Select a level: Select a term:
Only show courses available to first-year students.

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Course Schedule for AMERICAN STUDIES - Fall 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2050 AMST-203-01 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Heatherton,Christina TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for sophomores, 7 for first year students, 2 for juniors.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
2354 AMST-203-02 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Gieseking,Jack MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for sophomores, 7 for first year students, 2 for juniors
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
3437 AMST-203-03 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Manevitz,Alexander D. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: Seats are reserved: 8 First-Year, 8 Sophomore, and 3 Juniors
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
3476 AMST-212-02 Disability Studies:Theory&Hist 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  This course offers a rigorous interdisciplinary introduction to Disability Studies. We will look at the history of disability studies as it emerged in relation to the Civil Rights movement. We will consider how the efforts of disability activists and scholars have shaped disability studies and how this field informs and is also informed by other disciplines, such as Performance and Trauma Studies. We will examine how disability has been defined over time and how particular definitions of disability intersect with other aspects of identity, such as socio-economic class, race and/or ethnicity, sexuality and gender. In addition to reading and critiquing history and theory, we will also look at a variety of “disability texts” that will include various genres, such as fiction, memoir, film, and drama.
2802 AMST-336-01 Globalization:Amer in Mod Wrld 1.00 SEM Heatherton,Christina TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Our current moment of global crisis forces us to reckon with the contradictions of globalization. What does globalization mean? How can we trace its history? This course examines the roots of globalization through the twentieth century: from liberal democracy and communist internationalism to Bandung humanism, fascism, and global capitalism. It explores U.S. social movements, their organization and interpretations, as a site to uncover how America was depicted and understood throughout the world. These movements developed and subsequently imagined visions of freedom, governance, justice, and progress that could themselves be globalized. Through literature, film, poetry, and more, this course examines the transnational interaction of social movements within a global sphere.
2150 AMST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
3480 AMST-409-02 The Digital Image of the City 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12
  With half the world’s population now in cities, policymakers and activists are focused on the promise of smart urbanism. Smart urbanism deploys technology and data to tackle issues from gentrification and pollution to access to public spaces and improved walkability. How does this focus affect the growth of equal and just cities? Focused on US cities, namely Hartford and New York, this course connects global and national issues to the intimate experiences of everyday urban life. It pairs specific technical skills such as social science data collection and geographic information systems (GIS) mapping with urban theory and urban studies. The course project will bring together the theory, literature, and your own research, data analysis, and maps into a smart city recommendation for the city.
3558 AMST-423-01 The History of American Sports 1.00 SEM Goldstein,Warren T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This course will examine American sports from their beginnings in Puritan-era games to the multi-billion-dollar industries of today. We will begin by looking at the relationship between work, play, and religion in the colonies. We will trace the beginnings of horseracing, baseball, and boxing, and their connections to saloons, gambling, and the bachelor subculture of the Victorian underworld. We will study the rise of respectable sports in the mid- and late 19th century; follow baseball as it became the national pastime; see how college football took over higher education; and account for the rise of basketball. We will look at sports and war, sports and moral uplift, and sports and the culture of consumption. Finally, we will examine the rise of mass leisure, the impact of radio and television, racial segregation and integration, the rise of women’s sports, battles between players and owners in the last 25 years, and the entrance of truly big money into professional sports. Readings in primary and secondary sources will emphasize the historical experience of sports in the United States so that students can develop a framework for understanding current events, including the NHL lockout, the Kobe Bryant affair, and the controversies over steroids.
3605 AMST-428-01 New England & the Blk Atlantic 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This course will explore the trans-Atlantic cultural, economic, and political constellation that has linked Africa, Europe, and the Americas from the 15th century to the present. In particular, we will investigate some key aspects of New England’s part in the Black Atlantic, including slavery and the slave trade; literature, public speaking, and the arts; commerce and industry; and travel and migration. We will ground this study in past and present geographic sites of diaspora, racialization, and contestation, including ships and ports, the home, church, workplace, market, and performance spaces.
2851 AMST-435-01 Museum Exhibition 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  One of the most engaging ways to promote collections and explore a subject or theme is to create an exhibition, which is a genre in and of itself—telling a story with artifacts. Through critical readings students will explore the cultural and educational goals of exhibits, visitor needs and accessibility, design elements (including technology), and audience evaluation methods utilized at libraries, historic houses and historical sites, and history and cultural museums. Drawing from the extensive and wide-ranging collections in the Watkinson Library, students will conceive, write, and install an exhibition, design and publish a catalogue, and plan and implement an opening event to take place at the end of the semester in the Watkinson.
