Course Schedule

Select a level: Select a term:
Only show courses available to first-year students.

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Course Schedule for ENGLISH - Spring 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
5047 ENGL-101-01 The Practice of Literature 1.00 LEC Rosen, David T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the critical reflection requirement.
  This course looks at the most fundamental, but also the most difficult, questions about literature: what is literature, exactly? How does literature help us understand the wider world, and what life-long skills does the reading of literature help us develop? Although these questions animate every English course, we all -- professors, students -- answer those questions differently. In this course, each member of the English Department faculty will visit to discuss how she or he approaches the most important questions about literature and interpretation. Expect disagreements, and be prepared, in a highly collaborative environment, to express your own strong views. Each year, our readings will be organized around a common theme, which each faculty participant will address. This spring's theme: Writing About the Self. For English majors, this course satisfies the critical reflection requirement.
4703 ENGL-105-01 Intro to Amer Lit II 1.00 LEC Mrozowski, Daniel TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  This course surveys major works of American literature after 1865, from literary reckonings with the Civil War and its tragic residues, to works of "realism" and "naturalism" that contended with the late 19th century’s rapid pace of social change, to the innovative works of the modern and postmodern eras. As we read works by authors such as Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, William Faulkner, and Toni Morrison, we will inquire: how have literary texts defined and redefined "America" and Americans? What are the means by which some groups have been excluded from the American community, and what are their experiences of that exclusion? And how do these texts shape our understanding of the unresolved problems of post-Civil War American democracy? For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
4093 ENGL-111-01 English Lit 1700-Present 1.00 LEC Bergren, Katherine MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  Through readings in novels, drama, poetry, and prose from the Restoration to the 20th century, this course will examine shifts in the forms, functions, and meanings of English literature in the context of cultural and historical changes. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
4918 ENGL-117-01 Intro African Amer Lit Part II 1.00 LEC Paulin, Diana TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  This course surveys African American literature in multiple genres from the 20th-century to the present. We will examine texts by both canonical and emergent writers, such as James Weldon Johnson, Angelina Weld Grimke, Jean Toomer, Nella Larsen, Langston Hughes, Zora Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Ann Petry, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Octavia Butler, Rita Dove, August Wilson, Alice Walker, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, and others. Our discussions/strategies for reading will be informed by relevant social, historical, and political contexts. In addition to discussing issues of race, nation formation, diasporic identities, class, gender, and sexuality, we will identify/trace recurring ideas/themes, as well as develop a theoretical language to facilitate thoughtful engagement with these works. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
4582 ENGL-260-01 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Hager, Christopher MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
4583 ENGL-260-02 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Bilston, Sarah TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
4584 ENGL-260-03 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Wyss, Hilary TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
4704 ENGL-265-01 Intro to Film Studies 1.00 LEC Younger, James MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM
M: 6:30PM-9:10PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration.
  NOTE: Evening meetings of this class are for film screening only.
  This course provides a general introduction to the study of film and focuses on the key terms and concepts used to describe and analyze the film experience. As we put this set of tools and methods in place, we will also explore different modes of film production (fictional narrative, documentary, experimental) and some of the critical issues and debates that have shaped the discipline of film studies (genre, auteurism, film aesthetics, ideology). Note: Evening meetings of this class are for film screenings only. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the film studies minor.
4186 ENGL-270-01 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Woodard, Benjamin MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4310 ENGL-270-02 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Libbey, Elizabeth F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4252 ENGL-270-03 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Davis, Susanne MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for Juniors, ten for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4358 ENGL-270-04 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Woodard, Benjamin MW: 6:30PM-7:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
5057 ENGL-272-01 American Auteurs 1.00 LEC Younger, James MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM
W: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  NOTE: Evening meeting time is for film viewings only.
  This course explores and celebrates the work of classic American film directors and constitutes an introduction to the critical methodology of the auteur theory. The directors to be examined are Samuel Fuller, Howard Hawks, and Alfred Hitchcock. After an introduction to various approaches to the auteur, we will use the work of Fuller, Hawks and Hitchcock to explore the history and creative potential of these approaches. Emphasis will be given to contemporary developments that integrate a focus on auteurs with the practices of experimental cinephilia and philosophy. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200 level elective. Evening meeting time is for film viewing only.
