitomized Hollywood’s “golden age.” This course traces the development of the enormously popular genre from its emergence at the beginning of the Great Depression to its decline amid the social upheavals of the 1960s. It pays particular attention to the genre’s queering of masculinity and femininity, as well as its relationship to camp modes of reception. Readings by Jane Feuer, Rick Altman, Richard Dyer, Janet Staiger, and Steven Cohan.