Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for CLASSICS - Fall 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2280 CLAS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
3625 CLAS-401-01 Senior Seminar/Special Topics 1.00 SEM Safran,Meredith E. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  A senior capstone course that combines seminar meetings with independent study and the writing of a final essay under the direction of a member of the department. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the chair are required. Required of all Classics majors and open to Classical Antiquity and Classical Tradition minors (counts as a course toward fulfilling the minor).
2281 CLAS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
3626 CLCV-111-01 Intro Classical Art/Archaeolgy 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  A survey of the art and archaeology of the classical world, from the Neolithic period through the Roman Empire. Topics of discussion include sculpture, pottery, painting, architecture, town planning, burial practices, and major monuments, as well as archaeological method and theory.
3266 CLCV-203-01 Mythology 1.00 LEC Safran,Meredith E. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  Generally, this course is a study of the role of myth in society; particularly, the emphasis will be laid on the body of Greek myth and its relationship to literature and art. Readings within the area of classical literature will be wide and varied, with a view to elucidating what "myth" meant to the ancient Greeks. Whatever truths are discovered will be tested against the apparent attitudes of other societies, ancient and modern, toward myth. Lectures and discussion.
3635 CLCV-210-01 Magic in Ancient Rome 1.00 LEC Ramgopal,Sailakshmi MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Love potions, prayers, and curses-magic suffused daily life in ancient Rome, forming a vital aspect of how the Romans attempted to exercise agency in their lives. In this course, we will examine amulets, magical papyri, and textual records for supernatural beings like werewolves to assess how the Romans conceptualized magic-particularly in contradistinction to religious, scientific, and philosophical thought-and the physical spaces in which they used it. Along the way, we will ask what evidence for Roman magical practice reveals about gender, class, and foreigners in antiquity. By the end of the semester, students will be able to raise the dead, curse their enemies, and call upon Hecate to do their bidding.
3627 CLCV-214-01 Greek and Roman Architecture 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  An examination of building materials and methods used in the construction of domestic, civic, and religious buildings of the Greek and Roman worlds. The way in which the functions of these buildings influenced their forms is also examined. Further topics of discussion include comparative studies of the works of individual architects, architectural adaptations to local topography, and the use of building programs for propaganda purposes.
3621 CLCV-240-01 Ancient Mobility and Travel 1.00 LEC Ramgopal,Sailakshmi MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for first-year students, 6 for sophomores
  Tourism, pilgrimage, enslavement, and exile—these are but some of the reasons that brought the Greeks and Romans far from home or—as in the case of Vergil’s hero Aeneas—to home for the very first time. By traversing the Mediterranean Sea and beyond, the Greeks and Romans encountered people and places that shaped and reshaped their understanding of the world and their place in it. By studying texts like Homer’s Odyssey, Pausanias’ Description of Greece, and Cicero’s letters alongside archaeological evidence from sites like the multicultural island of Delos, we will discover the logics of mobility in classical antiquity and its social, cultural, and political implications for those whom the Greeks and Romans met.
2933 CLCV-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2309 CLCV-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
3218 GREK-102-01 Intr Class & Biblical Greek II 1.50 LEC Tomasso,Vincent E. MWF: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: a Grade of C- or better in Greek 101 or Permission of the instructor
  A continuation of Greek 101. The aim of the course is to enable students to read Greek as soon as possible.
3628 GREK-315-01 Plato 1.00 LEC Ewegen,Shane M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Selected readings from the dialogues, with special emphasis on Plato’s style, thought, and characterization of Socrates.
2977 GREK-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2314 GREK-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
2057 HMTS-112-01 Homer in Antiquity 1.00 LEC Tomasso,Vincent E. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA FYR2  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Only students in the Humanities Gateway program are allowed to enroll in this course.
  NOTE: Course is only open to students who have been accepted into the Guided Studies Program.
  NOTE: This course will meet the requirement in the English major for a 200 level elective.
  This course focuses on Homer's Iliad, one of the most famous texts of the western world. This epic poem, which narrates episodes from near the end of the ten-year long Trojan War, influenced cultures throughout antiquity, far beyond its original historical and cultural context. In this course, we will look at the Iliad and how and why later Greeks and Romans used and transformed it, including the Athenian playwright Euripides in his tragedy Hecabe; the Battle of Frogs and Mice, an animal fable that satirizes the Iliad; Virgil's Aeneid, a foundation epic of ancient Rome from the ashes of Troy; and the imperial Greek orator Dio Chrysostom's contentious Oration 11 that claims that Homer was wrong and the Trojans actually won the war.
1080 LATN-101-01 Fundamentals for Reading Latin 1.50 LEC Ramgopal,Sailakshmi MWF: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course focuses on the fundamental knowledge required to read and write in Latin. In addition to acquiring core vocabulary for reading major Latin authors, students learn the forms of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, and adverbs, with a special emphasis on the flexibility of noun cases, and basic subordinate clauses. This course is suitable for students who are embarking on the study of Latin, and an excellent review for students who have studied Latin previously.
2120 LATN-203-01 Adv. Latin Grammar/Reading 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Latin 102 or appropriate score on the placement exam.
  This course begins with a brief review of the material covered in Latin 102, especially complex subordinate clauses involving the subjunctive, indirect statement, and participial constructions. Students will then cover advanced topics, including the gerundive and the supine. The second half of the semester will be devoted to reading a suitable ancient text with commentary, as well as a selection of related scholarly articles, in preparation for the translation and interpretation of Latin texts at the 300 level.
3622 LATN-319-01 Virtus: Masculinity 1.00 SEM Staff,Trinity T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Latin 203 or a 300-level Latin course, or permission of the instructor
  The Latin term virtus, from which the English term "virtue" is derived, denotes the broad and changing concept of what makes a "man" (vir) in Roman culture and society. This course examines the construction and significance of masculinity through the use of the term virtus in a variety of Latin texts, including prose (e.g. Sallust's historiography), lyric poety (e.g. by Catullus), drama (e.g. the comedies of Plautus) and historical inscriptions. The selection of texts may change with each iteration of the course.
2485 LATN-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.