Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for ENGLISH - Fall 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2023 ENGL-105-01 Intro to Amer Lit II 1.00 LEC Mrozowski,Daniel J. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-years.
  This course surveys major works of American literature after 1865, from literary reckonings with the Civil War and its tragic residues, to works of "realism" and "naturalism" that contended with the late 19th century’s rapid pace of social change, to the innovative works of the modern and postmodern eras. As we read works by authors such as Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, William Faulkner, and Toni Morrison, we will inquire: how have literary texts defined and redefined "America" and Americans? What are the means by which some groups have been excluded from the American community, and what are their experiences of that exclusion? And how do these texts shape our understanding of the unresolved problems of post-Civil War American democracy? For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
2100 ENGL-110-01 Survey of Engl Literature I 1.00 LEC Wheatley,Chloe MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-years.
  Through selected readings in works from the Anglo-Saxon period to the late 17th century, this course will study the development of English literature in the context of stylistic, cultural, and historical changes and influences. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
3380 ENGL-222-01 Victorian Short Fiction 1.00 LEC Bilston,Sarah R. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  The Victorian period is known for its three-decker novels, but the later 19th century was a golden age for short fiction. We will examine the evolution of the short story and the novella, assessing the impact of technological advances in the printing industry, the rise of the cheap periodical, and burgeoning literacy levels. We will also look at the rapid growth of new popular genres, such as science fiction, detective fiction, adventure stories, ghost & horror stories, and feminist “New Woman” fiction. Writers to be studied include Elizabeth Gaskell, Charles Dickens, Eliza Riddell, Sheridan Le Fanu, Thomas Hardy, Mona Caird, “George Egerton,” and H.G. Wells. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
3379 ENGL-248-01 The World of Old English 1.00 LEC Fisher,Sheila M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  The earliest English literature might not even be considered English at all since it was composed in a Germanic language by Viking invaders. But this language, the ancestor of modern English, produced some extraordinary literature, from deeply psychological exile poems to obscene riddles, from sublime meditations on the new religion of Christianity to poems that play on the borders of polytheism. And, of course, the Anglo-Saxon period gave us the magnificent epic, Beowulf, in which heroes and monsters end up defining each other. This course will examine the spectrum of Old English literature (in translation) within the social, cultural, and artistic context of the Anglo-Saxon world. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
2952 ENGL-260-01 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Wheatley,Chloe MWF: 12:00PM-12:50PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2953 ENGL-260-02 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2954 ENGL-260-03 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Staff,Trinity TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2955 ENGL-260-04 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Benedict,Barbara M. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2745 ENGL-265-01 Intro to Film Studies 1.00 LEC Younger,James Prakash MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM
M: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satifies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration.
  This course provides a general introduction to the study of film and focuses on the key terms and concepts used to describe and analyze the film experience. As we put this set of tools and methods in place, we will also explore different modes of film production (fictional narrative, documentary, experimental) and some of the critical issues and debates that have shaped the discipline of film studies (genre, auteurism, film aesthetics, ideology). Note: Film screening only on Monday evenings. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the film studies minor.
2356 ENGL-270-01 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rutherford,Ethan MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2891 ENGL-270-02 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Libbey,Elizabeth B. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2357 ENGL-270-03 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rossini,Clare M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first-year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2464 ENGL-270-04 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rossini,Clare M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
3381 ENGL-310-01 Postcolonial Literature&Theory 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900, or a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This course provides an introduction to Anglophone literatures produced after decolonization. We will read postcolonial theory alongside novels, short stories, poetry, graphic novels, film, and drama in order to consider how these literatures represent issues of identity, nationalism, globalization, and race. The seminar will address the effects of literary form on these fraught representations, as well as the implications of approaching literature through the lens of “postcolonialism,” as opposed to globalization studies, World Literature, transnationalism, or the study of the Global South. Readings may include theory by Homi Bhabha, Franz Fanon, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak; and literature from Anglophone Africa, South Asia, Pacific Oceania, the Caribbean and the British Isles.
2364 ENGL-334-01 Adv Cr Writing:Fiction 1.00 SEM Rutherford,Ethan M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing majors.