4919 ENGL-310-01 Postcolonial Literature&Theory 1.00 SEM Bergren, Katherine MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900, or a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This course provides an introduction to Anglophone literatures produced after decolonization. We will read postcolonial theory alongside novels, short stories, poetry, graphic novels, film, and drama in order to consider how these literatures represent issues of identity, nationalism, globalization, and race. The seminar will address the effects of literary form on these fraught representations, as well as the implications of approaching literature through the lens of “postcolonialism,” as opposed to globalization studies, World Literature, transnationalism, or the study of the Global South. Readings may include theory by Homi Bhabha, Franz Fanon, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak; and literature from Anglophone Africa, South Asia, Pacific Oceania, the Caribbean and the British Isles. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900, or a course emphasizing critical reflection.
4920 ENGL-322-01 Social Networks ofRomantic Era 1.00 SEM Bergren, Katherine MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
  Romantic-era writers like Percy Bysshe Shelley and William Wordsworth were deeply invested in the question of ‘genius,’ of how artistic inspiration chooses and works upon an individual. This investment has affected our conception of Romanticism, most obviously in our continued focus on the “big six” male poets as defining the era’s literary production. This course pivots away from Romantic individuality to approach the era through networks: friendship, collaboration, rivalry. Emphasizing the social nature of Romanticism, this course asks: How do relationships revise our ideas of Romantic authorship and authority? Is Romanticism still ‘Romantic’ when we emphasize connections over the myth of the individual genius? Readings will include works by the Wordsworths, Coleridge, Lamb, Wollstonecraft, Burke, Paine, Austen, the Shelleys, Polidori and Byron. This is a research-intensive seminar. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement o f a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
5122 ENGL-330-01 Sex, Violence, Substance Abuse 1.00 LEC Goldman, Francisco W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
  Some of the greatest and most lasting depictions of México in fiction, non-fiction, cinema and photography have been produced by non-Mexicans. Rather than exposing any lack of significant Mexican creators in all these genres, such works reflect the strong pull, the attraction and at times repulsion, exerted by this complicated country and culture on outsiders. We will choose readings from such twentieth and twenty-first century works such as John Reed's Insurgent México, Malcolm Lowry's Under the Volcano, DH Lawrence's The Plumed Serpent, Graham Greene's The Power and the Glory, the short-stories of Katherine Anne Porter and Paul Bowles, the novels of B. Traven, Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian, the poetic meditations on Pre-Colombian México by recent French Nobel Prize winner Le Clézio, the contemporary México novels of the Chilean Roberto Bolaño, and, in Ana Castillo’s fiction, a U.S. Chicana's return to México, as well as other contemporary writings. Movies will be chosen from among A Touch of Evil, The Treasure of Sierra Madre, The Wild Bunch, Bring me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, The Night of the Iguana, The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, and Sín Nombre. The emphasis will be on the prose, novels especially, with three or four movies, and a class devoted to photography. We study the works themselves, their relation to their own literary-cultural traditions, their depiction of México, and the multiple issues raised by their status as works created by "foreigners." Supplemental readings, some by Mexicans. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
4094 ENGL-334-01 Adv Cr Writing:Fiction 1.00 SEM Goldman, Francisco T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English creative writing concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
  Students will write and rewrite fiction. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. For English creative writing concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4187 ENGL-336-01 Adv Cr Writing:Poetry 1.00 SEM Berry, Ciaran TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writingconcentrators. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
  Students will do in-class exercises, and write and revise their own poems. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers. This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing concentrators.
4922 ENGL-343-01 Women and Empire 1.00 LEC Bilston, Sarah TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written post-1900.
  This course examines women’s involvement in British imperialism in the 19th and 20th centuries. What part did ideologies of femininity play in pro-imperialist discourse? In what ways did women writers attempt to "feminize" the imperialist project? What was the relationship between the emerging feminist movement and imperialism at the turn of the 20th century? How have women writers in both centuries resisted imperialist axiomatics? How do women authors from once-colonized countries write about the past? How are post-colonial women represented by contemporary writers? Authors to be studied include Charlotte Brontë, Flora Annie Steel, Rudyard Kipling, Jean Rhys, Jamaica Kincaid, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Alexander McCall Smith.
5177 ENGL-373-01 Irish Poetry Since Yeats 1.00 SEM Berry, Ciaran TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature after 1900 and a class that emphasizes poetry.
