Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for ENGLISH - Fall 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3473 ENGL-105-01 Intro to Amer Lit II 1.00 LEC Hager, Christopher MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for First Years
  This course surveys major works of American literature after 1865, from literary reckonings with the Civil War and its tragic residues, to works of "realism" and "naturalism" that contended with the late 19th century’s rapid pace of social change, to the innovative works of the modern and postmodern eras. As we read works by authors such as Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, William Faulkner, and Toni Morrison, we will inquire: how have literary texts defined and redefined "America" and Americans? What are the means by which some groups have been excluded from the American community, and what are their experiences of that exclusion? And how do these texts shape our understanding of the unresolved problems of post-Civil War American democracy? For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
2066 ENGL-110-01 Survey of Engl Literature I 1.00 LEC Liu, Aileen WF: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-years, 2 seats for HMTCA students.
  Through selected readings in works from the Anglo-Saxon period to the late 17th century, this course will study the development of English literature in the context of stylistic, cultural, and historical changes and influences. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
3474 ENGL-116-01 Intro African Amer Lit Part I 1.00 LEC Paulin, Diana TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course surveys African American literature in a variety of genres from the 18th to the early 20th centuries. Through the study of texts by Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Wilson, Harriet Jacobs, William Wells Brown, Julia Collins, William and Ellen Craft, Charles Chesnutt, Paul Dunbar, Ida Wells, W.E.B. Du Bois, and others, we will explore how these writers represented and influenced the history of people of African descent in the U.S., from slavery and abolition to early struggles for civil rights; how their work has intervened in racial formation and imagined the black diaspora; how literary innovations have engaged with continuing political questions of nation, gender, sexuality, and class. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
3111 ENGL-209-01 Prison Literature 1.00 LEC Fisher, Sheila TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course examines texts, both fictional and non-fictional, written about and often in prison. While the course covers a variety of genres and historical periods, the common thread linking all the texts is that their authors were or are incarcerated. Through the works of canonical and non-canonical writers such as Thoreau, Wilde, King, Mandela, Davis, Horton, and currently incarcerated women and men, we will explore how the experience of imprisonment influences the individual, and his or her family, community, and society and raises questions about freedom, transgression, and human rights. This course will have a community learning component and will introduce students to some of the writers whose works we will be studying. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
3727 ENGL-218-01 Hungry Games:Dystopian Visions 1.00 LEC Woods, Livia MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  In reflecting upon the secrets of life and death that allowed him to generate his creature, Victor Frankenstein famously insists upon the dangers of "the acquirement of knowledge." Indeed, the hunger for and danger of ever greater knowledge about and control over life and death marks a tradition of dystopian literature in Western modernity. In this course, we will explore the representation of this hunger and danger in British prose satire, fiction, and poetry written between 1726 and the present. Assigned texts will include Gulliver's Travels, Frankenstein, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, "The Waste Land," Brave New World, film adaptations of Children of Men and Never Let Me Go, and episodes of the television series Black Mirror.
2579 ENGL-260-01 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Rosen, David MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2580 ENGL-260-02 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Wheatley, Chloe WF: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2581 ENGL-260-03 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Woods, Livia MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2994 ENGL-260-04 Intro Literary Studies 1.00 SEM Liu, Aileen WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of close reading. The course will show students how to apply this critical vocabulary to a wide range of literary genres from different historical periods, and to develop the writing and research skills necessary for composing clear and compelling arguments in the interpretation of a text. Note: This course is required of all English majors. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the literature and psychology minor.
2259 ENGL-270-01 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Ferriss, Lucy MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2569 ENGL-270-02 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rossini, Clare TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, seven seats for sophomores and first-year students, and 3 seats for incoming Interarts first year student.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2260 ENGL-270-03 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Rutherford, Ethan TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, seven seats for sophomores and first-year students, and 3 seats for incoming Interarts first year student.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
2318 ENGL-270-04 Intro to Creative Writing 1.00 SEM Libbey, Elizabeth F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: Students enrolled in ENGL 270 may not take another creative writing course that semester without special permission.
  NOTE: Five seats are reserved for juniors, ten seats for sophomores and first year students.
  An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in more than one genre. Discussion of work by students and established writers. This is a required course for creative writing concentrators. Beginning in the spring 2014 semester, ENGL 270 must be taken before senior year with enrollment of juniors restricted to five students per section. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
3630 ENGL-288-01 World Cinema 1.00 LEC Younger, James M: 1:15PM-3:55PM
W: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the film studies minor. Film screening only on Wednesday evenings.
