Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for ENGLISH - Fall 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3083 ENGL-104-01 Intro Amer Literature-I 1.00 LEC Hager,Christopher TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  NOTE: 15 spaces are reserved for first-year students, 2 seats for HMTCA students.
  This course introduces students to American literature before 1865 by surveying a wide range of texts-some very famous, some little-known-written by and about people living in the present-day United States, from the earliest Europeans' arrival in the Americas until the time of the U.S. Civil War. The course will trace political, intellectual, and social developments as they interacted with literary culture. Students will both acquire knowledge of American cultural history and develop skills of literary analysis. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
2116 ENGL-110-01 Survey of Engl Literature I 1.00 LEC Wheatley,Chloe TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-years, 2 seats for HMTCA students.
  Through selected readings in works from the Anglo-Saxon period to the late 17th century, this course will study the development of English literature in the context of stylistic, cultural, and historical changes and influences. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
3529 ENGL-209-01 Prison Literature 1.00 LEC Fisher,Sheila M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course examines texts, both fictional and non-fictional, written about and often in prison. While the course covers a variety of genres and historical periods, the common thread linking all the texts is that their authors were or are incarcerated. Through the works of canonical and non-canonical writers such as Thoreau, Wilde, King, Mandela, Davis, Horton, and currently incarcerated women and men, we will explore how the experience of imprisonment influences the individual, and his or her family, community, and society and raises questions about freedom, transgression, and human rights. This course will have a community learning component and will introduce students to some of the writers whose works we will be studying. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
2709 ENGL-260-01 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2710 ENGL-260-02 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2711 ENGL-260-03 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Wyss,Hilary E. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
3389 ENGL-260-04 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2337 ENGL-270-01 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Berry,Ciaran M. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2697 ENGL-270-02 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rossini,Clare M. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2338 ENGL-270-03 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rossini,Clare M. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first-year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2401 ENGL-270-04 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Libbey,Elizabeth B. F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
3436 ENGL-305-01 Evolution of the Western Film 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM
W: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research intensive.
  NOTE: Evening meeting time is for screenings only.
  The course examines how the Western genre emerged from global popular culture at the end of the 19th century to become one of the most powerful and complex forms for expressing the experience of Modernity. After careful consideration of the political and philosophical implications of the Western, we will track the development of the genre as it responds to the ideological contradictions and cultural tensions of 20th-century American history, focusing on broad trends within the mainstream, the contributions of individual directors, and the global dissemination of generic elements. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. Evening meeting time is for screenings only. This course is research intensive.
2344 ENGL-334-01 Adv Cr Writing:Fiction 1.00 SEM Davis,Susanne M. TBA TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing majors.
  Students will write and rewrite fiction. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. For English creative writing concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2838 ENGL-345-01 Chaucer 1.00 LEC Fisher,Sheila M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700.
  NOTE: This course is research intensive.
  A study of The Canterbury Tales and related writings in the context of late medieval conceptions of society, God, love, and marriage. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
3414 ENGL-355-01 Narratives of Disability 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research-intensive.
  This course introduces students to the ways in which disability has been used to represent both "normalcy" and extraordinariness in literature. We will consider how "tales told by idiots," as framed in Shakespeare's Hamlet, often supply the unique and insightful perspective that mainstream characters cannot see, hear, or experience because of their own limitations. We will look at how the notion of disability has been aligned with other aspects of identity, such as Charles Chesnutt's representation of race as a disability in his turn of the century literature or of slaves using performances of disability to escape from the horrid institution during the 19th-century. We will read a variety of genres, fiction, memoir, and some literary criticism to come to a clearer understanding of the ways in which the meaning of disability and its representation in a variety of texts echoes a broader set of beliefs and practices in the U.S. For English majors this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research-intensive.
3552 ENGL-377-01 The Revolutionary Generations 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
  Hannah Arendt suggested that the United States failed to remember its revolutionary tradition because it failed to talk about it. This course will recover those memories by reading the texts that founded the American rebellion, the writings produced in the aftermath of independence, and the creative works crafted in the wake of revolution. Our focus will be on the literature from 1740 until 1820 that struggled to define ways of being in the world that seemed specifically American; therefore, we will look beyond the context of New England to consider the roles played by Africa and the Caribbean in the cultural imagination, and we will trace how social class, race, and gender inflected the output of American writers in a post-1776 world. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.This course is research-intensive.
