Course Descriptions

Course Catalog for ENGINEERING
ENGR 102
Introduction to Engineering
An introduction to how engineers use math and science to solve problems and invent new products. Students will develop a general and historical understanding of materials, forces, energy, electrical systems, environmental engineering, and the impact of engineering on society. Student engineering design projects emphasizing team work, problem solving, and decision making will be incorporated throughout the class.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 108
The Science and Policies of Energy and Sustainability
This course will study the fundamental science of energy and its usage, and the environmental, economic, and societal impacts of coal, petroleum, natural gas, waste combustion, biomass, hydrogen, nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, solar, hydroelectric, wind, and geothermal power. Students shall gain current knowledge necessary to make informed, analytical decisions about energy policy aimed at achieving long-term energy sustainability.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 110
Engineering Computation and Analysis
This course introduces computational engineering analysis using programming languages MATLAB, C/C++, and FORTRAN. Programming techniques for numerical analysis and simulation will be emphasized through utilization of loops, arrays, logic controls, functions, and procedures. Programming projects will include solving linear equations, designing games, image processing, estimation and prediction.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 120
Introduction to Engineering Design: Mobile Robots
An introduction to the practice of engineering design. Students will complete a project that exposes them to the conceptualization, analysis, synthesis, testing, and documentation of an engineering system. Students will consider such design issues as modularity, testability, reliability, and economy, and they will learn to use computer-aided design tools. They will use laboratory instruments and develop hands-on skills that will support further project work.
Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 212
Linear Circuit Theory
The study of electric circuits in response to steady state, transient, sinusoidally varying, and aperiodic input signals. Basic network theorems, solutions of linear differential equations, LaPlace transform, frequency response, Fourier series, and Fourier transforms are covered. Both analysis and design approaches are discussed. Lecture and laboratory. This course meets the Writing Part II requirement for the engineering major.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Physics 231L and either Mathematics 132 or 142, with concurrent registration Mathematics 234 strongly recommended.
1.25 units, Lecture
ENGR 221
Digital Circuits and Systems
An introduction to the design of digital computers. Course content includes: binary information representation, Boolean algebra, combinational circuits, sequential machines, flip-flops, registers, counters, memories, programmable logic, and computer organization. The laboratory emphasizes the design of digital networks. Lecture and laboratory. This course meets the Writing Part II requirement for the engineering major.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 126 or 131, or permission of instructor.
1.25 units, Lecture
ENGR 225
Mechanics I
This introductory course in mechanics primarily studies particle and rigid body statics. Topics include: force systems, rigid body equilibrium, analysis of structures, distributed forces, friction, and the method of virtual work. The latter part of the course studies dynamics, focusing on kinematics and kinetics of particles and introducing vibrations. Engineering design is incorporated in projects and homework assignments.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Physics 131L and Mathematics 131.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 226
Mechanics II
This course studies particle and rigid body dynamics. Topics include: kinematics and kinetics of both particles and rigid bodies, equations of motion in rectangular, normal/tangential and polar coordinate systems, rigid body translation, rotation and general plane motion, work and energy, momentum conservation, mass moment of inertia, and free, forced, and damped vibrations. Engineering design is incorporated in projects and homework assignments.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 225.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 232
Engineering Materials
A study of the nature, properties, and applications of materials in engineering design. An introduction to the field of material science with topics including metals, ceramics, polymers, and semiconductors combined with the unifying principle that engineering properties are a consequence of the atomic/molecular structure of materials. Lecture and laboratory. This course meets the Writing Part II requirement for the engineering major.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 111L .
1.25 units, Lecture
ENGR 301
Signal Processing and Applications
This course presents digital signal processing (DSP) fundamentals and their practical applications through laboratory assignments. Topics include signal representations in continuous-time and discrete-time domains, discrete-time linear systems and their properties, the Fourier transform and fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm, the Z-transform, and digital filter design. This course includes laboratory experiments designed to reinforce DSP theory and to expose students to modern digital signal processing techniques, e.g., creating special audio effects, power spectrum estimation, encoding and decoding touch-tone signals, synthesizing musical instruments, frequency selective filtering, and image processing. Students gain a solid theoretical background in DSP and master hands-on applications using modern development tools.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 231 and Engineering 212L.