2201 AMST-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
3561 AMST-473-01 American Animation and Society 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  Animation has played a significant role in American culture. This course will consider the development of animation from the 1920s to today in its social, economic and cultural contexts. Special attention will be given to the perception of animation as a medium for children, to the growing acceptance of mature themes in shorts and feature films, and the power of imagery derived from animation in advertising, merchandising, and even political propaganda. We will look primarily at American feature films, which have dominated the international animation market since the groundbreaking Snow White (1939), the change from cel animation to CGI, and the innovations of studios that compete with still-dominant Disney, including Connecticut’s own Blue Sky. The course will include guest animators such as Bob Camp, co-creator of Ren and Stimpy.
2319 AMST-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
2151 AMST-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Requires completion of the Special Registration Form, available in the Office of the Registrar.
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2747 AMST-801-01 Appr to Amer Studies 1.00 LEC Miller,Karen Li R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar, which is required of all American studies graduate students, examines a variety of approaches to the field. Readings may include several “classic” texts of 18th- and 19th-century American culture and several key works of American studies scholarship from the formative period of the field after World War II, as well as more recent contributions to the study of the United States. Topics will include changing ideas about the content, production, and consumption of American culture; patterns of ethnic identification and definition; the construction of categories like “race” and “gender”; and the bearing of class, race, gender, and sexuality on individuals’ participation in American society and culture. Undergraduates who wish to enroll in this course must obtain permission of their adviser and the instructor.
3590 AMST-809-02 The Digital Image of the City 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3
  With half the world’s population now in cities, policymakers and activists are focused on the promise of smart urbanism. Smart urbanism deploys technology and data to tackle issues from gentrification and pollution to access to public spaces and improved walkability. How does this focus affect the growth of equal and just cities? Focused on US cities, namely Hartford and New York, this course connects global and national issues to the intimate experiences of everyday urban life. It pairs specific technical skills such as social science data collection and geographic information systems (GIS) mapping with urban theory and urban studies. The course project will bring together the theory, literature, and your own research, data analysis, and maps into a smart city recommendation for the city.
3559 AMST-823-01 The History of American Sports 1.00 SEM Goldstein,Warren T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course will examine American sports from their beginnings in Puritan-era games to the multi-billion-dollar industries of today. We will begin by looking at the relationship between work, play, and religion in the colonies. We will trace the beginnings of horseracing, baseball, and boxing, and their connections to saloons, gambling, and the bachelor subculture of the Victorian underworld. We will study the rise of respectable sports in the mid- and late 19th century; follow baseball as it became the national pastime; see how college football took over higher education; and account for the rise of basketball. We will look at sports and war, sports and moral uplift, and sports and the culture of consumption. Finally, we will examine the rise of mass leisure, the impact of radio and television, racial segregation and integration, the rise of women’s sports, battles between players and owners in the last 25 years, and the entrance of truly big money into professional sports. Readings in primary and secondary sources will emphasize the historical experience of sports in the United States so that students can develop a framework for understanding current events, including the NHL lockout, the Kobe Bryant affair, and the controversies over steroids.
3604 AMST-828-01 New England & the Blk Atlantic 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course will explore the trans-Atlantic cultural, economic, and political constellation that has linked Africa, Europe, and the Americas from the 15th century to the present. In particular, we will investigate some key aspects of New England’s part in the Black Atlantic, including slavery and the slave trade; literature, public speaking, and the arts; commerce and industry; and travel and migration. We will ground this study in past and present geographic sites of diaspora, racialization, and contestation, including ships and ports, the home, church, workplace, market, and performance spaces.
2776 AMST-835-01 Museum Exhibition 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  One of the most engaging ways to promote collections and explore a subject or theme is to create an exhibition, which is a genre in and of itself—telling a story with artifacts. Through critical readings students will explore the cultural and educational goals of exhibits, visitor needs and accessibility, design elements (including technology), and audience evaluation methods utilized at libraries, historic houses and historical sites, and history and cultural museums. Drawing from the extensive and wide-ranging collections in the Watkinson Library, students will conceive, write, and install an exhibition, design and publish a catalogue, and plan and implement an opening event to take place at the end of the semester in the Watkinson.
3560 AMST-873-01 American Animation and Society 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  Animation has played a significant role in American culture. This course will consider the development of animation from the 1920s to today in its social, economic and cultural contexts. Special attention will be given to the perception of animation as a medium for children, to the growing acceptance of mature themes in shorts and feature films, and the power of imagery derived from animation in advertising, merchandising, and even political propaganda. We will look primarily at American feature films, which have dominated the international animation market since the groundbreaking Snow White (1939), the change from cel animation to CGI, and the innovations of studios that compete with still-dominant Disney, including Connecticut’s own Blue Sky. The course will include guest animators such as Bob Camp, co-creator of Ren and Stimpy.
