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Course Schedule for AMERICAN STUDIES - Spring 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
4006 AMST-203-01 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Wickman,Thomas M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 305 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  NOTE: Seats will be reserved as follows: 10 - first-year, 7 - sophomore, 2 HMTCA particpants.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
4454 AMST-210-01 Doing Culture 1.00 LEC Baldwin,Davarian L. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM LSC - 137 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  Culture is not something we simply consume, inhabit or even create. Culture is serious business: pun both intended and upended. We have a dynamic relationship with the world around us and in this class we will use culture, both elite and popular, to help bridge the gap between what we do here in the “ivory tower” and how we live out there in the “real world,” hopefully changing both in the process. Here we will not take culture for granted but engage culture as a method, a tool by which to engage, analyze and critique both historical narratives and contemporary events. In this course, street life, advertisements, popular media, and clothing are interrogated as archives of dynamic meaning, arenas of social interaction, acts of personal pleasure, and sites of struggle. We will also explore what happens when a diversity of forces converge at the intersection of commerce and culture. Present day notions of popular culture, and topics such as authenticity and selling out, will be interrogated both socially and historically.
4654 AMST-254-01 Invisible Man & Black Mod Expr 1.00 LEC Baldwin,Davarian L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM LSC - 137 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This class interrogates the text and contexts of Ralph Ellison’s iconic novel Invisible Man. Specifically, bringing historical and cultural analysis to bear on a single work of fiction, this course surveys key themes in the Black modern experience from 1899 to 1950 including migration, urbanization, the black modern aesthetic, black radicalism, and black nationalism. Ultimately, Ellison crafted a text of profound social commentary through experimentation with archival evidence and literary form. This class reconstructs the intellectual, aesthetic, and historical production of an American classic.
4655 AMST-301-01 Jr. Sem.: American Texts 1.00 SEM Gac,Scott M: 6:30PM-9:10PM SH - S204 WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Prerequisite: C- or better in American Studies 203 or AMST 210 or concurrent enrollment.
  This course, required for the American studies major and ordinarily taken in the fall of the junior year, examines central texts in American history and culture. Through intensive discussion and writing, the class will explore the contexts of these works as well as the works themselves, paying particular attention to the interrelated issues of race, class, gender, and other similarly pivotal social constructs. Course is open only to American studies majors.
5229 AMST-311-01 Data Driven Cultures 1.00 LEC Gieseking,Jack MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM LIB - 02 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  From the algorithms that time traffic lights to those that filter search criteria and record thoughts and ideas, human existence is increasingly defined by code. This course explores the possibilities, limitations, and implications of using digital tools and methods to understand the issues that affect our everyday lives. What does data reveal to us about the world? What does it hide? Which data-based policy interventions should be made on behalf of the common good? To answer these questions students will learn to apply a critical lens for understanding and evaluating what technology can and cannot bring to the study of American life.
5211 AMST-329-01 Viewing The Wire 1.00 SEM Conway,Nicholas J. F: 1:15PM-3:55PM LSC - 135 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Through analysis and dissection of David Simon's The Wire, this course seeks to equip students with the tools necessary to examine our postmodern society. The Wire seamlessly juxtaposes aesthetics with socio-economic issues, offering up a powerful lens for investigating our surroundings. Whether issues of unregulated free market capitalism, the bureaucracy of our school systems, politics of the media, false notions of equal opportunity, devaluation of human life, or a failed war on drugs, The Wire addresses the complexities of American urban life. Through a socio-political and cultural reading of the five individual seasons, students will be able to explore a multitude of contemporary problems.
5168 AMST-332-01 Credit and Crisis 1.00 SEM Heatherton,Christina TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM SH - N215 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course explores the concepts of credit and crisis amid the global expansion of U.S. capitalism. From intimate struggles with indebtedness to grand projects of nation building, we will interrogate how discourses of debt have informed our commonplace social categories across scales. Readings will trace the historical and geographical transformation of the U.S., from its role as a debtor to its emergence as a creditor nation. It will consider how the vexed notion of American “inheritance” has related to the expansion of credit and deepening of economic crises. Through film, literature, and scholarly analysis it will trace how economic crisis and the concept of “failure” can be seen through the lens of personal identities; separating those who could assume risk from those deemed "at risk."
4241 AMST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
4007 AMST-402-01 Senior Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Requires completion of the Special Registration Form, available in the Office of the Registrar.
  Students undertake projects on American studies topics of their own choosing. The projects will be supervised by a faculty member in an American studies-related field. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the project adviser and director, are required for enrollment.
