Select a level: Select a term:
Only show courses available to first-year students.

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Course Schedule for AMERICAN STUDIES - Fall 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2017 AMST-203-01 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Heatherton,Christina TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
2346 AMST-203-02 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Gieseking,Jennifer E. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
2990 AMST-285-01 Born in Blood 1.00 LEC Gac,Scott MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM
W: 2:40PM-3:55PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49
  This course explains how violence has made modern America and belongs alongside liberty, democracy, freedom, and equality in the pantheon of American political and cultural ideals. Using figures such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Dwight Eisenhower, and events from the American Revolution to the era of Civil Rights, "Born in Blood" situates state sanctioned violence against American citizens as a definitive force in American life.
3435 AMST-298-01 Intro to HipHop Music & Cult 1.00 LEC Conway,Nicholas J. F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  This course will examine the evolution of hip hop music and culture (Graffiti art, B-boying [break-dancing], DJ-ing, and MC-ing) from its birth in 1970s New York to its global and commercial explosion during the late 1990s. Students learn to think critically about both hip hop culture, and about the historical, commercial, and political contexts in which hip hop culture took, and continues to take, shape. Particular attention is paid to questions of race, masculinity, authenticity, consumption, commodification, globalization, and good, old-fashioned funkiness.
2221 AMST-301-01 Jr. Sem.: American Texts 1.00 SEM Greenberg,Cheryl W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 14
  Prerequisite: C- or better in American Studies 203 or AMST 210 or concurrent enrollment.
  This course, required for the American studies major and ordinarily taken in the fall of the junior year, examines central texts in American history and culture. Through intensive discussion and writing, the class will explore the contexts of these works as well as the works themselves, paying particular attention to the interrelated issues of race, class, gender, and other similarly pivotal social constructs. Course is open only to American studies majors.
3024 AMST-336-01 Globalization:Amer in Mod Wrld 1.00 SEM Heatherton,Christina TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Our current moment of global crisis forces us to reckon with the contradictions of globalization. What does globalization mean? How can we trace its history? This course examines the roots of globalization through the twentieth century: from liberal democracy and communist internationalism to Bandung humanism, fascism, and global capitalism. It explores U.S. social movements, their organization and interpretations, as a site to uncover how America was depicted and understood throughout the world. These movements developed and subsequently imagined visions of freedom, governance, justice, and progress that could themselves be globalized. Through literature, film, poetry, and more, this course examines the transnational interaction of social movements within a global sphere.
2444 AMST-357-01 Race and Urban Space 1.00 LEC Baldwin,Davarian L. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Scholars and now even the larger public have conceded that race is a social construct. However, many are just beginning to fully explore how the specific dimensions and use of space is mediated by the politics of racial difference and racial identification. Therefore, this course seeks to explore how racism and race relations shape urban spatial relations, city politics, and the built environment and how the historical development of cities has shaped racial identity as lived experience. Covering the 20th century, the course examines three critical junctures: Ghettoization (1890s-1940s); Metropolitan Formation (1940s-1990s); and Neo-Liberal Gentrification (present).
2127 AMST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
3465 AMST-409-01 American Empire 1.00 SEM Baldwin,Davarian L. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course is open only to senior American Studies majors, or by permission of instructor.
  Thomas Jefferson once boldly described the United States as an “empire of liberty.” But whether or not America has ever taken on the identity, ever functioned, as an empire has been one of the most hotly debated topics of our current global times. In this senior seminar we want to take both a historical and contemporary look at what happens when the foreign policy of the United States converges with the general practices of military engagement, occupation, nation-building, commercial market control, and/or annexation of “foreign lands.” Do such foreign relations constitute an empire? In this course we will examine a number of critical moments including the internal U.S. expansion into native American and Mexican lands, “Manifest Destiny” projects in the turn-of-the-twentieth century Caribbean and Asian Pacific, Marshall Plan policies in Cold War Europe, and “War on Terror” initiatives in the present day Middle East. What have been the aspirations of U.S. foreign policy, what have been the consequences, how do they affect the policies and practices “back home.” Have any of these experiences constituted an American Empire?
3466 AMST-424-01 American Comics 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course provides an introduction to Comic Art in North America, from the beginnings of the newspaper comic strip through the development of comic books, the growth of graphic novels, and current developments in electronic media. It focuses on the history and aesthetics of the medium, comparison between developments in the United States, Mexico, and French Canada, and the social and cultural contexts in which comic art is created and consumed. The first half of the semester concentrates on early and 20th-century comic strips and the development of the comic book form through the 1940s; the second on the social changes affecting comic art in the 1950s and 1960s, the development of a comic book subculture from the 1970s to the 21st century, the growth of independently published graphic novels and the independent comics, and contemporary electronic media developments.