3415 ENGL-387-01 Ben Jonson and His World 1.00 LEC Wheatley,Chloe WF: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course fulfills the requirement for a pre-1700 course. This seminar is research-intensive.
  This course will focus on the life and works of Ben Jonson (1572-1637). Rivaling his fellow-playwright William Shakespeare in his comic artistry (and far surpassing Shakespeare in his explicit representation of life in early modern London), Jonson worked in court, playhouse, and printing house to make a name for himself as England's first poet laureate. The study of his plays, poems, and masques provides insight into the dynamics of social and political change that were shaping early modern English society; study of Jonson's critical reception in turn illuminates key facets of an English literary tradition. We will be reading a range of works by Jonson, poems by the self-identified "Sons of Ben," and contemporary critical commentaries by scholars, poets, and directors. For English majors, this course fulfills the requirement for a pre-1700 course. This seminar is research-intensive.
2295 ENGL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of individual tutorials in topics not currently offered by the department. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3127 ENGL-401-01 Intro to Literary Theory 1.00 SEM Rosen,David T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: English 401 and English 801 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This seminar is designed to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text.
3416 ENGL-448-01 Plants in Literature and Film 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: English 448 and English 848 are the same course. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
  This course engages with the plant world through novels, poetry, philosophy, comics, and film. We will track major trends in the human understanding of plants, beginning in the late eighteenth century-when poets were eager to consider the line between the plant and animal kingdoms-and ending in the twentieth century-when popular culture was more likely to categorize plants as monstrous and 'other.' In rethinking the being and meaning of plants we will necessarily revisit the idea of 'the human' and 'the animal,' employing these categories while attending to borderline cases where their utility falters. Readings will focus on Romantic-era texts by Erasmus Darwin, William Cowper, Charlotte Smith, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Austen, before turning to horror films like "Little Shop of Horrors," "Invasion of the Body Snatchers," "The Thing From Another World," "The Happening" and "The Ruins." English 448 and English 848 are the same course. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
2232 ENGL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Students may assist professors as teaching assistants, performing a variety of duties usually involving assisting students in conceiving or revising papers; reading and helping to evaluate papers, quizzes, and exams; and other duties as determined by the student and instructor. See instructor of specific course for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3417 ENGL-470-01 Film Theory: An Introduction 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course fulfills requirements toward the film studies minor. Film screenings to be discussed at the first class meeting.
  This course introduces the most important theoretical models which have been used to explain how films function as art, ideology, language, history, politics and philosophy. Some theorists are mainly concerned with the aesthetic potentials of the cinema: How do categories such as realism, authorship and genre explain and enhance our experience of films? Other theorists are focused on the relations between films and the societies that produce them, or on general processes of spectatorship: How do Hollywood films address their audiences? How do narrative structures shape our responses to fictional characters? As the variety of these questions suggests, film theory opens onto a wide set of practices and possibilities; though it always begins with what we experience at the movies, it is ultimately concerned with the wider world that we experience through the movies. Theorists to be examined include Munsterberg, Eisenstein, Burch, Kracauer, Balazs, Bazin, Altman, Gunning, Mulvey, Metz, Wollen, Havel, Benjamin, Pasolini, Deleuze and Jameson. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course fulfills requirements toward the film studies minor. Film screenings to be discussed at the first class meeting.
3646 ENGL-474-01 Race & Realism: African-Am Lit 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written post-1900.
  Coming of age in the ruins of Reconstruction, the encroachment of Jim Crow laws, and waves of great migration, African American writers of the early 20th century shaped American literature in powerful and often-forgotten ways. Their texts, published in the decades before the Harlem Renaissance, offer an opportunity to consider how people produce literature under the pressures of structural racism; how art might respond to the terrorism of state sanctioned violence; how genres might stretch to articulate the psychological complexities of social and self identities; and how writers appeal to audiences, construct communities, forge friendships, and speak truth to power, despite institutional ambivalence and resistance to their voices. Course readings will come from Charles Chesnutt, Pauline Hopkins, Alice Dunbar Nelson, WEB Du Bois and others. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written post-1900.