4903 AMST-409-01 Race, Gender, Global Security 1.00 SEM Heatherton,Christina W: 6:30PM-9:10PM SH - N215 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 11
  This course is open only to American Studies majors, or by permission of instructor.
  Recent events have focused attention on questions of race, gender, social justice, and the militarization of police. This course will consider how notions of race and security that evolved in the late 20th and early 21st century U.S., have shaped political discourse, and how in turn, those ideas have circulated around the world. Through analyses of American Studies texts, documentaries, and popular culture, we will consider both emerging and prevailing definitions of security. By examining case studies in major global cities, including Los Angeles, we will explore how space has been organized around the logics of racialized threats and gendered notions of safety. For a cumulative paper, students will select a global city and offer history, context, and analysis of the production of insecure spaces.
5230 AMST-409-02 Queer America 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack M: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - T408  
  Enrollment limited to 11
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for senior American Studies majors.
  Drawing on interdisciplinary work in lgbtq studies, Queer America uses key spaces and scales as lenses and sites in this research seminar. From bars and community centers, neighborhoods and cruising grounds, to cities and rural Walmarts, websites and social media, students will employ queer theory to broaden their understandings of lgbtq spaces in the nation. The application of classic and cutting-edge work in geographies of lgbtq culture will challenge the seemingly normal histories and geographies of American life.
5455 AMST-419-01 Digital World of NE Artifacts 1.00 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This seminar offers students engagement in primary research in historical, literary, and material culture studies and current methods of visualizing data generated by that research to produce new modes of interpretation. Students will develop skills through a series of exercises based on the rich holdings of printed books, ephemera, maps, manuscripts and artifacts related to New England in the 17th -19th centuries in the Watkinson Library. They will work with a clearly defined body of material while studying visualization methodologies currently utilized in digital humanities projects; the final exercise is a portfolio, which will include a process journal, a reflection paper, and a "grant proposal" for a real-world project..
4802 AMST-425-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM Miller,Karen Li W: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - N130  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history.
4242 AMST-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
5261 AMST-470-01 Native Amer Art & Storytelling 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher W: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - S204 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This seminar examines Native American Indian narrative artistic, pictorial, and literary traditions from North and Central America.Such traditions are inseparable from culture and performance, community and nation, human life and the physical world. The visual and tactile media considered include pictorial manuscripts, ceramics, bead- and shellwork, textiles, photographs, and paintings. The seminar will be interdisciplinary, with each unit including analyses of texts and visual materials and readings on aesthetics, translation, memory, and appropriation.
5131 AMST-480-01 New England Landscapes 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn M: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - N128  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This course concerns historical geographies of New England, or the meeting of nature and human agency in “developing” the land and waters of the region. It explores such iconic landscapes as Native American fields and villages; New England’s villages and commons; farms, fields, factories, and forests; free-flowing and dammed rivers; seaports; cities; and tourist destinations. We will attempt to understand both how this region has been imagined and how its changing, often contested landscapes have been related to the political economy, social identities (such as class, race, and gender), and cultural values, metrics, and desires.
4243 AMST-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
4195 AMST-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director, are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
4748 AMST-802-01 Primary Research Matls 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn T: 6:30PM-9:30PM AAC - 231  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This seminar is designed to enable students to identify, evaluate, and use a range of primary sources, from personal letters, vital records, and the census to photographs, oral history, and newspapers. Students will critically read secondary literature to explore how other scholars have used primary sources, and will develop research projects on topics of their own choosing, based on primary sources available in local archives and repositories. Course not open to undergraduates.
4749 AMST-803-01 Historiography&Historical Rsch 1.00 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  New England has had a sense of its boundaries, identity, and larger purposes since the mid-17th century and it began producing historical literature about itself earlier than other regions of what would become the United States. This course has a dual agenda—to study the evolution of historical consciousness in and about New England and to use the region’s rich and varied historical literature to prepare students for their own historical research on the region.
5249 AMST-809-01 Race, Gender, Global Security 1.00 SEM Heatherton,Christina W: 6:30PM-9:10PM SH - N215 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 4
  Recent events have focused attention on questions of race, gender, social justice, and the militarization of police. This course will consider how notions of race and security that evolved in the late 20th and early 21st century U.S., have shaped political discourse, and how in turn, those ideas have circulated around the world. Through analyses of American Studies texts, documentaries, and popular culture, we will consider both emerging and prevailing definitions of security. By examining case studies in major global cities, including Los Angeles, we will explore how space has been organized around the logics of racialized threats and gendered notions of safety. For a cumulative paper, students will select a global city and offer history, context, and analysis of the production of insecure spaces.