  This course provides an introduction to the study of world cinema, with a focus on cinematic cultures other than those of the USA or Europe. We will begin by considering some of the theoretical questions involved in intercultural spectatorship and introducing/reviewing critical categories we can use to discuss the films. We will then proceed through a series of units based around specific cinematic cultures, focusing on movement, genres and auteurs and on the historical, cultural, and geopolitical issues that the films illuminate. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the film studies minor.
2266 ENGL-334-01 Adv Cr Writing:Fiction 1.00 SEM Ferriss, Lucy MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 and permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop for creative writing majors.
  Students will write and rewrite fiction. The class is run as a workshop, and discussions are devoted to analysis of student work and that of professional writers. For English creative writing concentrators, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
3696 ENGL-335-01 Literary Nonfiction Narrative 1.00 SEM Goldman, Francisco R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in ENGL 270 and permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
  This workshop explores the form of writing that combines the craft of fiction writing with the skills and practices of the journalist. We will read some of the foremost 20th-century and contemporary practitioners of this form of writing (V.S. Naipaul, Joseph Mitchell, Joan Didion, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Ryszard Kapuscinski, Rory Stewart, Alma Guillermoprieto, Susan Orlean, Jon Lee Anderson, etc., and selections from some of their important precursors: Stephen Crane, Jose Marti) and discuss, often, the form's complex relation to literary fiction, the tensions and difference between journalism and imaginative works, and so on. The workshop will begin with practical writing assignments: first paragraphs, setting, character, how to develop meaning, short pieces, etc., with the final goal being to produce a New Yorker magazine-like (in length and craft) piece using some aspect of the city of Hartford. NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level workshop. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers.
3564 ENGL-339-01 Indian Film and Literature 1.00 SEM Younger, James MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM
M: 6:30PM-9:10PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 requirement.
  This course offers an introduction to the rich culture and society of the Indian subcontinent through some of its most celebrated films and works of literature. We will explore work in different genres (Bollywood films, Bengali art cinema, documentaries, short stories, novels, poetry and non-fiction writing) and several distinctive linguistic cultures (English and Hindi, Urdu, Bengali and other regional languages in translation) as a means to feel at home within the oceanic complexity, the sublime diversity, "the Wonder that is India". This course is research intensive. For English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 requirement.
2687 ENGL-345-01 Chaucer 1.00 LEC Fisher, Sheila TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700.
  NOTE: This course is research intensive.
  A study of The Canterbury Tales and related writings in the context of late medieval conceptions of society, God, love, and marriage. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700. This course is research intensive.
3700 ENGL-352-01 Shakespeare 1.00 LEC Liu, Aileen WF: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700.
  Through close study of a variety of Shakespeare’s works and analysis of selected performances on video, this course addresses definitions of the Shakespearean and examines the constitution of Shakespearean theater. The course pays particular attention to the coherence of Shakespearean dramas around vivid patterns of imagery, to the psychology and arts of Elizabethan and Jacobean characterization, to representations of Elizabethan social and political hierarchies, and to British Renaissance poetic will synthesizing Classical, Medieval, and Celtic source materials. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written before 1700 This course is research intensive.
3476 ENGL-364-01 Lit Transformations 18th Cent 1.00 LEC Benedict, Barbara TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  How do writers transform traditional literary forms to express new perceptions of identity, sexuality, society, and nature? In this course, we will examine the way the poets, playwrights, journalists, and fiction writers of Restoration and 18th-century England imitated, reworked, and finally rejected old genres to forge new kinds of literary expression. Readings include works by Aphra Behn, Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson, and Goldsmith. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. It is a research-intensive seminar.
2223 ENGL-399-01 Independent Study 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of individual tutorials in topics not currently offered by the department. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2855 ENGL-401-01 Intro to Literary Theory 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: English 401 and English 801 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection.
  This seminar is designed to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text.
3625 ENGL-425-01 Postmodernism in Film & Lit 1.00 SEM Rosen, David W: 6:30PM-9:10PM
M: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 distribution requirement. For literature and film concentrators, this course fulfills the requirement of an advanced course toward the major, and counts as a course in literature and film. This course fulfills the requirements toward the film studies major. Monday evenings screening only.
  “Postmodern” is the term used most often to describe the unique features of global culture (art, architecture, philosophy, cinema, literature) since the 1970s. And yet there is practically no agreement about what those features might be: is postmodernism ironic or serious, flat or deep, real or hyper-real, alive or defunct? In this course we will examine competing and often contradictory views of postmodernism, with the goal of developing a historical perspective on the contemporary world we live in now. Texts will be divided evenly between philosophy/theory (Lyotard, Baudrillard, Jameson, Fukuyama, Hutcheon), cinema (possible films: Bladerunner, Mulholland Drive, Pulp Fiction) and literature (possible authors: Borges, Pynchon, Barthelme, Murakami, Foster Wallace). The seminar will culminate with a field trip to New York City. English 425 and English 825 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 distribution requirement. For literature and film concentrators, this course fulfills the requirement of an advanced course toward the major, and counts as a course in literature and film. This course fulfills the requirements toward the film studies major. NOTE: Monday evenings screenings only.