2339 ENGL-492-01 Fiction Workshop 1.00 SEM Ferriss,Lucy R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270 and one of the following English 333, 334, 335, 336, 441, Theater and Dance 305, or Theater and Dance 393.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing majors. One requirement of the class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers and an advanced creative writing workshop.
  Advanced seminar in the writing of fiction. Class discussions devoted primarily to the analysis of student fiction, with some attention to examples of contemporary short stories. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop. This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing concentrators, and a senior project.
2340 ENGL-494-01 Poetry Workshop 1.00 SEM Berry,Ciaran M. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270 and one of the following English 333, 334, 335, 336, 441, Theater and Dance 305, or Theater and Dance 393.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing majors. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop.
  Advanced seminar in the writing of poetry. Class discussions devoted primarily to the analysis of student work, with some attention to examples of contemporary poetry. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop. This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing concentrators, and a senior project.
3467 ENGL-495-01 Senior Seminar: Being Literate 1.00 SEM Hager,Christopher M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course is open to senior English majors only.
  After you graduate with a degree in English, you will head in many directions, pursuing many careers and devoting your lives to diverse passions. But you will be all alike in at least one respect: you will be really well-read, fit for decades of capacious reading and writing. This seminar challenges you to prepare for your future as a highly-educated citizen by exploring what it means to be literate. We will study theories of literacy; patterns in the cultural history of literacy and illiteracy, intellectualism and anti-intellectualism; and literary texts that turn on verbal ability, bookishness, and the life of the mind. Students' final assignment will involve a deeply researched analysis of a literary text they consider pertinent to their own future.
2239 ENGL-497-01 One-Semester Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Individual tutorial in writing of a one-semester senior thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required.
3270 ENGL-498-01 Sr Thesis Part 1/Sr Colloquim 2.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is designed to teach senior English majors the techniques of research and analysis needed for writing a year-long essay on a subject of their choice. It is intended to help the students to write such year-long theses, and to encourage them to do so. It will deal with problems such as designing longer papers, focusing topics, developing and limiting bibliographies, working with manuscripts, using both library and Internet resources, and understanding the uses of theoretical paradigms. This course is required of all senior English majors who are planning to write two-semester, year-long theses. Please refer to the department's website for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
3126 ENGL-801-01 Intro to Literary Theory 1.00 SEM Rosen,David T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students pursuing the thesis capstone.
  This seminar is designed to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text.
3468 ENGL-848-01 Plants in Literature and Film 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: English 448 and English 848 are the same course.
  This course engages with the plant world through novels, poetry, philosophy, comics, and film. We will track major trends in the human understanding of plants, beginning in the late eighteenth century-when poets were eager to consider the line between the plant and animal kingdoms-and ending in the twentieth century-when popular culture was more likely to categorize plants as monstrous and 'other.' In rethinking the being and meaning of plants we will necessarily revisit the idea of 'the human' and 'the animal,' employing these categories while attending to borderline cases where their utility falters. Readings will focus on Romantic-era texts by Erasmus Darwin, William Cowper, Charlotte Smith, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Austen, before turning to horror films like "Little Shop of Horrors," "Invasion of the Body Snatchers," "The Thing From Another World," "The Happening" and "The Ruins." English 448 and English 848 are the same course. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
3534 ENGL-870-01 Film Theory: An Introduction 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course introduces the most important theoretical models which have been used to explain how films function as art, ideology, language, history, politics and philosophy. Some theorists are mainly concerned with the aesthetic potentials of the cinema: How do categories such as realism, authorship and genre explain and enhance our experience of films? Other theorists are focused on the relations between films and the societies that produce them, or on general processes of spectatorship: How do Hollywood films address their audiences? How do narrative structures shape our responses to fictional characters? As the variety of these questions suggests, film theory opens onto a wide set of practices and possibilities; though it always begins with what we experience at the movies, it is ultimately concerned with the wider world that we experience through the movies. Theorists to be examined include Munsterberg, Eisenstein, Burch, Kracauer, Balazs, Bazin, Altman, Gunning, Mulvey, Metz, Wollen, Havel, Benjamin, Pasolini, Deleuze and Jameson. (Note: English 470 and English 870 are the same course.) For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400-level elective, or a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course fulfills requirements toward the film studies minor.
