Course Descriptions

Course Catalog for CHEMISTRY
CHEM 100
Chemistry for Non-Scientists
This course will explore the ways modern chemists determine the composition and structures of chemicals, with an emphasis on molecules that are found in nature. Topics to be covered include the interpretation of infrared spectra, mass spectra, and proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Not creditable to the chemistry or biochemistry majors.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 111
Introductory Chemistry I and Laboratory
The study of the major concepts and theories required for an understanding of chemical phenomena. Principal topics include atomic and molecular structure, gas laws, stoichiometry, changes of state, chemical binding, solutions, and energetics in chemical reactions. Laboratory work includes quantitative measurements of solutions, synthesis, characterization of chemicals by physical and spectroscopic methods, molecular modeling, and student-assigned projects concentrating on quantitative measurements of solutions. Course intended primarily for students with little or no previous chemistry background.
1.25 units, Lecture
CHEM 112
Introductory Chemistry II and Laboratory
A continuation of Chemistry 111L with emphasis on chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, kinetics, and a presentation of the properties and reactions of selected elements. Laboratory work is devoted to the analysis of systems involving the principles and concepts studied in the classroom. To the greatest extent possible, laboratory and lecture section assignments shall remain the same as for Chemistry 111L.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 111L.
1.25 units, Lecture
CHEM 130
Environmental Chemistry
This course explores the fundamental chemistry relevant to environmental pollution through lectures, discussion, and class activities which measure actual pollution levels in the Hartford area. The types of pollutants, the risks associated with pollution, and the steps which can be taken to ameliorate pollution will be discussed, with particular emphasis on the urban environment. Not creditable to chemistry or biochemistry majors.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 135
Chemistry: The Science for All Seasons
A non-majors course which will explore the chemical principles of everyday life based on a seasonal categorization. Students will engage in discussions and integrated laboratory exercises on topics such as spectroscopy (sunscreen – summer; color changes in leaves – fall), thermodynamics (Hand warmers – winter, “Ice-melt” – winter), common chemical reactions (weed-killer- spring, pool chemistry – summer), and biochemical systems (Vitamin D: summer; fire-flies – fall).
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 141
Chemistry in Context
This course for non-science majors examines the chemistry that influences people's lives and their choices. Topics will include air pollution, water pollution, energy and climate change, genetic engineering, food and nutrition. Reacting to the Past simulation games will be used with some of the topics to enhance student understanding of the choices, economics, and political considerations related to the chemical issues. Integrated laboratory exercises will also be used. This course is based on the text Chemistry in Context developed by the American Chemical Society. Not creditable to the chemistry or biochemistry majors.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 150
Science in Art
This course will focus on topics of interest to artists from the perspective of scientific understanding of the materials comprising their work. Emphasis will be placed on the need for the conservation and preservation of art objects, in particular fresco and easel paintings, ceramic and metallic sculpture, jewelry, and cloth. Dating techniques will be covered as they assist with provenance and authentication studies. Topics of special interest to particular students may be presented as well as a discussion of several masters whose interest in art and science overlap to a considerable degree. Not creditable to the chemistry or biochemistry majors.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 155
Archaeological Chemistry
This course is designed to introduce students to the application of chemical principles to the exploration and explication of archaeological issues. From the identification of ancient trading routes through pottery analysis to the elucidation of human interactions with the environment through investigation of human remains, this course will demonstrate the utility of chemistry and chemical methodologies to archaeological research. Not creditable to chemistry or biochemistry majors.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 160
Introduction to Textile Science
This lecture and demonstration course will present an introduction to classification and identification of natural, regenerated, and synthetic fibers; construction of woven, non-woven, and knitted fabrics; application and design of finishes and colors; and evaluation methods for textiles. This course includes several field trips. Students should come away from this course with a solid background for the selection, use, and care of textiles and a recognition and appreciation for the science and technology associated with the textile industry.Not creditable to the chemistry or biochemistry majors.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 170
Introduction to Forensic Chemistry
This course provides an overview of the techniques used in the modern forensic laboratory for the analysis of common types of physical evidence encountered at crime scenes. The nature of physical evidence, the underlying chemical and physical principles of the scientific techniques employed in analyses, and the interpretation and evidentiary value of scientific results will be studied. This course will include lectures, demonstrations, and limited laboratory work. Not creditable to the chemistry or biochemistry majors.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 175
Chemistry of Atmosphere
This course provides an introduction to chemical principles through the lens of atmospheric chemistry. It covers the structure of the atmosphere, chemical reaction cycles of atmospheric importance, indoor air pollution, stratospheric ozone destruction, and a chemical perspective on climate change. The course also examines the interplay between scientific research, public perception of scientific knowledge, and governmental regulation. This course is intended primarily for non-science majors and is not creditable towards the chemistry or biochemistry majors. A student cannot take both Chemistry 175 and 205 for credit.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 180
Food Chemistry: Let's Eat!