2369 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
2188 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2184 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2185 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2187 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
2186 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
3425 ENGL-104-01 Intro Amer Literature-I 1.00 LEC Hager,Christopher MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  NOTE: 15 spaces are reserved for first-year students, 2 seats for HMTCA students.
  This course introduces students to American literature before 1865 by surveying a wide range of texts-some very famous, some little-known-written by and about people living in the present-day United States, from the earliest Europeans' arrival in the Americas until the time of the U.S. Civil War. The course will trace political, intellectual, and social developments as they interacted with literary culture. Students will both acquire knowledge of American cultural history and develop skills of literary analysis. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
3426 ENGL-116-01 Intro African Amer Lit Part I 1.00 LEC Paulin,Diana R. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  This course surveys African American literature in a variety of genres from the 18th to the early 20th centuries. Through the study of texts by Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Wilson, Harriet Jacobs, William Wells Brown, Julia Collins, William and Ellen Craft, Charles Chesnutt, Paul Dunbar, Ida Wells, W.E.B. Du Bois, and others, we will explore how these writers represented and influenced the history of people of African descent in the U.S., from slavery and abolition to early struggles for civil rights; how their work has intervened in racial formation and imagined the black diaspora; how literary innovations have engaged with continuing political questions of nation, gender, sexuality, and class. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
3498 ENGL-313-01 Contemporary American Prose 1.00 SEM Ferriss,Lucy TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
  Between the de-escalation of the Cold War (mid-1980s) and the beginning of the war in Iraq (2003), a quiet revolution took place in the way American writers articulated their concerns and their sense of what it meant to be American. Beginning with Don DeLillo and Toni Morrison and continuing through David Foster Wallace and Marilynne Robinson, we will explore both the “how” and the “what” of American fiction and nonfiction in the waning years of the 20th and the dawn of the 21st centuries. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900.
3429 ENGL-377-01 The Revolutionary Generations 1.00 LEC Mrozowski,Daniel J. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
  Hannah Arendt suggested that the United States failed to remember its revolutionary tradition because it failed to talk about it. This course will recover those memories by reading the texts that founded the American rebellion, the writings produced in the aftermath of independence, and the creative works crafted in the wake of revolution. Our focus will be on the literature from 1740 until 1820 that struggled to define ways of being in the world that seemed specifically American; therefore, we will look beyond the context of New England to consider the roles played by Africa and the Caribbean in the cultural imagination, and we will trace how social class, race, and gender inflected the output of American writers in a post-1776 world. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.This course is research-intensive.
3430 ENGL-451-01 Queer Harlem Renaissance 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  NOTE: Note: English 451 and English 851 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research-intensive.
  This course approaches the Harlem Renaissance or "the New Negro" Movement through the lens of sexuality, paying particular attention to the ways in which understandings of racial identity were filtered through representations of sex and gender. We will consider how writers of the Harlem Renaissance explored notions of sexuality and gender given the history of slavery and exploitation that generated rigid formulations of race and gender. How did cultural producers challenge, reinforce, question and imagine sexuality and its intersection with other aspects of identity, such as class, gender, and national origins. Writers/artists include, Wallace Thurman, Carl Van Vechten, Bessie Smith, Angelina Weld Grimke, Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Langston Hughes, and Bruce Nugent.
3442 ENGL-851-01 Queer Harlem Renaissance 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  NOTE: English 451 and English 851 are the same course. This course is research intensive. For the M.A. pursuing the pedagogy capstone, this course counts as an elective in ethnic literatures of the U.S..
  This course approaches the Harlem Renaissance or "the New Negro" Movement through the lens of sexuality, paying particular attention to the ways in which understandings of racial identity were filtered through representations of sex and gender. We will consider how writers of the Harlem Renaissance explored notions of sexuality and gender given the history of slavery and exploitation that generated rigid formulations of race and gender. How did cultural producers challenge, reinforce, question and imagine sexuality and its intersection with other aspects of identity, such as class, gender, and national origins. Writers/artists include, Wallace Thurman, Carl Van Vechten, Bessie Smith, Angelina Weld Grimke, Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Langston Hughes, and Bruce Nugent.
3380 HIST-200-01 Hartford: Past and Present 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students, 8 seats reserved for sophomores.
