Select a level: Select a term:
Only show courses available to first-year students.

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Course Schedule for AMERICAN STUDIES - Fall 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2006 AMST-203-01 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Manevitz, Alexander MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for sophomores, 7 for first year students, 2 for juniors.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
3660 AMST-212-01 Disability Studies:Theory&Hist 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course offers a rigorous interdisciplinary introduction to Disability Studies. We will look at the history of disability studies as it emerged in relation to the Civil Rights movement. We will consider how the efforts of disability activists and scholars have shaped disability studies and how this field informs and is also informed by other disciplines, such as Performance and Trauma Studies. We will examine how disability has been defined over time and how particular definitions of disability intersect with other aspects of identity, such as socio-economic class, race and/or ethnicity, sexuality and gender. In addition to reading and critiquing history and theory, we will also look at a variety of “disability texts” that will include various genres, such as fiction, memoir, film, and drama.
3717 AMST-260-01 The Struggle for Civil Rights 1.00 LEC Greenberg, Cheryl TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  African Americans and their allies have long struggled to win equal rights and equal opportunities in America. We will examine the course of that struggle in the twentieth century, focusing primarily on the period 1950-1968. We will consider questions of urbanization, employment, racism, politics, violence, non-violence, Black Power and the notion of “race blindness.” The end of the course will be spent considering the present day. What has been resolved, and what issues remain? Are there new challenges to achieving racial equality in the U.S? Have we become “post-racial” yet, and do we want to be?
3057 AMST-285-01 Born in Blood 1.00 LEC Gac, Scott MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM
W: 2:40PM-3:55PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  NOTE: 17 seats reserved for first year students, 17 for sophomores, 10 for juniors, and 5 for seniors
  This course explains how violence has made modern America and belongs alongside liberty, democracy, freedom, and equality in the pantheon of American political and cultural ideals. Using figures such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Dwight Eisenhower, and events from the American Revolution to the era of Civil Rights, "Born in Blood" situates state sanctioned violence against American citizens as a definitive force in American life.
3709 AMST-310-01 Young People Rise Up! 1.00 LEC Hanna, Karen MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  How have students imagined resistance? What methods have they used to actualize their ideas, and what have been outcomes of their efforts? This course centers student movements primarily in the United States, but also includes those elsewhere, discussing their relationship to American politics. Topics may include the formation of the Third World Liberation Front and movement for Ethnic Studies, anti-Vietnam War protests, #blacklivesmatter, campus sexual violence, gun violence, and student movements in the Philippines, Iran, and South Africa. Using primary documents, film, literature, popular media, and scholarly analysis, the course will assess the global social forces that spark and shape students' collective action, conditions that impact responses from the university, police and other institutional powers, and how these social actors shape one another.
3712 AMST-320-01 Place in the Native Northeast 1.00 SEM Wickman, Thomas TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The coasts, rivers, fields, hills, villages, and cities of present-day Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia have been home for indigenous families, communities, and nations through numerous environmental, political, and economic transformations. Students will learn about the ways that Native nations of the Northeast, from Pequots to Mi'kmaqs, have adapted, recreated, and reaffirmed a deep connectedness to their homelands and territories, from the fifteenth century to the present. Fields trips to local sites and archives will facilitate original historical research. Primary sources to be assigned include autobiographies, travel narratives, war histories, maps, Native American stories, and dictionaries of indigenous place names, and secondary source readings will cover major themes in Native American studies, with special emphasis on sense of place.
3058 AMST-325-01 New York and its Neighborhoods 1.00 SEM Manevitz, Alexander W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Founded as a small Dutch colonial port city on a narrow island inhabited by Lenape Indians, New York City became the most populous city in the United States, as well as a global economic and cultural hub. In order to better understand New York’s complex and uneven urban growth, we will analyze the ways a diverse array of New Yorkers struggled to define themselves and their communities. As we explore the dynamic history of the city and its residents, we will become better scholars and more responsible urban citizens. Each class meeting will focus on one of New York City’s diverse neighborhoods, using it as a lens to illustrate and investigate important themes of urban and American history that extend well beyond the five boroughs.