This course will explore the science of food, both as a necessity and as a source of pleasure, through an understanding of the fundamental chemistry of food, nutrition, cooking, and sensation. All foods are chemicals and the body uses these chemicals in various ways. Cooking is a combination of chemical and physical processes. Cooking exercises will demonstrate the role of various ingredients in the preparation of the final product, whether muffins or mayonnaise. Food is also a source of sensory pleasure. The chemical basis of taste and smell will be considered, including tasting exercises. Finally, there are safety, economic, political and social justice issues surrounding our use of food and its availability. Students will explore some of these issues through independent research and both written and oral presentations. Not creditable to chemistry or biochemistry majors.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 205
Atmospheric Chemistry
This lecture course serves as an introduction to the chemistry of the atmosphere. It will address atmospheric composition, chemical reactions in the atmosphere, and the heterogeneous chemistry of aerosols. Case studies will include the chemistry of stratospheric ozone destruction, smog, and climate change. Basic chemical topics will include chemical kinetics, phase equilibria, and molecular interaction with light. This course serves as a natural science elective for the environmental science major but is not creditable towards the chemistry or biochemistry major. A student cannot earn credit for both Chemistry 175 and Chemistry 205.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 111L.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 211
Elementary Organic Chemistry I
A systematic study of the compounds of carbon, including methods of synthesis and correlation of chemical and physical properties with structure. Introduction to certain theoretical concepts. One laboratory per week emphasizing basic techniques and synthesis.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 112L.
1.25 units, Lecture
CHEM 212
Elementary Organic Chemistry II
A continuation of the lecture and laboratory study begun in Chemistry 211L.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 211L.
1.25 units, Lecture
CHEM 230
Environmental Chemistry
This course will cover basic chemical concepts, such as polarity, volatility, and solubility, as they relate to chemical behavior in the environment. The ability to predict environmental behavior from chemical structure will be emphasized. Human and environmental toxicology will be discussed, and specific pollutants will be examined. Case studies will be used to illustrate concepts. The laboratory will emphasize techniques used for environmental analysis.
1.25 units, Lecture
CHEM 309
Physical Chemistry I
A lecture and laboratory course concentrating on the development of the theory and application of thermodynamics and kinetics to chemical systems. Special consideration will be given to the theoretical treatment of solution chemistry (e.g., colligative properties, electrolyte theory).
Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 132 and Physics 231L.
1.25 units, Lecture
CHEM 310
Physical Chemistry II
A comprehensive treatment of quantum chemistry, molecular structure, and chemical statistics. Subjects covered are designed to emphasize applications to chemical systems.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 132 or 142, and Physics 231.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 311
Analytical Chemistry
A lecture and laboratory course covering the theory and practice of chemical analysis techniques in a quantitative manner. Detailed discussion of simple and complex acid-base equilibria, and complex buffer systems, will be presented, as will related solubility problems, complex metal-ligand solution equilibria, and oxidation reduction equilibria. Stoichiometry will also be addressed in a systematic way. These techniques will be applied in the laboratory, where accuracy and precision will be stressed. Emphasis will be placed on useful chemical reactions for analysis purposes. Latter stages of the course will deal with potentiometry, spectrometry, and chromatographic theory, both gas and liquid, as a separation tool with practical applications.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 112L.