5250 AMST-809-02 Queer America 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack M: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - T408  
  Enrollment limited to 4
  Drawing on interdisciplinary work in lgbtq studies, Queer America uses key spaces and scales as lenses and sites in this research seminar. From bars and community centers, neighborhoods and cruising grounds, to cities and rural Walmarts, websites and social media, students will employ queer theory to broaden their understandings of lgbtq spaces in the nation. The application of classic and cutting-edge work in geographies of lgbtq culture will challenge the seemingly normal histories and geographies of American life.
5251 AMST-819-01 Digital World of NE Artifacts 1.00 SEM Cancelled  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This seminar offers students engagement in primary research in historical, literary, and material culture studies and current methods of visualizing data generated by that research to produce new modes of interpretation. Students will develop skills through a series of exercises based on the rich holdings of printed books, ephemera, maps, manuscripts and artifacts related to New England in the 17th -19th centuries in the Watkinson Library. They will work with a clearly defined body of material while studying visualization methodologies currently utilized in digital humanities projects; the final exercise is a portfolio, which will include a process journal, a reflection paper, and a "grant proposal" for a real-world project..
4801 AMST-825-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM Miller,Karen Li W: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - N130  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history.
5258 AMST-832-01 Economic History and Policy 1.00 LEC Jacobs,Cindy M: 6:30PM-9:30PM MC - 311  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course attempts to provide the student with a basic yet thorough understanding of the growth and development of the American economy. At the outset of the course, we will discuss the role and importance of economic history and the methodology of economic historians. We will then study the colonial economy, the early national and antebellum years, the reunification era, the emergence of a modern U.S. economy, and the development of the post-WWII economy up to the present. The analysis will focus on key economic sectors - agriculture, commerce, money and banking, labor, government - and their growth and development.
5097 AMST-844-01 The Gilded Age: 1865-1900 1.00 SEM Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The transformation of the United States into an urban industrial nation, with special attention to the social and cultural effects of industrialization. The course will begin by examining Reconstruction, but will concentrate on the years after 1877. Extensive readings in original source materials, including several novels, as well as in analytic histories.
4848 AMST-870-01 Native Amer Art & Storytelling 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher W: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - S204 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7
  This seminar examines Native American Indian narrative artistic, pictorial, and literary traditions from North and Central America.Such traditions are inseparable from culture and performance, community and nation, human life and the physical world. The visual and tactile media considered include pictorial manuscripts, ceramics, bead- and shellwork, textiles, photographs, and paintings. The seminar will be interdisciplinary, with each unit including analyses of texts and visual materials and readings on aesthetics, translation, memory, and appropriation.
5130 AMST-880-01 New England Landscapes 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn M: 6:30PM-9:30PM SH - N128  
  Enrollment limited to 8
  This course concerns historical geographies of New England, or the meeting of nature and human agency in “developing” the land and waters of the region. It explores such iconic landscapes as Native American fields and villages; New England’s villages and commons; farms, fields, factories, and forests; free-flowing and dammed rivers; seaports; cities; and tourist destinations. We will attempt to understand both how this region has been imagined and how its changing, often contested landscapes have been related to the political economy, social identities (such as class, race, and gender), and cultural values, metrics, and desires.
4423 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
4424 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4212 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4213 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
4219 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
4342 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
5102 AHIS-271-01 The Arts of America 1.00 LEC Curran,Kathleen A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM AAC - 320 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course examines major trends in painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts in the United States from the colonial period to 1900. Emphasis will be placed on how the arts in the United States reflect the social and cultural history of the 18th and 19th centuries.
4759 ECON-214-01 Bus & Entrepreneur Hist 1.00 LEC Gunderson,Gerald A. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM SH - N129 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  The evolution of business structures and practices, primarily in the American experience. Changes in such aspects of management, finance, marketing, and information are considered. Special attention is given to the role of entrepreneurs and conditions which may have influenced their creative efforts. Both an analytical approach and case studies are employed.
4368 EDUC-300-01 Education Reform: Past&Present 1.00 LEC Dougherty,John A. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM SH - S205 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24
  Prerequisite: C- or better in EDUC200, or American Studies major or Public Policy and Law major.