1.25 units, Lecture
ENGR 302
Image Processing and Biomedical Applications
This course presents an interdisciplinary introduction to image processing. The topics include image acquisition; image data structures; image operations (arithmetic, geometric, etc.); and basic problems (edge detection, enhancement, etc). These topics will expose students to the underlying methods applicable to many application contexts such as biomedical systems. Hands-on projects allow students to gain experience in applying image processing methodology to real life problems such as X-ray CT scan.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 212L or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 303
Analog and Digital Communication
This course introduces basic topics in modern communication theory, including characterization of signals in the time and frequency domains, modulation theory, information coding, and digital data transmission. Topics focus on modulation techniques, including amplitude modulation, frequency modulation, and pulse code modulation. Basic probability theory and statistics are presented to provide the tools necessary for design applications, for instance when binary data is transmitted over noisy channels. Computer programming in a high-level language (e.g., MATLAB) is used to solve assignment problems.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 212L or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 307
Semiconductor Electronics I
Introductory semiconductor physics leading to the development of p-n junction theory. Development and application of device models necessary for the analysis and design of integrated circuits. Applications include digital circuits based on bipolar transistors and CMOS devices with particular emphasis on VLSI design considerations. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 212L and 221L.
1.25 units, Lecture
ENGR 308
Semiconductor Electronics II
A survey of digital and analog semiconductor circuits, focusing on the application of metal-oxide semiconductor and bipolar junction transistors in electronic design. The laboratory provides design experience with digital and analog circuits. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 221L and 307L.
1.25 units, Lecture
ENGR 311
Electrophysiology of the Central Nervous System
This introductory course in cellular neurophysiology presents a modern and important body of knowledge in a highly integrated fashion drawing from the contributions of anatomists, physiologists, and electrical engineers. The basic biochemical properties of the membrane and sensory transduction, neural transmission, and synaptic interaction are considered in sequential order. Then the collective action of neurons in the form of compound electrical responses, and the electroencephalogram are discussed as means of understanding the neural circuitry involved in various behavioral modalities such as sleep-walking oscillation, pain modulation, etc. Particular emphasis is placed on experimental design. Ongoing research studies illustrating the concepts and techniques presented in the course will be discussed. Open to all junior and senior life science and physical science majors.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 312
Automatic Control Systems
Automatic control systems with sensors and feedback loops are ubiquitous in modern designs. The emergence of powerful microcontrollers in recent decades makes control system implementation much easier and encourages more innovation. This course provides a broad coverage of control system theory for engineering majors. Essential mathematical tools to study control systems are reviewed. Course topics include mathematical modeling, solutions to system design specifics, performance analysis, state variable and transition matrix, compensator design using root-locus, and PID controller design. Analysis is focused on linear control systems and broad applications. Linear system modeling is broadly applied to a variety of engineering systems. MATLAB and Simulink are used in assignments and team projects.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 231 and Engineering 212L.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 314
VLSI Design Projects
An introduction to very large scale integration (VLSI) technology and design. Topics include: characteristics of circuit elements including transistors and interconnects, physical limitations of scaling and voltage, and future trends. Laboratory exercises introduce modern computer-aided design tools for design entry, simulation, and layout. Students will complete a capstone project in which they design a complete VLSI chip suitable for fabrication.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 221L and Engineering 212L, and permission of instructor
1.25 units, Lecture
ENGR 316
Neural Engineering
This introductory course uses an integrative and cross-disciplinary approach to survey basic principles and modern theories and methods in several important areas of neural engineering. Course topics include: neural prosthetics, neural stimulation, neurophysiology, neural signal detection, and analysis and computational neural networks. The practicalities of the emerging technology of brain-computer interface as well as other research topics in neural engineering will be discussed. Students will also have the opportunity to perform hands-on computer simulation and modeling of neural circuits and systems.
Open to all junior and senior life science and physical science majors.
1.00 units, Seminar
ENGR 323
Microprocessor Systems
A hands-on study of design and implementation of microprocessor based systems. Students learn the steps of translating application specifics to design criteria, choosing essential hardware components, creating system schematics, wiring complete microprocessor systems, and developing application software. This course introduces major topics in computer system architecture, anatomy of CPU function, system bus structure, memory mapping, interrupt and latency, real-time control and multi-tasking. Assembly and C/C++ language programming is introduced and extensively used in laboratory assignments. Lectures and laboratory experiments are tightly coordinated to help students become familiar with various application aspects and design challenges concerning the embedded system.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 221L or permission of instructor.
1.25 units, Lecture
ENGR 325
Mechanics of Materials
Solid mechanics of deformable bodies, focusing on the internal effects of externally applied loads. Topics include elasticity theory, stress, strain and Young’s modulus, axial, torsional, and shear stresses, Mohr’s circle, analysis of beams, shafts, and columns subjected to axial, torsional, and combined loading. Students will also use computational analysis in the design of various combined loaded structures. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 225.
