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Course Schedule for ENGLISH - Spring 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
4953 ENGL-105-01 Intro to Amer Lit II 1.00 LEC Mrozowski,Daniel J. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  This course surveys major works of American literature after 1865, from literary reckonings with the Civil War and its tragic residues, to works of "realism" and "naturalism" that contended with the late 19th century’s rapid pace of social change, to the innovative works of the modern and postmodern eras. As we read works by authors such as Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, William Faulkner, and Toni Morrison, we will inquire: how have literary texts defined and redefined "America" and Americans? What are the means by which some groups have been excluded from the American community, and what are their experiences of that exclusion? And how do these texts shape our understanding of the unresolved problems of post-Civil War American democracy? For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
4093 ENGL-111-01 English Lit 1700-Present 1.00 LEC Benedict,Barbara M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  Through readings in novels, drama, poetry, and prose from the Restoration to the 20th century, this course will examine shifts in the forms, functions, and meanings of English literature in the context of cultural and historical changes. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
4966 ENGL-208-01 From Epic to X-Box:Narr Histry 1.00 LEC Henton,Alice M.H. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  This course looks at the way narrative techniques have changed over time and across various media: it begins with Old English Epics and concludes with digital games. How, we will ask, has the experience of narratives and fictional characters varied across time and forms? In what ways has it stayed constant? How have we gotten from stories about Beowulf to games featuring Master Chief, or the Hero of Ferelden? How, precisely, do we interact with stories and storytelling? How do these interactions change, or not change, when narrative becomes interactive, something one can "play" as opposed to "watch" or "hear" or "read?" To think about these questions, we will examine a variety of narratives and explore a number of narrative theories. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
4680 ENGL-260-01 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
4681 ENGL-260-02 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Hager,Christopher TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
4682 ENGL-260-03 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Benedict,Barbara M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
4683 ENGL-260-04 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
4954 ENGL-265-01 Intro to Film Studies 1.00 LEC Younger,James Prakash TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM
T: 6:30PM-9:10PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration.
  NOTE: Evening meetings of this class are for film screening only.
  This course provides a general introduction to the study of film and focuses on the key terms and concepts used to describe and analyze the film experience. As we put this set of tools and methods in place, we will also explore different modes of film production (fictional narrative, documentary, experimental) and some of the critical issues and debates that have shaped the discipline of film studies (genre, auteurism, film aesthetics, ideology). Note: Evening meetings of this class are for film screenings only. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the film studies minor.
4194 ENGL-270-01 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Berry,Ciaran M. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4323 ENGL-270-02 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Ferriss,Lucy MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4263 ENGL-270-03 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rutherford,Ethan TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for Juniors, ten for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4374 ENGL-270-04 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Libbey,Elizabeth B. F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4771 ENGL-300-01 Shaping the World 1.00 SEM Rutherford,Ethan TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course is open to students wishing to fulfill their 200-level elective requirements under petition.
  How do you get from that first scribbled note to the final draft of a story or poem? How do you use the work of other writers as a source of inspiration, a jumping off point? In this course we’ll analyze the craft of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. We’ll read and discuss important recent works in all three genres as well as a mixture of essays, interviews, and articles on craft issues and the writing life. Each week we’ll turn over a different topic, looking at how one aspect of craft operates across these genres. Students will respond to the readings and discussions via papers, creative work, and group work. We’ll also engage established writers in our conversations through class visits and Skype sessions. For English majors, this course is open to students wishing to fulfill their 200-level elective requirements under petition.
4581 ENGL-301-01 From Aristotle to Queer Theory 1.00 LEC Benedict,Barbara M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This course explores the different ways in which literature has been—and can be—interpreted and justified. Students will read critical theories from Platonism to feminism and queer theory, and will apply these theories to selected texts by Shakespeare, Keats, Austen, Conrad, and others in order to define their own literary theory. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
4955 ENGL-320-01 Contemporary Americans 1.00 LEC Berry,Ciaran M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course fulfills the requirement of a course emphasizing poetry and/or a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
  This course will focus on important individual collections of contemporary or near-contemporary American poetry. Rather than scanning a selected or collected volume for highlights, we'll look at poems in their original context, considering the single volume as a unified project (a concept increasingly important to contemporary poets) rather than simply a gathering of miscellaneous pieces. Working at a rate of roughly one poet/collection per week, we'll consider classics such as Louise Glück's The Wild Iris, C.K. Williams's Tar, Philip Levine's What Work Is, Yusef Komunyakaa's Magic City, and Jorie Graham's Erosion. We will also consider at least one very recently published collection and one first or near-to-first book. These readings will be supplemented by some theory on the state of contemporary poetry from both poets and critics. For English majors, this course would fulfill the requirement of a course emphasizing poetry and/or a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
5034 ENGL-329-01 Civil War Literature 1.00 SEM Hager,Christopher TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written from 1700-1900, and a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course is research intensive.