1.25 units, Lecture
CHEM 312
Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis
A lecture and laboratory course in the principles and practice of the use of instruments for quantitative and qualitative chemical measurements. Theory, optimization, and application of instrumentation for spectroscopic, electrochemical, spectrometric, and hyphenated methods of analysis are presented. Applications of computer methods of analysis as well as analog and digital manipulation of electrical signals are presented.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 311L.
1.25 units, Lecture
CHEM 313
Principles of Inorganic Chemistry
A study of atomic structure, the chemical bond, and molecular and ionic structure of inorganic compounds, and an introduction to the principles of coordination chemistry.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 112L.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 314
Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry
A lecture and laboratory course devoted to the systematic study of transition elements and main group elements, their compounds, and reactions. Topics of current interest in inorganic chemistry will be discussed.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 313.
1.25 units, Lecture
CHEM 316
Physical Biochemistry
A comprehensive survey of the physical methods used in the investigation of biological systems, and the models and underlying theory developed to account for observed behavior. The physical and chemical properties of amino acids, peptides, proteins, purines, pyrimidines, and nucleic acids will be examined from spectroscopic, thermodynamic, and kinetic viewpoints.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Mathematics 132 or 142, and Physics 231.
1.25 units, Lecture
CHEM 399
Independent Study
No Course Description Available.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
CHEM 403
Advanced Organic Chemistry I
Normally (but not restricted to) topics in theoretical organic chemistry. Emphasis on recent developments.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 212L, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 404
Biological Chemistry
A lecture seminar course focusing on the fundamental chemistry underlying biological phenomena. Examples from the current biochemical literature will be used.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 212L, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 406
Advanced Organic Chemistry II
Normally (but not restricted to) topics in organic synthesis. Emphasis on recent developments.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 212L, or concurrent enrollment.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 415
Organometallic Chemistry
The basic principles of the organometallic chemistry of the d-block elements will be presented. Topics will include a survey of ligand types, the properties and reactions of organometallic complexes, and applications of organotransition metal compounds in catalysis. Lectures will be supplemented with discussions of current literature in the field.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 212L and Chemistry 313.
1.00 units, Lecture
CHEM 418
Nuclear Magnet Resonance
A lecture and laboratory course that examines the principles and practice of pulsed Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (FT-NMR). Topics to be discussed include the interactions of nuclei in and with a magnetic field, net magnetization and the rotating frame, relaxation mechanisms, nuclear Overhauser enhancement, multiple pulse sequences, and two-dimensional FT-NMR. Students will also investigate these topics in an associated laboratory. There will be one lecture and one laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 212L, or permission of instructor.
1.00 units, Seminar
CHEM 419
Research (Library)
Students will conduct library research projects under the direction of an individual staff member. Students electing to pursue independent study of this type should plan a full semester culminating with the completion of a final formal paper. Participation in the weekly Friday departmental seminar series is mandatory. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chair are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 2.00 units max, Independent Study
CHEM 425
Research (Laboratory)
Students will conduct original laboratory research projects under the direction of an individual staff member. Students electing to pursue independent study of this type should plan on initiating work no later than the fall of the senior year, and should also plan on no less than two semesters of study with the completion of a final formal paper. Participation in the weekly Friday departmental seminar series is mandatory. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chair are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 2.00 units max, Independent Study
CHEM 430
Environmental Toxicology
This course will cover basic toxicological principles by examining the biological and chemical factors that influence toxicity, the impact of natural and synthetic toxins on the environment and health, toxicity testing protocols, and toxicological mechanisms. Human and ecological toxicology will be discussed with particular emphasis on the influence of chemical structure on toxicity. Case studies will be used to illustrate concepts.
Prerequisite: C- or better in Chemistry 212 or Chemistry 230.
1.00 units, Seminar
CHEM 466
Teaching Assistantship
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and chair are required for enrollment.
0.50 units min / 1.00 units max, Independent Study
CHEM 497
Senior Thesis
No Course Description Available.
1.00 units, Independent Study
CHEM 498
Senior Thesis Part 1
No Course Description Available.
2.00 units, Independent Study
CHEM 499
Senior Thesis
Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, after receiving approval for the thesis project from the Chemistry Department, is required.
2.00 units, Independent Study