3662 AMST-357-01 Race and Urban Space 1.00 LEC Baldwin, Davarian TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Scholars and now even the larger public have conceded that race is a social construct. However, many are just beginning to fully explore how the specific dimensions and use of space is mediated by the politics of racial difference and racial identification. Therefore, this course seeks to explore how racism and race relations shape urban spatial relations, city politics, and the built environment and how the historical development of cities has shaped racial identity as lived experience. Covering the 20th century, the course examines three critical junctures: Ghettoization (1890s-1940s); Metropolitan Formation (1940s-1990s); and Neo-Liberal Gentrification (present).
2084 AMST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
2954 AMST-402-01 Senior Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Students undertake projects on American studies topics of their own choosing. The projects will be supervised by a faculty member in an American studies-related field. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the project adviser and director, are required for enrollment.
3694 AMST-405-01 Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums 1.00 SEM Baldwin, Davarian T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Colleges, universities, and their medical centers have become the dominant employers, real estate holders, policing agents, and educational and health care providers in major cities across the country. Meanwhile struggling areas have looked to sports stadiums and casinos as their salvation from poverty. What happened? "Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums" examines a world without factories, as higher education, healthcare, and tourism have become the face of today's urban economy. Located at the center of what has been called the "Knowledge Corridor" along I-91, the course draws special attention to Trinity College's past and present role in shaping greater Hartford.
3563 AMST-445-01 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
3669 AMST-453-01 American Slavery 1.00 SEM Gac, Scott M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: Request pin code from professor for registration
  This course covers important themes and developments in the history of slavery in the United States. From origins in indigenous communities, colonization, and the black Atlantic, human bondage shaped (and continues to shape) the legal and social framework for generations of Americans. Readings feature voices from slaveholders to the enslaved, politicians and activists, as well as some of the best work done by recent historians. This course fulfills transnational approaches.
2123 AMST-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
2226 AMST-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2085 AMST-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE:
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2563 AMST-801-01 Approaches to American Studies 1.00 LEC Soto, Gabriella R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar, which is required of all American studies graduate students, examines a variety of approaches to the field. Readings may include several “classic” texts of 18th- and 19th-century American culture and several key works of American studies scholarship from the formative period of the field after World War II, as well as more recent contributions to the study of the United States. Topics will include changing ideas about the content, production, and consumption of American culture; patterns of ethnic identification and definition; the construction of categories like “race” and “gender”; and the bearing of class, race, gender, and sexuality on individuals’ participation in American society and culture. Undergraduates who wish to enroll in this course must obtain permission of their adviser and the instructor.
3737 AMST-805-01 Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums 1.00 SEM Baldwin, Davarian T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  Colleges, universities, and their medical centers have become the dominant employers, real estate holders, policing agents, and educational and health care providers in major cities across the country. Meanwhile struggling areas have looked to sports stadiums and casinos as their salvation from poverty. What happened? "Meds, Eds, Slots, and Stadiums" examines a world without factories, as higher education, healthcare, and tourism have become the face of today's urban economy. Located at the center of what has been called the "Knowledge Corridor" along I-91, the course draws special attention to Trinity College's past and present role in shaping greater Hartford.
3560 AMST-845-01 Black Women Writers 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 5
  Through readings in various genres (fiction, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, etc.), this course examines how black women's literary production is informed by the experiences, conditions, identities, and histories of women of African descent in the U.S., including some who were born or have lived outside of the U.S. Among the recurring themes/issues we will discuss are the impact of class, gender, race, sexuality, ability, and geographical location on black women's writings, artistic visions, the politics and dynamics of black women's roles in families, communities, the nation, and across the globe. Writers vary each semester but may include: Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Roxanne Gay, Lorraine Hansberry, bell hooks, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Z.Z. Packer, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ann Petry, Tracy K. Smith, and Alice Walker.