  In this course, we will learn about the literary culture of the Civil War era (by reading Louisa May Alcott, Rebecca Harding Davis, Herman Melville, and Walt Whitman, among others) and also consider broader questions about how we read, value, and remember literary works. What makes a text "Civil War literature"? Must it have been written during the U.S. Civil War, or about events of that war, or by a person who participated in the war? And do we understand literature differently when we organize it around a historical event rather than forms, genres, or authors? We will engage with the most recent scholarship on the subject and converse (in person or via Skype) with some of the nation's leading experts on Civil War literature.
4094 ENGL-334-01 Adv Cr Writing:Fiction 1.00 SEM Goldman,Francisco T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing concentrators.
  Students will write and rewrite fiction. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. For English creative writing concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4956 ENGL-335-01 Literary Nonfiction Narrative 1.00 SEM Goldman,Francisco W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
  This workshop explores the form of writing that combines the craft of fiction writing with the skills and practices of the journalist. We will read some of the foremost 20th-century and contemporary practitioners of this form of writing (V.S. Naipaul, Joseph Mitchell, Joan Didion, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Ryszard Kapuscinski, Rory Stewart, Alma Guillermoprieto, Susan Orlean, Jon Lee Anderson, etc., and selections from some of their important precursors: Stephen Crane, Jose Marti) and discuss, often, the form's complex relation to literary fiction, the tensions and difference between journalism and imaginative works, and so on. The workshop will begin with practical writing assignments: first paragraphs, setting, character, how to develop meaning, short pieces, etc., with the final goal being to produce a New Yorker magazine-like (in length and craft) piece using some aspect of the city of Hartford. NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of an elective. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
4195 ENGL-336-01 Adv Cr Writing:Poetry 1.00 SEM Berry,Ciaran M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writingconcentrators. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
  Students will do in-class exercises, and write and revise their own poems. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers. This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing concentrators.
4957 ENGL-346-01 Dream Vision and Romance 1.00 LEC Fisher,Sheila M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: for English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
  A study of two major medieval genres as they are developed in the works of Chaucer, Langland, the Gawain-poet, and Malory. The course will explore the structural and stylistic as well as the political, social, and psychological issues raised by these genres and the individual authors' treatments of them. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
4958 ENGL-360-01 Shakespeare on Film 1.00 SEM Riggio,Milla C. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course is not open to first-year students.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. For literature and film concentrators, this course fulfills the requirement of an advanced course toward the major, and counts as a course in literature and film. This course is research-intensive.
  In this course, we will study selected films based on Shakespeare plays. Though we will read the Shakespeare plays as prelude to film analysis, the films will be studied as independent texts. The film script (adapted from or based on a Shakespeare play) will be treated as one aspect of the text. Students will concentrate on analyzing camera angles, mise-en-scène, lighting, sound, editing, and script as aspects of a composite text. We will also discuss film genres and look at the signature work of specific directors, such as Laurence Olivier and Kenneth Branagh. Plays may be selected from Titus Andronicus, Hamlet, Much Ado About Nothing, Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, The Taming of the Shrew, and King Lear. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. For literature and film concentrators, this course fulfills the requirement of an advanced course toward the major, and counts as a course in literature and film. This course is research-intensive.
4289 ENGL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of individual tutorials in topics not currently offered by the department. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4959 ENGL-424-01 Reading Victorian Narratives 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: This is a hybrid English course. English 424 and English 824 are the same course. Enrollment is set at 15: 7 undergrads, 8 graduates. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research intensive.
  This course offers an advanced investigation into major writers and issues from the British Victorian period (1837-1901). We will concentrate on texts—fiction, non-fictional prose, poetry—in which notions of propriety and morality are in productive dialogue with crimes, threatening secrets, and subversive passions. In seminar sessions and in written work we will interrogate textual constructions of sexuality and gender, considering the potential for slippage between high-conservative ideals and actual lived experiences. Our readings will be informed by a range of modern critical, theoretical, and socio-historical examinations of Victorian literature and culture. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature between 1700-1900. It is research intensive.
4960 ENGL-439-16 The Documentary 1.00 SEM Riggio,Milla C. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: English 439-16 and English 839-12 are the same course. Enrollment limit is 15: 7 undergraduates/8 graduates. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement, or a core course for the literature and film concentration. This course is research-intensive.