  We’ll consider the blossoming of Irish poetry in English since the foundation of the Irish Free State. Given his centrality to both the state and the art form, we’ll begin by considering the work of W.B. Yeats. From Yeats, we’ll move up through the 20th century, looking at work by Patrick Kavanagh, Louis MacNeice, John Montague, Seamus Heaney, Michael Longley, Paul Durcan, Eamon Grennan, Eavan Boland, Paul Muldoon, Ciaran Carson, Vona Groarke, and Sinéad Morrissey. We’ll consider the poems through the lens of Irish independence and cultural identity, the Troubles, tensions over religion and class, the urban/rural divide, and the place of women within the tradition. We will also consider the poems as aesthetic objects, governed by different schools and traditions within the art form, Irish or otherwise. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature after 1900 and a class that emphasizes poetry.
5154 ENGL-379-01 Melville 1.00 SEM Hager, Christopher MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
  Though a superstar during his early career, Herman Melville watched his reputation decline as his literary ambitions escalated. One review of his seventh novel bore the headline, "Herman Melville Crazy." Not until the 20th century did even his best-known work, Moby Dick, attract considerable attention, but it now stands at the center of the American literary pantheon. Melville's work merits intensive, semester-long study not only because he is a canonical author of diverse narratives—from maritime adventures to tortured romances to philosophical allegories—but also because his career and legacy themselves constitute a narrative of central concern to literary studies and American culture. Through reading and discussion of several of his major works, we will explore Melville's imagination, discover his work's historical context, and think critically about literary form. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is also research-intensive.
4924 ENGL-383-01 Modern British Fiction 1.00 LEC Rosen, David TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. It is research intensive.
  This is a course in British fiction between 1890 and 1945. The prose (novels and stories) of this period is characterized by tremendous ambition, radical experimentation, the questioning of old conventions and the creation of new ones. Authors will include Wilde, Conrad, Ford, Forster, Joyce, Woolf, and Beckett. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. It is research intensive.
4277 ENGL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of individual tutorials in topics not currently offered by the department. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
5169 ENGL-413-01 Native American Lit & Theory 1.00 SEM Wyss, Hilary T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: This seminar is research-intensive. For English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 requirement, or a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  We are currently in an extraordinary intellectual and artistic moment for Native American communities. In this course, we will turn our attention to forms of Native textual production from the colonial period to today. We will not only educate ourselves in the richness and variety of Native expression, we will also grapple with our assumptions about what constitutes Native American literature, using recent Native American scholarship to guide us. Along the way we will sample various forms of expression from origin stories to ledger drawings, poems, novels, autobiographies, and critical nonfiction. Our efforts in this class will be collaborative; while we will share core readings, you should expect to do several outside readings and class reports. This seminar is research-intensive. For English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 requirement, or a course emphasizing critical reflection.
4925 ENGL-418-01 17th Century Poetry 1.00 SEM Wheatley, Chloe TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This is a research-intensive seminar.
  The poets of the early modern period made their contribution to an English literary tradition against a dynamic context of religious, political, and social change. Poets studied in this course will include Lanyer, Jonson, Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, Marvell, Philips, Bradstreet, and Milton. English 418 and English 818 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This is a research-intensive seminar.
5168 ENGL-420-01 Shakespeare 1.00 SEM Fox, Liz R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This seminar is research-intensive. For English majors, it fulfills the requirement for an upper-level course in pre-1700 literature. Students who have taken English 351 may not receive credit for this course. English 420 and English 820 are the same course.
  In this course, we will focus on a selection of Shakespeare’s plays, from early comedies to later tragedies and romances. Students will gain a broad familiarity with Shakespearean texts and contexts, from the sixteenth century to the present, deepening their understanding of Shakespeare’s drama and its cultural significance through close examination of both primary and secondary sources, as well as film and stage adaptations. This seminar is research-intensive. For English majors, it fulfills the requirement for an upper-level course in pre-1700 literature.