3728 ENGL-431-01 19thC-Novel: Rdg Pract&Debates 1.00 SEM Woods, Livia R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. The seminar is research intensive.
  How do literature classes train us to read? Does this training prime us to ask certain kinds of questions to the exclusion of others? Is there anything we would see in, say, the nineteenth-century novel if we read it differently? Is reading differently possible? Over the last 25 years, these types of questions have been asked by literary critics with increasing intensity, particularly among scholars of the nineteenth century. In this class, we will read novels by Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, and Thomas Hardy alongside criticism on reading practices from D.A. Miller, Eve Kosofsky Sedgewick, Bruno Latour, Rita Felski, Sharon Marcus and Stephen Best, and Franco Moretti. This course is research intensive.
3556 ENGL-445-01 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 requirement. This course is research intensive.
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
2165 ENGL-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Students may assist professors as teaching assistants, performing a variety of duties usually involving assisting students in conceiving or revising papers; reading and helping to evaluate papers, quizzes, and exams; and other duties as determined by the student and instructor. See instructor of specific course for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2261 ENGL-492-01 Fiction Workshop 1.00 SEM Rutherford, Ethan F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270 and one of the following English 333, 334, 335, 336, 441, Theater and Dance 305, or Theater and Dance 393.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing majors. One requirement of the class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers and an advanced creative writing workshop.
  Advanced seminar in the writing of fiction. Class discussions devoted primarily to the analysis of student fiction, with some attention to examples of contemporary short stories. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop. This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing concentrators, and a senior project.
2262 ENGL-494-01 Poetry Workshop 1.00 SEM Berry, Ciaran MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 270 and one of the following English 333, 334, 335, 336, 441, Theater and Dance 305, or Theater and Dance 393.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing majors. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop.
  Advanced seminar in the writing of poetry. Class discussions devoted primarily to the analysis of student work, with some attention to examples of contemporary poetry. One requirement of this class is attendance at a minimum of two readings offered on campus by visiting writers, and an advanced creative writing workshop. This course satisfies the requirement of a 400-level workshop for creative writing concentrators, and a senior project.
2171 ENGL-497-01 One-Semester Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Individual tutorial in writing of a one-semester senior thesis on a special topic in literature or criticism. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required.
2903 ENGL-498-01 Sr Thesis Part 1/Sr Colloquim 2.00 SEM Hager, Christopher MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is designed to teach senior English majors the techniques of research and analysis needed for writing a year-long essay on a subject of their choice. It is intended to help the students to write such year-long theses, and to encourage them to do so. It will deal with problems such as designing longer papers, focusing topics, developing and limiting bibliographies, working with manuscripts, using both library and Internet resources, and understanding the uses of theoretical paradigms. This course is required of all senior English majors who are planning to write two-semester, year-long theses. Please refer to the department's website for more information. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office and the approval of the instructor and the chairperson are required. (2 course credits are considered pending in the first semester; 2 course credits will be awarded for completion in the second semester.)
2854 ENGL-801-01 Intro to Literary Theory 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: For the English graduate program, this course is required of all students pursuing the thesis capstone.
  This seminar is designed to provide a perspective on varied critical vocabularies, and to explore the development of literary theories and methods from classical to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on a broad examination of the history and traditions of literary theory, the ongoing questions and conflicts among theorists, and practical applications to the study of works in literature. Students will compose a substantial critical essay based on research and the development of their own perspective on understanding and evaluating a literary text.
3626 ENGL-825-01 Postmodernism in Film & Lit 1.00 SEM Rosen, David W: 6:30PM-9:10PM
M: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  “Postmodern” is the term used most often to describe the unique features of global culture (art, architecture, philosophy, cinema, literature) since the 1970s. And yet there is practically no agreement about what those features might be: is postmodernism ironic or serious, flat or deep, real or hyper-real, alive or defunct? In this course we will examine competing and often contradictory views of postmodernism, with the goal of developing a historical perspective on the contemporary world we live in now. Texts will be divided evenly between philosophy/theory (Lyotard, Baudrillard, Jameson, Fukuyama, Hutcheon), cinema (possible films: Bladerunner, Mulholland Drive, Pulp Fiction) and literature (possible authors: Borges, Pynchon, Barthelme, Murakami, Foster Wallace). The seminar will culminate with a field trip to New York City. English 425 and English 825 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the post-1900 distribution requirement. For literature and film concentrators, this course fulfills the requirement of an advanced course toward the major, and counts as a course in literature and film. This course fulfills the requirements toward the film studies major. NOTE: Monday evenings screenings only.