  How do we explain the rise and decline of education reform movements? How do we evaluate their level of “success” from different sources of evidence? Drawing upon primary source materials and historical interpretations, this course examines a broad array of elementary, secondary, and higher education reform movements from the mid-19th century to the present, analyzing social, material, and ideological contexts. This intermediate-level seminar explores a topic common to all branches of educational studies from both theoretical and comparative perspectives.
4709 EDUC-307-01 Latinos in Ed: Local Realities 1.00 LEC Dyrness,Andrea W: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - N128 GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or International Studies, Language and Culture Studies, Hispanic Studies, or Anthropology major, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course is not open to first year students.
  This course investigates the education of Latinos, the largest and fastest growing minority group in the United States. By examining both the domestic and transnational contexts, we explore these central questions: How do cultural constructions of Latinos (as immigrants and natives, citizens and non-citizens) shape educational policy and teaching practices? What views of citizenship and identity underlie school programs such as bilingual education, as well as Latino responses to them? This course fulfills the related field requirement for Hispanic studies majors. It will also include a community learning component involving a qualitative research project in a Hartford school or community organization.
4048 ENGL-104-01 Intro Amer Literature-I 1.00 LEC Henton,Alice M.H. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM SH - N130 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  A survey of literature, written and oral, produced in what is now the United States from the earliest times to around the Civil War. We will examine relationships among cultural and intellectual developments and the politics, economics, and societies of North America. Authors to be read include some that are well known—such as Emerson, Melville, Dickinson—and some who are less familiar—such as Cabeza de Vaca, John Rollin Ridge, and Harriet Jacobs. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
5231 ENGL-208-01 From Epic to X-Box:Narr Histry 1.00 LEC Henton,Alice M.H. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM SH - N130 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  NOTE: Note: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  This course looks at the way narrative techniques have changed over time and across various media: it begins with Old English Epics and concludes with digital games. How, we will ask, has the experience of narratives and fictional characters varied across time and forms? In what ways has it stayed constant? How have we gotten from stories about Beowulf to games featuring Master Chief, or the Hero of Ferelden? How, precisely, do we interact with stories and storytelling? How do these interactions change, or not change, when narrative becomes interactive, something one can "play" as opposed to "watch" or "hear" or "read?" To think about these questions, we will examine a variety of narratives and explore a number of narrative theories. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
5232 ENGL-303-01 "Major American Authors" 1.00 SEM Henton,Alice M.H. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM MC - 309 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: Note: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection or a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
  Search any college bulletin from the beginning of the twentieth century onward and you will probably find a course on “Major American Authors.” While the authors listed on the syllabi have varied, the topic itself has remained a fixture of many English curricula. Why is it so popular and tenacious? What exactly makes a major American author? Why have these criteria changed, and when? What’s the difference between a class focusing on “Major American Authors,” and one, say, on “Major American Texts?” This course examines the evolving construct of authorship within the American literary canon and charts the trajectory of “major” American authors from Anne Bradstreet to George R.R. Martin. This seminar is research-intensive. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing critical reflection or a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
4966 ENGL-341-01 Am Ltry Modrnsm &the Great War 1.00 LEC Mrozowski,Daniel J. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MC - 305 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course will consider the impact of the Great War on American literary modernism. Grappling with apocalyptic devastation in Europe, massive shifts in global politics, and dramatic changes in technology, the Lost Generation responded with enduring and enigmatic works, haunted by wounds both psychic and spiritual. We will consider canonical writings by Ernest Hemingway and e.e. cummings, lesser-known works by Jessie Redmon Fauset and Edith Wharton, and first person accounts by combatants such as Thomas Boyd. As our focus will be on introducing the aesthetics of modernism through the context of the war itself, we will study maps, songs, photographs, newspapers, and other historical materials alongside traditional literary objects. Assignments will include a creative research project, weekly responses, and short essays. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. It is research intensive.
4160 HISP-280-01 Hispanic Hartford 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles,Aidali M: 1:15PM-3:55PM HL - 121 GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221 or 224, or permission of instructor.