  Students will write and rewrite fiction. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. For English creative writing concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
3296 ENGL-345-01 Chaucer 1.00 LEC Fisher,Sheila M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  A study of The Canterbury Tales and related writings in the context of late medieval conceptions of society, God, love, and marriage. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
2317 ENGL-351-01 Shakespeare 1.00 LEC Riggio,Milla C. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to first-year students.
  NOTE: For English majors; this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is not open to first-year students.
  In this course we will study selected Shakespeare plays, with an emphasis on understanding cultural contexts and on plays in performance. We focus on Shakespeare's language and the language of the theater and the drama of his age, with an eye also to helping you understand why these plays and this dramatist have earned such an extraordinary place in the cultural history of so many people and places, from Russia to Africa. Plays to be studied may include: King Lear, The Merchant of Venice, Othello, Titus Andronicus, A Midsummer Night's Dream, and The Tempest. These choices are subject to change. For English majors this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700.
3382 ENGL-359-01 Vic London: Lit of Chgng City 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. It is research-intensive seminar.
  London grew from a city of one million in 1800 to over four million inhabitants by the year of Queen Victoria’s death. We will investigate literary responses to the rapid transformation of the city, focusing on how different urban spaces and occupations were represented. Questions to be addressed include: what were the hopes of urbanization, and what were its problems? How was the relationship between the center, the suburbs, and the slums conceptualized? How was the urban interior represented, and what about the urban garden? Writers to be studied include Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, and Jane Ellen Panton; students will complete a research paper on Victorial London at the end of the course. This is a research-intensive seminar.
3297 ENGL-364-01 Lit Transformations 18th Cent 1.00 LEC Benedict,Barbara M. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This is a research-intensive seminar.
  How do writers transform traditional literary forms to express new perceptions of identity, sexuality, society, and nature? In this course, we will examine the way the poets, playwrights, journalists, and fiction writers of Restoration and 18th-century England imitated, reworked, and finally rejected old genres to forge new kinds of literary expression. Readings include works by Aphra Behn, Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson, and Goldsmith. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
3298 ENGL-383-01 Modern British Fiction 1.00 LEC Rosen,David MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This is a research-intensive seminar.
  This is a course in British fiction between 1890 and 1945. The prose (novels and stories) of this period is characterized by tremendous ambition, radical experimentation, the questioning of old conventions and the creation of new ones. Authors will include Wilde, Conrad, Ford, Forster, Joyce, Woolf, and Beckett. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. It is research intensive.
2303 ENGL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of individual tutorials in topics not currently offered by the department. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2968 ENGL-401-01 Theories& Methods of Litry Std 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course is also research intensive. English 401 and English 801 are the same course.
  This seminar is designed to introduce students to the field of literary studies at the graduate level, to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will write weekly, have opportunities to lead class discussion, and work in stages to compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text. (Note: English 401 and English 801 are the same course.) For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course is also research intensive. For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students and we recommend that entering students enroll in this course during their first year of graduate study.
3299 ENGL-418-01 17th Century Poetry 1.00 SEM Wheatley,Chloe T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This is a research-intensive seminar. English 418 and English 818 are the same course.
  The poets of the early modern period made their contribution to an English literary tradition against a dynamic context of religious, political, and social change. Poets studied in this course will include Lanyer, Jonson, Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, Marvell, Philips, Bradstreet, and Milton. English 418 and English 818 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. For the English graduate program, this course fulfills the requirement of a course emphasizing English literature or a cultural context for the literary studies track. It counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
3553 ENGL-441-01 Writing for Film 1.00 SEM Brink,Robert W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This is a hybrid graduate/advanced undergraduate course. Coursework involves reading relevant dramatic and cinematic theory, studying three produced screenplays and one unproduced script by a major writer, and completing weekly writing assignments. While studying screenplay format, three-act story structure, character development, dialogue, action, and style, students will develop a writing process grounded in the oral tradition. Reading and listening to work aloud in class will develop a supportive “writers room.” Readings will range from John Howard Lawson’s theory of screenwriting to Ed Spiegel’s The Innocence of the Eye. Writing exercises will consist of short film scripts. Students will have a choice of final projects: either a feature film treatment or a fully realized screenplay for a short film. For undergraduate students, the course may be counted as an advanced Creative Writing workshop or an elective for the English major. For graduate students, this course counts as a core course in the Writing, Rhetoric, and Media Arts track and an elective in the Literary Studies track.
