Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for CLASSICS - Fall 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2301 CLAS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
1054 CLAS-401-01 Senior Seminar/Special Topics 1.00 SEM Reger,Gary F: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  NOTE: Requires completion of the Special Registration Form, available in the Office of the Registrar.
  A senior capstone course that combines seminar meetings with independent study and the writing of a final essay under the direction of a member of the department. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the chair are required. Required of all Classics majors and open to Classical Antiquity and Classical Tradition minors (counts as a course toward fulfilling the minor).
2302 CLAS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
3593 CLCV-111-01 Intro Classical Art/Archaeolgy 1.00 LEC Risser,Martha K. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for sophomores and 8 seats reserved for first-year students
  A survey of the art and archaeology of the classical world, from the Neolithic period through the Roman Empire. Topics of discussion include sculpture, pottery, painting, architecture, town planning, burial practices, and major monuments, as well as archaeological method and theory.
3662 CLCV-203-01 Mythology 1.00 LEC Tomasso,Vincent E. TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  Generally, this course is a study of the role of myth in society; particularly, the emphasis will be laid on the body of Greek myth and its relationship to literature and art. Readings within the area of classical literature will be wide and varied, with a view to elucidating what "myth" meant to the ancient Greeks. Whatever truths are discovered will be tested against the apparent attitudes of other societies, ancient and modern, toward myth. Lectures and discussion.
3594 CLCV-206-01 Ancient Epic 1.00 LEC Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for Classics majors, 8 seats reserved for sophomores, and 8 seats reserved for first-year students
3368 CLCV-218-01 Archaeology of the Holy Land 1.00 LEC Risser,Martha K. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: Two seats are reserved for HMTCA students
  Through a survey of arts, architecture, material remains, and written accounts, this course traces the complex past of a region regarded as Holy Land by people of several major religions. We will evaluate incongruities between written texts and physical evidence; the contentious political and religious agendas that affected studies of these lands; and evidence for the ancient societies, cultures, economies, religions, and politics that contributed to shaping the modern Middle East.
3595 CLCV-224-01 Sex&Sxlties Ancnt Gre&Rm 1.00 LEC Ramgopal,Sailakshmi MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 20
  Do current Western attitudes toward sex and sexuality have a history? How and why did ancient Greek society glorify and institutionalize homosexuality and consider it superior to heterosexuality? What were the origins and evolution of Greek and Roman sexual attitudes and practices, and in what ways did Roman sexuality differ from Greek? This course will examine ancient Greek and Roman sexual values and practices in order to illuminate contemporary attitudes toward sex and the body. Readings will include selections from Homer, Sappho, Plato, Juvenal, Martial, Petronius, Catullus, and other ancient writers, as well as modern critical analyses. This course is intended for and open to all students. There is no prerequisite for enrollment.
3596 CLCV-234-01 Greek Comedy: Aristophanes 1.00 LEC Ewegen,Shane M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course will explore the literary, political, and philosophical elements of ancient Athens' greatest comic playwright, Aristophanes. By carefully reading several of his plays we will gain an appreciation for Greek comedy as a form of political satire, as a highly successful criticism of philosophy and sophistry, and as a method of philosophical inquiry in its own right. In order to better understand the humor and references of Aristophanes' plays, we will read a variety of other texts, including works of Greek history, tragedy, and philosophy. Finally, we will study some contemporary works in which the spirit (if not the structure) of Greek comedy is echoed.
3229 CLCV-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2333 CLCV-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3597 GREK-102-01 Intr Class & Biblical Greek II 1.50 LEC Tomasso,Vincent E. MWF: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: a Grade of C- or better in Greek 101 or Permission of the instructor
  A continuation of Greek 101. The aim of the course is to enable students to read Greek as soon as possible.
3598 GREK-301-01 Egypt Under Greeks & Romans 1.00 SEM Reger,Gary MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Greek 102 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
  From the advent of Alexander the Great to the Muslim conquest in 640 CE by the then governor of Palestine, Egypt was under the rule of Greeks and Romans. Thanks to the dry climate, thousands of texts on stone, papyrus, and fragments of pottery (ostraka) have been preserved. In this course, students will become familiar with the style, conventions, and language of these texts by reading the in the original Greek; they will also learn how to use scholarly aids to the study and interpretation of these texts.
3296 GREK-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2338 GREK-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2064 HMTS-112-01 The Greek and Roman World 1.00 LEC Reger,Gary MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Only students in the Humanities Gateway program are allowed to enroll in this course.
  NOTE: Course is only open to students who have been accepted into the Guided Studies Program.
  NOTE: This course will meet the requirement in the English major for a 200 level elective.
  This course focuses on two important moments in Greek and Roman culture: The first is the high point of power of the city-state of Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries BCE, two centuries that saw the consolidation of Athenian democracy, the construction and collapse of an Athenian empire. The second moment comes in the first century BCE and early first century CE, when the Roman Republic, also the head by then of a massive empire, faced challenges that led to its collapse and replacement by an authoritarian state headed by a single man. Both periods saw also the composition of important works of literature which cannot be understood without reference to the political and cultural scenes in which they were produced. This course counts towards partial fulfillment of Humanities Gateway I: Ancient Texts and Western Traditions. It can be counted toward completion of the Classics major.
1080 LATN-101-01 Fundamentals for Reading Latin 1.50 LEC Ramgopal,Sailakshmi MWF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course focuses on the fundamental knowledge required to read and write in Latin. In addition to acquiring core vocabulary for reading major Latin authors, students learn the forms of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, and adverbs, with a special emphasis on the flexibility of noun cases, and basic subordinate clauses. This course is suitable for students who are embarking on the study of Latin, and an excellent review for students who have studied Latin previously.
2131 LATN-203-01 Adv. Latin Grammar/Reading 1.00 LEC Risser,Martha K. MWF: 1:15PM-2:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Latin 102 or appropriate score on the placement exam.
  This course begins with a brief review of the material covered in Latin 102, especially complex subordinate clauses involving the subjunctive, indirect statement, and participial constructions. Students will then cover advanced topics, including the gerundive and the supine. The second half of the semester will be devoted to reading a suitable ancient text with commentary, as well as a selection of related scholarly articles, in preparation for the translation and interpretation of Latin texts at the 300 level.
3599 LATN-332-01 Catullus 1.00 LEC Ramgopal,Sailakshmi WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  A course designed for the upper-level Latin student, focusing on Catullus, the great lyric poet of the late Republic. We will read the Catullian corpus in its entirety (or very close to it) and explore the literary issues raised by the poet. There will be assignments in secondary critical literature, as well as possible forays into some of the Greek poets who influenced Catullus. A reading knowledge of Latin is essential, prior knowledge of Greek is desirable.
2521 LATN-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.