3670 AMST-853-01 American Slavery 1.00 SEM Gac, Scott M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This course covers important themes and developments in the history of slavery in the United States. From origins in indigenous communities, colonization, and the black Atlantic, human bondage shaped (and continues to shape) the legal and social framework for generations of Americans. Readings feature voices from slaveholders to the enslaved, politicians and activists, as well as some of the best work done by recent historians. This course fulfills transnational approaches.
2267 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
2115 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2111 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2112 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2114 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
2113 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
3514 AHIS-271-01 The Arts of America 1.00 LEC Curran, Kathleen TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course examines major trends in painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts in the United States from the colonial period to 1900. Emphasis will be placed on how the arts in the United States reflect the social and cultural history of the 18th and 19th centuries.
3596 ECON-214-01 Bus & Entrepreneur Hist 1.00 LEC Gunderson, Gerald TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 39
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  The evolution of business structures and practices, primarily in the American experience. Changes in such aspects of management, finance, marketing, and information are considered. Special attention is given to the role of entrepreneurs and conditions which may have influenced their creative efforts. Both an analytical approach and case studies are employed.
3473 ENGL-105-01 Intro to Amer Lit II 1.00 LEC Hager, Christopher MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for First Years
  This course surveys major works of American literature after 1865, from literary reckonings with the Civil War and its tragic residues, to works of "realism" and "naturalism" that contended with the late 19th century’s rapid pace of social change, to the innovative works of the modern and postmodern eras. As we read works by authors such as Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, William Faulkner, and Toni Morrison, we will inquire: how have literary texts defined and redefined "America" and Americans? What are the means by which some groups have been excluded from the American community, and what are their experiences of that exclusion? And how do these texts shape our understanding of the unresolved problems of post-Civil War American democracy? For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
3474 ENGL-116-01 Intro African Amer Lit Part I 1.00 LEC Paulin, Diana TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course surveys African American literature in a variety of genres from the 18th to the early 20th centuries. Through the study of texts by Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Wilson, Harriet Jacobs, William Wells Brown, Julia Collins, William and Ellen Craft, Charles Chesnutt, Paul Dunbar, Ida Wells, W.E.B. Du Bois, and others, we will explore how these writers represented and influenced the history of people of African descent in the U.S., from slavery and abolition to early struggles for civil rights; how their work has intervened in racial formation and imagined the black diaspora; how literary innovations have engaged with continuing political questions of nation, gender, sexuality, and class. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
3134 HIST-200-01 Hartford: Past and Present 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  Focusing on both Hartford and its region since the 1630s, this course explores key themes in American urban, social, economic, cultural, and political history, paying close attention to issues of race\ethnicity, gender\sexuality, class relations, religion, and urbanism. We first examine interactions between Native groups, English settlers, African slaves, and their descendants, from the Colonial Era to the Early Republic (1630s-1830s). We then explore urban cultures, abolitionism, European and African American migration, and Hartford's as a global financial and manufacturing center (1830s-1940s). Finally, from the 1940s to the present, topics include suburbanization, deindustrialization, racial segregation, Civil Rights movements, West Indian and Puerto Ricans migration, neoliberalism, globalization, and relations between Hartford and its suburbs. We also track Trinity College's history since 1823.
3528 MUSC-274-01 Jazz: 1900-Present 1.00 LEC Allen, Jennifer TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 39
  Through listening, discussion, and reading, this course will survey the development of jazz from ragtime and pre-jazz through New Orleans swing, be-bop, and modern jazz. Among composers and performers to be studied include Louis Armstrong, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Scott Joplin, Thelonious Monk, Charles Parker, and Woody Shaw. No previous training in music is required. Also listed under American Studies.
2057 PBPL-201-01 Intro to Ameri Public Policy 1.00 LEC Fulco, Adrienne TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: Course not open to First Year Students
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for sophomores and 4 seats by instructor consent.