  This course seeks to place Trinity students in active and informed dialogue with the Hartford region’s large and diverse set of Spanish-speaking communities. The course will help student recognize and analyze the distinct national histories (e.g. Peruvian, Puerto Rican, Chilean, Honduran, Cuban, Colombian, and Mexican) which have contributed to the Hispanic diaspora in the city and the entire northeastern region of the United States. Students will undertake field projects designed to look at the effects of transnational migration on urban culture, institution-building, and identity formation. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
5146 HIST-233-01 (Re)Connecting the Black Atlan 1.00 LEC Da Cruz Brito,Luciana MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM MECC - 232 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course explores slavery, abolition, and freedom in Brazil and the United States from the 16th to the 19th century. Where only 400,000 Africans were transported to North America during this time, more than 4 million were brought to Brazil, the largest Latin American country. From such numbers, in both countries, in the United States somewhat organically through reproduction and in Brazil through importation, emerged the foundation of massive slave societies. Slavery in the U.S. relied on a highly racialized society, one that formally institutionalized a racial code; slavery in Brazil was less formalized, but no less racial. Such differences had important implications for the eradication of slavery in the two countries.
5254 HIST-244-01 Star Trek in the 1960s 1.00 LEC Greenberg,Cheryl M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TC - 142 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  For many, the 1960s were the “final frontier,” as young people, African-Americans, women, conservatives, members of the “New Left” and many others struggled to re-imagine their lives and the life of their nation. Originally intended as a “Wagon Train to the Stars,” Star Trek came to embody the 1960s spirit, both reflecting and reflecting on the many pressing issues of the day. This course will examine important issues in the 1960s from Vietnam to the counterculture, from race to shifting sexual norms, from new technology to workers’ rights, through the television show that explored the “strange new worlds” of its time.
5201 HIST-247-01 Latinos/Latinas in USA 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM SH - S204 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  Who are “Latinos/Latinas” and how have they come to constitute a central ethnic/racial category in the contemporary United States? This is the organizing question around which this course examines the experiences of major Latino/Latina groups—Chicanos/Mexicanos, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans—and new immigrants from Central America and the Caribbean. We study U.S. colonialism and imperialism in the Old Mexican North and the Caribbean; migration and immigration patterns and policies; racial, gender, and class distinctions; cultural and political expressions and conflicts; return migrations and transnationalism; and inter-ethnic relations and the construction of pan-Latino/Latina diasporic identities.
4856 HIST-344-01 America's Most Wanted 1.00 SEM Greenberg,Cheryl TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM MC - 313 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  NOTE: This course is open only to senior History or American Studies majors, or others by permission of instructor.
  Americans are fascinated by crime. We read detective fiction, watch police dramas, and hold murder mystery dinners. When the crimes are real, we debate guilt or innocence, punishment or rehabilitation, death penalty or life in prison at our dinner tables. Why this fascination, and what does it tell us about our culture and our concerns? In this course we examine several actual crimes and try to understand what made these crimes, and not others, so riveting. What drew us in? What kept us there? Along the way we will also discuss changing police and penal practices, how attitudes about race, class, religion, and gender play into public fixations on particular crimes, and how and why those attitudes shifted over time.
5295 MUSC-133-01 Blues Women to Nicki Minaj 1.00 LEC Woldu,Gail H. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM AAC - 112 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  This course explores the music of black American women in music fro the era of blues queens of the 1920s through Nicki Minaj. Along the way we will listen to and read about the music of blues greats Ma Rainey and Bessie smith; trailblazer Marian Anderson; jazz legends Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, and Dinah Washington; Motown superstar Dina Ross and the fabulous Supremes; disco queen Donna summer; gospel and sould diva Aretha Franklin; rocker Tina Turner; and, ultimately, women in hip-hop, among them Queen Latifa, Lil Kim, and Nicki Minaj. Because context is critical to understanding of the music of these women, course readings will situate the women in their social and musical times.
4285 MUSC-218-01 American Popular Music 1.00 LEC Woldu,Gail H. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM AAC - 112 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students
  A broad survey of popular music in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. We will explore blackface minstrelsy, the music of Tin Pan Alley, ragtime and big band jazz, early blues and country music, post-war pop singers, the evolution of rock and roll, rhythm and blues and soul, folk music, alternative music, hip-hop, and MTV and the popular mainstream. Themes of music and identity, multi- cultural sources, the business of music, and the influence of technology will be followed throughout the course. No previous background in music is required. Also listed in American Studies.
5170 MUSC-252-01 The Beatles and Rock 'n' Roll 1.00 LEC Platoff,John MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM AAC - 112 Y ART  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  NOTE: Students who earned credit for FYSM 181, Beatles and the 1960's, may not earn credit for this course.
  The Beatles were at the center of a revolution in rock ’n’ roll in the 1960s, affecting music in the US and around the world. This course will explore the enormous changes in rock music in that decade, seeking to understand them both musically and in terms of the important political and social changes that defined the 1960s. Our focus will combine detailed, critical listening (to musicians including Bob Dylan, the Beach Boys, the Byrds, the Supremes, and many others) with exploration of the numerous connections between the music and the rapidly changing society in which it was produced.