3483 AMST-426-01 Nuclear America 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  In this course we will explore large- and small-scale cultural landscapes as they have been shaped by nuclear power, weapons, transportation, and waste. Among these landscapes are towns created for making nuclear weapons; open-air testing sites; military complexes, such as ports, bases, airfields, and silos; the West’s uranium mines, and the land, water, and Native American territory polluted by radioactive tailings; nuclear reactor sites, from New England’s regional power plants to those in metropolitan areas; and land and offshore storage sites for nuclear waste. Besides the physical changes to the American landscape, nuclear sites involve extensive secrecy, exclusion, and policing, and they are invested with fraught meanings. We will explore nuclear America through history, geography, art, literature, and film.
3128 AMST-435-01 Museum Exhibition 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  One of the most engaging ways to promote collections and explore a subject or theme is to create an exhibition, which is a genre in and of itself—telling a story with artifacts. Through critical readings students will explore the cultural and educational goals of exhibits, visitor needs and accessibility, design elements (including technology), and audience evaluation methods utilized at libraries, historic houses and historical sites, and history and cultural museums. Drawing from the extensive and wide-ranging collections in the Watkinson Library, students will conceive, write, and install an exhibition, design and publish a catalogue, and plan and implement an opening event to take place at the end of the semester in the Watkinson.
3484 AMST-449-01 Cult of Americanism in 20thc 1.00 SEM Cohn,William H. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  In 1894, Teddy Roosevelt published "True Americanism" in Forum Magazine, declaring the absolute necessity of applying a "fervid Americanism" to the solution of every problem and evil facing the country, including "Americanizing" newcomers to our shore. Nearly 50 years later, the rhetoric of Americanism proposed by Time publisher Henry Luce in his February 1941 editorial in Life Magazine, "The American Century," aimed to persuade Americans that the country's involvement in World War II and in the post-war world were not only necessary but inevitable. The Luce publications after the war publicized the culture of Americanism that was an essential part of the anti-communism that supported the Cold War for over half a century. Leaving aside the idea of American exceptionalism—"the notion that the United States has had a special mission and virtue that makes it unique among nations"—our focus will be on the culture of Americanism as it was promulgated in the Luce publications and other media outlets during and after World War II, and the extent to which it encouraged postwar homogeneity while discouraging the expression of dissent and non-conformist ideas.
2181 AMST-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
3504 AMST-475-01 Made in New England 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  Commodities—things produced, exchanged, and consumed—link places to the larger world. In this course, we will examine how natural resources and material goods have become marketable commodities through social, economic, political, technological, environmental, and cultural processes. Looking especially at things grown and made in past and present New England for capitalist exchange, we will explore how they have shaped and signified local communities while connecting them to global geographies of markets, power, and meaning.
2307 AMST-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2128 AMST-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Requires completion of the Special Registration Form, available in the Office of the Registrar.
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2836 AMST-801-01 Appr to Amer Studies 1.00 LEC Miller,Karen Li T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar, which is required of all American studies graduate students, examines a variety of approaches to the field. Readings may include several “classic” texts of 18th- and 19th-century American culture and several key works of American studies scholarship from the formative period of the field after World War II, as well as more recent contributions to the study of the United States. Topics will include changing ideas about the content, production, and consumption of American culture; patterns of ethnic identification and definition; the construction of categories like “race” and “gender”; and the bearing of class, race, gender, and sexuality on individuals’ participation in American society and culture. Undergraduates who wish to enroll in this course must obtain permission of their adviser and the instructor.
3468 AMST-826-01 Nuclear America 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  In this course we will explore large- and small-scale cultural landscapes as they have been shaped by nuclear power, weapons, transportation, and waste. Among these landscapes are towns created for making nuclear weapons; open-air testing sites; military complexes, such as ports, bases, airfields, and silos; the West’s uranium mines, and the land, water, and Native American territory polluted by radioactive tailings; nuclear reactor sites, from New England’s regional power plants to those in metropolitan areas; and land and offshore storage sites for nuclear waste. Besides the physical changes to the American landscape, nuclear sites involve extensive secrecy, exclusion, and policing, and they are invested with fraught meanings. We will explore nuclear America through history, geography, art, literature, and film.