  Since Dutch fur traders arrived in the 1610s, Hartford and its region have been part of many core themes in American urban history. This course examines Hartford's rise as a financial and manufacturing center from the 1800s to early 1900s; the roles played by ethnicity, gender, religion, race and social class in urban and suburban politics, culture, civic institutions and neighborhoods; the evolution in urban planning, architecture, transportation and public spaces; and the impact of post-¬-1945 suburbanization, capitalist restructuring and globalization on the social, political and cultural profile of Hartford and its suburbs.
3454 HIST-201-01 Early America 1.00 LEC Wickman,Thomas M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: Enrollment is limited to 10 History majors, 5 American Studies majors, 18 sophomores, and 2 HMTCA students.
  This course introduces students to major developments in the political, economic, and social history of North America from the sixteenth to the mid-nineteenth century. We will study indigenous sovereignty, encounters between Europeans and Native Americans, the founding of European colonies, the rise of the Atlantic slave trade, the Seven Years' War, the American Revolution, the spread of human enslavement, the War of 1812, Indian removal policy, U.S. wars with Native nations, westward expansion, the U.S.-Mexican War, abolitionism, and the Civil War. Students will be challenged to imagine American history within Atlantic and global contexts and to comprehend the expansiveness of Native American homelands and the shifting nature of North American borderlands.
3457 HIST-260-01 The Struggle for Civil Rights 1.00 LEC Greenberg,Cheryl TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first year students
  African Americans and their allies have long struggled to win equal rights and equal opportunities in America. We will examine the course of that struggle in the twentieth century, focusing primarily on the period 1950-1968. We will consider questions of urbanization, employment, racism, politics, violence, non-violence, Black Power and the notion of “race blindness.” The end of the course will be spent considering the present day. What has been resolved, and what issues remain? Are there new challenges to achieving racial equality in the U.S? Have we become “post-racial” yet, and do we want to be?
3459 HIST-311-01 Place in the Native Northeast 1.00 SEM Wickman,Thomas M. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Class enrollment is limited to 10 History majors and 5 American Studies majors.
  The coasts, rivers, fields, hills, villages, and cities of present-day Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia have been home for indigenous families, communities, and nations through numerous environmental, political, and economic transformations. Students will learn about the ways that Native nations of the Northeast, from Pequots to Mi'kmaqs, have adapted, recreated, and reaffirmed a deep connectedness to their homelands and territories, from the fifteenth century to the present. Fields trips to local sites and archives will facilitate original historical research. Primary sources to be assigned include autobiographies, travel narratives, war histories, maps, Native American stories, and dictionaries of indigenous place names, and secondary source readings will cover major themes in Native American studies, with special emphasis on sense of place.
3481 HIST-354-01 Civil War and Reconstr 1.00 SEM Manevitz,Alexander D. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course examines not only the military dimensions of the war years but also such topics as politics in the Union and the Confederacy, the presidential leadership of Lincoln and Jefferson Davis, women in the Union and Confederate war efforts, and the struggle over emancipation. The latter part of the course considers post-war political, social, and economic developments, including nearly four million African Americans' transition from slavery to freedom, the conflict over how to reconstruct the former Confederate states, the establishment of bi-racial governments in those states, and the eventual overthrow of Reconstruction by conservative white "Redeemers." Lectures and discussions.
2112 PBPL-201-01 Intro to Ameri Public Policy 1.00 LEC Fulco,Adrienne TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: Course not open to First Year Students
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for sophomores and 10 seats reserved for juniors.
  This course introduces students to the formal and informal processes through which American public policy is made. They will study the constitutional institutions of government and the distinct role each branch of the national government plays in the policy-making process, and also examine the ways in which informal institutions-political parties, the media, and political lobbyists-contribute to and shape the policy process.
3607 PBPL-865-01 Media & Presidential Election 1.00 SEM McEnroe,Colin T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  In this course, students will use the current presidential election as a living laboratory as they explore the role of the media in shaping perceptions, presenting content, and providing criticism. Students will follow the election in each news medium (including the Internet), interview consultants and "spin doctors," analyze television broadcasts, including television election ads, and prepare a talk radio show. The course will focus also on such issues as media bias, corporate ownership, and FCC regulation. We will also look at the nature of "content" in the political process and how it corresponds (or doesn’t) to literary notions of "text."
2993 PHIL-241-01 Race Racism & Phil 1.00 LEC Wade,Maurice L. WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An intensive examination of some philosophical discussions of race and racism. Topics include the origins of European racism, the distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic racism, the conceptual connections between racist thinking and certain canonized philosophical positions (e.g., Locke’s nominalism), the relationship between racism and our notions of personal identity, the use of traditional philosophical thought (e.g., the history of philosophy) to characterize and explain differences between European and black African cultures, the possible connections between racism and Pan-Africanism, the nature of anti-Semitism, and recent attempts to conceptualize race and racism as social constructions.