  Documentary films chronicle varied cultural, social, and political realities, from coal miners’ strikes and social revolutions to the development of musical genres. Documentary styles range from fictionalized recreations (docudramas) to narrative reenactments to non-narrative commentaries. This course will examine key documentary strategies through representative films, which may include Harlan County USA (Barbara Kopple, 1976) and Shut Up and Sing (Kopple and Cecilia Peck, 2006), Journalist and the Jihadi: The Murder of Daniel Pearl (Ahmad Jamal and Ramesh Sharma, 2006): segments of The Battle of Algiers, Poto Mitan: Haitian Women, Pillars of the Global Economy (Renee Bergan and Mark Schuller), Jazz (selected episodes) (Ken Burns, 2001), Say Amen, Somebody (George Nierenberg, 1982), An Inconvenient Truth (Davis Guggenheim, 2008), and Fair Game (Doug Liman, 2010). Note: English 439-16 and English 839-12 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement, or a core course for the literature and film concentration.
5032 ENGL-447-01 Serials 1.00 SEM Henton,Alice M.H. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: English 447 and English 847 are the same course. Enrollment is set at 15: 7 undergraduates / 8 graduates.
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course emphasizes critical reflection.
  NOTE: This course is research-intensive.
  Where most of the literature we encounter has a clear beginning, middle, and end, serial literature is open-ended and potentially infinite. What exactly is so fascinating about the prospect of “one story, told piece by piece?” In this course, we will examine American serials, beginning with early-18th and 19th-century magazine novels and ending with Sarah Koenig’s 21st-century podcast phenomenon, Serial. As we look at the various incarnations of serialized texts, we’ll think about their implications with the help of narrative theory. What exactly does the term serial imply? A genre? A technique? What accounts for the popularity of serialized texts? What might the next iteration look like? It is research-intensive. For English majors, this course emphasizes critical reflection.
5168 ENGL-451-01 Queer Harlem Renaissance 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course approaches the Harlem Renaissance or "the New Negro" Movement through the lens of sexuality, paying particular attention to the ways in which understandings of racial identity were filtered through representations of sex and gender. We will consider how writers of the Harlem Renaissance explored notions of sexuality and gender given the history of slavery and exploitation that generated rigid formulations of race and gender. How did cultural producers challenge, reinforce, question and imagine sexuality and its intersection with other aspects of identity, such as class, gender, and national origins. Writers/artists include, Wallace Thurman, Carl Van Vechten, Bessie Smith, Angelina Weld Grimke, Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Langston Hughes, and Bruce Nugent.
5033 ENGL-461-01 World Cinema Auteurs 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash T: 6:30PM-9:10PM
M: 6:30PM-9:10PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: This advanced undergraduate / graduate hybrid course - while not required, some prior experience with film analysis, film theory, or World Cinema is strongly recommended.
  NOTE: English 461 and English 861 are the same course. Monday evening meetings of the class are for film screenings only.
  NOTE: This course is research intensive. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
  This advanced course offers an in-depth exploration of the work of major auteur-directors from the domain of World Cinema, cinema from countries other than the United States or Europe. Three or four auteurs grouped by country, region or culture (e.g. Japan, India, Iran, Brazil, West Africa, or the Three Chinas: PRC, Hong Kong, and Taiwan) will be examined in their aesthetic, cultural and geo-political dimensions using the cutting-edge new methodologies of comparative and experimental cinephilia. Note: This advanced undergraduate/graduate hybrid course - while not required, some prior experience with film analysis, film theory, or World Cinema is strongly recommended. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research-intensive.
4290 ENGL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Students may assist professors as teaching assistants, performing a variety of duties usually involving assisting students in conceiving or revising papers; reading and helping to evaluate papers, quizzes, and exams; and other duties as determined by the student and instructor. See instructor of specific course for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4691 ENGL-496-01 Sem: What You Should Have Read 1.00 SEM Fisher,Sheila M. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open to senior English majors only.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a senior seminar.
  This is your final semester as an English major, and this senior seminar will provide you with an opportunity to reflect back on the intellectual paths you have and have not taken. What texts do you consider true classics, but have not yet read? This course will give you a chance to address those perceived gaps in your literary education, as students in the course will generate the primary reading list. What has led you to think of these specific works as central to the study of English literature? In addition to our list of selected classics, we will read critical essays that discuss issues of canonicity, the history of the English major, and the fate of literature (and literary study) in this latest "information age." Writing requirements will include weekly responses to assigned reading, class presentations, and a longer seminar paper. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a senior seminar.
4321 ENGL-497-01 One-Semester Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Individual tutorial in writing of a one-semester senior thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required.
4237 ENGL-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Individual tutorial in the writing of a year-long thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Seniors writing year-long, two-credit theses are required to register for the second half of their thesis for the spring of their senior year. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
5159 ENGL-824-01 Reading Victorian Narratives 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: English 424 and English 824 are the same course.
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature between 1700-1900.
  NOTE: This is a research intensive course.