2227 ENGL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Students may assist professors as teaching assistants, performing a variety of duties usually involving assisting students in conceiving or revising papers; reading and helping to evaluate papers, quizzes, and exams; and other duties as determined by the student and instructor. See instructor of specific course for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3386 ENGL-473-01 Dickens/Chaplin 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash M: 6:30PM-9:30PM
T: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400 elective. For literature and film concentrators, this course counts as a course in literature and film. Film screening only on Tuesday evenings. English 473 and English 873 are the same course.
  This course treats the work of Charles Dickens and Charles Chaplin from a critical perspective that recognizes their striking similarities. Charles Dickens was the most popular artist of the 19th century; the fictional world and characters he created made sense of modern life for millions around the world, and the adjective "Dickensian" testifies to how familiar his blend of comedy and melodrama has become. Charles Chaplin is remarkably analogous to Dickens; as the 20th century's most popular artist, his work addressed fundamental issues of contemporary social life, and also employed a blend of comedy and melodrama that merited its own adjective: "Chaplinesque". The course examines the evolution of these two major figures over the course of their careers. This is a research-intensive seminar.
2358 ENGL-492-01 Fiction Workshop 1.00 SEM Ferriss,Lucy W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270 and one of the following English 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, Film Studies 337, Theater and Dance 345, or Theater and Dance 393.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing majors. One requirement of the class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers and an advanced creative writing workshop.
  Advanced seminar in the writing of fiction. Class discussions devoted primarily to the analysis of student fiction, with some attention to examples of contemporary short stories. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop. This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing concentrators.
2359 ENGL-494-01 Poetry Workshop 1.00 SEM Berry,Ciaran M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270 and one of the following English 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, Film Studies 337, Theater and Dance 345, or Theater and Dance 393.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative wriring majors. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop.
  Advanced seminar in the writing of poetry. Class discussions devoted primarily to the analysis of student work, with some attention to examples of contemporary poetry. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop. This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing concentrators, and a senior project.
3300 ENGL-495-01 Sem: Phenom of Ltry Popularty 1.00 SEM Benedict,Barbara M. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a senior seminar.
  Why is Shakespeare considered great? Why is Jane Austen so popular? Or Romantic Poetry? Or Stephen King? In this course students will explore the way theorists and critics from Aristotle to Edward Said have understood literary value and meaning, while they also read key texts in British literature. Students will have the chance to develop their own literary theories and apply them to their favorite texts.
2240 ENGL-497-01 One-Semester Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Individual tutorial in writing of a one-semester senior thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required.
2282 ENGL-498-01 Sr Thesis Part 1/Sr Colloquim 2.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is designed to teach senior English majors the techniques of research and analysis needed for writing a year-long essay on a subject of their choice. It is intended to help the students to write such year-long theses, and to encourage them to do so. It will deal with problems such as designing longer papers, focusing topics, developing and limiting bibliographies, working with manuscripts, using both library and Internet resources, and understanding the uses of theoretical paradigms. This course is required of all senior English majors who are planning to write two-semester, year-long theses. Please refer to the department's website for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
2969 ENGL-801-01 Theories& Methods of Litry Std 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students and we recommend that entering students enroll in this course during their first year of graduate study.
  This seminar is designed to introduce students to the field of literary studies at the graduate level, to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will write weekly, have opportunities to lead class discussion, and work in stages to compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text. (Note: English 401 and English 801 are the same course.) For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course is also research intensive. For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students and we recommend that entering students enroll in this course during their first year of graduate study.
3481 ENGL-818-01 17th Century Poetry 1.00 SEM Wheatley,Chloe T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  The poets of the early modern period made their contribution to an English literary tradition against a dynamic context of religious, political, and social change. Poets studied in this course will include Lanyer, Jonson, Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, Marvell, Philips, Bradstreet, and Milton. English 418 and English 818 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. For the English graduate program, this course fulfills the requirement of a course emphasizing English literature or a cultural context for the literary studies track. It counts as an elective for the writing, rhetoric, and media arts track.