3729 ENGL-831-01 19thC-Novel: Rdg Pract&Debates 1.00 SEM Woods, Livia R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  How do literature classes train us to read? Does this training prime us to ask certain kinds of questions to the exclusion of others? Is there anything we would see in, say, the nineteenth-century novel if we read it differently? Is reading differently possible? Over the last 25 years, these types of questions have been asked by literary critics with increasing intensity, particularly among scholars of the nineteenth century. In this class, we will read novels by Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, and Thomas Hardy alongside criticism on reading practices from D.A. Miller, Eve Kosofsky Sedgewick, Bruno Latour, Rita Felski, Sharon Marcus and Stephen Best, and Franco Moretti. This course is research intensive.
3557 ENGL-845-01 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
2116 ENGL-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A limited number of tutorials are available for students wishing to pursue special topics not offered in the regular graduate program. Applications should be submitted to the department chairperson prior to registration. Written approval of the graduate adviser and department chairperson is required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2118 ENGL-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The graduate director, the supervisor of the project, and the department chairperson must approve special research project topics. Conference hours are available by appointment. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form. One course credit.
2289 ENGL-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2621 ENGL-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Continuation of English 954 (described in prior section).
2117 ENGL-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
3660 AMST-212-01 Disability Studies:Theory&Hist 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course offers a rigorous interdisciplinary introduction to Disability Studies. We will look at the history of disability studies as it emerged in relation to the Civil Rights movement. We will consider how the efforts of disability activists and scholars have shaped disability studies and how this field informs and is also informed by other disciplines, such as Performance and Trauma Studies. We will examine how disability has been defined over time and how particular definitions of disability intersect with other aspects of identity, such as socio-economic class, race and/or ethnicity, sexuality and gender. In addition to reading and critiquing history and theory, we will also look at a variety of “disability texts” that will include various genres, such as fiction, memoir, film, and drama.
3773 HMTS-112-01 The Trojan War in Antiquity 1.00 LEC Tomasso, Vincent MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Only students in the Humanities Gateway program are allowed to enroll in this course.
  NOTE: Course is only open to students who have been accepted into the Guided Studies Program.
  This course focuses on Homer's Iliad, one of the most famous texts of the western world. This epic poem, which narrates episodes from near the end of the ten-year long Trojan War, influenced cultures throughout antiquity, far beyond its original historical and cultural context. In this course, we will look at the Iliad and how and why later Greeks and Romans used and transformed it, including the Athenian playwright Euripides in his tragedy Hecabe; the Battle of Frogs and Mice, an animal fable that satirizes the Iliad; Virgil's Aeneid, a foundation epic of ancient Rome from the ashes of Troy; and the imperial Greek orator Dio Chrysostom's contentious Oration 11 that claims that Homer was wrong and the Trojans actually won the war.
2323 RHET-302-01 Writing Theories and Practices 1.00 LEC O'Donnell, Tennyson TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective.
  This course investigates the theories and practices of writing consultation in North American university writing centers as informed by studies in composition pedagogy, literacy, and rhetoric. Students will be introduced to the broad range of topics found at the intersection of practice and theory in writing centers, including socio-cultural dynamics, grammar instruction, English as a Second Language, learning disorders, critical reading, writing processes, and interpersonal communication. The course will encourage students to create new knowledge about writing and tutor research. By invitation only. For students admitted to the Writing Associates Program.
3044 THDN-393-01 Playwrights Workshop 1.00 SEM Preston, Michael MW: 1:15PM-3:15PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  Prerequisite: At least one theater and dance course or permission of instructor.
  An introduction to different styles and techniques of playwrighting through the study of selected plays from various world theater traditions. Assignments and exercises will lead to the development of short plays scripted by students.
3745 WMGS-212-01 Disability Studies:Theory&Hist 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course offers a rigorous interdisciplinary introduction to Disability Studies. We will look at the history of disability studies as it emerged in relation to the Civil Rights movement. We will consider how the efforts of disability activists and scholars have shaped disability studies and how this field informs and is also informed by other disciplines, such as Performance and Trauma Studies. We will examine how disability has been defined over time and how particular definitions of disability intersect with other aspects of identity, such as socio-economic class, race and/or ethnicity, sexuality and gender. In addition to reading and critiquing history and theory, we will also look at a variety of “disability texts” that will include various genres, such as fiction, memoir, film, and drama.