2915 AMST-835-01 Museum Exhibition 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  One of the most engaging ways to promote collections and explore a subject or theme is to create an exhibition, which is a genre in and of itself—telling a story with artifacts. Through critical readings students will explore the cultural and educational goals of exhibits, visitor needs and accessibility, design elements (including technology), and audience evaluation methods utilized at libraries, historic houses and historical sites, and history and cultural museums. Drawing from the extensive and wide-ranging collections in the Watkinson Library, students will conceive, write, and install an exhibition, design and publish a catalogue, and plan and implement an opening event to take place at the end of the semester in the Watkinson.
3493 AMST-842-01 From Poe to Game of Thrones 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  While modern American fantasy literature experienced sudden growth after the enormous popularity of J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings in the 1960s, American fantasy fiction has an extensive and separate tradition beginning in the nineteenth century with the works of Edgar Alan Poe. Moreover, it engaged social and environmental issues, from Henry George's Looking Backward to Andre Norton's Beastmaster. Women writers of fantasy since the 1930s, including C. L. Moore and Leigh Brackett, engaged issues of gender and equality. American traditions of humor and irreverence derived from Twain and Ade and folk traditions inform mid-century fantasy, while the social realism of Dos Passos finds rebirth in the darker stories of George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire series.
3469 AMST-849-01 Cult of Americanism in 20thCen 1.00 SEM Cohn,William H. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  In 1894, Teddy Roosevelt published "True Americanism" in Forum Magazine, declaring the absolute necessity of applying a "fervid Americanism" to the solution of every problem and evil facing the country, including "Americanizing" newcomers to our shore. Nearly 50 years later, the rhetoric of Americanism proposed by Time publisher Henry Luce in his February 1941 editorial in Life Magazine, "The American Century," aimed to persuade Americans that the country's involvement in World War II and in the post-war world were not only necessary but inevitable. The Luce publications after the war publicized the culture of Americanism that was an essential part of the anti-communism that supported the Cold War for over half a century. Leaving aside the idea of American exceptionalism—"the notion that the United States has had a special mission and virtue that makes it unique among nations"—our focus will be on the culture of Americanism as it was promulgated in the Luce publications and other media outlets during and after World War II, and the extent to which it encouraged postwar homogeneity while discouraging the expression of dissent and non-conformist ideas.
3503 AMST-875-01 Made in New England 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Commodities—things produced, exchanged, and consumed—link places to the larger world. In this course, we will examine how natural resources and material goods have become marketable commodities through social, economic, political, technological, environmental, and cultural processes. Looking especially at things grown and made in past and present New England for capitalist exchange, we will explore how they have shaped and signified local communities while connecting them to global geographies of markets, power, and meaning.
2365 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
2167 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2163 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2164 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2166 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
2165 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
2023 ENGL-105-01 Intro to Amer Lit II 1.00 LEC Mrozowski,Daniel J. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-years.
  This course surveys major works of American literature after 1865, from literary reckonings with the Civil War and its tragic residues, to works of "realism" and "naturalism" that contended with the late 19th century’s rapid pace of social change, to the innovative works of the modern and postmodern eras. As we read works by authors such as Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, William Faulkner, and Toni Morrison, we will inquire: how have literary texts defined and redefined "America" and Americans? What are the means by which some groups have been excluded from the American community, and what are their experiences of that exclusion? And how do these texts shape our understanding of the unresolved problems of post-Civil War American democracy? For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
2745 ENGL-265-01 Intro to Film Studies 1.00 LEC Younger,James Prakash MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM
M: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 65
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satifies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration.
  This course provides a general introduction to the study of film and focuses on the key terms and concepts used to describe and analyze the film experience. As we put this set of tools and methods in place, we will also explore different modes of film production (fictional narrative, documentary, experimental) and some of the critical issues and debates that have shaped the discipline of film studies (genre, auteurism, film aesthetics, ideology). Note: Film screening only on Monday evenings. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the film studies minor.
2465 HIST-216-01 World War II 1.00 LEC Kassow,Samuel D. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for First-Year students.
  This is a survey of the political, military, social, cultural and economic aspects of the Second World War.
2085 PBPL-201-01 Intro to Ameri Public Policy 1.00 LEC Fulco,Adrienne TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is only open to sophomores and juniors.
  NOTE: Course not open to First Year Students
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for sophomores and 10 seats reserved for juniors.