3552 ENGL-841-01 Writing for Film 1.00 SEM Brink,Robert W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This is a hybrid graduate/advanced undergraduate course. Coursework involves reading relevant dramatic and cinematic theory, studying three produced screenplays and one unproduced script by a major writer, and completing weekly writing assignments. While studying screenplay format, three-act story structure, character development, dialogue, action, and style, students will develop a writing process grounded in the oral tradition. Reading and listening to work aloud in class will develop a supportive “writers room.” Readings will range from John Howard Lawson’s theory of screenwriting to Ed Spiegel’s The Innocence of the Eye. Writing exercises will consist of short film scripts. Students will have a choice of final projects: either a feature film treatment or a fully realized screenplay for a short film. For undergraduate students, the course may be counted as an advanced Creative Writing workshop or an elective for the English major. For graduate students, this course counts as a core course in the Writing, Rhetoric, and Media Arts track and an elective in the Literary Studies track.
3385 ENGL-873-01 Dickens/Chaplin 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash M: 6:30PM-9:30PM
T: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300/400 elective. For literature and film concentrators, this course counts as a course in literature and film. Film screening only on Tuesday evenings.
  This course treats the work of Charles Dickens and Charles Chaplin from a critical perspective that recognizes their striking similarities. Charles Dickens was the most popular artist of the 19th century; the fictional world and characters he created made sense of modern life for millions around the world, and the adjective "Dickensian" testifies to how familiar his blend of comedy and melodrama has become. Charles Chaplin is remarkably analogous to Dickens; as the 20th century's most popular artist, his work addressed fundamental issues of contemporary social life, and also employed a blend of comedy and melodrama that merited its own adjective: "Chaplinesque". The course examines the evolution of these two major figures over the course of their careers. This is a research-intensive seminar.
2170 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2172 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2417 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
3129 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
2171 ENGL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2031 GDST-219-01 The Classical Tradition 1.00 LEC Safran,Meredith E. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Only students in the Guided Studies programare allowed to enroll in this course.
  NOTE: Course is only open to students who have been accepted into the Guided Studies Program.
  NOTE: This course will meet the requirement in the English major for a 200 level elective.
  A study of the interconnections between Greek and Roman history and culture, with a focus of reading literature and studying monuments with careful attention to their historical context and meaning for contemporaries.
2472 RHET-302-01 Writing Theory & Practic 1.00 LEC O'Donnell,Tennyson L. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective.
  A study of the art of discourse, with special emphasis on the dynamics of contemporary composition and argumentation. This course examines rhetorical theory from the Classical period to the New Rhetoric, as well as provides students with frequent practice in varied techniques of composing and evaluating expository prose. A wide selection of primary readings across the curriculum will include some controversial ideas about writing from Plato’s Phaedrus, the heart of Aristotle’s Rhetoric, and examples of the best writing in the arts and sciences. By invitation only. For students admitted to the Writing Associates Program.
3415 THDN-393-01 Playwrights Workshop 1.00 SEM Preston,Michael
Karger,Barbara
MW: 1:15PM-3:15PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  Prerequisite: At least one theater and dance course or permission of instructor.
  An introduction to different styles and techniques of playwrighting through the study of selected plays from various world theater traditions. Assignments and exercises will lead to the development of short plays scripted by students.
3460 WMGS-319-01 The Woman's Film 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective.
  In the 1930s Hollywood created a new genre, the woman’s picture or “weepie,” designed specifically for female audiences. This course examines the development of this enormously popular genre from the 1930s to the 1960s, including important cycles of women’s pictures such as the female gothic and the maternal melodrama. It pays particular attention to the genre’s exploration of female sexuality and its homoerotic organization of the look. It also considers the genre’s role in the formation of contemporary theories of female spectatorship. Film screenings include both versions of Imitations of Life, These Three, Stage Door, Blonde Venus, Stella Dallas, Mildred Pierce, Rebecca, Suspicion, Gaslight, The Old Maid, Old Acquaintance, The Great Lie, Letter from an Unknown Woman, All that Heaven Allows, and Marnie. Readings by Doane, Williams, Modleski, de Lauretis, Jacobs, and White.