2979 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
3399 POLS-102-02 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Dudas,Mary J. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
3400 POLS-102-03 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Dudas,Mary J. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
3403 POLS-225-01 American Presidency 1.00 LEC McMahon,Kevin J. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  An explanation of the institutional and political evolution of the presidency with an emphasis on the nature of presidential power in domestic and foreign affairs. Attention is also given to institutional conflicts with Congress and the courts. The nature of presidential leadership and personality is also explored.
2358 POLS-301-01 American Political Parties 1.00 LEC Evans,Diana TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  An analysis of American political parties, including a study of voting behavior, party organization and leadership, and recent and proposed reforms and proposals for reorganization of existing party structures.
3405 POLS-316-01 Con Law II:Civ Lib & Civ Ri 1.00 SEM McMahon,Kevin J. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, and permission of instructor.
  An analysis and evaluation of decisions of courts (and related materials) dealing principally with freedom of expression and equal protection of the laws.
3406 POLS-316-02 Con Law II:Civ Lib & Civ Ri 1.00 SEM McMahon,Kevin J. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, and permission of instructor.
  An analysis and evaluation of decisions of courts (and related materials) dealing principally with freedom of expression and equal protection of the laws.
2750 POLS-379-01 American Foreign Policy 1.00 LEC Flibbert,Andrew TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  This course offers an examination of postwar American foreign policy. After reviewing the major theoretical and interpretive perspectives, we examine the policymaking process, focused on the principal players in the executive and legislative branches, as well as interest groups and the media. We then turn to contemporary issues: the "war on terror," the Iraq war, humanitarian intervention, U.S. relations with other major powers, and America's future prospects as the dominant global power.
3477 SOCL-214-01 Racism 1.00 LEC Williams,Johnny Eric MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  A cross-national comparison of racial and ethnic differences as sources of conflict and inequality within and between societies. We will also consider the role of race and ethnicity as a basis for group and national solidarity. Topics will include the persistence of ethnic and racial loyalties in regard to language, marital choice, and politics; a comparison of social mobility patterns among various ethnic and racial groups; ethnicity and race as reactionary or revolutionary ideologies; and the issues and facts regarding assimilation and pluralism in different societies.
3431 URST-200-01 Hartford: Past and Present 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  NOTE: 5 seats are reserved for first year students, 4 seats reserved for sophomores.
  Since Dutch fur traders arrived in the 1610s, Hartford and its region have been part of many core themes in American urban history. This course examines Hartford's rise as a financial and manufacturing center from the 1800s to early 1900s; the roles played by ethnicity, gender, religion, race and social class in urban and suburban politics, culture, civic institutions and neighborhoods; the evolution in urban planning, architecture, transportation and public spaces; and the impact of post-¬-1945 suburbanization, capitalist restructuring and globalization on the social, political and cultural profile of Hartford and its suburbs.
3391 WMGS-245-01 The Hollywood Musical 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  Perhaps more than any other genre, the musical epitomized Hollywood’s “golden age.” This course traces the development of the enormously popular genre from its emergence at the beginning of the Great Depression to its decline amid the social upheavals of the 1960s. It pays particular attention to the genre’s queering of masculinity and femininity, as well as its relationship to camp modes of reception. Readings by Jane Feuer, Rick Altman, Richard Dyer, Janet Staiger, and Steven Cohan.
3096 WMGS-315-01 Women in America 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  An examination of women’s varied experiences in the public and private spheres, from their own perspective as well as that of the dominant society. The experiences of women of different classes and races will be compared, as will the relationship between images of women and changing realities of their lives. Emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries.
3097 WMGS-319-01 The Woman's Film 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective.
  In the 1930s Hollywood created a new genre, the woman’s picture or “weepie,” designed specifically for female audiences. This course examines the development of this enormously popular genre from the 1930s to the 1960s, including important cycles of women’s pictures such as the female gothic and the maternal melodrama. It pays particular attention to the genre’s exploration of female sexuality and its homoerotic organization of the look. It also considers the genre’s role in the formation of contemporary theories of female spectatorship. Film screenings include both versions of Imitations of Life, These Three, Stage Door, Blonde Venus, Stella Dallas, Mildred Pierce, Rebecca, Suspicion, Gaslight, The Old Maid, Old Acquaintance, The Great Lie, Letter from an Unknown Woman, All that Heaven Allows, and Marnie. Readings by Doane, Williams, Modleski, de Lauretis, Jacobs, and White.