  This course introduces students to the formal and informal processes through which American public policy is made. They will study the constitutional institutions of government and the distinct role each branch of the national government plays in the policy-making process, and also examine the ways in which informal institutions-political parties, the media, and political lobbyists-contribute to and shape the policy process.
2361 PBPL-344-01 Seeking JUSTICE in Amer Life 1.00 SEM Fulco,Adrienne
Schaller,Barry R.
M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  This course will examine basic theories of ethics (common morality), found in moral and political philosophy in order to consider the extent to which traditional ethical and moral principles govern legal, political, and private decision-making. We will begin by identifying ethical and moral principles in our founding documents before proceeding with the main work of the course, which is to examine the ethical and moral reasoning behind legal and policy decisions, business decisions, and personal decisions. Among the diverse subjects that will be discussed are physician-assisted suicide, the death penalty, buying and selling of body parts, human cloning, legalizing drugs, affirmative action, national service in war, hate speech and political dissent, wealth and income distribution including disbursing public money to private business, individual rights versus the needs of the community, torture, truth and lying in private and public, equality and inequality, drug-enhancement in sports, immoral behavior on the part of public figures.
3332 PHIL-241-01 Race Racism & Phil 1.00 LEC Marcano,Donna MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An intensive examination of some philosophical discussions of race and racism. Topics include the origins of European racism, the distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic racism, the conceptual connections between racist thinking and certain canonized philosophical positions (e.g., Locke’s nominalism), the relationship between racism and our notions of personal identity, the use of traditional philosophical thought (e.g., the history of philosophy) to characterize and explain differences between European and black African cultures, the possible connections between racism and Pan-Africanism, the nature of anti-Semitism, and recent attempts to conceptualize race and racism as social constructions.
3315 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
2351 POLS-301-01 American Political Parties 1.00 LEC Evans,Diana TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  An analysis of American political parties, including a study of voting behavior, party organization and leadership, and recent and proposed reforms and proposals for reorganization of existing party structures.
3372 POLS-317-01 Amer Political Thought 1.00 SEM Dudas,Mary J. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 18
  NOTE: This course is only open to Juniors and Sophomores.
  NOTE: This course satisfies the Sophomore/Junior seminar requirement.
  A study of the development of American political thought: the colonial period; the Revolution; Jeffersonian democracy; the defense of slave society; social Darwinism; the Populist and Progressive reform movements; and current theories of conservatism, liberalism, and the Left.
2851 POLS-379-01 American Foreign Policy 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  This course offers an examination of postwar American foreign policy. After reviewing the major theoretical and interpretive perspectives, we examine the policymaking process, focused on the principal players in the executive and legislative branches, as well as interest groups and the media. We then turn to contemporary issues: the "war on terror," the Iraq war, humanitarian intervention, U.S. relations with other major powers, and America's future prospects as the dominant global power.
2921 RELG-267-01 Religion and the Media 1.00 LEC Silk,Mark R. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Western religion, and Christianity in particular, has always put a premium on employing the available techniques of mass communication to get its message out. But today, many religious people see the omnipresent “secular” media as hostile to their faith. This course will look at the relationship between religion and the communications media, focusing primarily on how the American news media have dealt with religion since the creation of the penny press in the 1830s. Attention will also be given to the ways that American religious institutions have used mass media to present themselves, from the circulation of Bibles and tracts in the 19th century through religious broadcasting beginning in the 20th century to the use of the Internet today. (May be counted toward American studies and public policy studies.)
3459 WMGS-315-01 Women in America 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An examination of women’s varied experiences in the public and private spheres, from their own perspective as well as that of the dominant society. The experiences of women of different classes and races will be compared, as will the relationship between images of women and changing realities of their lives. Emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries.
3460 WMGS-319-01 The Woman's Film 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective.
  In the 1930s Hollywood created a new genre, the woman’s picture or “weepie,” designed specifically for female audiences. This course examines the development of this enormously popular genre from the 1930s to the 1960s, including important cycles of women’s pictures such as the female gothic and the maternal melodrama. It pays particular attention to the genre’s exploration of female sexuality and its homoerotic organization of the look. It also considers the genre’s role in the formation of contemporary theories of female spectatorship. Film screenings include both versions of Imitations of Life, These Three, Stage Door, Blonde Venus, Stella Dallas, Mildred Pierce, Rebecca, Suspicion, Gaslight, The Old Maid, Old Acquaintance, The Great Lie, Letter from an Unknown Woman, All that Heaven Allows, and Marnie. Readings by Doane, Williams, Modleski, de Lauretis, Jacobs, and White.