  This course offers an advanced investigation into major writers and issues from the British Victorian period (1837-1901). We will concentrate on texts—fiction, non-fictional prose, poetry—in which notions of propriety and morality are in productive dialogue with crimes, threatening secrets, and subversive passions. In seminar sessions and in written work we will interrogate textual constructions of sexuality and gender, considering the potential for slippage between high-conservative ideals and actual lived experiences. Our readings will be informed by a range of modern critical, theoretical, and socio-historical examinations of Victorian literature and culture. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature between 1700-1900. It is research intensive.
5160 ENGL-839-12 The Documentary 1.00 SEM Riggio,Milla C. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: English439-16 and English 839012 are the same course.
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement , or a core course for the literature and film concentration.
  NOTE: This is a research intensive course.
  Documentary films chronicle varied cultural, social, and political realities, from coal miners’ strikes and social revolutions to the development of musical genres. Documentary styles range from fictionalized recreations (docudramas) to narrative reenactments to non-narrative commentaries. This course will examine key documentary strategies through representative films, which may include Harlan County USA (Barbara Kopple, 1976) and Shut Up and Sing (Kopple and Cecilia Peck, 2006), Journalist and the Jihadi: The Murder of Daniel Pearl (Ahmad Jamal and Ramesh Sharma, 2006): segments of The Battle of Algiers, Poto Mitan: Haitian Women, Pillars of the Global Economy (Renee Bergan and Mark Schuller), Jazz (selected episodes) (Ken Burns, 2001), Say Amen, Somebody (George Nierenberg, 1982), An Inconvenient Truth (Davis Guggenheim, 2008), and Fair Game (Doug Liman, 2010). Note: English 439-16 and English 839-12 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement, or a core course for the literature and film concentration.
5161 ENGL-847-01 Serials 1.00 SEM Henton,Alice M.H. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: English 447 and English 847 are the same course.
  NOTE: for undergraduate English majors, this course emphasizes critical reflection.
  NOTE: This is a research intensive course.
  Where most of the literature we encounter has a clear beginning, middle, and end, serial literature is open-ended and potentially infinite. What exactly is so fascinating about the prospect of “one story, told piece by piece?” In this course, we will examine American serials, beginning with early-18th and 19th-century magazine novels and ending with Sarah Koenig’s 21st-century podcast phenomenon, Serial. As we look at the various incarnations of serialized texts, we’ll think about their implications with the help of narrative theory. What exactly does the term serial imply? A genre? A technique? What accounts for the popularity of serialized texts? What might the next iteration look like? It is research-intensive. For English majors, this course emphasizes critical reflection.
5162 ENGL-861-01 World Cinema Auteurs 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash T: 6:30PM-9:10PM
M: 6:30PM-9:10PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: English 461 and English 861 are the same course.
  NOTE: This is an advanced undergraduate/graduate hybrid course - while not required, some prior experience with film analysis, film theory, or World Cinema is strongly recommended.
  NOTE: Evening meetings of this class are for film screenings only.
  NOTE: For undergraduate English major, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
  NOTE: This is a research intensive course.
  This advanced course offers an in-depth exploration of the work of major auteur-directors from the domain of World Cinema, cinema from countries other than the United States or Europe. Three or four auteurs grouped by country, region or culture (e.g. Japan, India, Iran, Brazil, West Africa, or the Three Chinas: PRC, Hong Kong, and Taiwan) will be examined in their aesthetic, cultural and geo-political dimensions using the cutting-edge new methodologies of comparative and experimental cinephilia. Note: This advanced undergraduate/graduate hybrid course - while not required, some prior experience with film analysis, film theory, or World Cinema is strongly recommended. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research-intensive.
4426 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4258 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
4236 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4253 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
5029 AMST-264-01 Representations of Autism(s) 1.00 LEC Paulin,Diana R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  With increased visibility and diagnosis rates (1 in 50), autism spectrum disorders constitute a vital part of our nation’s fabric. Because it crosses boundaries, regardless of ethnicity, race, or socioeconomic status and because of its pervasiveness, a critical study of autism representations provides an instructive site for exploring overlapping commonalities and differences in U.S. culture. We will consider how shifting definitions of disability/ability contribute to our understanding of central values/beliefs, such as normalcy, success, humanity, and progress. How do representations and lived experiences frame our society’s understanding of identity, community, citizenship, agency, equality and humanity? Texts include fiction, memoir, film, poetry, print news, periodicals, legal documents, theoretical articles, television, internet media. Some titles include, Rainman and Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime.
4800 WMGS-345-01 Film Noir 1.00 SEM Corber,Robert J. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective.
  This course traces the development of film noir, a distinctive style of Hollywood filmmaking inspired by the hardboiled detective fiction of Dashiell Hammett, James Cain, and Raymond Chandler. It pays particular attention to the genre’s complicated gender and sexual politics. In addition to classic examples of film noir, the course also considers novels by Hammett, Cain, and Chandler.