5236 PBPL-365-01 Crime,Punishment&Public Policy 1.00 LEC Fulco,Adrienne TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 225  
  Enrollment limited to 30
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, Public Policy 202, or Political Science102, and permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Seats are reserved for Public Policy and Law majors. Other students need instructor permission to enroll.
  This course will introduce students to the public policy dimensions of crime and punishment in America. We will examine theories of punishment, the structure of the criminal justice system, and the role of the courts in defining the constitutional rights of the accused. Course materials will include novels, policy texts, films, and court cases.
4983 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Dudas,Mary J. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM CT - 105 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
4984 POLS-102-02 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Dudas,Mary J. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM LSC - AUD SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
5246 RELG-230-01 Bible, Creation and Evolution 1.00 SEM Young,Stephen L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM HL - 123  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  The Bible has different and even conflicting accounts of creation. We will explore the creation myths in the Bible, how they relate to other ancient creation mythologies, and what social and political effects these myths had. We will also examine the social, political, and legal contours of the Bible, Creationism, and debates about evolution in American culture and public policy. What is going on when people talk about God, creation, and human origins – whether in biblical times or in American culture?
4191 RELG-262-01 Religion in America 1.00 LEC Kirkpatrick,Frank TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM MECC - 246 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  The historical role of religion in shaping American life and thought, with special attention to the influence of religious ideologies on social values and social reform. (May be counted toward American Studies.)
5095 RELG-286-01 Islam in America 1.00 LEC Koertner,Mareike TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM MC - 313 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  Islam has become the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse religious group in the United States. This course is divided into two parts: the first provides an historical survey of Islam in America, from its discovery to the present; the second part examines contemporary issues of Muslim American communities and their interactions with American society at large. Topics include religious movements among African-American and immigrant groups, educational, cultural and youth initiatives, Sufism, civil rights groups, progressive Muslims, women's and feminist movements, and Islam in popular culture and in the media.
4461 SOCL-241-01 Mass Media & Pop Culture 1.00 LEC Williams,Johnny Eric TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM MC - 225 SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40
  Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Sociology course or permission of instructor.
  This course examines the integral role mass communication has in social and cultural life. Specifically, it explores how we identify and construct our social identity using media images. This is accomplished by focusing on different types of media content and their effect on individuals and culture, as well as by examining audience response to media content. Other topics covered include the social and economic organization of mass media, development of communication technologies, and sexist and racist stereotypes in the media.
5219 THDN-239-01 Contemporary American Theater 1.00 LEC Polin,Mitchell A. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM AAC - 231 ART  
  Enrollment limited to 25
  This course will provide a detailed study of the plays, performances, and techniques of major figures in American theater from the early 20th century to the present day. Artists examined include: Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, The Group Theater, Edward Albee, Guillermo Gomez-Pena, and the Wooster Group, among others. Also listed under American studies and English.
5277 WMGS-335-01 Mapping American Masculinities 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM SH - S205  
  Enrollment limited to 19
  This course examines the construction of masculinity in American society starting with Theodore Roosevelt’s call at the turn of the twentieth century for men to revitalize the nation by pursuing the “strenuous life." Through close readings of literary and filmic texts, it considers why American manhood has so often been seen as in crisis. It pays particular attention to the formation of non-normative masculinities (African-American, female, and gay) in relation to entrenched racial, class, and sexual hierarchies, as well as the impact of the feminist, civil rights, and gay liberation movements on the shifting construction of male identity. In addition to critical essays, readings also include Tarzan of the Apes, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, The Great Gatsby, The Sun also Rises, Native Son, Another Country, and Kiss Me Deadly (Spillane). Film screenings include Kiss Me Deadly (Aldrich), Shaft, Magnum Force, Philadelphia, Brokeback Mountain, Cleopatra Jones, and Boys Don’t Cry.
5096 WMGS-345-01 Film Noir 1.00 SEM Corber,Robert J. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM HL - 123  
  Enrollment limited to 15
  This course traces the development of film noir, a distinctive style of Hollywood filmmaking inspired by the hardboiled detective fiction of Dashiell Hammett, James Cain, and Raymond Chandler. It pays particular attention to the genre’s complicated gender and sexual politics. In addition to classic examples of film noir, the course also considers novels by Hammett, Cain, and Chandler.