  This course introduces students to the formal and informal processes through which American public policy is made. They will study the constitutional institutions of government and the distinct role each branch of the national government plays in the policy-making process, and also examine the ways in which informal institutions-political parties, the media, and political lobbyists-contribute to and shape the policy process.
3443 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Laws, Serena MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
3444 POLS-102-02 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Laws, Serena MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
3453 POLS-273-01 Law, Politics and Society 1.00 LEC Dudas, Mary MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 29
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  This course examines the role of law in American society and politics. We will approach law as a living museum displaying the central values, choices, purposes, goals, and ideals of our society. Topics covered include: the nature of law; the structure of American law; the legal profession, juries, and morality; crime and punishment; courts, civil action, and social change; and justice and democracy. Throughout, we will be concerned with law and its relation to cultural change and political conflict.
3742 POLS-301-01 Amer Political Parties & Elec 1.00 LEC Evans, Diana TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement. Closed to seniors.
  An analysis of American political parties, including a study of voting behavior, party organization and leadership, and recent and proposed reforms and proposals for reorganization of existing party structures.
3549 POLS-317-01 Amer Political Thought 1.00 SEM Dudas, Mary MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement. Closed to seniors.
  A study of the development of American political thought: the colonial period; the Revolution; Jeffersonian democracy; the defense of slave society; social Darwinism; the Populist and Progressive reform movements; and current theories of conservatism, liberalism, and the Left.
3440 POLS-355-01 Urban Politics 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie T: 6:30PM-9:00PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102 or permission of instructor.
  This course will use the issues, institutions, and personalities of the metropolitan area of Hartford to study political power, who has it, and who wants it. Particular attention will be given to the forms of local government, types of communities, and the policies of urban institutions. Guest speakers will be used to assist each student in preparing a monograph on a local political system.
3460 POLS-379-01 American Foreign Policy 1.00 LEC Flibbert, Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  This course offers an examination of postwar American foreign policy. After reviewing the major theoretical and interpretive perspectives, we examine the policymaking process, focused on the principal players in the executive and legislative branches, as well as interest groups and the media. We then turn to contemporary issues: the "war on terror," the Iraq war, humanitarian intervention, U.S. relations with other major powers, and America's future prospects as the dominant global power.
3622 RELG-286-01 Islam in America 1.00 LEC Koertner, Mareike MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Islam has become the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse religious group in the United States. This course is divided into two parts: the first provides an historical survey of Islam in America, from its discovery to the present; the second part examines contemporary issues of Muslim American communities and their interactions with American society at large. Topics include religious movements among African-American and immigrant groups, educational, cultural and youth initiatives, Sufism, civil rights groups, progressive Muslims, women's and feminist movements, and Islam in popular culture and in the media.
3652 SOCL-214-01 Racism 1.00 LEC Williams, Johnny TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 39
  A cross-national comparison of racial and ethnic differences as sources of conflict and inequality within and between societies. We will also consider the role of race and ethnicity as a basis for group and national solidarity. Topics will include the persistence of ethnic and racial loyalties in regard to language, marital choice, and politics; a comparison of social mobility patterns among various ethnic and racial groups; ethnicity and race as reactionary or revolutionary ideologies; and the issues and facts regarding assimilation and pluralism in different societies.
3135 URST-200-01 Hartford: Past and Present 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 17
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  Focusing on both Hartford and its region since the 1630s, this course explores key themes in American urban, social, economic, cultural, and political history, paying close attention to issues of race\ethnicity, gender\sexuality, class relations, religion, and urbanism. We first examine interactions between Native groups, English settlers, African slaves, and their descendants, from the Colonial Era to the Early Republic (1630s-1830s). We then explore urban cultures, abolitionism, European and African American migration, and Hartford's as a global financial and manufacturing center (1830s-1940s). Finally, from the 1940s to the present, topics include suburbanization, deindustrialization, racial segregation, Civil Rights movements, West Indian and Puerto Ricans migration, neoliberalism, globalization, and relations between Hartford and its suburbs. We also track Trinity College's history since 1823.