1.25 units, Lecture
ENGR 337
Thermodynamics
Theoretical and applied classical engineering thermodynamics. Concepts presented include the first and second laws, properties of ideal and real substances, gas mixtures, closed and open systems, work and heat, reversible and irreversible processes, various thermodynamic cycles, and chemical reactions. Students will also complete a design and optimization of a power cycle as an individual project.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Physics 131L.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 341
Architectural Drawing
Techniques of drawing required in architectural practice, including floor plans, perspectives, and shading techniques.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 342
Architectural Design
A study of architectural design concepts including space relationship, site planning, and use of materials. The students will prepare a three- dimensional model based on their own design. The course includes field trips.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 341.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 353
Biomechanics
This biomedical engineering core course applies principles of engineering mechanics in the examination of human physiological systems, such as the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. Topics are drawn from biosolid and biofluid mechanics, including non-Newtonian fluid rheology and viscoelastic constitutive equations; and biodynamics, such as blood flow, respiratory mechanics, gait analysis and sport biomechanics. Students will be exposed to current applied biomechanics research in industry and medicine.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 225.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 357
Physiological Modeling
An introduction to the design and use of models and simulations in the quantitative description of physiological systems. The former is a powerful tool for assimilating empirical data and for predicting new phenomena. The latter is especially useful for teaching purposes. Systems studied include action potential and neural modeling, cardiovascular system dynamics, muscle biomechanics and muscle contraction theories, insulin-blood glucose regulation and pharmacokinetics. Students develop and use mathematical models based on ordinary, nonlinear and stochastic differential equations that are solved numerically by digital computer. These models provide dynamic and steady-state information about the physiological systems under study.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 225 and Mathematics 234 or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 362
Fluid Mechanics
A study of fundamental concepts in fluid mechanics, including fluid physical properties, hydrostatics, fluid dynamics, conservation of mass and momentum, dimensional analysis, pipe flow, open channel flow, and aerodynamics. Lab experiments illustrate basic fluid dynamic concepts and introduce the student to pressure and flow instrumentation and empirical methods. Lab projects include subsonic wind-tunnel testing of aerodynamic models, mechanical instrumentation design and fabrication, and computer-aided piping design. Advanced concepts such as differential analysis (e.g., the Navier-Stokes equations) and solution of the resulting partial differential equations by numerical methods will be introduced. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 225 and Mathematics 234 or permission of instructor.
1.25 units, Lecture
ENGR 372
Heat Transfer
An introduction to the physical phenomena associated with heat transfer. Analytical and empirical techniques to study heat transfer by conduction, forced and free convection, and radiation are presented. Heat equations developed for applied conduction are solved numerically via digital computer. Students will apply design and analysis of heat transfer systems that combine conduction, convection, and radiation.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 212L or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 399
Independent Study
Independent research supervised by a faculty member in an area of the student’s special interests. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
ENGR 399
Independent Study - Robot Team
Independent research supervised by a faculty member for students participating on the Robot Team. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
ENGR 399
Independent Study-Architectural Design
No Course Description Available.
1.00 units, Independent Study
ENGR 401
Special Topic: Introduction to Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical engineering is a diverse, interdisciplinary field of engineering that integrates the physical and life sciences. Its core includes biomechanics, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation, physiological systems, medical imaging, rehabilitation engineering, biosensors, biotechnology, and tissue engineering. This course will highlight the major fields of activity in which biomedical engineers are engaged. A historical perspective of the field and discussion of the moral and ethical issues associated with modern medical technology is included. This course is designed for physical and life science students with strong mathematical backgrounds.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 401
Special Topics: Gas Dynamics
Thermodynamics and fluid dynamics of compressible gas flows with friction and heat transfer, and 1D and 2D shock waves. Application to nozzles, shock tubes and propulsion devises.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 431
Experimental Design and Methods
This laboratory course requires junior and senior level mechanical engineering students to perform significant independent engineering design using skills acquired from a broad range of previous engineering courses. Simultaneously, it provides practical experience designing, testing, and using mechanical transducers for measuring displacement, velocity, acceleration, force, temperature, and pressure. Transducers are interfaced to electrical and computer subsystems for data collection and subsequent numerical analysis. CAD design, machining, and finite-element analysis of structures are introduced.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 212L 225 or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
ENGR 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
ENGR 483
Capstone Design I
A research and design project, supervised by a member of the engineering faculty, that integrates knowledge from mathematics, science, and engineering courses taken for the major. Students must choose an area of study, survey the literature, determine feasibility, complete the design, and plan for implementation. Working either individually or as members of a team, students will submit full project documentation to the faculty supervisor and deliver a final oral presentation to the department. Normally elected in the fall semester. May not be taken concurrently with Engineering 484.
This course is open to senior engineering majors only.
1.00 units, Seminar
ENGR 484
Capstone Design II
A forum for discussing the current literature especially as it relates to issues in engineering design. Each student is required to carry out a design project and to report regularly to the seminar.
This course is open to senior engineering majors only.
1.00 units, Seminar
ENGR 490
Research Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1.00 units, Independent Study