3647 ENGL-874-01 Race & Realism: African-Am Lit 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Coming of age in the ruins of Reconstruction, the encroachment of Jim Crow laws, and waves of great migration, African American writers of the early 20th century shaped American literature in powerful and often-forgotten ways. Their texts, published in the decades before the Harlem Renaissance, offer an opportunity to consider how people produce literature under the pressures of structural racism; how art might respond to the terrorism of state sanctioned violence; how genres might stretch to articulate the psychological complexities of social and self identities; and how writers appeal to audiences, construct communities, forge friendships, and speak truth to power, despite institutional ambivalence and resistance to their voices. Course readings will come from Charles Chesnutt, Pauline Hopkins, Alice Dunbar Nelson, WEB Du Bois and others. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written post-1900.
2177 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2179 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2367 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2762 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
2178 ENGL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2057 HMTS-112-01 Homer in Antiquity 1.00 LEC Tomasso,Vincent E. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA FYR2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Only students in the Humanities Gateway program are allowed to enroll in this course.
  NOTE: Course is only open to students who have been accepted into the Guided Studies Program.
  NOTE: This course will meet the requirement in the English major for a 200 level elective.
  This course focuses on Homer's Iliad, one of the most famous texts of the western world. This epic poem, which narrates episodes from near the end of the ten-year long Trojan War, influenced cultures throughout antiquity, far beyond its original historical and cultural context. In this course, we will look at the Iliad and how and why later Greeks and Romans used and transformed it, including the Athenian playwright Euripides in his tragedy Hecabe; the Battle of Frogs and Mice, an animal fable that satirizes the Iliad; Virgil's Aeneid, a foundation epic of ancient Rome from the ashes of Troy; and the imperial Greek orator Dio Chrysostom's contentious Oration 11 that claims that Homer was wrong and the Trojans actually won the war.
2408 RHET-302-01 Writing Theories and Practices 1.00 LEC O'Donnell,Tennyson L. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective.
  This course investigates the theories and practices of writing consultation in North American university writing centers as informed by studies in composition pedagogy, literacy, and rhetoric. Students will be introduced to the broad range of topics found at the intersection of practice and theory in writing centers, including socio-cultural dynamics, grammar instruction, English as a Second Language, learning disorders, critical reading, writing processes, and interpersonal communication. The course will encourage students to create new knowledge about writing and tutor research. By invitation only. For students admitted to the Writing Associates Program.
3452 THDN-393-01 Playwrights Workshop 1.00 SEM Preston,Michael MW: 3:30PM-4:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  Prerequisite: At least one theater and dance course or permission of instructor.
  An introduction to different styles and techniques of playwrighting through the study of selected plays from various world theater traditions. Assignments and exercises will lead to the development of short plays scripted by students.
3051 WMGS-245-01 The Hollywood Musical 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  Perhaps more than any other genre, the musical epitomized Hollywood’s “golden age.” This course traces the development of the enormously popular genre from its emergence at the beginning of the Great Depression to its decline amid the social upheavals of the 1960s. It pays particular attention to the genre’s queering of masculinity and femininity, as well as its relationship to camp modes of reception. Readings by Jane Feuer, Rick Altman, Richard Dyer, Janet Staiger, and Steven Cohan.
3658 WMGS-335-01 Mapping American Masculinities 1.00 SEM Corber,Robert J. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course examines the construction of masculinity in American society starting with Theodore Roosevelt’s call at the turn of the twentieth century for men to revitalize the nation by pursuing the “strenuous life." Through close readings of literary and filmic texts, it considers why American manhood has so often been seen as in crisis. It pays particular attention to the formation of non-normative masculinities (African-American, female, and gay) in relation to entrenched racial, class, and sexual hierarchies, as well as the impact of the feminist, civil rights, and gay liberation movements on the shifting construction of male identity. In addition to critical essays, readings also include Tarzan of the Apes, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, The Great Gatsby, The Sun also Rises, Native Son, Another Country, and Kiss Me Deadly (Spillane). Film screenings include Kiss Me Deadly (Aldrich), Shaft, Magnum Force, Philadelphia, Brokeback Mountain, Cleopatra Jones, and Boys Don’t Cry.