5049 ENGL-421-01 1890's British Literature 1.00 SEM Bilston, Sarah M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written from 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
  The 1890s was a time of literary flourishing in the face of deep cultural and social anxiety. The British Empire was hovering on the edge of collapse; the fin de siècle was felt to be the end of an era. Yet even as some saw degeneration at hand, others saw opportunity, experimentation, rebellion, new beginnings. "New Women" posed a vocal threat to gender roles while Oscar Wilde and his fellow “decadents” asked a nation to rethink art and brought conversations about sexuality to the breakfast table. This course examines the literature, art, and culture of a remarkable decade. Students will read fiction, prose, poetry and drama, producing two research papers, several shorter papers, and an in-class research presentation. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written from 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
4278 ENGL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Students may assist professors as teaching assistants, performing a variety of duties usually involving assisting students in conceiving or revising papers; reading and helping to evaluate papers, quizzes, and exams; and other duties as determined by the student and instructor. See instructor of specific course for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4971 ENGL-496-01 Wordsworth.Rewrting Wordsworth 1.00 SEM Rosen, David R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a senior project. For non-seniors, the course can be taken to fulfill the "critical reflection" requirement.
  How does literature change over time? How do earlier writers exercise an influence, for good or ill, over their successors, and how do those later writers grapple with their most powerful forerunners? In this seminar, you will be invited to think in the abstract, theoretically, about these large questions, which have formed a subtext to your work in the major thus far. To focus our discussion, we will concentrate on Romantic and Modern poetry. In the first half, we will read through the major works of William Wordsworth, the most influential English language poet since (at the very least) Milton. Then, in the second half, we will look at how the greatest Modern poets, both British and American, struggled with Wordsworth's legacy – sometimes going so far as to rewrite specific Wordsworth poems, sometimes denying Wordsworth's importance altogether. Modernists will include Yeats, Frost, Eliot, Pound, Moore, Bishop, Stevens and Auden. In the final project, you will have the opportunity to apply our broader conclusions to your work in the major over the last four years. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a senior project. For non-seniors, the course can be taken to fulfill the "critical reflection" requirement.
4308 ENGL-497-01 One-Semester Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Individual tutorial in writing of a one-semester senior thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required.
4228 ENGL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Individual tutorial in the writing of a year-long thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Seniors writing year-long, two-credit theses are required to register for the second half of their thesis for the spring of their senior year. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
5170 ENGL-813-01 Native American Lit & Theory 1.00 SEM Wyss, Hilary T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  We are currently in an extraordinary intellectual and artistic moment for Native American communities. In this course, we will turn our attention to forms of Native textual production from the colonial period to today. We will not only educate ourselves in the richness and variety of Native expression, we will also grapple with our assumptions about what constitutes Native American literature, using recent Native American scholarship to guide us. Along the way we will sample various forms of expression from origin stories to ledger drawings, poems, novels, autobiographies, and critical nonfiction. Our efforts in this class will be collaborative; while we will share core readings, you should expect to do several outside readings and class reports. This seminar is research-intensive. For English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 requirement, or a course emphasizing critical reflection.
5167 ENGL-820-01 Shakespeare 1.00 SEM Fox, Liz R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  In this course, we will focus on a selection of Shakespeare’s plays, from early comedies to later tragedies and romances. Students will gain a broad familiarity with Shakespearean texts and contexts, from the sixteenth century to the present, deepening their understanding of Shakespeare’s drama and its cultural significance through close examination of both primary and secondary sources, as well as film and stage adaptations. This seminar is research-intensive. For English majors, it fulfills the requirement for an upper-level course in pre-1700 literature.
5050 ENGL-821-01 1890's British Literature 1.00 SEM Bilston, Sarah M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  The 1890s was a time of literary flourishing in the face of deep cultural and social anxiety. The British Empire was hovering on the edge of collapse; the fin de siècle was felt to be the end of an era. Yet even as some saw degeneration at hand, others saw opportunity, experimentation, rebellion, new beginnings. "New Women" posed a vocal threat to gender roles while Oscar Wilde and his fellow “decadents” asked a nation to rethink art and brought conversations about sexuality to the breakfast table. This course examines the literature, art, and culture of a remarkable decade. Students will read fiction, prose, poetry and drama, producing two research papers, several shorter papers, and an in-class research presentation. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written from 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
4404 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4247 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
4227 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4242 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
4625 WMGS-345-01 Film Noir 1.00 SEM Corber, Robert T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective.
  This course traces the development of film noir, a distinctive style of Hollywood filmmaking inspired by the hardboiled detective fiction of Dashiell Hammett, James Cain, and Raymond Chandler. It pays particular attention to the genre’s complicated gender and sexual politics. In addition to classic examples of film noir, the course also considers novels by Hammett, Cain, and Chandler.