Course Schedule

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Course Schedule for CLASSICS - Spring 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
4313 CLAS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairman are required for enrollment.
4652 CLAS-402-01 Senior Thesis 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A continuation of Classics 401 for students pursuing honors in the Classics major. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the chair are required.
4314 CLAS-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
5228 CLCV-210-01 Magic in Ancient Rome 1.00 LEC Ramgopal, Sailakshmi MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Love potions, prayers, and curses-magic suffused daily life in ancient Rome, forming a vital aspect of how the Romans attempted to exercise agency in their lives. In this course, we will examine amulets, magical papyri, and textual records for supernatural beings like werewolves to assess how the Romans conceptualized magic-particularly in contradistinction to religious, scientific, and philosophical thought-and the physical spaces in which they used it. Along the way, we will ask what evidence for Roman magical practice reveals about gender, class, and foreigners in antiquity. By the end of the semester, students will be able to raise the dead, curse their enemies, and call upon Hecate to do their bidding.
5112 CLCV-245-01 Songs of War from Greece 1.00 LEC Tomasso, Vincent MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 12 seats reserved for first-year students, 8 for sophomores
  War was a constant for every member of ancient Greek society, whether they were fighting in it, reveling in conquest, or lamenting the aftermath. For this reason, war also appears prominently in the ancient Greek imaginary. In this course we will investigate diverse ancient Greek viewpoints on war, which may include the perspective of heroic society in Homer’s epic poem the Iliad, of enslaved women in Euripides’ tragedy Trojan Women, of anti-heroic lyric poets like Archilochus and Sappho, and of the comic playwright Aristophanes in his Lysistrata. We will also consider how modern artists have re-appropriated ancient Greek visions of war, as in Bryan Doerries’s Theater of War and Sophocles’s tragedy Antigone performed by Syrian refugees.
5104 CLCV-247-01 Greek and Roman Marriage 1.00 LEC Safran, Meredith TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 3 seats reserved for first-years, 3 seats reserved for sophomores, 3 seats reserved for WMGS majors, 3 seats reserved for Classics majors
  How did ancient Greek and Roman societies understand “marriage,” a concept so familiar to us in contemporary American society? In recent years we have witnessed how its very definition, the kind of obligations and rights it entails, and how it defines gender roles are bound up in a web of familial, religious, and political interests that can change, despite insistence on “tradition.” In this course, we will read a survey of Greek and Roman texts that engage with the concept of marriage over a millennium, including Homer’s Odyssey, Athenian tragedies and legal oratory, Roman comedies, the account of Roman history by Livy, and the Roman poet Ovid’s epic Metamorphoses.
5652 CLCV-248-01 Ships & Underwater Archaeology 1.00 LEC Foster, Karen TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course introduces students to the world of the ancient mariners, with special attention to new discoveries and interpretations. We begin by discussing the history and methodological development of underwater and maritime archaeology. We then consider the evidence for ancient ships from art, artifacts, texts, and underwater and land archaeology, from e.g. pharaonic Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Bronze Age Aegean, and the classical Mediterranean. We conclude by discussing the ethical and legal dimensions of the discipline. No prior experience with the material is expected
5206 CLCV-316-01 Ovid's Metamorphoses 1.00 LEC Safran, Meredith T: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course explores one of the most influential works of art in the Western tradition: the epic weaving-together of centuries’ worth of classical mythology into one poetic masterwork by Ovid, who completed this work as his fortunes turned from celebrated poet to political exile in the twilight of the Emperor Augustus’ reign. No less controversial today than it was in antiquity, students will explore the many facets of this literary monument by reading the poem and critical writings, and through a mixture of discussion and written work.
5197 CLCV-323-01 Classics and Colonialism 1.00 SEM Ramgopal, Sailakshmi MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course explores the reception of classical literature and history in colonial contexts. Through texts like Sophocles' Antigone; Nehru's "India and Greece"; and Fugard's The Island, we will examine how colonized peoples used the classical tradition to develop strategies of collaboration and resistance to oust European colonizers from environments like India, South Africa, and the Caribbean. By studying the reception of classics through the perspectives of colonized communities, the course considers the relationship between classics and colonialism and performs the crucial function of decentering classical reception studies.
4078 CLCV-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND Risser, Martha TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4837 GREK-101-01 Intro Class & Biblical Greek I 1.50 LEC Tomasso, Vincent MWF: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  A course in the fundamentals of classical Greek, designed for those who begin the language in college.
5111 GREK-321-01 Euripides 1.00 LEC Caldwell, Lauren TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Greek 102 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
  Euripides was the youngest of the Athenian tragedians; we have preserved more of his plays than of any other dramatist. Questions of gender, war, politics, and human relations with the gods all figure powerfully in his dramas. We will read one or more of his works in Greek. In addition to translation, students may work on textual criticism, staging of drama, and/or the writing of a research paper.
5724 GREK-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
4126 LATN-102-01 Intermed Grammar Reading Latin 1.50 LEC Ramgopal, Sailakshmi MWF: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Latin 101; or equivalent score on the Latin placement exam as determined by the Classics Department; or permission of the instructor
  This course begins with a brief review of material covered in LAT101, then proceeds to cover complex subordinate clauses involving the subjunctive, indirect statement, and varieties of participial constructions, in addition to further vocabulary acquisition. Students begin to read passages from ancient Latin literature, such as Julius Caesar’s Gallic Wars, Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura, the Res Gestae of Augustus Caesar, and Ovid’s Metamorphoses.
5110 LATN-326-01 Roman Holidays in Latin Texts 1.00 SEM Safran, Meredith M: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Latin 203; or equivalent score on the Latin placement exam as determined by the Classics Department; or permission of the instructor
  Holidays are more than opportunities for a release from day-to-day responsibilities; they commemorate past events of communal importance as features of a recurring cycle of time, the calendar. The Roman program of holidays, the fasti, was both inscribed in monumental form and used as the basis of one of the Augustan poet Ovid's longest and most intricate poetic works, also titled Fasti. In this course students will explore the Roman cycle of holidays and their national-cultural significance through literary and epigraphic Latin texts.